Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council

Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council The Village Green is a collection of houses that tells the story of Cutchogue from 1640 to the present The Cutchogue Village Green is owned and maintained by the Cutchogue- New Suffolk Historical Council, a 501c3 non-profit, tax exempt charity, chartered by the Board of Regents of the New York State Education Department as an educational institution.

Council members are volunteer workers you see staffing the buildings and organizing the activities. We invite you to join us

Council members are volunteer workers you see staffing the buildings and organizing the activities. We invite you to join us

Operating as usual

09/17/2021

Part-time Executive Director

Send cover letter and resume to CNSHC, P.O. Box 714, Cutchogue, N.Y. 11935

The Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council is seeking a part-time Executive Director at a salary of $40,000 per year.



The candidate should have

- A minimum of a B.A., preferably in history, museum curating, education or public relations

- At least five years work experience, with references

- Connections to Foundations

- Computer experience, especially Past Perfect

- Excellent writing ability

- A proven track record for obtaining grants



The Executive Director will be responsible for:

Volunteer development
Programs & special events
Grant writing & fund-raising
Curating & maintaining the Collections of the CNSHC
Attending & presenting a Director’s Report at the Board meetings


A pleasant personality and the ability to deal with the public is essential.

Dawn Duerwald, Concierge at Harvest Pointe came to the tour of the village Green today. Dawn is a member of the Case fam...
09/13/2021

Dawn Duerwald, Concierge at Harvest Pointe came to the tour of the village Green today. Dawn is a member of the Case family. She is holding up a picture of her Great-Grandfather, whose picture hangs in the farming exhibit in the Red Barn.

Dawn Duerwald, Concierge at Harvest Pointe came to the tour of the village Green today. Dawn is a member of the Case family. She is holding up a picture of her Great-Grandfather, whose picture hangs in the farming exhibit in the Red Barn.

All ready
07/24/2021

All ready

All ready

07/24/2021
Liquidation Sale on Saturday! contents of Carriage House gift Shop to make room for Exhibits! 10AM start!
07/21/2021

Liquidation Sale on Saturday! contents of Carriage House gift Shop to make room for Exhibits! 10AM start!

07/20/2021
Potluck Supper & Annual General Meeting of the Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical CouncilTuesday, July 20, 2021 outdoors o...
07/15/2021

Potluck Supper & Annual General Meeting of the Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council

Tuesday, July 20, 2021 outdoors on the Village Green

6 P.M. for supper, AGM at 7 P.M.

Bring a dish to share. If you prefer not to share bring your own picnic.

BYOB (Bring Your Own Bottle/drink) & BYOC (Bring Your Own Chair)

We will meet outside by the Garage for the supper, the AGM will be across the road under the tent.



All members are invited. New members may join on the spot at the Membership table.



Masks are optional for members who are vaccinated. Please wear a mask if you are not

vaccinated or if you prefer.

Potluck Supper & Annual General Meeting of the Cutchogue-New Suffolk Historical Council

Tuesday, July 20, 2021 outdoors on the Village Green

6 P.M. for supper, AGM at 7 P.M.

Bring a dish to share. If you prefer not to share bring your own picnic.

BYOB (Bring Your Own Bottle/drink) & BYOC (Bring Your Own Chair)

We will meet outside by the Garage for the supper, the AGM will be across the road under the tent.



All members are invited. New members may join on the spot at the Membership table.



Masks are optional for members who are vaccinated. Please wear a mask if you are not

vaccinated or if you prefer.

07/11/2021
06/25/2021

Installing restored windows for opening in July!

Tours should begin mid July!
06/16/2021

Tours should begin mid July!

Tours should begin mid July!

The Council is busy creating new exhibit space for our opening in July. Looks like a bird has made the Carriage House th...
06/04/2021

The Council is busy creating new exhibit space for our opening in July. Looks like a bird has made the Carriage House their home!

The Council is busy creating new exhibit space for our opening in July. Looks like a bird has made the Carriage House their home!

