Polish Museum of America

Polish Museum of America The Polish Museum of America is located in what had been the historical Polish Downtown neighborhood of Chicago. It is home to a plethora of Polish artifacts, artwork, and embroidered folk costumes among its growing collection.
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Operating as usual

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10/03/2020

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147 years ago, on October 3rd the PRCUA, our founding and Mother institution was established! Thank you for your continuing support! Happy Birthday! Serdeczne życzenia jubileuszowe drogie Zjednoczenie Polskie Rzymsko-Katolickie w Ameryce! Dziękujemy za powołanie nas do życia i nieustanne wsparcie! From PMA Collection
x2007.004.0068 Photo by Z. Rozanski
#prcua #onthisday

147 years ago, on October 3rd the PRCUA, our founding and Mother institution was established! Thank you for your continu...
10/03/2020

147 years ago, on October 3rd the PRCUA, our founding and Mother institution was established! Thank you for your continuing support! Happy Birthday! Serdeczne życzenia jubileuszowe drogie Zjednoczenie Polskie Rzymsko-Katolickie w Ameryce! Dziękujemy za powołanie nas do życia i nieustanne wsparcie! From PMA Collection
x2007.004.0068 Photo by Z. Rozanski
#prcua #onthisday

On this occasion of the 76 solemn anniversary of the Collapse of the Warsaw Uprising -we invite You to watch this specia...
10/01/2020

On this occasion of the 76 solemn anniversary of the Collapse of the Warsaw Uprising -
we invite You to watch this special video presentation filmed in the historic Polish Museum of America. It shows how over 8 centuries of Polish history, the spirit of the Polish quest for freedom arrived at its zenith in the 1944 Warsaw Uprising.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLX0bO9mKYK1elL9DHpfXWqWy5f_WgYfZF

On this occasion of the 76 solemn anniversary of the Collapse of the Warsaw Uprising -we invite You to watch this specia...
10/01/2020
Produced by The Polish Museum of America

On this occasion of the 76 solemn anniversary of the Collapse of the Warsaw Uprising -
we invite You to watch this special video presentation filmed in the historic Polish Museum of America. It shows how over 8 centuries of Polish history, the spirit of the Polish quest for freedom arrived at its zenith in the 1944 Warsaw Uprising.

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLX0bO9mKYK1elL9DHpfXWqWy5f_WgYfZF

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube.

THE CAPITULATION OF THE POLISH HEL PENINSULAOCTOBER 2, 1939 By Beatrix Czerkawski On October 2, 1939, Hel, the Polish pe...
10/01/2020

THE CAPITULATION OF THE POLISH HEL PENINSULA
OCTOBER 2, 1939

By Beatrix Czerkawski

On October 2, 1939, Hel, the Polish peninsula located on the northern Baltic coast, the last outpost holding strong for 32 hellish days and denying the infuriated German invasion access to this strategic strip of Polish land, capitulated in what was to be the next to the last battle of the Polish September campaign.
The 32 day Battle of Hel was an unbelievable odyssey of bravery and stoic steel will of the Polish military, in this case the Polish Navy.
The Polish Navy port at Hel, at the very tip of the peninsula on the Baltic sea, was completed in 1936 and declared the Hel Fortified Area (pol. Rejon Umocniony Hel).
It consisted of anti-ship and anti-aircraft batteries.
Its commanders were Kontradmirał Włodzimierz Steyer and Admiral Józef Unrug, who moved his garrison from German occupied Gdynia.
2,800 Polish soldiers and a destroyer and minelayer faced 38,000 Germans, 2 destroyers and dozens of vessels.
At the end of September 1939, after the Pomeranian Army was defeated at the Battles of Tuchola Forest and Kępa Oksywska, Hel was the only major military resistance pocket left in Northern Poland.
Today, you can visit this spectacular peninsula, surrounded from the west, south, and east by the majestic Baltic sea, in Gdansk Bay, and admire original Polish fortification remnants. The Polish coastline stretches from the Island of Wolin near Poland’s western border to Braniewo near the Kaliningrad Region of the Russian Federation.
This covers three Polish provinces: West Pomerania, Pomerania, and Warmia-Masuria.
Please come and join us on the Polish Museum of America website, where you will be impressed by our diverse collection of paintings, lithographs, sculptures, and poster art, including artifacts connected with the Polish coastline, a rare plafond of Gdynia, splendid Świnoujście harbor watercolors, and other treasures.
Our gift shop, also online, has artistic, original Polish Baltic amber jewelry that you won’t find anywhere else in the world!

