Kwesi Ronald Harris Division of Historical Records

Kwesi Ronald Harris Division of Historical Records HCF Division of Historical Records will present a selection of digitized historical records that illustrate significant moments in Black and HBCU history.
HBCU Campaign Fund Division of Historical Records presents a selection of digitized historical records that illustrate significant moments of Black and Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) history.

The Ronald Baba Kwesi Harris Division of Historical Records at HBCU Campaign Fund presents a selection of digitized historical records that illustrates significant moments in Black and HBCU history.

Mission: HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) supports the significance and campaigns to raise funds to sustaining student scholarships and HBCU's. HCF serves as advocates for students and HBCU's.

On this day, American diplomat, and journalist Lester Walter was born.In 1902, Walton became the first African-American ...
04/20/2019

On this day, American diplomat, and journalist Lester Walter was born.

In 1902, Walton became the first African-American full-time reporter for the St. Louis Star, mainly covering the city's courts. Five years later, he moved to New York City and was hired by the New York Age as its theatrical editor and manager. The job there, a paper owned business by Fred Moore was an opportunity to meet the publisher's daughter, Gladys Moore, and they married in 1912.

From 1922-1931, Walton was a special writer for the New York World. When the paper closed, he joined the New York Herald Tribune, but he quit the paper after they refused to give him a byline. In 1931, he was back at the New York Age as associate editor.

His involvement in world affairs began in 1919 when he attended the Versailles Peace Conference as a correspondent. Years before, Walton's activism was noted when he became a strong advocate for the capitalization of the word "Negro." The journalistic prominence and his political connections were pivotal to his next steps into the world of diplomacy. A subsequent visit to Liberia in 1933 and a series of articles for several publications secured him the recognition he needed to be appointed an envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to Liberia in 1935 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

He remained the ambassador to Liberia for more than a decade, and even after his resignation, he continued as an advisor to the Liberian delegation to the U.S. in 1948-49.

Walton died on October 16, 1965. He received three honorary degrees: in 1927, he received a masters of arts from Lincoln University, PA. Later in 1945, Walton received an LL.D. from Wilberforce University, and in 1958, he was presented with LL.D. from the University of Liberia for his hard work and dedication to Liberia. He was a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

A moment in #HBCU and Black history - built after 1900, this house was originally a two-story frame residence with a pro...
03/21/2019

A moment in #HBCU and Black history - built after 1900, this house was originally a two-story frame residence with a projecting bay and wrap around porch. A fire in 1989 destroyed the second story. Barrett Visanska (1849-1932), a jeweler, brought the house in 1913. Visanska, a native of Poland, was a leader in Columbia's Jewish community and a founder of the Tree of Life Congregation. In 1938, Dr. John Starks, president of Benedict College, brought the house.

Dr. John Jacob Starks (1876-1944), the first black president of Benedict College, lived in the house from 1938 until his death. Starks was president of Seneca Institute 1899-1912; Morris College 1912-1930; and Benedict College 1930-1944. After World War II the house served as the nurses' home for Good Samaritan-Waverly Hospital, created by merger in 1939.

Happy Founders' Day West Virginia State University! Authorized by the U.S. Congress as a land-grant institution under th...
03/17/2019

Happy Founders' Day West Virginia State University! Authorized by the U.S. Congress as a land-grant institution under the Second Morrill Act of 1890, the West Virginia Legislature established WVSU, on March 17, 1891, to provide education to African American citizens. #WeAreBlackHistory

On March 15, 1974, marked 45 years since Jackson State College (JSC) became Jackson State University (JSU). Further expa...
03/17/2019

On March 15, 1974, marked 45 years since Jackson State College (JSC) became Jackson State University (JSU). Further expansion of the curriculum and a notable building program preceded the elevation of Jackson State College to University status. Pictured is Alexander Hall and the Sonic Boom of the South. #WeAreHBCUs #JACKSON_RYS19

Pictured: The children involved in the landmark Civil Rights lawsuit ‘Brown V. Board of Education,’ which challenged...
10/21/2018

Pictured: The children involved in the landmark Civil Rights lawsuit ‘Brown V. Board of Education,’ which challenged the legality of American public schools segregation, Topeka, Kansas, 1953.

