Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council

Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council The Village Green is a collection of houses that tells the story of Cutchogue from 1640 to the present The Cutchogue Village Green is owned and maintained by the Cutchogue- New Suffolk Historical Council, a 501c3 non-profit, tax exempt charity, chartered by the Board of Regents of the New York State Education Department as an educational institution.
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Council members are volunteer workers you see staffing the buildings and organizing the activities. We invite you to join us

Council members are volunteer workers you see staffing the buildings and organizing the activities. We invite you to join us

Operating as usual

How the East End's indigenous people mark Thanksgiving
11/23/2020
How the East End's indigenous people mark Thanksgiving

How the East End's indigenous people mark Thanksgiving

For the East End’s Native people — who populated this land long before settlers arrived and drove them away in the 17th century — Thanksgiving is many things at once. It’s an opportunity to come together and celebrate the harvest, yes. But it’s also a moment to mourn and honor ancestors an...

Service Flag also known as Mother’s Flag that was recently earmarked for conservation. It hung from the rafters in the C...
11/11/2020

Service Flag also known as Mother’s Flag that was recently earmarked for conservation. It hung from the rafters in the Carriage House. Each blue star represents a family member in the service. More research about this flag and the family needs to be done.

Southold Indian Museum
11/08/2020

Southold Indian Museum

We look forward to seeing you on Sunday, Nov 8, when we will be open from 1:30pm to 4:30pm! We always appreciate donations of artifacts found locally, as now everyone in our community can view these parts of our history. One example is the gorget pictured here, discovered in Greenport.

The Fairbanks House
10/31/2020

The Fairbanks House

HAPPY HALLOWEEN from the Fairbanks House! To ward off evil spirits colonial settlers in New England often carved hex marks (also known as apotropaic marks) like these found in the Fairbanks House. This was usually done close to the chimney which was believed to give easy access to witches, demons and even disease. Hex marks have also been found throughout the house, but there is a particular abundance in the West wing addition. Another practice used was to bury shoes in their walls and ceilings to protect themselves from evil forces. Hex marks like these in the Fairbanks House have also been found in the Tower of London and the home of William Shakespeare. These families were not irreligious. As Puritans their beliefs in malevolent spirits were actually reinforced by the Church's teachings: that the devil was a literal presence in the world that would harm them physically and spiritually by afflicting them with disease or diverting them from righteousness. Despite their beliefs in spirits and witchcraft, New England settlers did not celebrate All Hallows Eve or Halloween, which was much more common in Maryland, Virginia, and the southern colonies.

Poor Parker Wickham lost this home and Robins Island because his loyalties during the Revolutionary  were to King George...
10/30/2020

Poor Parker Wickham lost this home and Robins Island because his loyalties during the Revolutionary were to King George III. ( here as portrayed in Hamilton)

11 headstones with interesting epitaphs are marked with flags for a self tour of the Old Burying Ground at corner of the...
10/27/2020

11 headstones with interesting epitaphs are marked with flags for a self tour of the Old Burying Ground at corner of the Main Road and Harbor Lane! Can you find the earliest?

10/24/2020

Great event sponsored by Mattituck Historical Society.

The person’s essence attracts the witch . Once in the shoe the witch cannot back out!
09/24/2020

The person’s essence attracts the witch . Once in the shoe the witch cannot back out!

This man’s leather shoe, dated 1600-1690, was found in the Fairbanks House during repair work. It was buried behind the ceiling near the chimney in the Hall. Shoes, especially children’s shoes, were often hidden behind walls and hearths from the 17th until the early 20th centuries, a custom believed to ward off evil spirits and witchcraft. Hidden shoes have been discovered in farmhouses, cottages, manor houses, and chapels dating back to the Middle Ages. The practice spread throughout Britain and Europe and later to America through colonial New England, and Australia. Shoes are most often found near chimneys, but also near doors and windows, all entrances to the house interior. Because shoes were well worn and took the shape or “essence” of the wearer, historians believe that the practice was meant to trick evil spirits entering the house to notice the shoes, not its inhabitants. Another theory is that hiding shoes would bring good luck to the members of the household; even horse shoes were considered good luck.
#fairbankshouse #historylovers #historicalpix #historyinpictures #artifactshoes #colonialhouse #colonialamerica #colonialhistory #coloniallife #superstition #evilspirits

09/23/2020

Did you register to vote? Below are low tech Turn of the century ballot boxes used in Suffolk. On display in the Old School house.

On this day September 22, 1692 eight people were hanged as witches in Salem. Below are the artifacts that colonists empl...
09/22/2020

On this day September 22, 1692 eight people were hanged as witches in Salem. Below are the artifacts that colonists employed to protect themselves from witches in Cutchogue in the 17 th century.

Magical thinking of 17 th century colonists on display now in the Old House Cutchogue #cutchogue #nofo #northforkermagazine #northforker #witchcraft #oldhouse #supernatural #cnshc

Will a library expansion uncover Revolutionary War artifacts? - The Suffolk Times
09/16/2020
Will a library expansion uncover Revolutionary War artifacts? - The Suffolk Times

Will a library expansion uncover Revolutionary War artifacts? - The Suffolk Times

Could a renovation of a parking lot at the Mattituck-Laurel Library unearth Revolutionary War-era artifacts? Some in the town’s planning department seem to think so, and are recommending an archaeological investigation into the property’s history as the project moves forward. “These are rare o...

Interesting  local history news !
09/13/2020
Ground penetrating radar brought to 19th century burial ground in Orient

Interesting local history news !

