Clark Humanities Museum

Clark Humanities Museum Housed in the Humanities Building at Scripps College, the Clark Humanities Museum features exhibitions annually and serves as a study space for students.

Art Museum

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On behalf of the Clark Humanities Museum, we would like to wish you the best on International Creativity and Innovation ...
04/21/2021

On behalf of the Clark Humanities Museum, we would like to wish you the best on International Creativity and Innovation Day! We invite you to be brave, be bold, and be creative! Whether it’s related to art, science, education, politics, nature, or anything else in between, we encourage you to look at things from a different angle, think outside of the box, or try something new. And feel free to share your projects and ideas to spread creativity and innovation on this one of a kind day.

Anne Hirondelle, American, b. 1944
Outurn 30, 2003
Stoneware
12 1/8 in. x 12 1/8 in. x 10 3/8 in. (30.8 cm x 30.8 cm x 26.35 cm)
2004.4.16
Scripps College, Claremont
@scrippscollege @ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery #InternationalCreativityandInnovationDay #Creativity #Innovation #Art #Ceramic #AnneHirondelle

On behalf of the Clark Humanities Museum, we would like to wish you the best on International Creativity and Innovation Day! We invite you to be brave, be bold, and be creative! Whether it’s related to art, science, education, politics, nature, or anything else in between, we encourage you to look at things from a different angle, think outside of the box, or try something new. And feel free to share your projects and ideas to spread creativity and innovation on this one of a kind day.

Anne Hirondelle, American, b. 1944
Outurn 30, 2003
Stoneware
12 1/8 in. x 12 1/8 in. x 10 3/8 in. (30.8 cm x 30.8 cm x 26.35 cm)
2004.4.16
Scripps College, Claremont
@scrippscollege @ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery #InternationalCreativityandInnovationDay #Creativity #Innovation #Art #Ceramic #AnneHirondelle

We at the CHM would like to wish you a warm World Health Day. This year’s World Health Day theme is to create greater fa...
04/07/2021

We at the CHM would like to wish you a warm World Health Day. This year’s World Health Day theme is to create greater fairness within the healthcare systems around the globe. By spreading awareness and advocating for those who do not have access to healthcare, we can help to improve some of these unfortunate issues.

Making improvements like these can take a lot of time and effort, but you can start small by looking within your own community. You can volunteer at a local hospital, attend city council meetings, or start a community garden to make access to healthier foods more readily available. Sometimes fixing larger problems may seem unobtainable, like making it to the top of the mountain, but if we work together we can reach our goals of equality.

Osamu SUGIYAMA, Japanese, b. 1946
Climbing Up Mt. Fuji / Fujiko, 2006
Ink on paper
11 3/8 x 9 1/8 in. (29 x 23 cm)
@scrippscollege @ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery
#Art #Health #WorldHealthDay #OsamuSugiyama #Equality

We at the CHM would like to wish you a warm World Health Day. This year’s World Health Day theme is to create greater fairness within the healthcare systems around the globe. By spreading awareness and advocating for those who do not have access to healthcare, we can help to improve some of these unfortunate issues.

Making improvements like these can take a lot of time and effort, but you can start small by looking within your own community. You can volunteer at a local hospital, attend city council meetings, or start a community garden to make access to healthier foods more readily available. Sometimes fixing larger problems may seem unobtainable, like making it to the top of the mountain, but if we work together we can reach our goals of equality.

Osamu SUGIYAMA, Japanese, b. 1946
Climbing Up Mt. Fuji / Fujiko, 2006
Ink on paper
11 3/8 x 9 1/8 in. (29 x 23 cm)
@scrippscollege @ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery
#Art #Health #WorldHealthDay #OsamuSugiyama #Equality

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic MeaningSelection Curated by Gillian BellDescription ...
03/05/2021

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning

Selection Curated by Gillian Bell

Description by Gillian Bell

Bill Owens is a photojournalist who focused his work on the working class and suburban residents of California. His work is a combination of portraits and photos from various events in the tri-valley area (the area east of the Bay Area, between Dublin, Livermore, Pleasanton and San Ramone).

This photograph was taken at the opening of World Bank in Livermore and is part of Owens’ collection entitled Our Kind of People. This collection is comprised of photographs Owens took at meetings put on by various local organizations, like the Avon Bottle club, The Masons, the Supreme Emblem’s. Owens was intrigued by the space relation between the people there and how it displays the social interaction in its purest form.

