Tallapoosee Historical Museum

Tallapoosee Historical Museum Tallapoosa county has a rich history centered around the early settlers and prominent citizens of o
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ANOTHER MILESTONE FOR US:  We recently finished another project at the museum.  It cost us some money but it's nice.  Un...
09/09/2023

ANOTHER MILESTONE FOR US: We recently finished another project at the museum. It cost us some money but it's nice. Under our building was dry, dusty dirt , rocks n old wood. It has been cleaned back, dirt leveled and poured in 3" cement. There is now a strong, new lockable door in place with a rain shed over the entrance. It makes a very nice storage area for bulky items, nothing of much value, but needed. ( ex: a Christmas tree and other decor ) It was all paid for with donations from our visitors and/or members. Just had a very busy day, today, Sept 9. We had about 25-30 visitors today. Here is a view of our newest accomplishment. The rest of the trash will be moved soon. Our design department has chosen a decor that consists of a simple cane back chair. We are now looking at getting some large letters on the outside upper front of our building. Not right sure we will do with that, we will discuss it among our members, it will be pricy I am sure.

YOU'VE NEVER SEEN IT?  You mean to tell me that you have never visited the Tallapoosa County Museum at 214 Broadnax in d...
08/26/2023

YOU'VE NEVER SEEN IT? You mean to tell me that you have never visited the Tallapoosa County Museum at 214 Broadnax in downtown Dadeville ? Really ? You do know it's free, 74 degrees inside and there are clean public rest rooms. i still can't believe you've never visited the place. You really should bring the family to see the place. And you've never been? Unbelievable. It's open on Saturdays from 10 till about 4.

08/23/2023

A NOTE FROM RHODE ISLAND...I recieved this note from a couple who was traveling through small towns in Alabama. I wanted to share it with the citizens of Dadeville.

Trail Trees – Native Americans would bend saplings to make living sign posts. Trail Trees, or Crooked Trees, are strange...
07/13/2023

Trail Trees – Native Americans would bend saplings to make living sign posts. Trail Trees, or Crooked Trees, are strangely shaped trees that were purposely bent by early Native Americans as a way to mark a path through the woods. Trail Trees, or Crooked Trees, are strangely shaped trees that were purposely bent by early Native Americans as a way to mark a path through the woods.

We are taking a look at the possibility of when we might be able to reopen the museum now that covid seems to be subsidi...
03/18/2022

We are taking a look at the possibility of when we might be able to reopen the museum now that covid seems to be subsiding. We don't want to jump the gun and have to close again if some variant strain pops up. The annex that we bought several years ago has come a long way since its inception. Here is a pic of the work when we started. As a contractor himself, Bob Daniel headed all the renovation while he was president of THM during that time. Right now we have over 4500 sq ft of displays. Hopefully we will have some info soon as to our plans for reopening. It will be posted here on FB as well as other places. Maybe the newspaper and a public service announcement on local tv/radio.

GREAT SHARE FROM HISTORIC DADEVILLE post :
02/09/2022

GREAT SHARE FROM HISTORIC DADEVILLE post :

This is a photo of the Bell Telephone office in Dadeville. Simple looking it's it? Unlike the switching station in Dadeville now. The office was located upstairs of the Tallapoosa County Bank on the west side of the courthouse. The woman's name in the picture is Ms. Hexie Thornton. Ms. Thornton worked that job for 45 years. She probably knew more about the people and what was going on in Dadeville then anyone. The city had a siren on top of the bank and the telephone operator would turn on the siren to notify the volunteer fire department they had a fire somewhere. One day the phone company had an inspection and made the city take it out because of the liability on the phone company. People back in those days would never dream that one day you could pull out a phone in your pocket and call someone on the other side of the globe.

Dad told me that in the late 40s or early 50s, I forget when, that he dug that bank out for a car dealership's mechanic ...
07/24/2021

Dad told me that in the late 40s or early 50s, I forget when, that he dug that bank out for a car dealership's mechanic shop that was started there. The shop was either at the upper or lower level. The lower level had a very steep drive I don't remember the dealership that was there before Firestone.. Anyway, he said he got into some old graves and pushed up some skulls. He had a few black helpers working there for him. They went to lunch somewhere and never came back. Here is part of what is on a historical marker in front of Great Bethel Baptist church now on Jefferson street, stating that the original GBB was located at at that intersection. I assume there was a church cemetery there. Thanks for jogging my memory of some info we have at the Tallapoosa County Museum in downtown Dadeville....."Freedmen (former slaves) moving to the new market town of Youngsville in the early 1870s occupied homes along a street they called Needmore Street. They relocated their house of worship from near the present junction of South Central Avenue and Cherokee Road to the Needmore neighborhood where Methodists and Baptists shared a building."

