International Women's Air & Space Museum

International Women's Air & Space Museum Exhibit Hours:
8 a.m. - 8 p.m. 7 days a week. Office, Gift Shop and Research Center Hours:
10 a.m. - 4 p.m. M-F

Parking is run by a separate company.
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The mission of the International Women's Air & Space Museum is to collect, preserve, and showcase the history and culture of women in all areas of aviation & aerospace; educate people of the world about their contributions; and inspire future generations by bringing the history to life. This free museum located in the terminal building of Burke Lakefront Airport celebrates the amazing history of women in aviation & space. The museum also houses the Joan L. Hrubec Aviation Education Center and the Fay Gillis Wells Research Center.

Operating as usual

#Didyouknow that April 18-24 is #NationalVolunteerWeek? Established in 1974, National Volunteer Week is an opportunity t...
04/19/2021

#Didyouknow that April 18-24 is #NationalVolunteerWeek? Established in 1974, National Volunteer Week is an opportunity to recognize and thank volunteers who lend their time, talent, voice and resources to meet the critical needs of our communities. IWASM wouldn't be where we are without our dedicated volunteers! This week, we will highlight some of these stellar (pun intended) individuals, and who better to kick off the week than with Marcy!

"When the International Women's Air & Space Museum moved to Cleveland, I started to volunteer because I thought I could offer some help with my knowledge of spaceflight. Later, I learned about designing exhibits, became a trustee and then board secretary. I enjoy connecting with children and adults, and sharing the trailblazing stories of women in air and space that we promote at the museum.” - Marcy Frumker, Space Advisor, Board Member, Volunteer-Extraordinaire

During this year's National Volunteer Week, we can't do half of our mission without the help of Marcy! She is our space expert, and her go-to-it approach to all we throw at her is truly an inspiration. Whether it is prepping for a Facebook Live highlighting the newest exhibit on 20 years of the International Space Station, learning the ropes as a Zoom host, or regaling us with the latest news about women in space, we love having Marcy with us!

Want to volunteer with the museum? Visit our website for how to get involved!

#Didyouknow that April 18-24 is #NationalVolunteerWeek? Established in 1974, National Volunteer Week is an opportunity to recognize and thank volunteers who lend their time, talent, voice and resources to meet the critical needs of our communities. IWASM wouldn't be where we are without our dedicated volunteers! This week, we will highlight some of these stellar (pun intended) individuals, and who better to kick off the week than with Marcy!

"When the International Women's Air & Space Museum moved to Cleveland, I started to volunteer because I thought I could offer some help with my knowledge of spaceflight. Later, I learned about designing exhibits, became a trustee and then board secretary. I enjoy connecting with children and adults, and sharing the trailblazing stories of women in air and space that we promote at the museum.” - Marcy Frumker, Space Advisor, Board Member, Volunteer-Extraordinaire

During this year's National Volunteer Week, we can't do half of our mission without the help of Marcy! She is our space expert, and her go-to-it approach to all we throw at her is truly an inspiration. Whether it is prepping for a Facebook Live highlighting the newest exhibit on 20 years of the International Space Station, learning the ropes as a Zoom host, or regaling us with the latest news about women in space, we love having Marcy with us!

Want to volunteer with the museum? Visit our website for how to get involved!

Congratulations to former NASA astronaut, Pam Melroy! Yesterday it was announced Melroy's official nomination to become ...
04/17/2021

Congratulations to former NASA astronaut, Pam Melroy! Yesterday it was announced Melroy's official nomination to become NASA’s next Deputy Administrator. While a woman has yet to hold the position as Administrator, if confirmed, Melroy will become the 5th woman to serve as Deputy Administrator. She would follow Shana Dale (2005-2009), Lori Garver (2009-2013), Dava Newman (2015-2017), and Lesa Roe who was acting Deputy Administrator from January - September 2017.