Technology arrived at a 19th century burial ground in Orient on Saturday with the hope of answering a contentious question: could slaves owned by the Tuthill family be buried on this spot? The technology to try and answer that question came in the form of an instrument that uses ground penetrating r...

08/18/2020

Colonial riddle

In Spring I look gay,
Decked in comely array.
In Summer more clothing I wear.
When colder it grows,
I fling off my clothes,
And in Winter quite naked appear.

scroll down for answer

(a tree)

08/17/2020

Riddle
As round as an apple, as deep as a pail;
It never cries out, till it’s caught by the tail.

Scroll down for answer

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A bell

08/16/2020

Colonial riddle #2
Little Nancy Etticoat
With a white petticoat
And a red nose;
She has no feet or hands.
The longer she stands
The shorter she grows.

Scroll down for answer
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A candle

08/14/2020

Still closed for the season. A colonial riddle, can you guess the answer?
Two brothers we are, great burdens we bear,on which we are bitterly pressed. The truth is to say, we are full all the day, and empty when we go to rest.
Answer- a pair of shoes!

Our neighbor town
08/10/2020

Our neighbor town

The new temporary sign explaining what the Oysterponds Historical Society is doing has been placed at Slaves Burying Ground in Orient. Read what we previously wrote about the plans here: https://bit.ly/3a9DXRh

08/05/2020
Colonial Williamsburg

Enjoy

Join Interpreter Hope Wright LIVE as she shares her research and answers your questions about the clothing, jewelry, material culture, and experiences of enslaved Black women.

Southold Indian Museum
07/12/2020

Southold Indian Museum

Almost there! We reopen the Museum on Sunday, July 19. Come see us next week to check out our new set of see-through drawer exhibits (big Thank You to the Tuesday Crew for installing them!)

A family’s rich history is apparent at 170-year-old Wickham farm
07/09/2020
A family’s rich history is apparent at 170-year-old Wickham farm

A family’s rich history is apparent at 170-year-old Wickham farm

From the peach and apple orchards at its south end, to the abundant tomato crop planted on rich soil just east of the farmhouse or the freshly picked fruit and vegetables sold at the iconic farm stand on Main Road, the Wickham farm is all things North Fork, and all things Cutchogue.

07/07/2020
North Fork Art Show Summer 2020

North Fork Art Show Summer 2020

We here at the Cutchogue-New Suffolk Free Library encourage you to sit back, relax, and enjoy a show of beautiful artwork set to Beethoven's Piano Sonata No....

Cutchogue New Suffolk Free Library
07/05/2020

Cutchogue New Suffolk Free Library

Mariella Oliver Ostroski's Water Towers of the North Fork Tour Week #2—1. Water Tower currently at Cherry Creek Golf Club, 9th hole. 2. Water Tower, Sound Avenue, west of Edward's Avenue,Calverton; 3. New Discovery, west side of Edward's Avenue, Calverton; 4. New Discovery, west side of Edward's Avenue, Calverton; 5. Sound Avenue, Baiting Hollow; 6. Middle Road, Riverhead, Middle Road Plantations. Mariella Ostroski, local history librarian. Ovella Long, artist.

06/22/2020

Enjoy summer! Hope you recognize these two people relaxing in Nassau Point with Peconic Bay, and Fleets Neck in the background.

After this walk be sure to visit the Village on Case’s Lane for a self guided walking tour of historic buildings.
06/20/2020

After this walk be sure to visit the Village on Case’s Lane for a self guided walking tour of historic buildings.

Roberta Jaklevic's New Suffolk Walking Tour Week #5--21. Frank Acker (Cooper) House; 22. Jennings House; 23. Sadie Acker House. "Stayed tuned, new post every week." New Suffolk Walking Tour created by Mariella Ostroski, Local History Librarian. Click on each photo for more information.

New Interpretative signs are installed! Stroll the Cutchigue Village Green and learn about the 17th century Old House
06/13/2020

New Interpretative signs are installed! Stroll the Cutchigue Village Green and learn about the 17th century Old House

Throw back Thursday original restoration sign
06/10/2020

Throw back Thursday original restoration sign

06/09/2020
Sto Lat - 100 Years of Our Lady of Ostrabrama [Updated]

Sto Lat - 100 Years of Our Lady of Ostrabrama [Updated]

June of 2020 marks one hundred years since the dedication of Our Lady of Ostrabrama Church in Cutchogue. To commemorate this centennial celebration and honor...

Closed until phase 4!
06/06/2020

Closed until phase 4!

Stay tuned! Museums are classified as "Phase 4" entities in New York, so we will re-open as soon as Long Island reaches Phase 4. We will be closed on Sunday, June 7, but hope to see you as soon as possible this summer!

Address

27320 ROUTE 25
Cutchogue, NY
11935

Telephone

(631) 734-7122

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The Council is a Not for Profit 501(c)(3) Charity that maintains the Cutchogue Village Green and structures dating from 1640.

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Comments

Great story about colors in early colonial homes. The photo of Prussian Blue in George Washington's home is striking. I would never have imagined it was so appropriate..
Cutchogue's latest replica for the1699 Joseph and Sarah Wickham house project, a 1950s table reconditioned and painted powder blue. This will have a green baize carpet on it for Wickham to keep his carved box and account book and Bible and write his letters and bills on. The top is about three feet deep and five feet wide.
The new splint cradle Peter Follansbee of Kingston, Massachusetts, just made for the 1699 Wickham House. Based on one at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Here is the 2nd picture
I visited the gift shop in August with my 2 brothers to see the Holland sub model and thought you would be interested in these photos our Great Uncle took in the 20s or 30s showing the model as it was displayed on the building in New Suffolk.