Hello all  I wanted to get some feedback from the our staff and the citizens of the county regarding our long  awaited r...
06/02/2021

Hello all
I wanted to get some feedback from the our staff and the citizens of the county regarding our long awaited reopening. It was March 14, 2020 that we closed and all ran for cover. There hasn't been a lot of discussion among us about reopening for the simple reason that there seemed to be no reliable info out there as to what direction the virus was going to take. Who knows what it may do in the future.
I would like to propose that we look at June 12 as a date to get the museum back up and running. Hopefully all of our staff can stay with us this year. If you cant or dont want to please let me know asap. We would be excited to have more staff from Alex City so they can share with others what a great little museum we have. I think it will be possible to get out a news letter by 6/30/21 and let our members know what we are doing.

WE'RE BUSY !  Even though we are remaining closed as a precaution, that doesn't mean we aren't getting things done.  Ins...
10/01/2020

WE'RE BUSY ! Even though we are remaining closed as a precaution, that doesn't mean we aren't getting things done. Inside we have added railings on both sides of the steps going upstairs. The kitchen pass through window has been trimmed out, our century old loading dock has been rebuilt and MUCH needed gutters have been installed across the backs of our two buildings. Member Micky Forbus has been the driving force in organizing the dock work. It looks great ! Micky is presently working with selecting and installing some ornamental iron railing around the newly restored dock for safety. (And code requirements) The beautification board has many dedicated members who are working hard all over town and doing a great job !

A LOADING DOCK FACE LIFT...The work on the rear of our museum building continues.The old loading dock that was used for ...
08/15/2020

A LOADING DOCK FACE LIFT...The work on the rear of our museum building continues.The old loading dock that was used for many different businesses over the years was crumbling and dangerous. A VERY generous donation from a member of our society enabled us to tackle some projects that were so badly needed. The concrete top layer will be poured soon. Micky Forbus is working hard on this project. Thanks Mickey !!

The museum received this great piece a few months ago. It is a masonite type board of "Buster Brown" from Darrell Alvin ...
06/06/2020

The museum received this great piece a few months ago. It is a masonite type board of "Buster Brown" from Darrell Alvin (D.A.) and Shirley Scarborough's "Scarborough Shoe Mart" on Broad street in Alex City, AL. The store was there from 1957-1996. It was a very slim building because it was an alley that they bought and made into a shoe store. Remember the huge high heel shoe sign out front with the neon bulb outline? The figure is one of 2 pieces that fit together and looked like giant X from above. When one walked around it one saw 4 different views of Buster, each view had one or both eyes closed or opened. Quite amusing for a child to think that Buster was winking at them. Buster's dog, "Tige" went with the display but was long ago lost, I guess. It was donated to the museum by Mona Gilland, Jim & Gail Wilder.

WW2 OFFICER'S ROAD/CITY MAP OF FRANCE....Frank Pearson gave the museum an authentic map issued to officers in the US Arm...
03/29/2020

WW2 OFFICER'S ROAD/CITY MAP OF FRANCE....Frank Pearson gave the museum an authentic map issued to officers in the US Army. It is HIGHLY detailed and shows many roads that had to be dirt or heavily used trails. I can't imagine how difficult it would have been if the map were lost or destroyed while fighting in France during the early 40s. It is on display in the military section at The Tallapoosa County Museum in downtown Dadeville.

ROUSSEAU'S RAIDS:  MARCHING THROUGH DADEVILLE AT NIGHT ON JULY 16, 1864   Excerpts from Dr Brett J Derbes' writings  Bre...
02/26/2020

