Museum Africa

Museum Africa This page is designed for people who are interested n Museum Africa and its programs. Please learn more at our website at http://themuseumafrica.org

Museum Africa currently is a virtual museum dedicated to bringing to light all of the magnificent achievements of both ancient and modern African civilizations. We believe we are the sole museum of its type attempting to compile, in aggregate, the greatness of African achievements in the arts, religion, and the advancement of humankind. Headquartered in Chicago, Illinois, we nevertheless reach out across the globe to share our findings with all who seek truth and advocate for peaceful coexistence among all peoples of the earth.

05/01/2019

For all of the fans of Museum Africa, we are still alive and kicking; we’ve just decided to regroup.

When we do regroup, we will resume our membership with the American Alliance of Museums. We will be more aggressive in raising the $50 million to build Jeff Peltier ‘s beautifully designed, state-of-the-art museum that incorporates an atrium with a cascading waterfall, a 400-seat theater named after board member Musa Diallo, thousands of artifacts from all over Africa.

Finally, we will inaugurate a scholarship program to encourage more college students to become archaeologists and anthropologists who can be dispatched to Africa and dig up the history of ancient African civilizations. We have already started this program. We need a temporary home for Museum Africa, and we are asking alumni and current students to help. Please ask the history or African Studies officials at your college and university to consider assisting in helping raising funds and identifying qualified students. Thanks!

Museum Africa
04/26/2019

Museum Africa

Amenhotep IV (Akhenaten) -- some scholars believe he is the actual Moses.

Akhenaten (also spelled Echnaton, Akhenaton, Ikhnaton, and Khuenaten; meaning "Effective for Aten") known before the fifth year of his reign as Amenhotep IV (sometimes given its Greek form, Amenophis IV, and meaning Amun is Satisfied), was a pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt who ruled for 17 years and died perhaps in 1336 BC or 1334 BC. He is especially noted for abandoning traditional Egyptian polytheism and introducing worship centered on the Aten, which is sometimes described as monotheistic or henotheistic. An early inscription likens the Aten to the sun as compared to stars, and later official language avoids calling the Aten a god, giving the solar deity a status above mere gods.

Akhenaten tried to bring about a departure from traditional religion, yet in the end it would not be accepted. After his death, traditional religious practice was gradually restored, and when some dozen years later rulers without clear rights of succession from the Eighteenth Dynasty founded a new dynasty, they discredited Akhenaten and his immediate successors, referring to Akhenaten himself as "the enemy" in archival records.

He was all but lost from history until the discovery, in the 19th century, of Amarna, the site of Akhetaten, the city he built for the Aten. Early excavations at Amarna by Flinders Petrie sparked interest in the enigmatic pharaoh, whose tomb was unearthed in 1907 in a dig led by Edward R. Ayrton. Interest in Akhenaten increased with the discovery in the Valley of the Kings, at Luxor, of the tomb of King Tutankhamun, who has been proved to be Akhenaten's son according to DNA testing in 2010.

I am sharing these photos, like the one of Akhenaten’s bust below, in an effort to shed light on the contributions of ...
04/24/2019

I am sharing these photos, like the one of Akhenaten’s bust below, in an effort to shed light on the contributions of ancient Africans to civilization. For thousands of years, Africans have been maligned as being “too stupid,” in the words of Donald Trump, to do what whites have done over the centuries. These photos are meant to show otherwise. My intent is not to further sow dissension among whites and non-whites but to finally have a frank conversation about what is or isn’t the truth.

As I mentioned a few weeks ago, several members of Museum Africa, most of them white, are also in search of the truth. These include people from France, England, Denmark, Israel, South Africa, United Arab Emirates, India, Argentina, Nigeria, Canada, as well as the United States.

I invite all of you to go further in digging up the histories of Africa’s ancient people. If you haven’t done so already, please click on the Museum Africa link above to learn more. Thank you.

Amenhotep IV (Akhenaten) -- some scholars believe he is the actual Moses.