Bill Owens, American (1938 - )
Bank Social Tri-valley Area, Northern California, 1969-75
Gelatin silver print on paper
8 x 10 in. (20.32 x 25.4 cm)
Accession number: 2019.22.99
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery @ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery @scrippscollege #Art #Photography #Collaboration #BillOwens

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning

Selection Curated by Gillian Bell

Description by Gillian Bell

Bill Owens is a photojournalist who focused his work on the working class and suburban residents of California. His work is a combination of portraits and photos from various events in the tri-valley area (the area east of the Bay Area, between Dublin, Livermore, Pleasanton and San Ramone).

This photograph was taken at the opening of World Bank in Livermore and is part of Owens’ collection entitled Our Kind of People. This collection is comprised of photographs Owens took at meetings put on by various local organizations, like the Avon Bottle club, The Masons, the Supreme Emblem’s. Owens was intrigued by the space relation between the people there and how it displays the social interaction in its purest form.

Bill Owens, American (1938 - )
Bank Social Tri-valley Area, Northern California, 1969-75
Gelatin silver print on paper
8 x 10 in. (20.32 x 25.4 cm)
Accession number: 2019.22.99
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery @ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery @scrippscollege #Art #Photography #Collaboration #BillOwens

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic MeaningSelection Curated by Gillian BellDescription ...
03/05/2021

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning

Selection Curated by Gillian Bell

Description by Gillian Bell

Danny Lyon is a documentary photographer born in 1942, who worked with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee as a photographer while attending University of Chicago. His style is categorized as new journalism which features the author’s subjective responses to the people and events as they occur.

While I haven’t been able to find the exact date this photograph was taken on, Berkeley, in 1969, was a hot spot for political action surrounding the Civil Rights Movement.

Danny Lyon, American (1942 - )
Arrests of Demonstrators, Berkeley, 1969
Gelatin silver print on paper
11 x 14 in. (27.94 x 35.56 cm)
Accession number: 2019.22.94
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery @ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery @scrippscollege #Art #Photography #Collaboration #DannyLyon

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning

Selection Curated by Gillian Bell

Description by Gillian Bell

Danny Lyon is a documentary photographer born in 1942, who worked with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee as a photographer while attending University of Chicago. His style is categorized as new journalism which features the author’s subjective responses to the people and events as they occur.

While I haven’t been able to find the exact date this photograph was taken on, Berkeley, in 1969, was a hot spot for political action surrounding the Civil Rights Movement.

Danny Lyon, American (1942 - )
Arrests of Demonstrators, Berkeley, 1969
Gelatin silver print on paper
11 x 14 in. (27.94 x 35.56 cm)
Accession number: 2019.22.94
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery @ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery @scrippscollege #Art #Photography #Collaboration #DannyLyon

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic MeaningSelection Curated by Anna HorneDescription by...
02/25/2021

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning
Selection Curated by Anna Horne
Description by Anna Horne

For full description see link in bio.


Edward Weston is one of the most influential American photographers of the 20th century. His 40-year career began in California, and over his long career he was able to photograph a large variety of subjects, including portraits, nudes, landscapes, and whimsical parodies. Among Edward Weston’s iconic images are his still-life peppers. He aimed to transform humble vegetables into something monumental.

Weston began this theme in 1927, continuing it throughout the late 1920s. He highlights the pepper’s curving form, transforming the objects into a sculpture. Weston’s close-up view and placement of the pepper on a stone pedestal creates this effect. The intense and dramatic lighting of the pepper strips the organic object of its original meaning. It captures light and shadow transforming the object. The pepper does not look edible and appears only vaguely plant-like. From August 2nd through 6th, 1930, Weston created more than 30 negatives of peppers for a series of silver gelatin prints. All of the prints were approximately 9 ½ x 7 ½ in. This photograph is assumed to belong to this series. The pepper carried emotional resonance for Weston, and he later wrote, “I have done perhaps fifty negatives of pepper: because of the endless variety in form manifestations, because of their extraordinary surface texture[s], because of the power, the force suggested in their amazing convolutions. A box of peppers at the corner grocery holds implications to stir me emotionally more than almost any other edible form, for the run the gamut of natural forms, in experimental surprises.” Weston’s fascination with peppers, connects to his interest in the human figure and in addition highlights his meticulous attention to detail.

Edward Weston, American(1886-1958)
Pepper, 1930
Gelatin silver Process
9 7/16 in. x 7 1/2 in. (23.9 cm. x 19.1 cm.)
Accession Number: AR39
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery
@ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery @scrippscollege #Art #Photography #Collaboration #EdwardWeston

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning
Selection Curated by Anna Horne
Description by Anna Horne

For full description see link in bio.