Painting “Harbor of Hel” (pol. Port w Helu). By Michalina Krzyzanowska, 1930, Oil on canvas, Polish Pavilion New York 1939 World Fair

Poster entitled “The First Sport Championships for Poles Abroad”
(Warsaw and Hel peninsula clearly visible) 1934, author unknown
Polish Museum of America Collection #hel #worldwarll #michalinakrzyżanowska

THE COLLAPSE OF THE WARSAW UPRISINGOCTOBER 2, 1944 By Beatrix Czerkawski On October 2, 1944 in the evening hours, the Wa...
10/01/2020

THE COLLAPSE OF THE WARSAW UPRISING
OCTOBER 2, 1944

By Beatrix Czerkawski

On October 2, 1944 in the evening hours, the Warsaw Uprising came to an end.
The Home Army (pol. Armia Krajowa) ordered its units to stop offensive activities and sent its delegates to Ożarów, to the headquarters of Brigadeführer Erich von dem Bach-Zelewski, with the purpose of negotiating capitulation. A ceasefire between the Polish side and the German side was reached after midnight October 3, 1944, although in some cases, it was enforced from 5am to 7pm on October 1 and 2.
Combatant rights for the Uprising Home Army soldiers and protection guarantees from collective responsibility for civilian residents of Warsaw were the two top priority conditions for the Home Army. In theory, the Germans agreed to them; in practice, Warsaw insurgents were still brutally executed. One of many such dramatic tragedies took place in those very last days when 140 Polish soldiers and civilians managed to make it out of the Warsaw canal labyrinths; the city’s canal infrastructure had provided an extreme but nevertheless effective communication system for the Polish military. In this case, the exit at Dworkowa street in Mokotów, a neighborhood just south of downtown Warsaw, was located near a German command building. Despite Polish pleas for honoring the ongoing negotiations, a German firing squad shot all 140 people, including women.
In the first week of October, close to 20,000 people, including the Warsaw Uprising Commander General Tadeusz Bór-Komorowski, members of the Polish Underground State Council of Ministers, Kazimierz Pużak among them, and Poland’s Government in exile (London) Delegate to Poland, were marched out of their beloved city into German captivity.
A transitional German concentration camp in Pruszków near Warsaw served as a staying center. From here, these 20th century modern day Polish gladiators who fought for human dignity and freedom were sent in deadly cattle freight conditions to slave labor and death camps in Germany, including Mauthausen-Gusen, Sachsenhausen, and Ravensbrück, a death camp exclusively for women. The German military showed no mercy to the Poles as it fled the Red army approaching from the East.
Who was Erich von dem Bach-Zelewski, and could he have acted more humanely at this final hour for Poland? This ex-Prussian soldier, who initially fought against the 1919-1921 Silesian Uprisings which successfully recaptured ethnically Polish Silesia away from Prussian occupation was a high ranking SS (germ. Schutzstaffel) commander. He was charged by Hitler to intensify security warfare against those designated by the German state as its enemies in the occupied territories of Poland. Serving only as a witness at the Nuremberg trials, Bach-Zelewski never stood trial himself despite undisputed war crimes and crimes against humanity which he committed.
This “Commissioner for the Strengthening of Germandom” was also the chief proponent of the Auschwitz concentration camp. And he specialized in confiscating Polish private property, including Polish masterpieces of art.
Meanwhile, Hitler’s final orders regarding Warsaw after its capitulation were that this modern day major European city be wiped off the planet. German soldiers on the ground attacked residence after residence, building after building, with flamethrowers as well as bombing from air. Today, you can watch an original bird’s eye film footage of Warsaw from September and October of 1944, and see what the word “apocalypse” truly means. No other city in the world except Hiroshima or Nagasaki experienced such destruction and hatred.
The continent of Europe never saw anything like the Armageddon of Warsaw.
And yet photos that survived until our times, of the young soldiers, men and women, boys and girls, who took part in the Uprising, show smiling faces, young people on an honorable “hands on” mission to retake their beloved city from the enemy.
In the words of former Polish President Lech Kaczynski:
“The Home Army was a typical example of a civic military force capable of fighting a battle with an overwhelming German enemy. It is impossible to understand this city – Warsaw, capital of Poland, which in the summer of 1944 decided to take up arms in an uneven struggle, without its, for the most part, young insurgent army. Abandoned by allied powers, Warsaw in her impossible quest with this German Goliath perished under her own ruins.
“About 70,000 people came through the Home Army, in large part unarmed. I tell the story of my own father who was a troop leader and carried a machine gun.
“The platoon commander was equipped with a Thompson, considered an automatic revolver, which was real fire power. The rest of them were lucky to have a grenade. And this was the Baszta squad, an assault unit. And still the Warsaw racetrack area was retaken from the Germans.
“On the other side, there were regular German units and heavy artillery, and somehow the racetrack was recaptured, as were so many other targets. So that is why the Uprising for me is first and foremost an example of heroism.”
The Warsaw Uprising was the single, largest operation of this significance and magnitude in all of WWII.
Please join us in the virtual world online to marvel at the Polish Museum of America and its unlimited magnificent array of fine arts, among them artifacts related to Warsaw, to discover how richly our collection reflects the beauty, originality, and history of Poland!
The Warsaw Mermaid (pol. Syrenka) Warsaw Coat of arms, Pre-1939, Sculpture in wood - Polish Pavilion New York 1939 World Fair
Warsaw Mermaid (pol. Syrenka) - Warsaw Coat of arms
By Henryk Grunwald, pre-1939
Wrought iron
Polish Pavilion, New York 1939 World Fair
PMA Collection #warsawuprising #syrenkawarszawska 🌹