Akhenaten (also spelled Echnaton, Akhenaton, Ikhnaton, and Khuenaten; meaning "Effective for Aten") known before the fifth year of his reign as Amenhotep IV (sometimes given its Greek form, Amenophis IV, and meaning Amun is Satisfied), was a pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt who ruled for 17 years and died perhaps in 1336 BC or 1334 BC. He is especially noted for abandoning traditional Egyptian polytheism and introducing worship centered on the Aten, which is sometimes described as monotheistic or henotheistic. An early inscription likens the Aten to the sun as compared to stars, and later official language avoids calling the Aten a god, giving the solar deity a status above mere gods.

Akhenaten tried to bring about a departure from traditional religion, yet in the end it would not be accepted. After his death, traditional religious practice was gradually restored, and when some dozen years later rulers without clear rights of succession from the Eighteenth Dynasty founded a new dynasty, they discredited Akhenaten and his immediate successors, referring to Akhenaten himself as "the enemy" in archival records.

He was all but lost from history until the discovery, in the 19th century, of Amarna, the site of Akhetaten, the city he built for the Aten. Early excavations at Amarna by Flinders Petrie sparked interest in the enigmatic pharaoh, whose tomb was unearthed in 1907 in a dig led by Edward R. Ayrton. Interest in Akhenaten increased with the discovery in the Valley of the Kings, at Luxor, of the tomb of King Tutankhamun, who has been proved to be Akhenaten's son according to DNA testing in 2010.

01/27/2019

Please be patient! We’re rebuilding the Museum Africa website. It will be up soon. Thanks!

It’s Baaasck! 💗💗💗
09/20/2018

It’s Baaasck! 💗💗💗

ANNOUNCED #FilmAfrica18 Programme: bit.ly/FA2018Programme

Film Africa, the annual London film festival celebrating the best African cinema from across the continent and diaspora, is here! Brought to you by Royal African Society, the festival returns to screens across London from 2 to 11 November. 40 films, 15 African countries, 8 premieres, and special guests. Join us for 10 days of discovery, debate, live music, family fun, festival awards, parties, and more!

Film Africa opens with incredible debut The Burial Of Kojo by BLITZ the AMBASSADOR on 2 November at 6.15pm at BFI Southbank, including director Q&A and after party with Palm Wine Club on the decks.

Closing the festival with side-splitting pidgin is KASALA! directed by Ema Edosio on 11 November at 6.15pm at Rich Mix London, including director Q&A and after party with BORN N BREAD on the decks.

BOOK NOW: bit.ly/FA2018Galas

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Explore this year’s strands: AFROBUBBLEGUM: Kenya's Movie Mavericks, Young Rebels, (UP)Rooted and Naija New Wave. Don't miss our much loved Dine & View, Film Africa LIVE! and Film Africa Young Audiences screenings and other events on our site www.filmafrica.org.uk.

Film Africa 2018 Venues: BFI, Bernie Grant Arts Centre, Ritzy Cinema, RichMix and South London Gallery.

03/04/2018
themusesumafrica.org

While it is heartwarming that so many people "like" our Museum Africa page, it is disheartening that, after more than 10 years of our existence as a nonprofit, we could't raise as little as $100 to keep our website going, let alone raise the $50 million to house artifacts from African civilizations' glorious past. People spend money hand over fist to honor the achievements of Africans in bondage.

White supremacists love to point out, to them, Africans' inglorious past, claiming that Africans have no history to speak of. Africans, themselves, participate in their own oppression and degradation, by agreeing with white supremacists by celebrating so-called "Black History" month, as if African history only started when European explorers stole men, women and children from their ancestral lands.

Last year, we had stop supporting our website at http://themusesumafrica.org for lack of interest. What a shame!

12/09/2017
LSU

LSU

🎶 Walking in an LSU Wonderland 🎶
❄️💜💛❄️

The following article raises the same or similar questions that I have about the myths surrounding ancient African peopl...
03/06/2016
Why do white churches continue to use debunked white images of Jesus & other biblical personalities?

The following article raises the same or similar questions that I have about the myths surrounding ancient African people versus historical facts,

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/02/24/1366486/-Why-do-white-churches-continue-to-use-debunked-white-images-of-Jesus-other-biblical-personalities?detail=emailclassic

Leonardo da Vinci painted his version of "The Last Supper" from 1494-1498. It's famous. It's special. It's important. What it isn't, is historically accurate ... at all. Using only ...

