Uri-Eichen Gallery

Uri-Eichen Gallery About URI-EICHEN Gallery

Opened June 2011, URI-EICHEN Gallery is independent space for art and comm

Greetings Uri-Eichen Gallery Supporters! After more than 12 years of monthly shows, discussions, and other events we are...
11/28/2023

Greetings Uri-Eichen Gallery Supporters!

After more than 12 years of monthly shows, discussions, and other events we are reaching out to tell you that the gallery will be taking a programming pause for the remainder of 2023 and most of 2024.

Donate Today at http://www.uri-eichen.com/

We will still continue to take suggestions for shows and programs we should host upon our reopening (so please reach out).

We hope you were able to join us for one or more of the events in 2023 dedicated to the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the coup in Chile, or in 2022 our long-delayed show honoring Mark Rogovin, or earlier shows or series about racism, income inequality, drone warfare, reparations, vitally important SCOTUS cases undermining human rights, LGBTQ+ rights, police abuses, Joe Hill, labor rights, and so much more.

As a reminder, Uri-Eichen is all volunteer run, in a donated space, is a 501c3 (yes, there are still expenses for the space during the pause-you can still donate!), and is entirely dedicated to social justice themed events. Please donate this Giving Tuesday or before the end of the year!

Donate Today at http://www.uri-eichen.com/

Mercurial Lake  Poetry/Screening Event: September 16, 2023 – 6-7:30pm Exhibition Walkthrough: October 13, 2023 – 6-7:30p...
08/26/2023

Mercurial Lake

Poetry/Screening Event: September 16, 2023 – 6-7:30pm

Exhibition Walkthrough: October 13, 2023 – 6-7:30pm Meet the artists!

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 60608

Insidiously tethered to neoliberalism, Mercurial Lake proposes the oscillation between care systems and toxic relationships. This exhibition, lake-like, features artists whose works volatilizes hot out of architectural tectonics, site construction, and power consciousness.

Featured Artists:
Alberto Ortega Trejo
ebere agwuncha
Roland Knowlden
Fabrizzio Subia
Lydia Cheshewalla
Jose Luis Benavides
Paige Taul
Teresita Carson
Daniel Borzutzky

This exhibition project is prompted by Uri-Eichen Gallery’s 6-month special event series called People Power, which focuses on the 50th anniversary of the 1973 Chilean coup. This series brings exhibitions, programs, and talks about the history of U.S destabilization efforts to Chilean democracy, the Augusto Pinochet dictatorship, and the Arpilleras art movements. Chuquimarca was invited to respond to this series with artists that can speak to the effects of neoliberalism.

Opening Reception Program September 8th at 7pm: The Coup, its Aftermath, and Solidarity with Ruth Needleman, Mario Pino, Margaret Power, and Mario Venegas.

Fifty years ago the United States helped install one of history's most violent and repressive dictatorships in Chile under Gen. Augusto Pinochet. The program for the opening on September 8th is a commemoration. Mario Vanegas, then a student leader, will describe that day, September 11, 1973, in Santiago, Chile's capital. Margaret Power, long-time activist, will highlight the achievements of the solidarity movements that helped to bring down that dictatorship. Mario Pino, born after the coup, will share the experiences of those who struggle to this day to survive the continued oppression. What can we do today? We will discuss on-going solidarity initiatives.

Accessibility Note: The gallery is not wheelchair accessible. Entrance has 3 steps to access the exhibition platform and ramps are not available. We will be more than happy to manually assist, please reach out if needed.

Open by appointment outside of receptions through November 3rd. For an appointment, please call 312-852-7717 or email at [email protected].

Uri-Eichen is a 501c3 and all volunteer run gallery in the same donated space since 2012. In these turbulent days, we need community venues committed to advancing a dialogue about building a civil society in our world today.

Presented in collaboration with the Committee to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Coup in Chile and the Uri-Eichen Gallery, as part of their months-long exhibitions in memory of the coup.