The Polish Museum of America honors the memory of PMA member, volunteer and friend, Michael Michał Schneider, who passed...
09/25/2020

The Polish Museum of America honors the memory of PMA member, volunteer and friend, Michael Michał Schneider, who passed away on September 16, 2020, at age 94.
Michael was born in Brody near Lwów, Ukraine then Poland on September 27 1926. During the war he was sent as forced labor to Germany. He moved to United States. He was a Veteran of the US Air Force serving in Guam as a navigator.
He studied at Illinois Institute of Technology and earned a degree in electronics, and married his beloved Danuta Kowalczyk. He was active in Chicago’s Polonia as a member of the PMA as well as the Chicago Society, Polish National Alliance, helping Glos Nauczyciela, Zrzeszenie Nauczycieli Polskich w Ameryce and many others.

He loved travel, making pictures and slides, classical and folk music, old movies, books, radio, American cars, Sudoku and pasjans. Michael was in attendance at many events at the Polish Museum of America. He cherished education and supported teachers, always there with his kindness and good spirit. He our Mentor and friend. He introduced peace everywhere he appeared. He will be very missed.

Michael Schneider is survived by his nieces: Joanna (Roman) Koperski and Ludmila (Lech) Dabrowski; great nephews: Miroslaw Koperski, Jaroslaw (Anne) Koperski, Aleks (Maria) Dabrowski; and great great cousins: Jack and Charlotte Koperski, Adeline and James Dabrowski and many devoted Friends from Chicago.
Memorial mass will be held at 10 AM on Tuesday September 29, 2020 at the St. John Brebeuf Church, 8307 N. Harlem Ave., Niles IL 60714. Funeral info: 847-966-7302 #michalschneider