Thanks to my friend Herb Allen, I would have missed this important PBS documentary below.  Please click on the following...
09/04/2015
Rise of the Black Pharaohs | Watch Online | PBS Video

Thanks to my friend Herb Allen, I would have missed this important PBS documentary below. Please click on the following link: http://video.pbs.org/program/rise-black-pharaohs/

However, I take issue with the term "Black Pharaohs" because it implies that all of the pharaohs prior to the conquests of the Kush*tes were non-black or non-African. We at Museum Africa have been hammering this point for many years.

Watch Rise of the Black Pharaohs videos on demand. Stream full episodes online. Around 800 BC, Kush, a little-known subject state of Egypt, rose up and conquered Egypt, enthroned its own Pharaohs and ruled for nearly 100 years. This unlikely chapter of history has been buried by the Egyptians and wa…

Amazigh people are the indigenous people of North Africa, some 20 million non-Arabic Tamazight and Tamashek speakers, fr...
12/11/2014

Amazigh people are the indigenous people of North Africa, some 20 million non-Arabic Tamazight and Tamashek speakers, from the Oasis of Siwa in Egypt, to Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, the Canary Islands (Guanches), the Sahara Desert, Mali and Niger. This whole region, which is larger than one third of Africa, is called "Tamazgha" in Berber languages, and "Temust" in Tamashek, language spoken by Tuaregs of Mali and Niger. Because of "Near East" and "Middle East" or other Asian linguistic and cultural misnomers have been applied to the region and its people, the indigenous cultures have been consistently minimized and marginalized to the detriment of their African origins. The Imazighen, which roughly translates to "free human beings," goes back to ancient pre-dynastic Egyptian rule.

The African aestheticThe beauty of African art can convey various feelings and messages to the casual observer. However,...
12/09/2014

The African aesthetic

The beauty of African art can convey various feelings and messages to the casual observer. However, true appreciation can only arrive through an understanding of the culture and environment that influenced the art. It would be easy to understand African art better if it were possible to study it using Western methods. The majority of the books on Western art history focus on the changes in style and ways that various artist have influenced each other. Because there is no chronological record of style changes in African art, it cannot be studied in the same manner. Moreover, some existing studies of African art were done by researchers who were not familiar with the native languages of Africa. Nor with its native customs, which are necessary to make accurate interpretations of African art. But, from the little data that was collected, some generalizations about the sculptures can be made.

First, sculpture was used as an additional language through which Africans communicated their inner feelings to the world. The lack of writing in African cultures resulted in an oral tradition, where mythology and literature was recited from generation to generation. African sculpture has also served as communication between people and supernatural forces. Finally, sculpture may have indicated the wealth and status of its owner; carefully made objects such as stools, cups, boxes, staffs, neck rests and pipes can proclaim the taste and social position of those who use them. However, a more useful way to look at African sculpture is through common or recurring themes. These themes relate the artworks to their cultural setting, making it possible to understand the aesthetics, values, purpose and significance of a particular art object. When you compare the ways various cultures express a common theme, the similarities and differences among them become more obvious.

Sculpture is the best known African art form. The primary materials used to make African sculpture are wood, iron, clay, bronze, ivory, and textiles. Many African sculptures are heavily ornamented. They share many of the same characteristics, such as arms held to the side, eyes in the frontal position, and weight equally distributed on both feet. Other characteristics include heads that are enlarged, large stomachs, large hands and feet, and protruding navels. The heads on African sculptures are often exaggerated because it is thought to be the center of character and emotion. The protruding navel is symbolic of creative power. (Segy, Ludislas. African Sculpture Speaks. 1969). The rhythmic repetition of bulging and swelling body parts moves the viewer's eye from head to toe.

Aspelta was a ruler of the kingdom of Kush (c. 600 - 580 BCE).Aspelta used titles based on those of the Egyptian Pharaoh...
12/07/2014

Aspelta was a ruler of the kingdom of Kush (c. 600 - 580 BCE).

Aspelta used titles based on those of the Egyptian Pharaohs.