ROUSSEAU'S RAIDS: MARCHING THROUGH DADEVILLE AT NIGHT ON JULY 16, 1864
Excerpts from Dr Brett J Derbes' writings
Brett J. Derbes, Auburn University
Rousseau's Raid was a series of attacks by Union forces, led by Maj. Gen. Lovell Harrison Rousseau, on sites important to the Confederate war effort in Alabama between July 10 and 22, 1864. The raid began in Decatur, Morgan County, and concluded near Columbus, Georgia. The raid achieved its aim of destroying military supplies and disrupting the Montgomery and West Point Railroad around Notasulga and Loachapoka in Macon County and Auburn and Opelika in what is now Lee County . His strategy called for a swift raid by a large cavalry force moving south and then east through the center of Alabama that would systematically destroy the logistically vital railroad connecting Montgomery, Montgomery County, and Atlanta. The raiders then travelled southeast in Talladega County toward Winterboro and Youngsville and reached Stowe's Ferry along the Tallapoosa River on the evening of July 16, 1864. Most of Rousseau's cavalrymen crossed the river at a ford to the north. The raiders, though exhausted, travelled 30 miles overnight, passing through Dadeville and stopping when they reached Loachapoka, located along the Montgomery and West Point Railroad. The Union soldiers cut the telegraph wires at the abandoned depot and then rested for a few hours. Rousseau's cavalrymen had travelled almost 240 miles since departing Decatur. Rousseau woke his men at ten o'clock in the evening on July 17 to proceed with their primary objective of destroying the railroad. Harrison's men gathered timbers, crossties, fence posts, and other combustibles into large piles and set them ablaze. They then threw the iron rails upon the fires until they burned red-hot and, as instructed, twisted and bent the rails to assure their future uselessness.
After crossing the Tallapoosa River, they were to dismantle segments of the railroad between Tuskegee and Opelika by heating the iron rails and twisting them into what would become known as "Sherman's Neckties." Rousseau reported that his men had destroyed more than 30 miles of railroad track along with a number of trestle bridges, stations, buildings, and depots as well as vast quantities of cotton and commissary goods at Opelika, Auburn, Loachapoka, and Notasulga. After crossing the Tallapoosa River, they were to dismantle segments of the railroad between Tuskegee and Opelika by heating the iron rails and twisting them into what would become known as "Sherman's Neckties." Rousseau reported that his men had destroyed more than 30 miles of railroad track along with a number of trestle bridges, stations, buildings, and depots as well as vast quantities of cotton and commissary goods at Opelika, Auburn, Loachapoka, and Notasulga.

DADEVILLE WAS INCORPORATED 160 YEARS AGO ON FEB 6, 1860 !!!    We have in our museum the original 1936 survey map  of do...
01/31/2020

DADEVILLE WAS INCORPORATED 160 YEARS AGO ON FEB 6, 1860 !!! We have in our museum the original 1936 survey map of downtown Dadeville by John Broadnax

Quarterly meeting:   The Tallapoosee Historical Society will hold its quarterly meeting on Sunday, January 19 at 2:00 p....
01/18/2020

Quarterly meeting: The Tallapoosee Historical Society will hold its quarterly meeting on Sunday, January 19 at 2:00 p.m. at its museum on the square, 214 N Broadnax Street in Dadeville. The program will be "Sing Along with the Dulcimer Club." This group, led by Kim Walls with dulcimer leaders Gerry White, Teresa Wi******er, and Cathy Delionback, will play and everyone can join in to sing some of the songs. The dulcimer instrument originated in the Scotch Irish settlements in Appalachia and remains an instrument in use today for traditional songs. The Scotch Irish descendents were a significant group in the settling of Alabama. The meeting is open to the public and refreshments will be served.

1950 Edison Electric Institute Movie Star Cook Booklet....Here is a booklet I've have from years ago.  Don't remember wh...
12/11/2019

1950 Edison Electric Institute Movie Star Cook Booklet....Here is a booklet I've have from years ago. Don't remember where I got it but it's going to the Al Pow Co display at the museum. Mega stars from 1950. I bet the power's that be at EEI co paid out a pretty penny for all that movie star power in their small cook booklet designed to promote sales of electric stoves. :)

11/28/2019
Here is a post card sent to us from Valerie Burnes in Livingston, AL.  It is a view of a part of the Avondale Mills in A...
11/18/2019

Here is a post card sent to us from Valerie Burnes in Livingston, AL. It is a view of a part of the Avondale Mills in Alex City. Anyone recognize these buildings and/or worked in one of them? On the left looks like maybe where cotton was unloaded. What a nice piece to place in our AC post card collection. Thank you, Valarie.

Off to the museum again.  Today is my 233rd Sat on duty as a volunteer.  I enjoy the museum very much and you will, too....
11/16/2019

Off to the museum again. Today is my 233rd Sat on duty as a volunteer. I enjoy the museum very much and you will, too......Remember when the bus used to stop on court square in front of Oliver/Moore hardware store?

10/20/2019
Off to the museum.  Here is our new newsletter.
10/12/2019

Off to the museum. Here is our new newsletter.