Woven Memory / Memoria Entretejida ChicagoSoledad MuñozCarolina Toro CortèsOpening August 11th from 6-9pmURI-EICHEN Gall...
07/24/2023

Woven Memory / Memoria Entretejida Chicago

Soledad Muñoz
Carolina Toro Cortès

Opening August 11th from 6-9pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 60608

Woven Memory is a series of site-specific installations commemorating the lives of the disappeared detainees and political executees of Augusto Pinochet's dictatorship in Chile (1973-1990). The project is built around large-scale copper wire pieces made by artist Soledad Muñoz, which are installed in sites of memory related to the dictatorship or given to the family members of the disappeared detainees and political executees (most of them located in Chile). The imagery of the pieces is planned in collaboration with the communities associated with the sites and the historical materiality of copper is used to address the human right's violations related to the effects of extractivism in the Global South. For this exhibition we will present the woven portraits of New York journalist Charles Horman and Frank Teruggi, from Chicago, who were murdered by the Chilean dictatorship in 1973. Accompanying the weavings photographs captured by Carolina Toro at Woven Memory's Chilean iterations in La Veleidosa mine (Tocopilla) and La Providencia (Antofagasta).

Opening Reception Program August 11th at 7pm: Joyce Horman and Janis Teruggi on their family members disappearance and murder after the coup. We will also be joined by Steve Volk on International Solidarity work for Chile.

Soledad Muñoz is a weaver, interdisciplinary artist, and researcher born in her family's exile in Canada and raised in Rancagua, Chile. Her work explores the ever-changing social spaces we inhabit and the archival properties of cloth. Through her practice she hopes to fabricate embodied instances that participate in the construction of a more equitable society and the creation of new archives of resistance. Her latest collaborative audiovisual project entitled "La Parte de Atras de la Arpillera" features a collection of interviews with Chilean textile workers whose experiences stitch together the country's history of resistance. In 2014 she started Genero, an audio project/label that focuses on the distribution and representation of women and non-binary artists within the sound realm. Subsequently, in 2017, she co-founded CURRENT, a multidisciplinary, electronic arts program working with women, non-binary, and BIPOC artists in Canada and beyond.

Carolina Toro is an architect, photographer and university teacher, with a master's in human and social sciences from the Jean Monnet University in France. Her projects have been linked to the study of cultural heritage and history in the Antofagasta region in Chile, where she has worked on various initiatives supporting the collective effort to value the history of the region, from its architecture and people's memory. Her work is based on producing new photographic records, she was a photographic documentarist for the survey of sites of memory in the region of Antofagasta with the project "Desierto de Memorias" (Desert of Memories) and recently with "Woven Memory". In her work we can observe the crossover between visual arts and the creation of collective memory, where the artist is in search of her own language to combine history, memory and heritage as part of the same narrative.

Open by appointment outside of receptions through September 1st. For an appointment please call 312-852-7717 or email at [email protected].

Uri-Eichen is a 501c3 and all volunteer run gallery in the same donated space since 2012. In these turbulent days, we need community venues committed to advancing a dialogue about building a civil society in our world today.

Join us Saturday August 12th at 2pm at the Gene Siskel Film Center for a screening of Missing: After American journalist Charlie Horman mysteriously disappears during the 1973 coup in Chile, his father Ed (Jack Lemmon) travels to the country to join Charlie's wife Beth (Sissy Spacek) in the search to find him. Stymied by absurd bureaucratic red tape and surrounded by tense political unrest, Ed and Beth lean on one another in grief and fear as they slowly uncover the truth about Charlie's fate. Based on the true story and directed by Costa-Gavras (Z) with courage and precision, both Lemmon and Spacek give commanding, award-nominated performances in this haunting political thriller. www.siskelfilmcenter.org/missing

Presented in collaboration with the Committee to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Coup in Chile and the Uri-Eichen Gallery, as part of their months-long exhibitions in memory of the coup, MISSING will be followed by a panel discussion featuring Charlie Horman's widow, Joyce Horman, alongside Janice Teruggi, sister of Frank Teruggi, another American victim of the coup.