Before becoming an astronaut in 1994 where she flew aboard two Space Shuttle missions as a pilot, she was a test pilot in the U.S. Air Force. On her final shuttle mission in 2007, she became only the second female commander of a shuttle flight aboard STS-120. During that mission, she even took an IWASM patch with her to the International Space Station - patches are available in our gift shop. After leaving NASA in 2009, Melroy worked for the FAA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) where she served as Deputy Director of the Tactical Technology Office.

If you missed our exhibit from 2018, no problem! Here’s a snapshot along with Melroy’s USAF flight jacket which she donated to the museum.

30 years ago in October 1991, IWASM hosted the FLATs (dubbed by Jerrie Cobb to describe the First Lady Astronaut Trainee...
04/16/2021

30 years ago in October 1991, IWASM hosted the FLATs (dubbed by Jerrie Cobb to describe the First Lady Astronaut Trainees) for their 30th Reunion. Now known as the Mercury 13, the FLATs were a group of 13 women who successfully underwent the same astronaut physiological testing as the Mercury 7 beginning in 1961. While many matched or surpassed the testing results compared to their male counterparts, none of the FLATs ultimately flew to space.

In celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Mercury 13 testing, IWASM hosted a lecture panel showcasing these women and their stories along with a weekend full of activities. Pictured here from left to right are: Jerrie Cobb, Rhea Hurrle Allison Woltman, Myrtle Cagle, Irene Leverton, and B Steadman at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Unfortunately, Cobb did not stay for the filmed lecture - which we have in our collections!

30 years ago in October 1991, IWASM hosted the FLATs (dubbed by Jerrie Cobb to describe the First Lady Astronaut Trainees) for their 30th Reunion. Now known as the Mercury 13, the FLATs were a group of 13 women who successfully underwent the same astronaut physiological testing as the Mercury 7 beginning in 1961. While many matched or surpassed the testing results compared to their male counterparts, none of the FLATs ultimately flew to space.

In celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Mercury 13 testing, IWASM hosted a lecture panel showcasing these women and their stories along with a weekend full of activities. Pictured here from left to right are: Jerrie Cobb, Rhea Hurrle Allison Woltman, Myrtle Cagle, Irene Leverton, and B Steadman at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Unfortunately, Cobb did not stay for the filmed lecture - which we have in our collections!

Lots of changes are happening at the International Space Station!NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, Expedition 64 flight engine...
04/15/2021

Lots of changes are happening at the International Space Station!

NASA astronaut Kate Rubins, Expedition 64 flight engineer, will undock with her Soyuz crew on Friday, April 16 at 9:34 p.m. EDT and land in Kazakhstan on Saturday, April 17 at 12:56 a.m. EDT (that is 10:56 AM in Kazakhstan). Rubins has been in space since launching on her birthday on October 14, 2020, aboard a Russian Soyuz rocket.

Before the undocking, NASA astronaut Shannon Walker will be taking command of the station on Thursday, April 15 during a change of command ceremony at 3:45 p.m. EDT. She will be - ONLY - the third female space station commander.

You can catch all the activities at www.nasa.gov and at NASA’s social media sites.
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#womenshistory #womeninspace #space #spacehistory #iss #womeninstem #iwasm45 #seeherbeher #womeninengineering #nasa

04/13/2021
Mercury Women: Forgotten Link to the Future

Join IWASM Space Advisor and Trustee, Marcy Frumker in tonight’s program on the lasting legacy of the Mercury 13!

Missed the start? No problem. The video will be available afterward here on Facebook thanks to our friends at Armstrong Air & Space Museum.

Join us tomorrow, April 13th for our second program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Mercury 13! IWASM Trustee an...
04/12/2021
Join IWASM for Part 2 of our Mercury 13 Program Series

Join us tomorrow, April 13th for our second program celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Mercury 13! IWASM Trustee and Space Advisor, Marcy Frumker will discuss the legacy of the remarkable women who underwent astronaut testing in 1961 on NASA's astronaut corps. We're partnering with the Armstrong Air & Space Museum to provide two options to participate! Join either by Zoom or tune in on Facebook Live. Click the link to learn more.