Horus name: Neferkha ("Whose Appearances are Beautiful")

Nebty Name: Neferkha ("Whose Appearances are Beautiful")

Golden Horus Name: Userib ("Whose heart is strong")

Prenomen: Merykare ("Re is one whose ka is loved")

Nomen: Aspelta

More is known about him and his reign than most of the rulers of Kush. He left several stelae carved with accounts of his reign. He was the son of Senkamanisken and brother of Anlamani, who immediately preceded him.

According to his inscriptions, Aspelta was selected as ruler by a committee of twenty-four religious and military leaders. He then set out north to Napata to be selected as king by the gods and crowned. Another stele that might date from Aspelta's reign recounts how a group of priests were put to death, likely for conspiring against the king. In 592 BC, Kush was invaded by an Egyptian military expedition initiated by Pharaoh Psamtik II perhaps because Aspelta posed a threat to this pharaoh's authority over Upper Egypt. The invaders sacked Napata, and some historians believe that because of this attack, Aspelta decided to move the Nubian capital to the more secure city of Meroe.

Aspelta's tomb was located at Nuri and is the second largest burial structure here.[3] His tomb was excavated by George A. Reisner in 1916 and many items were discovered within it, most of which are now in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. The palace built by him and his brother was excavated by Reisner in 1920.

12/05/2014

Museum Africa is offering an open invitation to our Facebook followers to send information about people and events from ancient Africa. Let's show the world the many contributions to civilization that Africans have made since the beginning of humankind.

Eritrean history is home to some of the oldest civilizations on the continent. Together with northern Somalia, Djibouti,...
12/05/2014

Eritrean history is home to some of the oldest civilizations on the continent. Together with northern Somalia, Djibouti, and the Red Sea coast of Sudan, Eritrea is considered the most likely location of the land known to the ancient Egyptians as Punt (or "Ta Netjeru," meaning god's land), whose first mention dates to the 25th century BC. The ancient Puntites were a nation of people that had close relations with Pharaonic Egypt during the times of Pharaoh Sahure and Queen Hatshepsut.

Around the 8th century BC, a kingdom known as D'mt was established in Eritrea and northern Ethiopia, with its capital at Yeha in northern Ethiopia. Its successor, the Kingdom of Aksum, emerged around the 1st century BC or 1st century AD and grew to be, as described by the Persian philosopher Mani, one of the four greatest civilizations in the world, along with China, Persia, and Rome.

In the third century AD, Flavius Philostratus wrote this: "For there is an ancient law in regard to the Red Sea, which the king Erythras laid down, when he held sway over that sea, to the effect that the Egyptians should not enter it with a vessel of war, and indeed should employ only a single merchant ship." (Life of Apollonius of Tyana, Book III, chapter ###V, Loeb Classical Library)

Great Zimbabwe is a ruined city in the southeastern hills of Zimbabwe near Lake Mutirikwe and the town of Masvingo. It w...
12/02/2014

Great Zimbabwe is a ruined city in the southeastern hills of Zimbabwe near Lake Mutirikwe and the town of Masvingo. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe during the country's Late Iron Age. Construction on the monument by ancestors of the Shona people began in the 11th century and continued until the 14th century,] spanning an area of 722 hectares (1,780 acres) which, at its peak, could have housed up to 18,000 people. It is recognised as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

Great Zimbabwe served as a royal palace for the Zimbabwean monarch and would have been used as the seat of political power. One of its most prominent features were the walls, some of which were over five metres high and which were constructed without mortar. Eventually the city was abandoned and fell into ruin.

The earliest known written mention of the ruins was in 1531 by Vicente Pegado, captain of the Portuguese garrison of Sofala, who recorded it as Symbaoe. The first visits by Europeans were in the late 19th century, with investigations of the site starting in 1871. Later, studies of the monument were controversial in the archaeological world, with political pressure being put upon archaeologists by the government of Rhodesia to deny its construction by black people. Great Zimbabwe has since been adopted as a national monument by the Zimbabwean government, and the modern independent state was named for it. The word "Great" distinguishes the site from the many hundreds of small ruins, now known as 'zimbabwes', spread across the Zimbabwe Highveld. There are 200 such sites in southern Africa, such as Bumbusi in Zimbabwe and Manyikeni in Mozambique, with monumental, mortarless walls; Great Zimbabwe is the largest.

Address

8247 S Oglesby Ave
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60617

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Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
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