Closing: Stitching Archives of ResistanceArpillera Workshop with Bélgica Castro Fuentes, in person, August 4th 6-9 pmOn ...
07/24/2023

Closing: Stitching Archives of Resistance

Arpillera Workshop with Bélgica Castro Fuentes, in person, August 4th 6-9 pm

On Display: the work of Bélgica Castro Fuentes and The Arpilleras from The Peace Museum's Traveling Exhibition.

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 60608

A book cover with a pink and white coverDescription automatically generatedBélgica Castro Fuentes is a Chilean artist, activist, and cultural worker whose work has been crucial in the fight against human rights violations worldwide, especially against the Chilean civic-military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990). She was a member of the Arpillera workshop of The Association of Families of the Detained-Disappeared at the Vicariate of Solidarity. She joined this group in 1978, five years after the forced disappearance of her husband, Raúl San Martin Barrera, who was arrested on October 6, 1973, by the military dictatorship and is currently one of thousands Chilean disappeared detainees. The Arpillera workshop of The Association of Families of the Detained-Disappeared, primarily made up of women, gathered once a week at The Vicariate of Solidarity to embroider, talk, and remember their loved ones. They stitched together visual stories with scraps of fabrics and threads, leaving a testimony of what was happening, making their struggle visible, and denouncing the atrocities committed by the dictatorship. The resulting embroideries were called Arpilleras, named after the material they used as a backing (burlap) and were sold abroad by the Vicariate.

The dictatorship then exiled Bélgica to Sweden, where she has resided since 1986, developing an incredible body of work in the two cities where she has lived, first Vaxjo, and now Malmö. She is an inspiration to many artists and textile workers worldwide who admire her resilience, technique, and ability to express through cloth what words cannot define.

The Arpilleras from The Peace Museum's Traveling Exhibition were shown for the first time in 1983 for the "Patchwork and Peace Quilts" exhibition at the Peace Museum in Chicago. In addition to the twenty "Arpilleras from Chile," this art show featured Peace Quilts from Idaho and Illinois, woodcuts on human rights from Brazil, photo essays on Central American refugees and an open invitation for local quilters to contribute a square for the Midwest Peace Quilt. The "Arpilleras from Chile" were later added to the museum's Travelling Exhibitions program, an educational outreach initiative in which the Peace Museum would loan exhibits to schools, churches, galleries, and libraries. This program included titles such as "Give Peace a Chance" (with works by John Lennon, Yoko Ono, Joan Baez, Gil Scott-Heron and Bob Marley), "The Unforgettable Fire" (with drawings by survivors of the Hiroshima bombing) and "Dr. Martin Luther King Jr - Peacemaker."

The Peace Museum was a gallery, resource center and workshop founded in 1981 in Chicago by muralists Mark Rogovin and Marjorie Craig Benton. The museum closed in 2007, and in 2011, the State of Illinois brought a suit to protect and distribute its collection. The "Arpilleras from Chile" collection is currently under the care of Mary McCann. It will be presented at Uri-Eichen with the original content of their labels, which contain the translations of the words embroidered on the works or their backstories.

Join us tonight!
06/09/2023

Join us tonight!

Film Screening: Controlling Interest: the World of the Multinational Corporation, June 9th

June 9th - Film Screening: Controlling Interest: the World of the Multinational Corporation

Reception 6-9pm and film at 7pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 60608

About the Film:

"Controlling Interest (45 minutes) is one of the first documentary films to provide a critical analysis on the growth of multinational corporations, and their impacts on people and the environment. Upon its release, Controlling Interest quickly became a standard audio-visual text for those concerned about the growing impact of multinational corporations, examining how the ever-increasing concentration of money and power affects employment in the United States, shapes patterns of development across the world, and influences foreign policy. This is the film that helped kick-off the anti-globalisation movement. Remarkably candid interviews with business executives provide a rare glimpse of the reasoning behind corporate global strategy, and the never-ending search for resources, ever-cheaper labour, and the commodification of life. The film documents the impact of corporate decisions on people around the world, including how “freedom” has come increasingly to mean the freedom of global corporations to operate without restriction. Some of the case studies include Massachusetts’ declining machine tool industry, Brazil’s “economic miracle,” and Chile before and after the 1973 coup." https://thoughtmaybe.com/controlling-interest/

On Display in the Gallery: Secrets of State: U.S. Intervention in Chile
Popular Unity (Unidad Popular, UP) posters dating from 1970-1973 which capture the priorities of the period and numerous formerly top-secret documents from the CIA, White House, FBI, and NSC records, curated by Peter Kornbluh.

