The Old Manse

The Old Manse A property of The Trustees of Reservations, this National Historic Landmark witnessed the "shot heard round the world," and, less than a century later, Emerson, Hawthorne, and Thoreau spawned a revolution in American philosophy from here.
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Built in 1769, adjacent to Concord's Old North Bridge: Witness to Revolution, and home of Hawthorne, Emerson and American Transcendentalism.

05/02/2020
Hawthorne's "The Birth-Mark" Part 2

"The Birth-Mark" by Nathaniel Hawthorne was written during his stay in the Old Manse and remains one of this famous American author's most harrowing tales. We hope you enjoy the first part of this reading by Cultural Site Interpreter Shelley Hawks
For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus
Video Credits:
Read from, "The Birth-Mark", Mosses from an Old Manse by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Read by Shelley Hawks
Edited by Matthew Ahern
Music: Moonlight Sonata, Beethoven (Public Domain)

05/01/2020
Musings and Ramblings from the Old Manse - Sophia Peabody

Following up on our "Five Minute Lesson from the Old Manse" on Sopia Peabody, Lead Interpreter Matthew Ahern, and Cultural Site Interpreters Victor Curran, Shelley Hawks, and Marybeth Kelly spend some time discussing Sophia Peabody's life as an artist, writer, and mother. We invite you to comment down below with questions!
For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

May 1 marks the beginning of Rev. Ezra Ripley’s life, and the end of Mary Moody Emerson’s life, 112 years later. Their s...
05/01/2020

May 1 marks the beginning of Rev. Ezra Ripley’s life, and the end of Mary Moody Emerson’s life, 112 years later. Their stories intersected at the Old Manse, and between them, they witnessed a span of history from the birth of the American nation to the emancipation of its enslaved people.
Ezra Ripley, born in Connecticut on May 1, 1751, came to Concord as a Harvard senior in 1775, and returned when he was called to serve as the town’s minister in 1778. In 1780, he married Phebe Bliss Emerson, the widow of Concord's previous minister, and came to live at the house that Phebe had built with her late husband William Emerson--the house we now call the Old Manse.
Rev. Ripley gave a portion of the Manse property to the town to erect the Battle Monument at the North Bridge site in 1836. He felt some regret that he had not come to Concord in time to witness the battle at the North Bridge, as his wife had done. On April 19, 1775, Phebe had watched the Minute Men rout the Redcoats while holding her 8-month-old daughter Mary Moody Emerson in her arms.
Mary Moody would grow into a wise and proudly independent woman. She had deep spiritual convictions, but had little use for religious orthodoxy. In her own words, she “danced to the music of my own imajanation,” suggesting a sort of proto-transcendentalism that left its mark on young Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, among others.
Nothing seemed to frighten her, not even death. As if taunting the Grim Reaper, she had a burial shroud made and wore it as a dress, even when riding on horseback.
Mary was ready for death long before it was ready for her. She died at the age of 88 on May 1, 1863, just a few months after the Emancipation Proclamation vindicated her abolitionist sentiments.

05/01/2020

In the first of three special videos by Brandon Fisichella filmed at the Old Manse, he takes a look at some of the common misconceptions we have about how both the sides fought during the Battle of Lexington and Concord.

Brandon is an independent historian, reenactor, and YouTube content creator. You can find more links to his social media platforms below.

Website: https://www.brandon-f.com/
YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9NNB_Hd4zPR-QDfnNOChwg
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BrandonFYT/

To learn more about reenacting, visit https://www.brigade.org/

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

04/30/2020

Following up on our "Five Minute Lesson from the Old Manse" on Sopia Peabody, Lead Interpreter Matthew Ahern, and Cultural Site Interpreters Victor Curran, Shelley Hawks, and Marybeth Kelly spend some time discussing Sophia Peabody's life as an artist, writer, and mother. We invite you to comment down below with questions!
For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

04/30/2020

"The Birth-Mark" by Nathaniel Hawthorne was written during his stay in the Old Manse and remains one of this famous American author's most harrowing tales. We hope you enjoy the second part of this reading by Cultural Site Interpreter Shelley Hawks
For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus
Video Credits:
Read from, "The Birth-Mark", Mosses from an Old Manse by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Read by Shelley Hawks
Edited by Matthew Ahern
Music: Moonlight Sonata, Beethoven (Public Domain)

04/29/2020
Five Minute Lesson from the Old Manse - Sophia Peabody

In this short video lesson, we cover the life Sophia Peabody who lived at the Old Manse with her husband Nathaniel Hawthorne. We hope you enjoy this short video on this transcendentalist, artist, and mother.

Please comment below with any questions you may have, and we'll be sure to answer them on our Musings and Ramblings from the Old Manse later this week.

