Chippewa County Historical Society

Chippewa County Historical Society The Chippewa County Historical Society preserves artifacts, images and local history. Our museum is open to the public most Tuesdays and fourth Saturdays of the month. See "About" & Gen. Info. below for more details.
The CCHS was established: To stimulate historical communication, education, interest and exchange of information to/with individuals and organizations; To provide instruction and/ or assistance through educational programs, workshops and seminars to its members and the general public; To encourage the collection, preservation and maintenance of Chippewa County historic material for public accessibility; To further inter-organizational communication and cooperation with all historical societies within the county; To operate the affairs of the CCHS facilities that houses the museum and library materials; To publish a regular newsletter and To cooperate with the Chippewa County Genealogical Society.
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The Chippewa County Historical Society (CCHS) and Chippewa County Genealogical Society (CCGS) share a library located in The Area History Center, in the former convent building at 123 Allen Street, which is owned by the Notre Dame Parish. A 50 room museum is also operated by the CCHS at this location.

Mission: To collect, preserve, interpret and share the rich history of Chippewa County

Week 124 Time Capsule: 1954-1955 Chi-Hi Basketball Team
04/28/2020

Week 124 Time Capsule: 1954-1955 Chi-Hi Basketball Team

Time Capsule, Week 124: 1954-1955 Chi-Hi Boys Basketball Team

Players on the 1954-1955 Chi-Hi Boys Basketball team are pictured from left to right: (front row) John Abrams, Emery Crowley, Bill Hanzlik, Don Zutter, Dave Gutkneckt, Julian Olson, and Manger C. Roder; (second row) Head Coach Tom Lehman, Bill Larson, Ray Holte, Dennis Krause, Jim Meyer, Lynn Mellen, and Coach Orrie Boettcher.

Each Saturday, the Chippewa Area History Center showcases a piece of local history in the Herald. The Area History Center at 123 Allen Street, Chippewa Falls has multiple rooms of displays about Chippewa County history and genealogy. Visit www.ChippewaAreaHistoryCenter.org to learn more about the future Chippewa Area History Center and how you can help support local history preservation and education.

On this date in 1836 Congress voted to create the Wisconsin Territory. It was an organized incorporated territory of the...
04/20/2020

On this date in 1836 Congress voted to create the Wisconsin Territory. It was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from July 3, 1836, until May 29, 1848, when an eastern portion of the territory was admitted to the Union as the State of Wisconsin. Belmont was initially chosen as the capital of the territory. In 1837, the territorial legislature met in Burlington, just north of the Skunk River on the Mississippi, which became part of the Iowa Territory in 1838. In that year, 1838, the territorial capital of Wisconsin was moved to Madison.

Week 123 Time Capsule: General George Clay Ginty and Mrs. Flora Beall Ginty, founding couple of the Chippewa Herald news...
04/19/2020

Week 123 Time Capsule: General George Clay Ginty and Mrs. Flora Beall Ginty, founding couple of the Chippewa Herald newspaper

Time Capsule, Week 123: General George Clay Ginty and Mrs. Flora Beall Ginty, founding couple of the Chippewa Herald newspaper