From front: Vicki Henderson, Donald Henderson, Linda Brown, James Emanuel, Nancy Todd, and Katherine Carper. Thurgood Marshall argued the landmark 1954 Supreme Court case.
#ThurgoodMarshall #LindaBrown #BrownvsBoardofEducation

HBCU Campaign Fund
10/21/2018

HBCU Campaign Fund

#TBT - The admission of #JamesMeredith, the first black student at the University of Mississippi, led to a campus riot. Thousands of U.S. soldiers and guardsman were called in, two people were killed, and hundreds were injured. When Meredith entered this classroom, the white students filed out. He graduated in 1963.

Vanessa Wyche, 54, is the first African-American to hold the deputy director position at Houston’s Johnson Space Cente...
08/12/2018

Vanessa Wyche, 54, is the first African-American to hold the deputy director position at Houston’s Johnson Space Center which had a budget of $4.5 billion in fiscal year 2017 and employs about 10,000 civil service and contractor employees.

She is the second in command at the space center. She will help Mark Geyer, the center’s director, run one of NASA’s largest facilities, home to the nation’s astronaut corps where human space flight research and training take place.

Wyche began working at Johnson Space Center in 1989 as a project engineer for space life sciences. Throughout her 29-year tenure at the center, she has served as acting director of Human Exploration Development Support and assistant center director.

#BlackHistory #BlackPower

#ThrowbackTuesday: Dr. Allix Bledsoe James, the seventh president of Virginia Union University from 1970 to 1979. For 46...
07/17/2018

#ThrowbackTuesday: Dr. Allix Bledsoe James, the seventh president of Virginia Union University from 1970 to 1979. For 46 years, he served as a faculty member and administrator at Virginia Union, with more than 30 years in senior administrative roles, including dean of students, dean of the school of theology, vice president, and president.

Dr. James made history as the first African-American to be elected president of the American Association of Theological Schools; the first to serve as Virginia region president of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, now the the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities; the first to be elected president of the Virginia State Board of Education; and the first to chair the Richmond Planning Commission.

#HBCU

Maceo T. Bowie was the first President of Kennedy-King College in Chicago from 1969 until 1975. The school was formerly ...
07/15/2018

Maceo T. Bowie was the first President of Kennedy-King College in Chicago from 1969 until 1975. The school was formerly known as Wilson Junior College. He served as an associate professor of English at Southwest College of Chicago. From 1954 to 1961, Bowie had been a teacher and administrative assistant to the principal at Chicago’s Wendall Phillips High School.

Bowie was a former member of Chicago Mayor Richard Daley’s Commission Youth Welfare and the advisory board of Chicago’s NAACP.

Bowie is a graduate of Huston-Tillotson College (now Huston-Tillotson University) and the University of Wisconsin. He died in 1976 at the age of 51.

#HBCU

DYK?Jesse White is Illinois' 37th Secretary of State. White was first elected to the office in 1998 and won landslide vi...
07/09/2018

DYK?

Jesse White is Illinois' 37th Secretary of State. White was first elected to the office in 1998 and won landslide victories in 2002. White became Illinois' longest serving Secretary of State on May 30, 2014.

Under White's leadership, customer service has been improved through the use of technology as well as modernizing and streamlining operations. Wait times in facilities are shorter then ever before. Illinois has become a national leader in road safety as White strengthened DUI laws, reformed the CDL program and overhauled teen driving guidelines. As a result, traffic fatalities have decreased, with drunk driving deaths down nearly 50 percent and teen driving deaths reduced by 51 percent. In 2014, White was inducted into the Illinois High School & College Diver Education Association Hall of Fame.

Prior to his election as Secretary of State, White served as Cook County Recorder of Deeds - a job to which he was first elected in 1992 and re-elected in 1996. Before that, he served 16 years in the Illinois General Assembly, representing the most culturally, economically and racially diverse in Illinois.

In 1959, White founded the internationally known Jesse White Tumbling Team to serve as a position alternative for children residing in and around the Chicago area. Since its inception, more than 17,500 young men and women have performed with the team. White has spent 58 years working as a volunteer with the team to help kids stay away from gangs, drugs, alcohol and smoking, and to help set at-risk youth on the path to success. The program has received international praise. Currently, there are 51 members enrolled in college.