Posters and documents on display from May 12th- July 7th.

Masks are highly recommended and available at the gallery, air cleaner installed in space. Snacks and drinks as usual, just ask that you consume outside!

Open by appointment outside of receptions. Questions and to schedule an appointment? Email: [email protected] or call (312) 852-7717.

Series Presented by the Committee to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Coup in Chile.

Next up in the series:

July: Stitching Archives of Resistance: Artist Belgica Castro and Arpillera Collection of the Peace Museum

Opening Reception July 14th from 6-9pm

Bélgica Castro Fuentes started embroidering arpilleras in Santiago, Chile, in 1978 and was part of The Arpillera Workshop of The Association of Families of the Detained-Disappeared.

More Background on the coup:

As the fiftieth anniversary of the bloody, U.S.-backed military coup in Chile approaches, the Uri-Eichen Gallery will feature six months of exhibits and programs that capture the stories of President Salvador Allende’s peaceful road to socialism, and the crushing U.S covert intervention to destabilize and bring down his democratically elected government.

With the dire threat of authoritarianism escalating around the world, the history of the overthrow of the Chilean democracy and the advent of the Pinochet dictatorship could not be more relevant.

*How did the people of Chile build popular power?

*How did the United States intervene to assist Chilean reactionaries and establish the deadly military regime of General Pinochet?

*How did Chileans rebuild a resistance movement to bring down that dictatorship?

* And what role did global solidarity play?

The documents and the artwork that recorded and inspired this dramatic history will be part of an evolving series of gallery exhibitions on Chile from May through October.

In November 1970, the Chilean Socialist Party's candidate for president, Salvador Allende, took office, promising that the wealth of Chile would be used to improve the lives of Chileans rather than to enrich US-controlled multinational corporations. Allende, himself a medical doctor, focused on making food, health care, education, and housing accessible and affordable for all. Government policies enabled workers to take control of their factories and supported rural labor in taking ownership of the land they had worked for more than a century.

Among Allende's first acts was the nationalization of key industrial, mining and communications sectors so that Chile’s resources would serve the people of Chile. An incredible flowering of popular arts and music provided the spirit for Allende’s peaceful transition to socialism. Hundreds of thousands of Chileans took the challenge and supported this peaceful revolution.

Stitching Archives of ResistanceOpening July 14, 6-9 pmOn Display: the work of Bélgica Castro Fuentes and The Arpilleras...
06/07/2023

Stitching Archives of Resistance
Opening July 14, 6-9 pm

On Display: the work of Bélgica Castro Fuentes and The Arpilleras from The Peace Museum's Traveling Exhibition.

Program 7pm:

Struggle and Resistance Chile with Kathy Osberger and Mario Venegas.

Kathy will speak about her book I Surrender, a Memoir of Chile’s Dictatorship 1975 “A riveting account of terrors executed by the Pinochet regime upon the Chilean people and Catholic religious communities living among them. Osberger's narrative is heart-stopping. Her memoir witnesses to the suffering and resilience of the Chilean people, to heroic lives of her companions, and most movingly, of her own encounter with the divine in the midst of life-threatening perils.” - Kathleen M. O’Connor, Columbia Theological Seminary

Arpillera Workshop with Bélgica Castro Fuentes, in person, August 4th 6-9 pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 60608

poster maker paz pereira-vega (Instagram )

Bélgica Castro Fuentes is a Chilean artist, activist, and cultural worker whose work has been crucial in the fight against human rights violations worldwide, especially against the Chilean civic-military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet (1973-1990). She was a member of the Arpillera workshop of The Association of Families of the Detained-Disappeared at the Vicariate of Solidarity. She joined this group in 1978, five years after the forced disappearance of her husband, Raúl San Martin Barrera, who was arrested on October 6, 1973, by the military dictatorship and is currently one of thousands Chilean disappeared detainees.