In the next installment celebrating the Mercury 13th 60th anniversary... Happening Tomorrow... Mercury Women: Forgotten Link to the Future Tuesday, April 13, 2021 at 7:00 p.m. EDT (adjust for your tim

04/10/2021
Nora AlMatrooshi

Congratulations to Nora Al Matrooshi named today as the 1st female Arab astronaut! She holds a degree in mechanical engineering, and has been selected from the second class of the UAE Astronauts program. AlMatrooshi was selected from over 4,305 astronaut applicants-of which only about 1,400 were women. Amazing what stargazing as a child can inspire you to do!

It’s common to associate the accomplishments of 20th century aviation with the achievements made possible because of the...
04/09/2021

It’s common to associate the accomplishments of 20th century aviation with the achievements made possible because of the Wright brothers. However, 18th and 19th century Europe witnessed other notable examples of first flight – thanks to balloons!

Shown here is a sketch of Sophie Blanchard of France from our collection. Captioned “Mme, Blanchard Celebre Aeronaute” or Ms. Blanchard celebrated aeronaut, the image is described in French as, “Sophie Blanchard-Armant in the basket of the balloon with which she takes off. The evening of August 15, 1811…in Milan (Italy) in the presence of Napoleon 1st…”

In 1805, Blanchard became the first woman to pilot her own balloon. After her husband’s death in 1809, she continued flying to pay off his debts, and caught the attention of Napoleon Bonaparte. Napoleon would soon choose her as the official aeronaut of festivals in France, and later his chief air minister of ballooning where she worked on plans for an aerial invasion of England by French troops via balloon in the 1810s. Though those plans were soon deemed impossible to execute. Throughout her life, she made long-distance flights over the Alps and even set off pyrotechnics beneath her hydrogen-fueled balloon. She died in an accident in 1819 during an exhibition over the Tivoli Gardens in Paris when, during her descent, her basket hit the roof of a building pitching her out and where she plunged to the street below. An epitaph on her tombstone read, “Victime de son Art et de son Intrepidite” or Victim of her art and intrepidity.

As early as the 1770s, there is record of the first free flight carrying a human in Paris, France. The earliest years of balloon air travel did not utilize the hot air generated from flames that we are accustomed to today. The use of gas enabled travelers, like Blanchard, to ascend to higher altitudes for longer periods of time.

It’s common to associate the accomplishments of 20th century aviation with the achievements made possible because of the Wright brothers. However, 18th and 19th century Europe witnessed other notable examples of first flight – thanks to balloons!

Shown here is a sketch of Sophie Blanchard of France from our collection. Captioned “Mme, Blanchard Celebre Aeronaute” or Ms. Blanchard celebrated aeronaut, the image is described in French as, “Sophie Blanchard-Armant in the basket of the balloon with which she takes off. The evening of August 15, 1811…in Milan (Italy) in the presence of Napoleon 1st…”

In 1805, Blanchard became the first woman to pilot her own balloon. After her husband’s death in 1809, she continued flying to pay off his debts, and caught the attention of Napoleon Bonaparte. Napoleon would soon choose her as the official aeronaut of festivals in France, and later his chief air minister of ballooning where she worked on plans for an aerial invasion of England by French troops via balloon in the 1810s. Though those plans were soon deemed impossible to execute. Throughout her life, she made long-distance flights over the Alps and even set off pyrotechnics beneath her hydrogen-fueled balloon. She died in an accident in 1819 during an exhibition over the Tivoli Gardens in Paris when, during her descent, her basket hit the roof of a building pitching her out and where she plunged to the street below. An epitaph on her tombstone read, “Victime de son Art et de son Intrepidite” or Victim of her art and intrepidity.

As early as the 1770s, there is record of the first free flight carrying a human in Paris, France. The earliest years of balloon air travel did not utilize the hot air generated from flames that we are accustomed to today. The use of gas enabled travelers, like Blanchard, to ascend to higher altitudes for longer periods of time.