White served our country as a paratrooper in the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division and as a member of the Illinois National Guard and Reserve. He played professional baseball with the Chicago Cubs organization, which was followed by a 33-year with the Chicago Public School as a teacher and administrator.

Jesse White earned his Bachelor of Science from Alabama State College (now Alabama State University) in 1957, where he was a two-sport athlete earning all-conference honors in baseball and basketball. In May 1995, White was inducted into the Southwestern Athletic Conference Hall of Fame. White has two daughters, Glenna and Lorraine, and two grandchildren Jesse and Susan.

Happy Birthday Dr. Charles R. Drew!Born on this day in 1904; the late African-American surgeon and physician was known f...
07/03/2018

Happy Birthday Dr. Charles R. Drew!

Born on this day in 1904; the late African-American surgeon and physician was known for pioneering work and method of storing blood plasma for transfusion and organized the first large-scale blood bank in the U.S.

Drew attended Amherst College in Massachusetts, where his athletics prowess in track and football earned him the Mossman trophy. He then taught biology and served as coach at Morgan College (now Morgan State University) before entering McGill University School of Medicine in Montreal. As a medical student, Drew became an Alpha Omega Alpha Scholar and won the J. Francis Williams Fellowship, based on a competitive examination given annually to the top five students in his graduating class, receiving his MD degree in 1933. A few years later, Drew did graduate work at Columbia University, where he earned his Doctorate of Medical Science degree, becoming the first African-American to do so. He served his first appointment as a faculty instructor in pathology at Howard University, from 1935 to 1936. He then became an instructor in surgery and an assistant surgeon at Freedman's Hospital, a federally operated facility associated with Howard University.

As the European war scene became more violent and the need for blood plasma intensified, Drew was selected as the full-time medical director of the Blood for Britain Project. He supervised the successful collection of 14,500 pints of vital plasma for the British. In February 1941, Drew was appointed director of the first American Red Cross Blood Bank, in charge of blood for use by the U.S. Army and Navy.

After creating two of the first blood banks, Drew returned to Howard University in 1941. He served as a professor there, leading the university's department of surgery. He also became the first African-American examiner for the American Board of Surgery. Drew was killed in an on-care accident on April 1, 1950.

Did you know? That the only #HBCU in California is named in honor of Drew, called the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science. The university was founded in August 1966 as a private non-profit institution located in Willowbrook, California. The university serves as a member-school of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund.

Joe Jackson dies at age of 89
06/27/2018

Joe Jackson dies at age of 89

Joe Jackson, father, and musical family patriarch dies at 89 after a battle with Pancreatic Cancer.

The Kwesi Ronald Harris Division of Historical Records at HBCU Campaign Fund honors the life of Robert S. Abbott, founde...
06/27/2018

The Kwesi Ronald Harris Division of Historical Records at HBCU Campaign Fund honors the life of Robert S. Abbott, founder of The Chicago Defender.

Born on November 24, 1870, to formerly enslaved parents, Robert S. Abbott attended Hampton Institute (now Hampton University). At Hampton, he sang with the Hampton Choir and Quartet, which toured nationally. He then went on to graduate from Kent Law School (now Chicago-Kent College of Law in Illinois) in 1898. Abbott tried to set up law practice, working for a few years in Gary, Indiana; and Topeka, Kansas. He returned home to Georgia for a period, then went back to Chicago, where he could see changes arriving with thousands of new migrants from the rural South.

After setting in Chicago, in 1905 Abbott founded the Chicago Defender newspaper with an initial investment of 25 cents. He wanted to push for job opportunities and social justice and was eager to persuade blacks to leave the segregated Jim Crow South for Chicago. The Defender circulation reached 50,000 by 1916, 125,000 by 1918; and more than 200,000 by the early 1920s. Credited with contributing to the Great Migration of rural southern blacks to Chicago, the Defender became the most widely circulated black newspaper in the country. It was known as "American Black Newspaper." It success resulted in Abbott becoming one of the first self-made millionaires of African-American descent.

After inventing the fictional character "Bud Billiken" with David Kellum for articles in the Defender, Abbott established the Bud Billiken Club. In 1929, Abbott and Kellum founded the Bud Billiken Parade and Picnic. It became an occasion for African-American to celebrate their pride and connections.