Edward Weston is one of the most influential American photographers of the 20th century. His 40-year career began in California, and over his long career he was able to photograph a large variety of subjects, including portraits, nudes, landscapes, and whimsical parodies. Among Edward Weston’s iconic images are his still-life peppers. He aimed to transform humble vegetables into something monumental.

Weston began this theme in 1927, continuing it throughout the late 1920s. He highlights the pepper’s curving form, transforming the objects into a sculpture. Weston’s close-up view and placement of the pepper on a stone pedestal creates this effect. The intense and dramatic lighting of the pepper strips the organic object of its original meaning. It captures light and shadow transforming the object. The pepper does not look edible and appears only vaguely plant-like. From August 2nd through 6th, 1930, Weston created more than 30 negatives of peppers for a series of silver gelatin prints. All of the prints were approximately 9 ½ x 7 ½ in. This photograph is assumed to belong to this series. The pepper carried emotional resonance for Weston, and he later wrote, “I have done perhaps fifty negatives of pepper: because of the endless variety in form manifestations, because of their extraordinary surface texture[s], because of the power, the force suggested in their amazing convolutions. A box of peppers at the corner grocery holds implications to stir me emotionally more than almost any other edible form, for the run the gamut of natural forms, in experimental surprises.” Weston’s fascination with peppers, connects to his interest in the human figure and in addition highlights his meticulous attention to detail.

Edward Weston, American(1886-1958)
Pepper, 1930
Gelatin silver Process
9 7/16 in. x 7 1/2 in. (23.9 cm. x 19.1 cm.)
Accession Number: AR39
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery
@ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery @scrippscollege #Art #Photography #Collaboration #EdwardWeston

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic MeaningSelection Curated by Anna HorneDescription by...
02/25/2021

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning
Selection Curated by Anna Horne
Description by Anna Horne

For full description see link in bio.


Berenice Abbott is best known for her striking black-and-white photographs documenting New York City’s changing landscape in the 1930s. Her photographs of buildings are like portraits, influenced by Eugène Atget’s Parisian streetscapes. This influence is seen in her series, "Changing New York." This photograph belongs to that same series. She aimed to document the tension between old and new in her favorite city. Abbott aspired to produce strong objective photographs, even saying, “Photography can never grow up if it imitates some other medium. It has to walk alone; it has to be itself.”

This photograph comes from Abbott’s documentation of the Middle East Side. The photograph offers a spliced and compressed view of architecture from different eras. The 1930s combined low and high buildings. Abbot aimed to highlight the shifting landscape from old Victorian architecture to the new Art Deco structures. The Victorian–style building on the right is the Murray Hill Hotel, and the stark contrast of the skyscraper on the left exemplifies the changing landscape. The stark contrast between the buildings colors and lines create a strong architectural snapshot of New York during this time period. The composition of this photograph draws the eye to every corner. Abbott’s composition of the Murray Hill Hotel offers a close-up display of the hotel’s intricate architecture. The image depicts a sweeping view upward and the photograph does not show the entire street scene, focusing on the space in the sky where these contrasting structures meet. Abbott’s framing was genius, capturing all elements of the changing landscape. Abbott is known for her thoughtful framing to create her compositions.

Berenice Abbott, American (1898-1991)
Murray Hill Hotel: Spiral, 1935
Gelatin silver print on paper
19 1/2 in. x 15 1/4 in. (49.53 cm x 38.74 cm)
Accession Number: 2012.2.1
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery
@ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery @scrippscollege #Art #Photography #Collaboration #BereniceAbbott

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning
Selection Curated by Anna Horne
Description by Anna Horne

For full description see link in bio.


Berenice Abbott is best known for her striking black-and-white photographs documenting New York City’s changing landscape in the 1930s. Her photographs of buildings are like portraits, influenced by Eugène Atget’s Parisian streetscapes. This influence is seen in her series, "Changing New York." This photograph belongs to that same series. She aimed to document the tension between old and new in her favorite city. Abbott aspired to produce strong objective photographs, even saying, “Photography can never grow up if it imitates some other medium. It has to walk alone; it has to be itself.”