The Arpillera workshop of The Association of Families of the Detained-Disappeared, primarily made up of women, gathered once a week at The Vicariate of Solidarity to embroider, talk, and remember their loved ones. They stitched together visual stories with scraps of fabrics and threads, leaving a testimony of what was happening, making their struggle visible, and denouncing the atrocities committed by the dictatorship. The resulting embroideries were called Arpilleras, named after the material they used as a backing (burlap) and were sold abroad by the Vicariate.

The dictatorship then exiled Bélgica to Sweden, where she has resided since 1986, developing an incredible body of work in the two cities where she has lived, first Vaxjo, and now Malmö. She is an inspiration to many artists and textile workers worldwide who admire her resilience, technique, and ability to express through cloth what words cannot define.

The Arpilleras from The Peace Museum's Traveling Exhibition were shown for the first time in 1983 for the "Patchwork and Peace Quilts" exhibition at the Peace Museum in Chicago. In addition to the twenty "Arpilleras from Chile," this art show featured Peace Quilts from Idaho and Illinois, woodcuts on human rights from Brazil, photo essays on Central American refugees and an open invitation for local quilters to contribute a square for the Midwest Peace Quilt. The "Arpilleras from Chile" were later added to the museum's Travelling Exhibitions program, an educational outreach initiative in which the Peace Museum would loan exhibits to schools, churches, galleries, and libraries. This program included titles such as "Give Peace a Chance" (with works by John Lennon, Yoko Ono, Joan Baez, Gil Scott-Heron and Bob Marley), "The Unforgettable Fire" (with drawings by survivors of the Hiroshima bombing) and "Dr. Martin Luther King Jr - Peacemaker."

The Peace Museum was a gallery, resource center and workshop founded in 1981 in Chicago by muralists Mark Rogovin and Marjorie Craig Benton. The museum closed in 2007, and in 2011, the State of Illinois brought a suit to protect and distribute its collection. The "Arpilleras from Chile" collection is currently under the care of Mary McCann. It will be presented at Uri-Eichen with the original content of their labels, which contain the translations of the words embroidered on the works or their backstories.

For the closing of the exhibition Stitching Archives of Resistance, the artist Bélgica Castro Fuentes will teach a workshop in person at the gallery on August 4, 6-9 pm.

Open by appointment outside of receptions. For an appointment, call 312 852 7717 or email at [email protected]

Film Screening: Controlling Interest: the World of the Multinational Corporation, June 9thJune 9th - Film Screening: Con...
06/04/2023

Film Screening: Controlling Interest: the World of the Multinational Corporation, June 9th

June 9th - Film Screening: Controlling Interest: the World of the Multinational Corporation

Reception 6-9pm and film at 7pm

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 60608

About the Film:

"Controlling Interest (45 minutes) is one of the first documentary films to provide a critical analysis on the growth of multinational corporations, and their impacts on people and the environment. Upon its release, Controlling Interest quickly became a standard audio-visual text for those concerned about the growing impact of multinational corporations, examining how the ever-increasing concentration of money and power affects employment in the United States, shapes patterns of development across the world, and influences foreign policy. This is the film that helped kick-off the anti-globalisation movement. Remarkably candid interviews with business executives provide a rare glimpse of the reasoning behind corporate global strategy, and the never-ending search for resources, ever-cheaper labour, and the commodification of life. The film documents the impact of corporate decisions on people around the world, including how “freedom” has come increasingly to mean the freedom of global corporations to operate without restriction. Some of the case studies include Massachusetts’ declining machine tool industry, Brazil’s “economic miracle,” and Chile before and after the 1973 coup." https://thoughtmaybe.com/controlling-interest/

On Display in the Gallery: Secrets of State: U.S. Intervention in Chile
Popular Unity (Unidad Popular, UP) posters dating from 1970-1973 which capture the priorities of the period and numerous formerly top-secret documents from the CIA, White House, FBI, and NSC records, curated by Peter Kornbluh.

Posters and documents on display from May 12th- July 7th.

Masks are highly recommended and available at the gallery, air cleaner installed in space. Snacks and drinks as usual, just ask that you consume outside!