A.C.H.S. class of 1945`````Here are some scans from our collection of BRHS & Dadeville HS yearbooks at the museum in Dad...
10/05/2019

A.C.H.S. class of 1945`````Here are some scans from our collection of BRHS & Dadeville HS yearbooks at the museum in Dadeville

Quote by Golda Meir:     “One cannot and must not try to erase the past merely because it does not fit the present.”
09/22/2019

Quote by Golda Meir:
“One cannot and must not try to erase the past merely because it does not fit the present.”

The Tallapoosee Historical Museum is located at 214 Broadnax street in downtown Dadeville, Alabama. It is staffed and ma...
09/22/2019

The Tallapoosee Historical Museum is located at 214 Broadnax street in downtown Dadeville, Alabama. It is staffed and managed by volunteers from the Tallapoosee Historical Society of Tallapoosa County. Presently the museum is open Thursday (10-1,) Friday (10-1) and Saturday (10-5). The Bank of Dadeville donated the main room. There are 2 openings that go into a second large spacious annex that the society purchased and opened in Jan 2016. Both rooms (over 4600 sq ft total) are filled with items of all sizes, ages, and historical meanings. The museum features items such as old wooden and cast iron school desks, wood & kerosene burning cook stoves, and a chair from a local barbershop of years ago. There is a uniform and sword from the Civil War along with items from WW1, WW2 & the Vietnam War. A huge 48 star American flag is on display. There is a large wooden delivery wagon that was used by Duncan and Sons Furniture. The Duncans are the ones who moved over 900 graves from the lake bed of Lake Martin. The vintage toy section is popular with both children and adults.
The artifacts are arranged into loosely constructed exhibits of related artifacts with free-standing wooden latticework that serve to divide individual exhibits and the utilitarian purpose of creating additional display space.The interpretation and exhibit labels are minimal throughout the museum. Often simply telling what the artifact is, the year it originated in, and the name of the donor or original owner. The focus of the museum is entirely on the local, by locals and primarily for locals. The museum does not attempt to weave exhibits together into an interpretive narrative that connects to national significance, as National Park museums do. Instead, exhibits focus on old towns, historical structures, important individuals, and local schools from the county, some of which no longer exist. The artifacts have mostly been acquired through donations of items that span a wide range of time periods, subject matter, and arguably historical value.
In a local museum that is run by and funded by volunteers and donations, there are many differences from a traditional formal museum that is supported by an institution or government agency. The goal of the museum is not to interpret a particular event or person, or to emotional connect visitors with a site. The goal of the museum is to “preserve the history of Tallapoosa County for the current and future generations.” While professional curators and museum designers could criticize the museum, it achieves its purpose by sharing the stories, memories, and pieces of the history of Tallapoosa County. It is an excellent example of what public history looks like when it is done by the public for the public.
There are 2 clean rest rooms available to the public, one of which is handicap accessible. The new annex also has a kitchen. The annex is available free of charge to group meetings of not over 50 people. We are available for private showings to groups or for your special visitors from out of town. The contact # is Danny Hayes @ 256 825 7535

1983 Dadeville High School football program....The museum is full of interesting items, among them is this 1983 DHS foot...
09/09/2019

1983 Dadeville High School football program....The museum is full of interesting items, among them is this 1983 DHS football program donated to us by (Doctor) Frank Pearson

It was an honor to travel to Tuscaloosa to receive this award on behalf of our wonderful Tallapoosa County Museum in dow...
08/25/2019

It was an honor to travel to Tuscaloosa to receive this award on behalf of our wonderful Tallapoosa County Museum in downtown Dadeville. The wording is a little misleading. Ms Burnes is the president of the Alabama Historical Association and I am in my 4th year as president of our local museum, Joan Sampson is VP and Sharon Gaither is sec/treasurer.

Much of our growth has been noted in several State of Alabama publications and on line. Please click on the link below t...
08/11/2019

Much of our growth has been noted in several State of Alabama publications and on line. Please click on the link below to read about our museum in Dadeville, the county seat of Tallapoosa county

The Tallapoosee Historical Museum in historic Dadeville, Tallapoosa County, is dedicated to preserving, sharing, and celebrating the history of Tallapoosa County. The museum focuses on the early settlers and citizens of the county in order to promote its cultural and historical significance. The sit...