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/…/TrusteesReser…

Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

We hope you enjoy this next "Lesson from the Old Manse" on Sophia Peabody Hawthorne and her time at the Old Manse. Pleas...
04/27/2020

We hope you enjoy this next "Lesson from the Old Manse" on Sophia Peabody Hawthorne and her time at the Old Manse. Please feel free to share your thoughts, along with any questions you may have in the comments below!
Find more to do at: http://www.thetrustees.org/athome

04/25/2020
Emerson's "Self Reliance"

Members of the staff of the Old Manse in Concord, MA read passages from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay, Self-Reliance.

Featuring the voices of Richard Dorbin, Shelley Hawkes, Victor Curran, Marybeth Kelly, Amanda Horrocks, and Michelle Purrington.

04/24/2020

Members of the staff of the Old Manse in Concord, MA read passages from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay, Self-Reliance.

Featuring the voices of Richard Dorbin, Shelley Hawkes, Victor Curran, Marybeth Kelly, Amanda Horrocks, and Michelle Purrington.

04/24/2020
Musings and Ramblings from the Old Manse - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Following up on our "Five Minute Lesson from the Old Manse" on Ralph Waldo Emerson, Lead Interpreter Matthew Ahern, and Cultural Site Interpreters Victor Curran, Shelley Hawks, and Marybeth Kelly spend some time discussing Ralph Waldo Emerson's life, writings, and impact. We invite you to comment down below with questions!
For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

04/23/2020

Following up on our "Five Minute Lesson from the Old Manse" on Ralph Waldo Emerson, Lead Interpreter Matthew Ahern, and Cultural Site Interpreters Victor Curran, Shelley Hawks, and Marybeth Kelly spend some time discussing Ralph Waldo Emerson's life, writings, and impact. We invite you to comment down below with questions!
For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

04/22/2020
Five Minute Lesson From the Old Manse - Ralph Waldo Emerson

In this short video lesson, we cover the life of one of Concord's most influential minds, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Though he only lived at the Old Manse for around a year, his time there helped to launch Trancendentalism - Americas's first unique intellectual movement.

Please comment below with any questions you may have, and we'll be sure to answer them on our Musings and Ramblings from the Old Manse later this week.

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations

Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

Video Credits:

Music:
"Aeolian Harp" - Chopin

Images Used Courtesy of:
Concord Free Public Library
Photos by David Kasabian
Massachusetts Historical Society
Smithsonian Institute
Library of Congress

04/22/2020

In this short video lesson, we cover the life of one of Concord's most influential minds, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Though he only lived at the Old Manse for around a year, his time there helped to launch Trancendentalism - Americas's first unique intellectual movement.

Please comment below with any questions you may have, and we'll be sure to answer them on our Musings and Ramblings from the Old Manse later this week.

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations

Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

Video Credits:

Music:
"Aeolian Harp" - Chopin

Images Used Courtesy of:
Concord Free Public Library
Photos by David Kasabian
Massachusetts Historical Society
Smithsonian Institute
Library of Congress

We hope you enjoy this next "Lesson from the Old Manse" on Ralph Waldo Emerson and his philosophy. Please feel free to s...
04/20/2020

We hope you enjoy this next "Lesson from the Old Manse" on Ralph Waldo Emerson and his philosophy. Please feel free to share your thoughts, along with any questions you may have in the comments below!
Find more to do at: http://www.thetrustees.org/athome

04/19/2020
Reverend William Emerson's April 19th

In celebration of Patriots' Day weekend, we invite you to join us as we read through Reverend William Emerson's brief account of the Battle of Lexington and Concord.

A special thank you to the Concord Museum for collaborating with the Old Manse and providing us access to high resolution copies of Amos Doolittle's engravings depicting the conflict (originals owned by the Connecticut Historical Society).

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

Video Credits

Images Used

Emerson, Edward. A Farewell to Family

Doolittle, Amos. The Battle of Lexington, April 19th, 1775, 1775, printer's ink and watercolor, Connecticut Historical Society.

Doolittle, Amos.A View of the Town of Concord, 1775, printer’s ink and watercolor, Connecticut Historical Society.

Doolittle, Amos.The Engagement at The North Bridge in Concord, 1775, printer’s ink and watercolor, Connecticut Historical Society.

Doolittle, Amos.A View of the South Part of Lexington, 1775, printer’s ink and watercolor, Connecticut Historical Society.

Music Used

The United States Army Field Band, Fife and Drum demonstration

The Company of Military Collectors & Historians,"Fife and Drum Music of the American Revolution: Military Music in America series, vol. 1," Washington, D.C. with George P. Carroll, Director of Music.

Read and edited by, Matthew Ahern (Lead Interpreter)

04/18/2020
Hawthorne's "The Birth-Mark" - Part 1

"The Birth-Mark" by Nathaniel Hawthorne was written during his stay in the Old Manse and remains one of this famous American author's most harrowing tales. We hope you enjoy the first part of this reading by Cultural Site Interpreter Amanda Horrocks.