In 1919, Illinois Governor Frank Lowden appointed Abbott to the State Race Relations Commission. The commission conducted studies about the changes resulting the Great Migration; in one period, 5,000 African-Americans were arriving in the city every week. He died on February 29, 1940 of Bright's disease, and left the paper in the control of his heir and nephew, John Henry Sengstacke.

We remember Dr. Mitchell W. Spellman, Founding Executive Dean, Dean of the College of Medicine, Professor of Surgery at ...
06/27/2018

We remember Dr. Mitchell W. Spellman, Founding Executive Dean, Dean of the College of Medicine, Professor of Surgery at Charles R. Drew Postgraduate Medical School and alumnus of Dillard University.

Born on December 1, 1919, Dr. Mitchell W. Spellman went to Gilbert Academy in New Orleans at the age of 12, where he graduated valedictorian in 1936. He graduated Magna Cum Laude and valedictorian from Dillard University in New Orleans in 1940. In 1944, he graduated from Howard University College of Medicine, and was ranked 2nd in his class. As a young men pursuing medical education in 1940, the options were few. Howard University provided him with a home and a mentor, in Charles R. Drew, MD, he then began 11 years of post-medical school surgical training at Cleveland General Hospital, Freedman's Hospital and finished at the University of Minnesota where he served 1951-1954 as Commonwealth Fund Fellow in Surgery and Resident in Thoracic Surgery.

He received his Ph.D. in Surgery from the University of Minnesota in 1955. From 1954-1968, in Washington, DC, he was a member of the surgical faculty at Howard University College of Medicine, ultimately becoming Professor of Surgery and Chief Medicine Officer at DC General Hospital for the Howard University, Division of Surgery. From 1969-1978, in Los Angeles, CA, he served as Founding Dean, Executive Dean and Professor of Surgery of Charles R. Drew Postgraduate Medical School, Assistant Dean and Professor of Surgery at UCLA School of Medicine, and Clinical Professor of Surgery at USC School of Medicine.

From 1978-2004, at Harvard Medical School, in Boston, MA, he served as Dean of Medical Services, Professor of Surgery, Director of International Medical Programs and Executive Vice President of the Harvard Medical Center. He was also Director of Academic Alliances and International Exchange Programs for Harvard Medical International.

He was awarded Honorary Doctorates by Georgetown University, University of Florida, and Dillard University. He served as Visiting Professor at Standford School of Medicine from 1975-1976. He was the recipient of numerous academic awards throughout his career.

Dr. Spellman died on November 11, 2013, after several years' battle with a rare neurodegenerative disease at the age of 93.

DYK?Born on November 2, 1902, Dr. Robert Prentiss Daniel was installed as the second African-American to become presiden...
05/21/2018

DYK?

Born on November 2, 1902, Dr. Robert Prentiss Daniel was installed as the second African-American to become president of Shaw University in 1936.

Dr. Daniel graduate magna cm laude from Virginia Union University, earning his Bachelor of Arts degree in 1924. He was valedictorian and his class secretary. Upon graduation, he worked as an instructor of mathematics and freshman English for twelve years, and in 1926 he worked as an assistant professor of education.

Dr. Daniel attended Teachers College Columbia University in New York City for his graduate studies, receiving his master's degree in education in 1928 and a Ph.D. in educational psychology in 1932. Concurrently and until 1936, he worked as a professor of education and psychology and Director of Extension Division at Virginia Union University.

During the summers of 1935 and 1936, Dr. Daniel worked as a visiting professor of education at Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) in Virginia.

After being installed as the president of Shaw University at the age of 33, he remained there until 1950 when he was elected by the Virginia State Board of Education as president of Virginia State College (now Virginia State University) and served there for 18 years until his death in 1968. He was a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

#HBCU

Born May 13, 1937, Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr., graduated from Arkansas AM&N College in 1958 before serving as Chancellor...
05/17/2018

Born May 13, 1937, Dr. Lawrence A. Davis, Jr., graduated from Arkansas AM&N College in 1958 before serving as Chancellor of what is now the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff from 1991-2012. He currently serves as Emeritus Chancellor. This past Sunday, Davis turned 81. Happy belated Birthday Dr. Davis! 🎈🎂 #HBCU #UAPB

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