Open by appointment outside of receptions. Questions and to schedule an appointment? Email: [email protected] or call (312) 852-7717.

Series Presented by the Committee to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Coup in Chile.

Next up in the series:

July: Stitching Archives of Resistance: Artist Belgica Castro and Arpillera Collection of the Peace Museum

Opening Reception July 14th from 6-9pm

Bélgica Castro Fuentes started embroidering arpilleras in Santiago, Chile, in 1978 and was part of The Arpillera Workshop of The Association of Families of the Detained-Disappeared.

More Background on the coup:

As the fiftieth anniversary of the bloody, U.S.-backed military coup in Chile approaches, the Uri-Eichen Gallery will feature six months of exhibits and programs that capture the stories of President Salvador Allende’s peaceful road to socialism, and the crushing U.S covert intervention to destabilize and bring down his democratically elected government.

With the dire threat of authoritarianism escalating around the world, the history of the overthrow of the Chilean democracy and the advent of the Pinochet dictatorship could not be more relevant.

*How did the people of Chile build popular power?

*How did the United States intervene to assist Chilean reactionaries and establish the deadly military regime of General Pinochet?

*How did Chileans rebuild a resistance movement to bring down that dictatorship?

* And what role did global solidarity play?

The documents and the artwork that recorded and inspired this dramatic history will be part of an evolving series of gallery exhibitions on Chile from May through October.

In November 1970, the Chilean Socialist Party's candidate for president, Salvador Allende, took office, promising that the wealth of Chile would be used to improve the lives of Chileans rather than to enrich US-controlled multinational corporations. Allende, himself a medical doctor, focused on making food, health care, education, and housing accessible and affordable for all. Government policies enabled workers to take control of their factories and supported rural labor in taking ownership of the land they had worked for more than a century.

Among Allende's first acts was the nationalization of key industrial, mining and communications sectors so that Chile’s resources would serve the people of Chile. An incredible flowering of popular arts and music provided the spirit for Allende’s peaceful transition to socialism. Hundreds of thousands of Chileans took the challenge and supported this peaceful revolution.

Join us tomorrow!
06/02/2023

Join us tomorrow!

Secrets of State: U.S. Intervention in Chile

June 2nd from 6-9pm, program at 7pm: Peter Kornbluh author of The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountability will join us to discuss the exhibit on display in the gallery of declassified documents that record the clandestine U.S. role in Chile and U.S. support for the Pinochet dictatorship. Also, Ruth Needleman who carried out interviews with right-wing Chilean leaders during the Allende period and then with AFL-CIO, AIFLD and other collaborators back in the U.S. after the coup, will share her research for the first time.

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 60608

On Display in the Gallery:
Popular Unity (Unidad Popular, UP) posters dating from 1970-1973 which capture the priorities of the period and numerous formerly top-secret documents from the CIA, White House, FBI, and NSC records, curated by Peter Kornbluh.

OTHER FIRST PART OF SERIES EVENTS:

June 9th - Film Screening: Controlling Interest: the World of the Multinational Corporation. Uri-Eichen Gallery, reception 6-9pm and film at 7pm

Posters and documents on display from May 12th- July 7th.

Masks are highly recommended and available at the gallery, air cleaner installed in space. Snacks and drinks as usual, just ask that you consume outside!

Open by appointment outside of receptions. Questions and to schedule an appointment? Email: [email protected] or call (312) 852-7717.

Series Presented by the Committee to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Coup in Chile.

More Background on the coup:

As the fiftieth anniversary of the bloody, U.S.-backed military coup in Chile approaches, the Uri-Eichen Gallery will feature six months of exhibits and programs that capture the stories of President Salvador Allende’s peaceful road to socialism, and the crushing U.S covert intervention to destabilize and bring down his democratically elected government.

With the dire threat of authoritarianism escalating around the world, the history of the overthrow of the Chilean democracy and the advent of the Pinochet dictatorship could not be more relevant.

*How did the people of Chile build popular power?

*How did the United States intervene to assist Chilean reactionaries and establish the deadly military regime of General Pinochet?