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

Video Credits:
Read from, "The Birth-Mark", Mosses from an Old Manse by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Read by Amanda Horrocks
Edited by Matthew Ahern
Music: Midnight Sonata, Beethoven (Public Domain)

04/18/2020

In celebration of Patriots' Day weekend, we invite you to join us as we read through Reverend William Emerson's brief account of the Battle of Lexington and Concord.

A special thank you to the Concord Museum for collaborating with the Old Manse and providing us access to high resolution copies of Amos Doolittle's engravings depicting the conflict (originals owned by the Connecticut Historical Society).

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

Video Credits

Images Used

Emerson, Edward. A Farewell to Family

Doolittle, Amos. The Battle of Lexington, April 19th, 1775, 1775, printer's ink and watercolor, Connecticut Historical Society.

Doolittle, Amos.A View of the Town of Concord, 1775, printer’s ink and watercolor, Connecticut Historical Society.

Doolittle, Amos.The Engagement at The North Bridge in Concord, 1775, printer’s ink and watercolor, Connecticut Historical Society.

Doolittle, Amos.A View of the South Part of Lexington, 1775, printer’s ink and watercolor, Connecticut Historical Society.

Music Used

The United States Army Field Band, Fife and Drum demonstration

The Company of Military Collectors & Historians,"Fife and Drum Music of the American Revolution: Military Music in America series, vol. 1," Washington, D.C. with George P. Carroll, Director of Music.

Read and edited by, Matthew Ahern (Lead Interpreter)

04/17/2020
Musings and Ramblings from the Old Manse - "The Home of Two Revolutions"

Following up from our Tuesday "Five Minute Lesson from the Old Manse" on the Old Manse, Lead Interpreter Matthew Ahern, and Cultural Site Interpreters Victor Curran and Marybeth Kelly spend some time discussing some of the objects that fascinate them in this 250 year old house. They also offer some book recomendations to end the discussion. We hope you enjoy and encourage you to post down below about what your favortie part of the Old Manse is!

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations

Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

04/17/2020

"The Birth-Mark" by Nathaniel Hawthorne was written during his stay in the Old Manse and remains one of this famous American author's most harrowing tales. We hope you enjoy the first part of this reading by Cultural Site Interpreter Amanda Horrocks.

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations
Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

Video Credits:
Read from, "The Birth-Mark", Mosses from an Old Manse by Nathaniel Hawthorne
Read by Amanda Horrocks
Edited by Matthew Ahern
Music: Moonlight Sonata, Beethoven (Public Domain)

04/17/2020

Following up from our Tuesday "Five Minute Lesson from the Old Manse" on the Old Manse, Lead Interpreter Matthew Ahern, and Cultural Site Interpreters Victor Curran and Marybeth Kelly spend some time discussing some of the objects that fascinate them in this 250 year old house. They also offer some book recomendations to end the discussion. We hope you enjoy and encourage you to post down below about what your favortie part of the Old Manse is!

For more content to exprience at home, please visit http://www.thetrustees.org/athome or visit our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/TrusteesReservations

Also, if you're not a member of the Trustees, please consider joining and supporting our mission by going to https://www.thetrustees.org/joinus

Interior photos used courtesy of David Kasabian

Address

269 Monument St
Concord, MA
01742

Commuter Rail, Concord Station.

Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 17:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(978) 369-3909

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Our Story

The first shots of the Revolutionary War were fired nearby – and, less than a century later, Emerson, Hawthorne, and Thoreau spawned a revolution in American philosophy from here. What makes the Old Manse a special place? A handsome Georgian clapboard building, The Old Manse sits near the banks of the Concord River among rolling fields edged by centuries-old stone walls and graced by an orchard. From upstairs, you can look out over the North Bridge, where the famous battle of April 19, 1775, took place. Ralph Waldo Emerson and Nathaniel Hawthorne both called the Manse home for a time – and each found inspiration here. Emerson would draft his famous essay “Nature” from an upstairs room, and Hawthorne would write a tribute to the homestead called Mosses from an Old Manse. Hawthorne and his wife, Sophia, started their married life here, and you can still see the poems they wrote to each other, etched on the Manse’s window panes. The heirloom vegetable garden, which has been recreated today, was originally planted by Henry David Thoreau in honor of the Hawthornes’ wedding.

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Comments

Manse pics from yesterday, 2 November 2019. Enjoy.
Loving the Old Manse
This photo oh the Old Manse was taken back in March of 2010. The front field was flooded out and made for a good reflection
Our company's January newsletter features the Old Manse:
Looking forward to the nooks & crannies tour; just purchased tix!
Owen Cody pleased to be allowed to perform Mozart's Sonata in G Major K. 283, composed in 1774, on The Old Manse's circa 1864 Steinway piano. "What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us." Ralph Waldo Emerson.
Almost Solstice Sunset Sunday at Old Manse. And cardboard boat race.
Lots of wonderful concerts under the tent on Sunday afternoons.
May 19 is a memorable day in our literary history. Reading Fiction Blog remembers Nathaniel Hawthorne with some free reading by this beloved author.