Have you been to one of our Dinner with a Slice of History Lecture Series? You'll be interested to know that we have a l...
04/08/2021

Have you been to one of our Dinner with a Slice of History Lecture Series? You'll be interested to know that we have a long history of offering engaging lectures dating back to the 1990s at our Centerville, OH location. Starting in 1990, we had 12 lectures with about three a year until 1994. All 12 were recorded and are currently a part of our library. Pictured here are photos from the first three lectures. The first photo is of Nancy Hopkins Tier, then IWASM president, at her lecture in November 1990. The second photo is Wally Funk, Tier, and Bernice "B" Steadman, then IWASM Executive Vice President, at Steadman's lecture in January 1991. The last photo is Tier and pilot Lori Griffith in front of the International Society of Women Airline Pilots exhibit. This lecture featured a panel of Women Airline Pilots in March 1991. Stay tuned for more in our #IWASM45 series, including more on the Centerville lecture series.

Who’s ready for tomorrow’s virtual #behindthescenes program? We’re putting the final touches and making the last selecti...
04/06/2021

Who’s ready for tomorrow’s virtual #behindthescenes program? We’re putting the final touches and making the last selections of items from the IWASM collections to showcase! Here you can see our Collections Manager, Katherine, reviewing the scrapbook of Irene Leverton one of the Mercury 13. Before this secret testing to become astronauts, Leverton worked as a crop duster, flight instructor, consultant, ferrying aircraft, and flying charters. She once said in response to astronaut Eileen Collins piloting her first mission, “Every time a woman accomplishes something like that I feel so damn good I have to sit down...to celebrate and think, ‘maybe it was worth it.’”

Tune in tomorrow at 3:00 p.m. EDT to learn more about Leverton and the other 12 women of the Mercury 13 through their objects and archives.

Register now at: https://bit.ly/3dDqIKz

Who’s ready for tomorrow’s virtual #behindthescenes program? We’re putting the final touches and making the last selections of items from the IWASM collections to showcase! Here you can see our Collections Manager, Katherine, reviewing the scrapbook of Irene Leverton one of the Mercury 13. Before this secret testing to become astronauts, Leverton worked as a crop duster, flight instructor, consultant, ferrying aircraft, and flying charters. She once said in response to astronaut Eileen Collins piloting her first mission, “Every time a woman accomplishes something like that I feel so damn good I have to sit down...to celebrate and think, ‘maybe it was worth it.’”

Tune in tomorrow at 3:00 p.m. EDT to learn more about Leverton and the other 12 women of the Mercury 13 through their objects and archives.

Register now at: https://bit.ly/3dDqIKz

The team at IWASM has been hard at work the past few months building and strengthening community partnerships. What’s re...
04/02/2021
Register Now for Events with IWASM!

The team at IWASM has been hard at work the past few months building and strengthening community partnerships. What’s resulted is a month chock full of virtual, and free events! Now you can join us from wherever you are. Grab a cup of coffee and click the link below to register for one or all in our April 2021 line-up.

Not signed up to receive regular program, event, and other updates from the museum? Visit our website to get started!

Exciting virtual events happening in April 2021. Learn more and join.. Upcoming April Events Do you enjoy all of the programs from the International Women's Air & Space Museum? Consider donating direc

It's no joke...We're under a week away from a special #behindthescenes program with Collections Manager, Katherine! This...
04/01/2021
Behind the Collections Door - The Mercury 13

It's no joke...We're under a week away from a special #behindthescenes program with Collections Manager, Katherine! This event shows the lasting legacy and real-life history of the women who have become known as the Mercury 13. Join us on April 7th at 3:00 p.m. (EDT) as we share the history of these remarkable women through the lens of their personal records, flying trophies, and more. This event is in partnership with California Aeronautical University.

The event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Click here to sign up!

Get a glimpse into the collections cared for at the International Women.