May He rest in Peace

Muzeum Polskie w Ameryce żegna swojego Członka, Wolontariusza i Przyjaciela Śp. Michała Schneidera, zmarłego nagle we środę 16 września 2020 roku.
Pan Michał urodził się w Brodach, niedaleko Lwowa, 27 września 1926 roku. Podczas wojny przeżył najazd Niemców i Rosjan na Lwów, a następnie został wysłany na roboty przymusowe do Niemiec, trafił do szpitala, później związał się z Wojskowymi Służbami Ratowniczymi. Po odzyskaniu niepodległości był w amerykańskiej strefie i zdecydował się na emigrację do Stanów Zjednoczonych, przybył tu w przez Nowy Jork. Zgłosił się do armii amerykańskiej, do lotnictwa, ale ponieważ od dziecka miał słaby wzrok – został przyjęty do nawigacji. Służył na wyspie Guam na Pacyfiku. Studiował na Illinois Institute of Technology w Chicago. Uzyskał dyplom z elektroniki, na studiach związał się z Polskim Związkiem Akademików w Ameryce, okręg Chicago. Po studiach zaangażowany został do pracy na uczelni. W 1964 roku poślubił swoją ukochaną Danutę z domu Kowalczyk. Działał na rzecz Polonii chicagowskiej jako członek MPA oraz Chicago Society, był członkiem Związku Narodowego Polskiego, przez wiele lat wspierał działalność Głosu Nauczyciela, Zrzeszenia Nauczycieli Polskich w Ameryce oraz wielu innych organizacji.
Pasjonowały Go podróże, zwiedził z żoną prawie cały świat, z radością robił zdjęcia, przygotowywał z nich slajdy, słuchał muzyki klasycznej i etnicznej z całego świata. Lubił stare filmy, dobre książki, kochał radio, jeździł wyłącznie amerykańskimi samochodami, rozwiązywał sudoku i stawiał pasjanse. Uczestniczył w praktycznie wszystkich uroczystościach Muzeum Polskiego w Ameryce i pomagał nam jako wolontariusz. Cenił edukację i wspierał nauczycieli i uczniów. Traktował ludzi z sympatią i należnym szacunkiem, często prosiliśmy Go o radę, był dla nas mentorem i przyjacielem, zawsze można było na Niego liczyć. Wszędzie towarzyszył Mu spokój, sama Jego obecność go wyzwalała. Będzie nam Go bardzo brakowało w Muzeum.
Pan Michał pozostawił po sobie siostrzenice: Joannę Koperską z mężem Romanem i Ludmiłę Dąbrowską z mężem Lechem, dzieci siostrzenic z żonami i dziećmi: Mirosława Koperskiego, Jarosława Koperskiego z żoną Anne, Aleksa Dąbrowskiego z żoną Marią oraz ich wnuki Jacka i Charlotte Koperskich oraz Adeline i Jamesa Dąbrowskich wraz z całą rodziną oraz wielu oddanych przyjaciół i znajomych.
Pogrzebem zajmuje się Skaja Terrace Funeral Home, pod adresem 7812 N. Milwaukee Ave., Niles IL. Informacje: 847-966-7302
Msza pogrzebowa odbędzie się w dzień imienin Pana Michała w kościele Św. Jana Brebeufa, pod adresem 8307 N. Harlem Ave. W Niles we wtorek, 29 września 2020 r., o godzinie 10 rano.
Cześć Jego Pamięci!

On the happy occasion of their mother's 100th birthday, PMA members and volunteers Louis and Charlene Bielakowski purcha...
09/25/2020

On the happy occasion of their mother's 100th birthday, PMA members and volunteers Louis and Charlene Bielakowski purchased a PMA membership for Her. On this wonderful milestone the PMA wishes Rosalie Sophie Tritthardt a joyous 100th birthday and in our Polish tradition we wish her 200 years. Dwieście lat!

Happy Birthday to our wonderful tour guide Basia Kożuchowska! Serdeczne życzenia urodzinowe! Sto lat!
09/24/2020

Happy Birthday to our wonderful tour guide Basia Kożuchowska! Serdeczne życzenia urodzinowe! Sto lat!

The Fall🍁, from the series: Four Seasons [Jesień, z cyklu: Cztery pory roku] by Irena Pokrzywnicka. A large painting, th...
09/23/2020

The Fall🍁, from the series: Four Seasons [Jesień, z cyklu: Cztery pory roku] by Irena Pokrzywnicka. A large painting, the second in a series of four, of a woman named Fall. Pre [przed] 1939, oil [olej], New York World's Fair Collection of the PMA, conservation made possible by Instytut Polonika. Dziękujemy! Thank you!