General George C. Ginty (1840 to 1890) published the first issue of the Chippewa Herald on January 29, 1870. The Herald was a weekly newspaper until June 25, 1894, when it became a daily.
Born in Toronto, Canada, on February 14, 1840, Mr. Ginty was a printer and editor by trade but also led a life of public service from a young age. His many accomplishments include: WI State Legislature member in 1863, member of the US Army during the Civil War, President of the Board of Education for the city of Chippewa Falls from 1868 to 1884, representative for the 30th Senatorial district in WI comprising the counties of Dunn and Chippewa from 1881 to 1885, United States Marshall for the Western District of Wisconsin, and owner/editor of the Chippewa Herald from 1870 to his death in 1890.
Flora Beall (Outhwaite) Ginty (1839 to 1907) was born in Cooperstown, NY on September 27, 1839. She was a descendant of a delegate to the Continental Congress and signer of the Declaration of Independence. Mrs. Ginty moved with her parents at a young age to Green Bay, WI and married George Clay Ginty in 1861 moving with him to Chippewa Falls in 1869, taking an active role in the city and state. She was an avid writer and editor and authored many beautiful poems and strong interesting articles. After Mr. Ginty’s death on December 9, 1890, Flora took over editing and publishing the Chippewa Herald until February 12, 1892, when the Herald Printing Company was formed.
Each Saturday, the Chippewa Area History Center showcases a piece of local history in the Herald. The Area History Center at 123 Allen Street, Chippewa Falls has multiple rooms of displays about Chippewa County history and genealogy. Visit www.ChippewaAreaHistoryCenter.org to learn more about the future Chippewa Area History Center and how you can help support local history preservation and education.

We received a request for a photo of this school from Monique Handrahan. Here is the photo. We featured that school on t...
04/19/2020

We received a request for a photo of this school from Monique Handrahan. Here is the photo. We featured that school on the Rural Schools of Chippewa County Wisconsin on May 27, 2019. We post a different school each week and usually include a photo along with other information on the school on Chippewa Area History Center FB page.

This week we lost a dedicated local historian and one of the founders of the Chippewa County Historical Society. David H...
04/18/2020

This week we lost a dedicated local historian and one of the founders of the Chippewa County Historical Society.

David Havre Raihle, Sr., 86, passed away peacefully on Monday, April 13, 2020 at the Chippewa Manor in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin.

David was born on February 21, 1934, in Chippewa Falls to Paul H. Raihle and Sylvia Havre.

David spent the early years of his life on the family farm in Anson, Wisconsin, which was the source of his life-long passion for hard work and his love of the outdoors. David and his family later moved to Chippewa Falls, where he resided the rest of his life. David cherished his time at the Raihle Homestead, a once-forgotten property located north of Bemidji, Minnesota, that his mother, Sylvia, homesteaded in 1914. The Homestead later became a family cabin that was the source of memorable times and David’s infamous work projects.

David began his education in the one-room country school in East Anson and graduated from Chippewa Falls High School in 1951. During his school years, David was active in the Boy Scouts of America (earning the rank of Eagle Scout), academics, debate and school plays. David graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire with a Bachelor of Arts in History. David also served six years in the United States Naval Reserve, with two years of active duty during the Korean Conflict (1953-1955), attached to the Pacific Fleet. In 1959 David graduated from the University of Wisconsin Law School with a Juris Doctorate and LLB degree. While studying at the University of Wisconsin, David met Sharon Disbrow. David and Sharon were married in Wausau, Wisconsin, on February 18, 1961. They recently celebrated their 59th anniversary.

David’s professional life was a testament to his devotion and commitment to Chippewa Falls. David began his legal career in 1959 when he joined his father at the Raihle Law Office in Chippewa Falls. David’s service to Chippewa Falls stemmed from a rich heritage of public service (both of his parents served in the Wisconsin State Legislature). David practiced law in Chippewa County for 38 years, during which he served as Chippewa County Corporate Counsel and at various times as the attorney for the City of Chippewa Falls, Town of Lake Hallie, and other Chippewa County municipalities. David also served on the Chippewa Falls Park Board Planning Commission and was president of the second Chippewa Foundation. David’s professional contributions were also integral to building the city pool, developing a new city camper sanitary station, bringing city-wide water to the Town of Lake Hallie, creating Allen Park and promoting improvements to Irvine Park and the zoo. David also had the unique distinction of seeing one of his cases being argued at the U.S. Supreme Court.

David believed in preserving the history of Chippewa Falls and Chippewa County. David’s efforts led to the establishment of the Cook Rutledge Trust, the acquisition of the Cook Rutledge Mansion, and the development of the Chippewa County Historical Society. David led the efforts to establish the historical sign markers in Chippewa County as well as an inventory of all the Chippewa County cemeteries. David was active in historic building restorations including the Sheely House (the restoration of the Sheely House was an adventure inspired by a desire to save the rooming house/saloon culture of the 1880’s) and the Cook Rutledge Mansion.