A visitor to the museum in Dadeville on Saturday asked me if I remembered a pic of  the beard growing contest in Dadevil...
08/04/2019

A visitor to the museum in Dadeville on Saturday asked me if I remembered a pic of the beard growing contest in Dadeville during Alabama's 150th year celebration in 1969. I had seen a pic of it but couldn't remember where. Saturday afternoon I was up on the mezzanine and saw where Sharon Gaither had it laid out on a table sometime the week b4. What an amazing coincidence. Here are Frank Pearson, Hilton Karr and Loyd Boleware

The Tallapoosee Historical Society will meet on Sunday, July 21, at 2:00 p.m. at its museum on the courthouse square.The...
07/20/2019

The Tallapoosee Historical Society will meet on Sunday, July 21, at 2:00 p.m. at its museum on the courthouse square.The address is 214 Broadnax Street in downtown Dadeville. The speaker will be Frances Osborn Robb and the topic will be the history of photography in Alabama 1839-1941. The meeting is open to the public, and refreshments will be served. Before the meeting starts maybe we can get Marlene Jones to play a few hymns on our antique pump church organ. (Here is an 1860 photo of a married couple all dressed up for their wedding.)

We still run across pics in the county museum in downtown Dadeville that r so interesting.  This is from a June, 1990  A...
07/11/2019

We still run across pics in the county museum in downtown Dadeville that r so interesting. This is from a June, 1990 AC Outlook newspaper. It is the Flint Hill class of 1904. The tallest guy on the back in a white shirt is non other that Professor Reuben Young Scott. He was principal at Russell Mills school when I attended from 1959-1964. (4th - 8th grades) He was what seemed to me to be about 8'10" back then . He could grab your shoulder with those 7" fingers and shake your eyeballs outta your head. It's a wonder some of didn't get whiplash from those shakings. He as born on Dec 24, 1891 so if this was '04 he was 13 at the time and maybe in the 8th grade. He was a tall one ! (I am going to share this with the "You Know You Are In Alexander City" page on FB.

05/09/2019

Hello Danny and all the hard working staff,

You folks are doing an amazing job with our Tallapoosee Historical Society Museum. The visitors, the donations of items and money, the Awards for Excellence, the beautiful displays, the utilization of our buildings for community events and many other things are all the direct results of an outstanding, dedicated staff of volunteers. I am very proud of all the things you accomplish toward preserving our county’s history.



No wonder you received the award for the outstanding small museum…YOU ARE THE BEST!



Bob and Cheryl Daniel

Julie Jackson Dowdy-Cotten ‎ to Tallapoosee Historical Museum · Great visit today, (3-8-19) we had no idea what  wonderf...
03/11/2019

Julie Jackson Dowdy-Cotten ‎ to Tallapoosee Historical Museum
· Great visit today, (3-8-19) we had no idea what wonderful history was behind their doors. We highly recommend this to all. Our visit included an opportunity to overhear a group of musicians practicing on various instruments. We were treated to an organ interlude and a personal tour by docent Joan Sampson. Many Thanks! We look forward to returning!........

RED FRONT DOORS:  Here are the two original door that were on the front of our annex.  We kept them and believe me,  the...
03/07/2019

RED FRONT DOORS:
Here are the two original door that were on the front of our annex. We kept them and believe me, they are heavy! Our building used to be a Ben Franklin store. Many people have told me of how good the hot popcorn smelled outside of the store. It was a time when there were candy counters where you could get most any kind of loose candies or nuts weighed out and placed in a small paper bag. There is a deep worn spot in our floor near the front where the checkout counter was. Many hours were spent in that spot in order to wear it down so deep. The shelves are in the back where goods and layaways were kept. In the late 1800's the annex was the Ridgeway Hotel. It burned in 1902. Gosh, those old "10 cent" stores sure do bring back some pleasant memories.

One of our FB comments is,  "Well worth the visit!  Had two of the nicest most informative ladies give us a tour. Will d...
02/01/2019

One of our FB comments is,
"Well worth the visit! Had two of the nicest most informative ladies give us a tour. Will definitely be back!"

Here are 2 pics brought to us that were discovered among some old things by a resident of the county. They are from 1954...
01/16/2019

Here are 2 pics brought to us that were discovered among some old things by a resident of the county. They are from 1954 and show the cement mixers being unloaded and then the bridge foundations being built for the new cement bridge. The new bridge replaced the old covered Miller Bridge across the Tallapoosa River at Horseshoe Bend. Great stuff ! They will be on display at the Tallapoosa County Museum in downtown Dadeville. 256-825-7535 for info about our quarterly meeting this Sunday......Please come to the quarterly meeting of the Tallapoosee Historical Society on Sunday, January 20, at 2:00 p.m. at the Museum on the Square, 214 Broadnax Street in Dadeville. Dr. William Deutsch will speak on the river system in Alabama. Tasty refreshments will be served.