*How did Chileans rebuild a resistance movement to bring down that dictatorship?
* And what role did global solidarity play?

The documents and the artwork that recorded and inspired this dramatic history will be part of an evolving series of gallery exhibitions on Chile from May through October.

In November 1970, the Chilean Socialist Party’s candidate for president, Salvador Allende, took office, promising that the wealth of Chile would be used to improve the lives of Chileans rather than to enrich US-controlled multinational corporations. Allende, himself a medical doctor, focused on making food, health care, education, and housing accessible and affordable for all. Government policies enabled workers to take control of their factories and supported rural labor in taking ownership of the land they had worked for more than a century.

Among Allende’s first acts was the nationalization of key industrial, mining and communications sectors so that Chile’s resources would serve the people of Chile. An incredible flowering of popular arts and music provided the spirit for Allende’s peaceful transition to socialism. Hundreds of thousands of Chileans took the challenge and supported this peaceful revolution.

Secrets of State: U.S. Intervention in Chile June 2nd  from 6-9pm, program at 7pm: Peter Kornbluh author of The Pinochet...
05/29/2023

Secrets of State: U.S. Intervention in Chile

June 2nd from 6-9pm, program at 7pm: Peter Kornbluh author of The Pinochet File: A Declassified Dossier on Atrocity and Accountability will join us to discuss the exhibit on display in the gallery of declassified documents that record the clandestine U.S. role in Chile and U.S. support for the Pinochet dictatorship. Also, Ruth Needleman who carried out interviews with right-wing Chilean leaders during the Allende period and then with AFL-CIO, AIFLD and other collaborators back in the U.S. after the coup, will share her research for the first time.

URI-EICHEN Gallery 2101 S Halsted Chicago IL 60608

On Display in the Gallery:
Popular Unity (Unidad Popular, UP) posters dating from 1970-1973 which capture the priorities of the period and numerous formerly top-secret documents from the CIA, White House, FBI, and NSC records, curated by Peter Kornbluh.

OTHER FIRST PART OF SERIES EVENTS:

June 9th - Film Screening: Controlling Interest: the World of the Multinational Corporation. Uri-Eichen Gallery, reception 6-9pm and film at 7pm

Posters and documents on display from May 12th- July 7th.

Masks are highly recommended and available at the gallery, air cleaner installed in space. Snacks and drinks as usual, just ask that you consume outside!

Open by appointment outside of receptions. Questions and to schedule an appointment? Email: [email protected] or call (312) 852-7717.

Series Presented by the Committee to Commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Coup in Chile.

More Background on the coup:

As the fiftieth anniversary of the bloody, U.S.-backed military coup in Chile approaches, the Uri-Eichen Gallery will feature six months of exhibits and programs that capture the stories of President Salvador Allende’s peaceful road to socialism, and the crushing U.S covert intervention to destabilize and bring down his democratically elected government.

With the dire threat of authoritarianism escalating around the world, the history of the overthrow of the Chilean democracy and the advent of the Pinochet dictatorship could not be more relevant.

*How did the people of Chile build popular power?

*How did the United States intervene to assist Chilean reactionaries and establish the deadly military regime of General Pinochet?

*How did Chileans rebuild a resistance movement to bring down that dictatorship?
* And what role did global solidarity play?

The documents and the artwork that recorded and inspired this dramatic history will be part of an evolving series of gallery exhibitions on Chile from May through October.

In November 1970, the Chilean Socialist Party’s candidate for president, Salvador Allende, took office, promising that the wealth of Chile would be used to improve the lives of Chileans rather than to enrich US-controlled multinational corporations. Allende, himself a medical doctor, focused on making food, health care, education, and housing accessible and affordable for all. Government policies enabled workers to take control of their factories and supported rural labor in taking ownership of the land they had worked for more than a century.

Among Allende’s first acts was the nationalization of key industrial, mining and communications sectors so that Chile’s resources would serve the people of Chile. An incredible flowering of popular arts and music provided the spirit for Allende’s peaceful transition to socialism. Hundreds of thousands of Chileans took the challenge and supported this peaceful revolution.

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2101 S Halsted Street
Chicago, IL
60608

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