This photograph comes from Abbott’s documentation of the Middle East Side. The photograph offers a spliced and compressed view of architecture from different eras. The 1930s combined low and high buildings. Abbot aimed to highlight the shifting landscape from old Victorian architecture to the new Art Deco structures. The Victorian–style building on the right is the Murray Hill Hotel, and the stark contrast of the skyscraper on the left exemplifies the changing landscape. The stark contrast between the buildings colors and lines create a strong architectural snapshot of New York during this time period. The composition of this photograph draws the eye to every corner. Abbott’s composition of the Murray Hill Hotel offers a close-up display of the hotel’s intricate architecture. The image depicts a sweeping view upward and the photograph does not show the entire street scene, focusing on the space in the sky where these contrasting structures meet. Abbott’s framing was genius, capturing all elements of the changing landscape. Abbott is known for her thoughtful framing to create her compositions.

Berenice Abbott, American (1898-1991)
Murray Hill Hotel: Spiral, 1935
Gelatin silver print on paper
19 1/2 in. x 15 1/4 in. (49.53 cm x 38.74 cm)
Accession Number: 2012.2.1
Ruth Chandler Williamson Gallery
@ruthchandlerwilliamsongallery @scrippscollege #Art #Photography #Collaboration #BereniceAbbott

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning Selection Curated by Tsion MamoDescription b...
02/12/2021

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning

Selection Curated by Tsion Mamo

Description by Tsion Mamo

Tony Gleaton (1948-2015) was an African-American photographer who specialized in black-and-white portraits. He wanted to document Black cowboys' lives and images of the African diaspora in Latin America in his work. Tony lived in the southwest region in the United States, with Black communities that were barely acknowledged. He wanted to capture them in their daily lives to bring attention to their existence in a beautiful way. The pictures Tony takes are carefully crafted and typically in a tight frame to focus solely on the subject.

This image is part of Tony's series called "Tengo Casi 500 Años: Africa's Legacy in Central America" and depicts a family coming in or going out to sea in Livingston, Guatemala. In this image, the subjects' gazes are all in different directions as the father is working to gather the nets, the mother watches him, and the child is looking at the camera. Their many gazes can represent the different priorities that each subject has in their life right now. The father and mother are trying to support their family while the child is curious to discover the world they live in. These subjects also seem to be carefully positioned to give the image Tony's desired lighting. This manipulation of fame can relate to the truth as photographs are the photographer's preferred truth, not the actual truth.

Tony Gleaton, American (1948-2015)
Family of the Sea/ Familia del Mar, 1988
12 in. x 17 7/8 in. (30.48 cm. x 45.4 cm.)
Gelatin silver print on paper
Accession Number: P97.4.10
Benton Museum of Art at Pomona College Collection
@scrippscollege @bentonatpomona #Art #Photography #Collaboration #TonyGleaton

Exhibition Title- Subjects/Objects: A Critical look at Photographic Meaning

Selection Curated by Tsion Mamo

Description by Tsion Mamo

Tony Gleaton (1948-2015) was an African-American photographer who specialized in black-and-white portraits. He wanted to document Black cowboys' lives and images of the African diaspora in Latin America in his work. Tony lived in the southwest region in the United States, with Black communities that were barely acknowledged. He wanted to capture them in their daily lives to bring attention to their existence in a beautiful way. The pictures Tony takes are carefully crafted and typically in a tight frame to focus solely on the subject.

This image is part of Tony's series called "Tengo Casi 500 Años: Africa's Legacy in Central America" and depicts a family coming in or going out to sea in Livingston, Guatemala. In this image, the subjects' gazes are all in different directions as the father is working to gather the nets, the mother watches him, and the child is looking at the camera. Their many gazes can represent the different priorities that each subject has in their life right now. The father and mother are trying to support their family while the child is curious to discover the world they live in. These subjects also seem to be carefully positioned to give the image Tony's desired lighting. This manipulation of fame can relate to the truth as photographs are the photographer's preferred truth, not the actual truth.

Tony Gleaton, American (1948-2015)
Family of the Sea/ Familia del Mar, 1988
12 in. x 17 7/8 in. (30.48 cm. x 45.4 cm.)
Gelatin silver print on paper
Accession Number: P97.4.10
Benton Museum of Art at Pomona College Collection
@scrippscollege @bentonatpomona #Art #Photography #Collaboration #TonyGleaton

Address

981 Amherst
Claremont, CA
91711

Opening Hours

Monday 13:30 - 17:00
Monday 09:00 - 12:30
Tuesday 13:30 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 12:30
Wednesday 13:30 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 12:30
Thursday 13:30 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 12:30
Friday 13:30 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 12:30

Telephone

(909) 607-3606

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