Here is our winter Jan 2019 news letter for the museum:
01/14/2019

Here is our winter Jan 2019 news letter for the museum:

It has taken a lot of work, time and resources to turn the museum annex into what it is today.  Here is a pic from 2015 ...
01/10/2019

It has taken a lot of work, time and resources to turn the museum annex into what it is today. Here is a pic from 2015 when we were all feverishly trying to get it ready to roll out for Jan 2016. We made it with the guidance and hard work of our then president Bob Daniel. Bob was a contractor and donated MANY hours of his time to the massive project. It doubled our space. We now have over 4500 sq ft of space plus a balcony/mezzanine where old newspapers are stored and is also a work station for picture framing. We also have a small kitchen and two clean rest rooms for our visitors. One is handicap accessible. It didn't take long to fill the much needed space with more displays full of interesting items from Tallapoosa County. The museum was organized on Feb 17, 1969. That's right, we will be 50 years old this Feb.

I bet very few, if any, know who this man is. . I will give the info in a few days. This photo is about 100 years old.  ...
01/05/2019

I bet very few, if any, know who this man is. . I will give the info in a few days. This photo is about 100 years old. (1) The first hint is: he was an educator.

Address

214 N Broadnax Street
Dadeville, AL
36853

Telephone

(256) 825-7535

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Giveback cleaning to the backside of the Tallapoosee Historical Museum
Where is birthplace?
MY CHRISTMAS GIFT FROM ME TO YOU, DADEVILLE! MERRY CHRISTMAS! Thank you for your support! Floyd's Feed & Seed Pennington Park Zazu's Verandah Raining Dogs Studio & Gallery Tallapoosee Historical Museum
May I help with your fundraising ?

I'd be happy to send you a coupon for you to raffle or auction ?

You keep the proceeds.

Just send me your street address to [email protected]

⌡im [THE BookMan]

920.265.5966
Hello!
It's finally out! My newly-republished book, AMAZING ALABAMA: AMAZING TALES, HISTORICAL ODDITIES AND ENTERTAINING FACTS ABOUT THE YELLOWHAMMER STATE has many interesting stories, highlighting the great number of museums and attractions, that tell more about our wonderful state. The book has had wonderful reviews in both Retirement Systems of Alabama (RSA) and Alabama Living Magazine (and ALM listed AMAZING ALABAMA as #1 on their list of recommended reading for the year). Alabama Media Group (AL.com) liked the book so much, they created a video--an Alabama trivia game (which you can watch for free on my website).
The book is available (at wholesale prices, for volume purchases and gift-shops) through my publisher, www.MoonHowlerPublishing.com, or (at retail prices) through Amazon! My writer's website is www.TJensenLacey.com. My cell is 931.801.7495. I am available for readings and book signings.
All the best,
T. (Theresa) Jensen Lacey
Author, 20+ books, 17 book contributions (anthologies), 800+ articles for newspapers and magazines
PS Your museum is highlighted in my chapter on “Native American, Cowboy and Rodeo Tales”--about the Battle of Horseshoe Bend. That is one awe-inspiring place to visit, as is your museum.
This is the Thornton family. Martha died after giving birth to my Great Grandmother Mattie Dee William married soon after to Ida Harris
Pictured: Avon Buddy Thornton, William J. Thornton, Rosa Thornton,Ida Thornton,Lilley Thornton, Margaret
Thornton,Eva Thornton. Picture taken around 1901
This is the home of William J. Thornton and Martha Darden Thornton. It was located on Prospect Road on Lake Martin. A volunteer fire department burned it down for practice in the 90's.
Dadeville attorney Teresa Fulmer was packing up the contents of her bookcase when she came across an 1881 book by famed Dadeville humorist Johnson J. Hooper, which, according to its inscription, may have been owned by an Alabama governor.

The book is being donated to Tallapoosee Historical Museum.
Frances Osborn Robb, a Historian of Photography and Author of “Shot in Alabama”, will be speaking at Tallapoosee Historical Museum Sunday, June 21 beginning at 2:00 pm.

This event is sponsored by Alabama Humanities Foundation and Tallapoosee Historical Society.

This is free to the public! You don’t want to miss!

Tallapoosee Historical Museum
Enjoying some Dulcimer music at the Tallapoosee Historical Museum