ROYAL CITY OF LWÓW SURRENDERThe Battle of Lwów, September 22, 1939By Beatrix Czerkawski Lwów, once upon a time a Polish ...
09/22/2020

ROYAL CITY OF LWÓW SURRENDER
The Battle of Lwów, September 22, 1939
By Beatrix Czerkawski

Lwów, once upon a time a Polish city in southeastern Poland.
Lwów - the “Rome of the North,” situated on beautiful hills and in verdant valleys.
Lwów - the City of the Lions, Lwów the royal city which was star studded with landmarks, temples, theaters, palaces, and residences designed by elite Polish and Italian architects engaged by Polish kings.
Jadwiga Andegaweńska, Polish saint and Poland’s queen, reconfirmed on March 8, 1387 the city’s rights and privileges, it was in Lwów that this outstanding Polish monarch collected her seigniory from Moldavia, her fiefdom.
Attacked by Tatars, Kossacks, and Swedes, Lwów resisted them all.
In 1656, Jan Kazimierz, King of Poland, made a pilgrimage to the Cathedral of the Assumption of Most Holy Virgin Mary in Lwów, and made an official vow that he would not rest until the enemies of Poland were defeated and offered up Poland under the protection of the Virgin Mary.
Lwów - the seat of the Royal Jan Kazimierz University and the Polytechnic which would give the world unmatched Polish scientists, in fact the entire schools of science, like the Polish School of Mathematics. People like Stefan Banach and Stefan Kaczmarz pioneered functional analysis, a modern discipline of mathematics being developed in the twentieth century.
Lwów, home to the Happy Lwów Airwaves (pol. Wesola Lwów ska Fala), excellent vaudeville and comedy radio programs, and home to the most popular Polish movie stars of the 1920s and 1930’s.
Lwów, the only city next to Warsaw, the first city ever to be decorated by Polish Marshal Piłsudski with the Virtuti Militari, the highest Polish military distinction for the heroism of its children and students who helped defend Lwów during the Ukrainian attempted invasion in 1918-19.
It was the third most important Polish metropolis after Warsaw and Kraków.
And Lwów is in part my Czerkawski Family Seat.

LWÓW and the entire voivodeship was part of the operational group Wschód (East), which presupposed a defensive war with the Soviet Union, in cooperation with allied Romania and the material assistance of Western nations. This region was critically important for the Polish military in general because the main railroad lines ran through here. August 27, 1939 a mobilization alarm was ordered and covered the following units from the Lwów garrison: the 14th Jazlowiec Uhlan Regiment, the 19th Infantry Regiment, the 5 light artillery regiment, 12 Infantry Division, two armored subunits, three independent recon companies, and three motorized convoys. However, no set planning for the defense of urban parts of Lwów existed.
Beginning with September 1, 1939, the city endured heavy Luftwaffe bombing, sure enough the railroad junction was hit the hardest, as were churches and factories.
Anti-aircraft defense was in place. Professor Roman Longchamps de Bérier, president of King Jan Kazimierz University, took charge of the civic committee for the protection of Lwów.
On September 9, Gen. Władysław Langner ordered the construction of a barrier manned by assistance companies deployed on the Żółkiew, Janów, Wereszyca river, Gródek Jagielloński, Wereszyca, Komarno, and Dniester river line.