David’s civic contributions were also extended to memberships in Kiwanis, Moose, Masonic Lodge (Blue Lodge and Scottish Rite), Elks, Wisconsin and Chippewa County Historical Societies, American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and Wisconsin Woodland Owners Association. David was also a lifetime member of Trinity United Methodist Church.

David’s greatest achievement, however, was as a husband, father, grandfather, uncle and friend. His irreverent humor, keen knowledge, and love of history was the stuff of family legend. His happiest moments were spent with his family at the family property near Cobban, Wisconsin, maintaining and conserving his woodland, making maple syrup, sharing family stories and strengthening the family bonds that were important to him. David also loved to plan family camping trips throughout the United States and Canada. A better grandfather and father will be hard to come by.

David is survived by his wife, Sharon; children, David Jr. (Rita) Raihle, Paula (Glenn) Pederson, Christine (Thomas) Richards and Richard Raihle; and grandchildren, James Richards, Hannah Pederson, Alexis Raihle, William Richards, Joshua Pederson, and David Raihle III.

David was preceded in death by his parents, Paul and Sylvia Raihle; siblings, Richard (Irene) Raihle, June (Harry) Esklund, Pauline (Dale) Wiensch, Alys Melton; nieces, Laurie Vold and Dana Melton; and nephew, David Melton.

Private funeral services will be held. Inurnment will be held at Forest Hill Cemetery in Chippewa Falls. Military Rites will be conducted by the Chippewa Falls Patriotic Council. A Celebration of Life will be held at a later date in Cobban, WI.

To protect the health and safety of all, services are currently being limited as required by state and local authorities and the CDC. Thank you for understanding and respecting the family at this difficult time.

The family would like to extend a sincere and heartfelt thank you to the Chippewa Manor for the care and kindness they extended to David and his family during his stay there. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the Chippewa Area History Center Building Campaign at https://www.chippewaareahistorycenter.org/.

Week 122 Time Capsule: The Chippewa Falls Carnegie Library
04/11/2020

Week 122 Time Capsule: The Chippewa Falls Carnegie Library

Time Capsule, Week 122: The Chippewa Falls Carnegie Library

On February 18, 1902, the Daily Independent newspaper (now the Chippewa Herald) published the following letter as written to Mr. Leslie Willson from the office of Andrew Carnegie on February 15, 1902.
Dear Sir:
Responding to your communication, if the city of Chippewa Falls pledges itself to support a Free public library at cost of not less than two thousand dollars a year and furnish a site, Mr. Carnegie will be glad to provide twenty thousand dollars for the erection of a Free Public Library building.
Mr. Willson and the city of Chippewa Falls had been advocating for Mr. Carnegie to assist in building a new library for the citizens of Chippewa Falls (and surrounding communities) for some time. In August of 1903 the new library was completed on Central Street, across the street from where the current library stands. The Carnegie library was in use until 1969.
Each Saturday, the Chippewa Area History Center showcases a piece of local history in the Herald. The Area History Center at 123 Allen Street, Chippewa Falls has multiple rooms of displays about Chippewa County history and genealogy. Visit www.ChippewaAreaHistoryCenter.org to learn more about the future Chippewa Area History Center and how you can help support local history preservation and education.