Connecticut
04/02/2021

Connecticut

This is no April Fool's Prank! In just 30 days the Fairbanks House museum will reopen on May 1st. Tours of the oldest surviving timber frame house will be offered BY APPOINTMENT ONLY on the hour on Saturdays and Sundays. Outdoor and herb & flower garden tours will also be offered by appointment Wednesday through Friday. TO SCHEDULE YOUR PRIVATE TOUR PLEASE CALL 781 326-1170. Covid guidelines apply. If you can't visit on site, visit the House online:
https://fairbankshouse.org/virtual-tour/ Or ask us about our live presentations for groups and classrooms via Zoom by our most experienced docent. For more information and ticket prices please visit https://fairbankshouse.org/visit/. #fairbankshouse #colonialtours #historichomes #historytours #aprilfools #oldhouselove #oldhouselovers

03/11/2021

Dendrochronology: How do we know for sure that construction of the Fairbanks House began in 1637? Dendrochronology, or tree ring dating, was performed on the summer beam (the horizontal beam in the photo) in the central hall in 2002. The term “summer beam” has nothing to do with the season of the year. Instead, it comes from a Norman word denoting “weight bearing”. The 6" x 6" oak beam is in fact one of the main structural supports for an entire half of the house and was, by necessity, one of the first to be erected. Dendrochronology experts removed and examined a small plug from this beam to determine the exact age of the tree that was used, believed to have probably started its life around the time Columbus arrived in 1492! Because of this dating and the fact that timber was not fully cured prior to building in the 17th century, we know that the beam was made from wood felled in 1637 and incorporated into the structure shortly thereafter. Dendrochronology was also performed on a number of smaller support posts in the House, and one was dated to 1641. This suggests that the House was built between 1637 and 1641. One theory concerning the four-year spread shown in the dendrochronology samples is that at least one of the original supports split due to the lack of curing prior to its use. It would have been replaced with a beam from a tree felled at a later date. Regardless, the house was likely livable within the first year- 1637. It is important to note that Jonathan did not build the house himself. He hired a master carpenter and a master mason to build the house for him. Based on the house layout and construction techniques we believe the builder was trained in the style used in East Anglia, England. This high level of craftsmanship is a large part of why the house still stands today. To learn more, take our virtual tour at https://fairbankshouse.org/virtual-tour/.

03/05/2021

Fun!

Part of walking tour
02/28/2021

Part of walking tour

Goldsmith & Tuthill, c1828-First National Bank-North Fork Bank & Trust Company

02/22/2021

Throwback to fun socials

Exhibit on Long Island’s first whalers opens in Cold Spring Harbor | TBR News Media
02/20/2021
Exhibit on Long Island’s first whalers opens in Cold Spring Harbor | TBR News Media

Exhibit on Long Island’s first whalers opens in Cold Spring Harbor | TBR News Media

Exhibit on Long Island’s first whalers opens in Cold Spring Harbor AnimalsArt exhibitArts & EntertainmentCommunityTimes of Huntington-Northport by Tara Mae - January 28, 2021 0 323 Offers insight into Indigenous maritime history 1 of 6 'Shinnecock Indian Man, 18th Century,' oil painting by David M...

Examples of items that would complete our Old House interior
01/24/2021

Examples of items that would complete our Old House interior

Your #MuseumMomentOfZen with the geometric designs of a desk box (top) and chest (bottom) made in New England in the late 1600s. Both pieces are on display in the Great Hall of the Whitfield House.

📸 by Brian Kutner

Add this winery to your visit when we finally reopen!
01/20/2021
Long Island’s original vines are for sale in Cutchogue - The Suffolk Times

Add this winery to your visit when we finally reopen!

It’s not entirely uncommon for a North Fork real estate listing to include a historic structure or a unique feature like a vineyard. But what about a historic vineyard? A piece of Long Island’s first commercial vineyard hit the market this week in a 66-acre Cutchogue listing that includes a priv...

National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers
01/06/2021

National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers

Fraunces Tavern Restaurant in New York City is one of the many businesses located in historic buildings that is struggling during the coronavirus pandemic. Fraunces Tavern has played a prominent role in history before, during, and after the American Revolution. At various points in its history, Fraunces Tavern served as a headquarters for George Washington, a venue for peace negotiations with the British, and housing federal offices in the early republic. In 1900, the tavern was slated for demolition by its owners, who reportedly wanted to use the land for a parking lot. A number of organizations, most notably the Daughters of the American Revolution National Headquarters, worked to preserve it, and convinced New York state government leaders to use their power of eminent domain and designate the building as a park (which was the only clause of the municipal ordinances that could be used for protection, as laws were not envisioned at the time for the subject of "historic preservation", then in its infancy). The temporary designation was later rescinded when the property was acquired in 1904 by the Sons of the Revolution in the State of New York. Since 1907, the Fraunces Tavern® Museum on the second and third floors has helped to interpret the Fraunces Tavern and the collection of artifacts that it holds. The building was listed in the National Register of Historic Places - NPS in 2008. The organizations and businesses that call historic properties, like the Fraunces Tavern, home have been under a great deal of stress during the coronavirus pandemic. NY State Parks & Historic Sites and other National Conference of State Historic Preservation Officers members are committed to working with these organizations and businesses to help them weather the pandemic.
Fraunces Tavern Restaurant

Same time period as The Old House on the Village Green
12/06/2020

Same time period as The Old House on the Village Green

Your Sunday #MuseumMomentOfZen with a view of the South Chamber on the second floor of the Whitfield House. Check out this chair's back bends! It was made in the Netherlands (c. 1680-1725) out of walnut, and it features a caned seat and two caned panels in its curvy back. Paul Johnson of Guilford donated the chair to the museum in 2000, along with its twin, pictured behind the table.