On September 10, Gen. Kazimierz Sosnkowski arrived in Lwów, after he was given orders by the Polish Chief of General Staff to take command of the Karpaty Army to secure the San river line and shield Lwów. Later that evening Sosnkowski met with the current commander Maj. Gen. Kazimierz Fabrycy and his staff. On the outer perimeter of the city, construction of anti-tank trenches and barricades was underway. The plan for the defense of Lwów was promptly completed.
It was based on natural terrain obstacles, specifically two hills, Kortumowa Góra and Gora pod Zboiskami. The city proper was divided into independent blocks and segments. Ammunition depots, sanitary and sustenance provision points went up in no time. Next, the division of Lwów was consolidated into 4 parts and headed by, respectively, Western segment - Col. Henryk Jankowski; Eastern segment - Maj. Eugeniusz Ślepecki; Northern sector - Col. Bolesław Jaśkiewicz; and Southern sector- Lt. Col. Stefan Mrozek.
The German invasion of Lwów began September 12, 1939, with motorized convoys under Col. Ferdinand Schörner, whose objective was to attack by surprise, capture vital city points, and immobilize the Polish forces. Soon, more German subunits arrived and began penetrating wide margins of the city. The Polish defense was strengthened with Polish forces from Grodno, sector East (the least threatened area) - one battalion, sector West - three infantry battalions, sector North - four battalions, sector South - two battalions.
On September 13-14, Schörner’s German combat group captured Kortumowa Gora which provided the best strategic view of Lwów to enable precision artillery shelling.
That day, Gen. Sosnkowski flew with a small staff to Przemyśl in order to take command of that city’s armed forces and break through to the rescue of Lwów.
Meanwhile, Gen. Langner was astonished to learn about the evacuation of the voivodeship offices. Municipal authority had to be replaced by former Prime Minister Kazimierz Bartel and City of Lwów President Stanisław Ostrowski.
Lack of reliable communication was a problem, the municipal lines which were the only telephone line available, were overloaded.
On September 15, Gen. Langner ordered Lwów’s defense forces to recapture Gora pod Zboiskami from the Germans and successfully forced the German forces to retreat. Only thanks to overwhelming German artillery did the enemy manage to turn back.
On September 19, Soviet officers arrived and were stopped at the city limits. They came with a proposal addressed to the City of Lwów Defense Command to start negotiations concerning the handing over of Lwów to the Soviets. The Soviet side claimed that their objective was to fight against the Germans.
On September 20, Gen, Langner gave orders to prepare for an encirclement defense.
Due to the worsening combat conditions and the total encirclement of Lwów by the enemy, opinions as to what strategy should be continued radically differed among Polish military decision makers.
Meanwhile, the Ukrainian front 6 Army Soviet command was poised to attack Polish positions in the East sector and from the southeastern direction.
A German-Soviet demarcation line was established that same day. On September 21, the Soviet side reapproached Lwów’s Defense Command to discuss capitulation.
Theoretically, their protocol of Polish capitulation guaranteed Polish civilians and military absolute inviolability.
Gen. Langner, after analyzing the positions of all his units and a possibility of continuing defense, concluded that the chances of his units to break out of the city and breakthrough towards Romania and Hungary were next to none. Lwów’s key military significance as the support point for Polish forces retreating southward was lost.
Polish patrols were ordered to be on high alert and use fire if after three warnings Soviet units, which were stealing up very close to Polish positions, did not stop.
On September 22 in the morning, the Polish delegation led by Gen. Langner met with the Soviets in Winniki (suburb of Lwów) and agreed to the Soviet proposal, in return the Soviets accepted all of the conditions set by the Polish side.
Needless to say, the Soviets did not keep their part of the capitulation agreement and shortly after riding their tanks into the city, the Red army and NKWD committed countless atrocities on Polish civilians. Many Polish Officers were hunted down, from door to door and arrested.
They were either executed on the spot or interned and sent to Katyń or other mass genocide Soviet execution camps.
It is important to realize that despite the huge German forces thrown into Lwów, the enemy failed to take control and take over this Invincible City of the Lions, single handedly. The Polish defense of Lwów cost the Germans such immense supplies of ammunition and armaments that they were forced, as historians account, to wait until the spring of 1940 for new equipment.
This speaks volumes about the invincible Polish spirit of combat and Poland’s empowering love for her freedom.
The world famous Polish artist, painter, muralist most closely and affectionately associated with his beloved royal city of Lwów was Jan Henryk Rosen.
Born in Warsaw (1891), Rosen studied at the Warsaw Academy of Art and was discovered by Armenian Archbishop Józef Teodorowicz, who viewed his exhibit at the Zacheta Gallery and invited him to create murals for the Armenian Cathedral in Lwów. These jewels of Byzantine style art, Christ at the Last Supper in the chancel behind the main altar, The Crucifixion and Birth of Jesus in Bethlehem, surmounted in the side naves of the cathedral, are amazing in color and composition, under strong influence of Polish Art Nouveau master Józef Mehoffer, with whom Rosen completed the Armenian master paintings.
Rosen taught at the Lwów Polytechnic in the 1930’s. Due to the German-Soviet occupation of Poland, he managed to evacuate and reach the United States where his career spanned 50 years. He is best known for his Miracle on the Vistula painting, commissioned by Pope Pius IX for Castel Gandolfo, the papal summer residence, and also for Polish Victory at Vienna at the chapel of King Jan Sobieski at Kahlenberg near Vienna. The Polish Catholic Bishops Palace in Warsaw houses the monumental mural by Jan Rosen entitled, The Mother of Saints, The Shield of Christians, and the Polish Museum of America is the very proud owner of remarkable twin mural paintings by Rosen entitled, Great Figures from Poland’s Past and Poland of the Future. We sincerely invite our friends out there in America and the world, to please visit us online and feast your eyes and souls on these masterpieces! They absolutely capture the genetic makeup of the Polish heart and mind, the Polish passion for freedom and justice!
#lwów #onthisday #tegodnia #janhenrykrosen

Address

984 N Milwaukee Ave
Chicago, IL
60642

The Polish Museum of America is accessible thrrough Rapid Transit via the CTA Blue Line's Chicago street stop. From the Chicago street stop walk northwest on Milwaukee Avenue until you reach Augusta Boulevard. The museum entrance is located on the corner of Milwuakee and and Augusta at 984 N. Milwaukee Ave.

Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 11:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 19:00
Friday 11:00 - 16:00
Saturday 11:00 - 16:00
Sunday 11:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(773) 384-3352

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The Polish Museum of America

The Polish Museum of America was established in 1935 as the “Museum and Archives of the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America.” The first public display area opened on January 12, 1937 in a specially designed and constructed room within the headquarters building of the PRCUA. From that date the Museum’s collection and importance grew very rapidly and quickly gained autonomous status as “The Polish Museum of America” with its own governing board of directors.

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Comments

Hi, I have enjoyed learning more about Casimir Pulaski's extraordinary contributions to our country. I recently obtained this poster at auction and was wondering if anyone might be able to help me identify the artist.
Piper Robertson visited the Polish Museum of America about 4 years ago. Today, she is in the 3rd grade and chose Poland for her International Day school project. She was very excited to showcase her 1st cousin 5x removed, Ignace Paderewski!
Chicago Society PNA Sledz this Saturday evening February 22nd at Lone Tree Manor. Price drop for children. Tickets still available! . www.chicagosocietypna.org/sledz Zapraszamy!
While I was babysitting my granddaughter in Chicago in October, I had the chance to visit the Museum and tour the current exhibit. If you have the opportunity, is is well worth your time. The huge stained glass window is wonderful - and doubly so for me as my my uncle worked at the Polish Pavilion there, where he met his wife, my mother's sister. I took the tour with the knowledgable guide Beatriz C and saw many things I had only read about. One was the uniform of the Blue/Haller's Army, which must have been like the one my great uncle wore. He had emigrated to the US, and like so many others, returned to fight in Poland. There was much more to see and learn and I truly recommend it.
The Hyde Park Jazz Festival hopes to see you at the headlining performance of this year's Festival, the Chicago premiere of Amir ElSaffar's 'Ahwaal' featuring Ksawery Wójciński, Wacław Zimpel, and Lutosławski Quartet. The performance will take place at 11pm on Saturday, September 28th at Rockefeller Chapel. https://www.facebook.com/events/779855735765333/
Zapraszamy! Juz Jutro!Muzeum Polskie w Ameryce (MPA) i Fundacja Dar Serca świętują IX lat współpracy przy Art For Heart/Sztuka Dla Serca - wystawy wspierającej te dwie ważne Fundacje. Specjalna promocja, jeśli kupisz bilet przez Internet do północy, otrzymasz jeden bezpłatny los na loterię. Bilety będą również dostępne do kupienia jutro przy drzwiach. Uroczyste otwarcie odbędzie się w sobotę 7 września 2019 od 7:00PM do 11:00PM w S w MPA. Będzie to pierwsza okazja dla publiczności aby zobaczyć wystawę, która będzie trwala do 21 września a także zakupić dzieła sztuki i spotkać się z artystami – twórcami wystawianych dzieł. Imprezie towarzyszyć będzie oprawa muzyczna, przekąski oraz płatny bar. Muzeum mieści się przy 984 N. Milwaukee Avenue w Chicago i posiada bezpłatny parking. Bilety będą dostępne przy wejściu lub na stronie, w cenie $20. Specjalna promocja, jeśli kupisz bilet przez Internet do północy, otrzymasz jeden bezpłatny los na loterię. Twoje nazwisko będzie na liście gości przy drzwiach. Wszystkie wystawione oryginały oraz repliki będą przeznaczone na sprzedaż. Cały dochód przeznaczony zostanie na Fundację Dar Serca (50%) i MPA (50%). https://www.facebook.com/events/460248261439263/
Hello, I am planning a visit to Chicago and the museum. Can anyone recommend how much time I should plan at the museum? Thank you!
Join us for a great concert of Polish music at the Copernicus Center in Chicago!