Week 120 Time Capsule: August H. Mason: More Than Shoes
03/30/2020

Week 120 Time Capsule: August H. Mason: More Than Shoes

Time Capsule, week 120.
August H. Mason: More Than Shoes

Born in Germany in 1846, August H. Mason moved with his parents to Green Bay, WI when he was three years old. The Mason family moved to Chippewa Falls in 1856, when it was just a small village.
Orphaned by the age of approximately 14 years, August began work in the “woods” at a young age and lumbering was his primary business for the remainder of his life. He also was actively involved in other business ventures. He was among a group of men who organized one of the first shoe factories in Chippewa Falls, the Harshman Shoe Company. In 1904 he assisted his son, B. A. Mason, to found what would become the Mason Shoe Manufacturing Company. From 1900 to 1924, Mr. Mason was the President of the First National Bank and a Director until his death. His son Albert C. Mason had the A.C. Mason Hardware Company in Chippewa Falls and August owned several farms in the area which were managed by his son John W. Mason.
Each Saturday, the Chippewa Area History Center showcases a piece of local history in the Herald. The Area History Center at 123 Allen Street, Chippewa Falls has multiple rooms of displays about Chippewa County history and genealogy. Visit www.ChippewaAreaHistoryCenter.org to learn more about the future Chippewa Area History Center and how you can help support local history preservation and education.

Remembering three Chippewa County Medal of Honor Recipients
03/30/2020

Remembering three Chippewa County Medal of Honor Recipients

Today is National Medal of Honor Day and we are remembering the three Medal of Honor Recipients from Chippewa County: Richard A. Cosgriff (Civil War), Horace Ellis (Civil War), and Charles E. Mower (WWII).

A little inspiration for today... Thank you Sokup's Market!
03/30/2020

A little inspiration for today... Thank you Sokup's Market!

If these walls could talk what do you think they would say? I believe they would say we made it through the Spanish American War, WW1, The Great Depression, The Bombing of Pearl Harbor, WW2, The Cuban Missile Crisis, The Vietnam War, September 11th and we will make it through the Coronavirus Outbreak.

Hang in there everyone and know that Sokup's never closed during any of the events listed above and we will remain open during this one.

Time Capsule: Opening of the Rainbow Gardens in Cadott
03/30/2020

Time Capsule: Opening of the Rainbow Gardens in Cadott

During this time of "social-distancing", while we're staying away from public places, we thought it might be fun to reminisce about the early history of one local gathering place. Any memories you'd like to share about the Rainbow Gardens in Cadott?

Time Capsule: Opening of the Rainbow Gardens in Cadott, WI

The May 3rd, 1929 issue of the Chippewa Herald-Telegram announced the following news.

“Opening dance at the new Rainbow Gardens pavilion, 4 miles NE of Cadott, 4 miles NW of Boyd on C.T.O, Wednesday evening, May 8. Billie’s Superior Orchestra.”

Mr. Frank Rykal owned and operated Rainbow Gardens from 1929 to approximately 1952.

Each Saturday, the Chippewa Area History Center showcases a piece of local history in the Herald. The Area History Center at 123 Allen Street, Chippewa Falls has multiple rooms of displays about Chippewa County history and genealogy. Visit www.ChippewaAreaHistoryCenter.org to learn more about the future Chippewa Area History Center and how you can help support local history preservation and education.

Spanish Flu tragedy during the period of 1918-20.
03/30/2020

Spanish Flu tragedy during the period of 1918-20.

During these uncertain times while we are unable to have our History Center open to the public we will be posting some historic local newspaper clippings about the Spanish Flu tragedy during the period of 1918-20.
We post these with the greatest of respect to history and the families who were impacted by this terrible tragedy. While many families were negatively impacted, it is inspiring to see how the communities in Chippewa County pulled together and came through this tragedy stronger than ever.
The information in this article from The Evening Independent and Chippewa Times (later became the Chippewa Herald newspaper), October 21, 1918, sounds very similar to information and recommendations we are hearing today.

Time Capsule: St. Joseph’s Hospital of Chippewa Falls
03/30/2020

Time Capsule: St. Joseph’s Hospital of Chippewa Falls

Time Capsule: St. Joseph’s Hospital of Chippewa Falls, WI

The Hospital Sisters of St. Francis sent Sister Rosa and three other sisters to Chippewa Falls in June 1885 to a small home, their first hospital at the intersection of Rural and Spring Streets, to nurse the sick and care for men from the lumber camps.