Did you know that the first Japanese woman in space was cardiovascular surgeon Dr. Chiaki Mukai? She earned her medical ...
03/30/2021

Did you know that the first Japanese woman in space was cardiovascular surgeon Dr. Chiaki Mukai? She earned her medical degree in 1977 and a doctorate in physiology in 1988 from Keio University School of Medicine, and was selected in 1985 to be one of three Japanese Payload Specialist candidates by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA, known now as the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)). She is the first Japanese female astronaut in space and flew aboard STS-47 for the First Material Processing Test (Spacelab-J)!

In 1994 aboard the space shuttle Discovery to the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2), she studied human physiology, space biology, radiation biology, and bioprocessing. Another project of this particular mission played to Mukai’s strengths and expertise – the study of the cardiovascular system, autonomic nerve system, and bone and muscle metabolism. She flew again in 1998 aboard STS-95 Discovery (along with US Senator John Glenn) for a nine-day mission.

After her space flight career, she worked as a visiting professor at the International Space University where she taught students in the school’s master’s program (2007-2011). In July 2012, Dr. Mukai became the Director of JAXA Center for Applied Space Medicine and Human Research.

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1501 N Marginal Rd Ste 165
Cleveland, OH
44114

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 20:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 20:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 20:00
Thursday 08:00 - 20:00
Friday 08:00 - 20:00
Saturday 08:00 - 20:00
Sunday 08:00 - 20:00

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(216) 623-1111

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Dayton Theatre Guild Production dates: 10/11 – 10/27/2019 “Decision Height tells the story of six Women’s Air Force Service Pilots (called WASPS) who flew aircraft during World War II. While they didn’t see combat, these ladies were responsible for transporting planes and pulling targets for live ammunition training, freeing the men for active duty after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The WASPS proved an important asset for the military, but have been largely forgotten in the history books. This play was the winner of the 2013 Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival.”
This looks like such a wonderful facility! Its nice to see women in aviation celebrated! It reminds me of a documentary I saw recently called Above the Best, about Army aviators in the Afghan war that opens with a beautiful account from a strong female pilot. I'd recommend! You can find the film on iTunes or Amazon if you're interested.
So happy to have come by for a visit today. Thank you for all that you do.
It was a great event last night at the International Women's Air & Space Museum! A record turnout with nearly 200 attendees. Special thanks to staff members Heather Alexander and Katie Brinager who made it seem easy in the face of several last minute challenges! Thanks also to Board member Jena Olsen for her hours of work helping to put it all together, along with interns Katherine and Elizabeth, Board member and Secretary Marcy Frumker, and volunteers Mark Thomas and Ruth Glasgow! Brennan's Catering received many compliments. They did a great job, as always! DJ Slim kept an upbeat mood spinning some great tunes. And thanks to Betsy Kling and Channel 3 for covering the event in real time, along with Cleveland Magazine and Currents, which will be reporting on it. Hopefully International Women's Air & Space Museum will have brought in record funds as well. Thank you to all of our attendees and donors! (It isn't too late to make a donation!) Looking forward to next year!!
great job last night---another Corks under our belt---- ✈️🍾🥂
It was a great event last night at the International Women's Air & Space Museum! A record turnout with nearly 200 attendees. Special thanks to staff members Heather Alexander and Katie Brinager who made it seem easy in the face of several last minute challenges! Thanks also to Board member Jena Olsen for her hours of work helping to put it all together, along with interns Katherine and Elizabeth, Board member and Secretary Marcy Frumker, and volunteers Mark Thomas and Ruth Glasgow! Brennan's Catering received many compliments. They did a great job, as always! DJ Slim kept an upbeat mood spinning some great tunes. And thanks to Betsy Kling and Channel 3 for covering the event in real time, along with Cleveland Magazine and Currents, which will be reporting on it. Hopefully International Women's Air & Space Museum will have brought in record funds as well. Thank you to all of our attendees and donors! (It isn't too late to make a donation!) Looking forward to next year!!
Emily
Marcy
She is an onion!!