📷 by Brian Kutner

Henry Whitfield State Museum
11/29/2020

Henry Whitfield State Museum

Your Sunday #MuseumMomentOfZen with a long view of the Great Hall in the Whitfield House -- many of the furniture pieces in this room date to the 1600s. The house was empty when it became a museum in 1900, and the museum collection has over 10,000 items today -- many with stories tied to Guilford families, but none to the Whitfields.

📷 Brian Kutner

How the East End's indigenous people mark Thanksgiving
11/23/2020
How the East End's indigenous people mark Thanksgiving

How the East End's indigenous people mark Thanksgiving

For the East End’s Native people — who populated this land long before settlers arrived and drove them away in the 17th century — Thanksgiving is many things at once. It’s an opportunity to come together and celebrate the harvest, yes. But it’s also a moment to mourn and honor ancestors an...

Service Flag also known as Mother’s Flag that was recently earmarked for conservation. It hung from the rafters in the C...
11/11/2020

Service Flag also known as Mother’s Flag that was recently earmarked for conservation. It hung from the rafters in the Carriage House. Each blue star represents a family member in the service. More research about this flag and the family needs to be done.

Southold Indian Museum
11/08/2020

Southold Indian Museum

We look forward to seeing you on Sunday, Nov 8, when we will be open from 1:30pm to 4:30pm! We always appreciate donations of artifacts found locally, as now everyone in our community can view these parts of our history. One example is the gorget pictured here, discovered in Greenport.

The Fairbanks House
10/31/2020

The Fairbanks House

HAPPY HALLOWEEN from the Fairbanks House! To ward off evil spirits colonial settlers in New England often carved hex marks (also known as apotropaic marks) like these found in the Fairbanks House. This was usually done close to the chimney which was believed to give easy access to witches, demons and even disease. Hex marks have also been found throughout the house, but there is a particular abundance in the West wing addition. Another practice used was to bury shoes in their walls and ceilings to protect themselves from evil forces. Hex marks like these in the Fairbanks House have also been found in the Tower of London and the home of William Shakespeare. These families were not irreligious. As Puritans their beliefs in malevolent spirits were actually reinforced by the Church's teachings: that the devil was a literal presence in the world that would harm them physically and spiritually by afflicting them with disease or diverting them from righteousness. Despite their beliefs in spirits and witchcraft, New England settlers did not celebrate All Hallows Eve or Halloween, which was much more common in Maryland, Virginia, and the southern colonies.

Poor Parker Wickham lost this home and Robins Island because his loyalties during the Revolutionary  were to King George...
10/30/2020

Poor Parker Wickham lost this home and Robins Island because his loyalties during the Revolutionary were to King George III. ( here as portrayed in Hamilton)

Address

27320 ROUTE 25
Cutchogue, NY
11935

Telephone

+16317346714

Products

The Old House 1698
The Wickham Farmhouse 1704
The Old Schoolhouse 1840
The Carriage House 19th century
The Old Burying Ground

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The Council is a Not for Profit 501(c)(3) Charity that maintains the Cutchogue Village Green and structures dating from 1640.

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Comments

Rwandan is happy to be with you
Great story about colors in early colonial homes. The photo of Prussian Blue in George Washington's home is striking. I would never have imagined it was so appropriate..
Cutchogue's latest replica for the1699 Joseph and Sarah Wickham house project, a 1950s table reconditioned and painted powder blue. This will have a green baize carpet on it for Wickham to keep his carved box and account book and Bible and write his letters and bills on. The top is about three feet deep and five feet wide.
The new splint cradle Peter Follansbee of Kingston, Massachusetts, just made for the 1699 Wickham House. Based on one at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Here is the 2nd picture
I visited the gift shop in August with my 2 brothers to see the Holland sub model and thought you would be interested in these photos our Great Uncle took in the 20s or 30s showing the model as it was displayed on the building in New Suffolk.