In November of 1885, the Sisters moved to the former house of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Rutledge at the intersection of Pearl and Spruce Streets.

In 1888, a multi-story hospital was built at 912 Pearl Street and included patient-care rooms, a chapel, laundry, and kitchen.

St. Joseph’s Hospital provided continuous medical care at that site until a new hospital was constructed in 1975. The original hospital was converted into the St. Joseph’s Apartments.

Each Saturday, the Chippewa Area History Center showcases a piece of local history in the Herald. The Area History Center at 123 Allen Street, Chippewa Falls has multiple rooms of displays about Chippewa County history and genealogy. Visit www.ChippewaAreaHistoryCenter.org to learn more about the future Chippewa Area History Center and how you can help support local history preservation and education.

Address

123 Allen St
Chippewa Falls, WI
54729

General information

MEMBERSHIP & HOURS OPEN BELOW: Annual membership types include: Individual - $25 (3 yrs - $70), Family - $35 (3 yrs - $100) and contributing - $60 (3 yrs - $170). Life member individual - $500 and family - $750. Members receive a 10 page newsletter quarterly. Mail your check to 123 Allen St. Chippewa Falls, WI 54729. made payable to CCHS and write "membership" in the memo. The Area History Center is open to the public every Tuesday year-round from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Typically we are closed the Tuesdays before Christmas and New Years. We are also open the fourth Saturday of each month 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. We will not be open on Saturdays in June, July, August or December. Semi-annual membership meetings with program speakers are held during February and September.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 09:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(715) 723-4399

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Mission: Preserve, Interpret and Share the rich history of Chippewa County

The Chippewa County Historical Society (CCHS) and Chippewa County Genealogical Society (CCGS) share a library located in The Area History Center, in the former convent building at 123 Allen Street, which is owned by the Notre Dame Parish. A 50 room museum is also operated by the CCHS at this location. We have more than 20,000 artifacts and historic photos!

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Other Chippewa Falls museums

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Comments

Frank Smoot talked at last night's Semi Annual meeting of the Chippewa County Historical Society. Trying to jam 10,000 years of First Nations history into 20 minutes. Didn't make it time wise, but topic wise was a big hit.
Hi all. I’m trying to get a bit more history on the old Chippewa Falls theatre; years open, where, or any other fun facts. I’ve got these old theatre chairs I’m told are from the CF theatre and want fun facts about them.
JULY 1 1926 LAKE WISSOTA LAND FOR SALE - STATE HIGHWAY #16 - WISSOTA DELLS
Cont.from previous post
1897 colorized newspaper first year it was called Northern Wisconsin State Fair in 1896 it was called Northwestern Wisconsin Fair -J Leinenkugel Spring Brewery sold Groceries, Crockery and Glassware
I received the book on Friday and am happy as the memories it brought back from my youth. I knew Ralph Wolfe well enough to have been behind the scenes numerous times and help feed the animals. I am a bit disappointed at the lack of colored photos in book of the more current articles but my guess is they were pulled from the newspaper. Great job.
I was reading about Charles E Mower from Chippewa Falls. He was killed in action in the Philippines in world war 2. He was awarded the Medal of Honor. I’m curious, Are there any parks or memorials in his honor around Chippewa falls?
I am wondering if there is an Eau Claire County historical FB page? I am searching for a write up done by the Eau Claire newspaper for the Centennial of Eau Claire County - I believe it was in 1955 or 1956. There was an article or special edition and in it was an aerial photo of my uncle's home - a large farm with 25 or so buildings. This is located near Augusta/Foster, WI. If anyone has any hints I would welcome any ideas. I can get the microfilm of the newspaper but I need a date of the edition. Thank YOU!!
Is there anywhere to get more information on the Melville Settlement? I had heard there was a publication, but never been able to find one. This is where my ancestors lived.
The Minneapolis Journel 22 July, 1905. Got this from the Osceola Historical Society's page.