Field Museum

Field Museum The Field Museum fuels a journey of discovery across time to enable solutions for a brighter future rich in nature and culture. We fuel a journey of discovery across time to enable solutions for a brighter future rich in nature and culture.
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Every day we contribute to groundbreaking scientific research thanks to almost 40 million specimens and artifacts in our collections and over 150 scientists on staff. Discovering, collecting, collaborating, researching, educating, conserving, solving—there’s a lot of work to do. And we’re on it. 🌎

Operating as usual

We have 650 volunteers that contribute about 95,000 service hours to our collections, research, and visitor programs ann...
04/20/2021

We have 650 volunteers that contribute about 95,000 service hours to our collections, research, and visitor programs annually! 👏👏 Over the past year, we've been keenly aware of how empty our museum is without these dedicated volunteers. During National Volunteer Week, we want to thank all the volunteers who have connected with us virtually and acknowledge their hard work and dedication to the museum. 💙

We're looking forward to the day when we can invite our volunteers back to the front lines interacting with visitors and members—as shown in these pictures from pre-pandemic times—as well as behind the scenes helping in our collection areas and research labs. 🔬 We can't wait to see you soon!

04/19/2021
Atmospheric Antarctica

April showers bring—a wintry mix?! Chicago, no! 😣 For this week’s Calm and Collected, we embrace the dip in temperatures and chill out in Antarctica. ❄ A landscape of extremes, this polar desert is often the coldest, driest, and windiest continent in the world. But that doesn't stop our researchers from going there to dig for dinosaurs. Can you spot any in this video? 👀

Every Monday in April, we’re sharing an atmospheric video that opens a window into natural history and the world around us. Hit play whenever you need a moment peace with Calm and Collected ➡️ bit.ly/FieldCalmCollected

For the Pokagon Potawatomi people, baskets are more than just containers—and they have stories to tell if you listen. 👂T...
04/16/2021

For the Pokagon Potawatomi people, baskets are more than just containers—and they have stories to tell if you listen. 👂

The tradition of weaving black ash baskets has existed for as long as the Potawatomi have been on Earth. In addition to teaching weaving techniques, skilled basket makers pass on their heritage and ancestral connection.

Now, an invasive species of beetle threatens the survival of the black ash, destroying over 60 million trees since the 1990s. 🌳 The Potawatomi continue to work for the survival of the black ash, treating trees on tribal lands with organic pesticides and collecting seeds that may be replanted in the future.

Get to know 34 of these handwoven baskets, as well as some of their makers in a new mini-exhibition opening today ➡️ fieldmuseum.org/pokagonbaskets

Curator of Birds John Bates joins Alie Ward of the Ologies Podcast to talk about avian pediatrics. 🐣 John describes our ...
04/15/2021

Curator of Birds John Bates joins Alie Ward of the Ologies Podcast to talk about avian pediatrics. 🐣 John describes our egg collection—one of the largest in North America. Some of the collection's specimens contributed to the banning of DDT, which led to the recovery of Peregrines and other birds.

An eggscellent springtime listen ➡️ bit.ly/EggsOlogies

04/14/2021
Meet a Museum Insider with Nina Sandlin

We're celebrating National Volunteer Month with Nina Sandlin. She's volunteered at the Field for 22 years and shares her knowledge of incredible and tiny spiders with Learning Facilitator Jeff Schroeder. 🕷

Join us for Meet A Museum Insider every Wednesday at 2:30pm on Facebook Live, and watch previous episodes here ➡️ bit.ly/MuseumInsider

Hope you and your crew are having a great week. 🦕☀️ If you need some softness in your life—or need to shop for a whole n...
04/13/2021

Hope you and your crew are having a great week. 🦕☀️

If you need some softness in your life—or need to shop for a whole natural history-loving herd—check out our bundles. Dino-mite savings this way 🦖➡️ bit.ly/PlushBundles

Hope you and your crew are having a great week. 🦕☀️

If you need some softness in your life—or need to shop for a whole natural history-loving herd—check out our bundles. Dino-mite savings this way 🦖➡️ bit.ly/PlushBundles

04/12/2021
Ice Age Animals

Ah, the soothing sounds of the Pleistocene. 🦌 If you're not feeling calm, we hope this "mammoth" meditation on mastodons and other ice age creatures helps center you.

Every Monday this month, we’re sharing an atmospheric video that opens a window onto natural history and the world around us. 🌅 Hit play whenever you need a moment peace with Calm and Collected ➡️ bit.ly/FieldCalmCollected

Make room for the person-sized microscope! 🚧Technically called an atom probe field-ion microscope, this machine is used ...
04/09/2021

Make room for the person-sized microscope! 🚧

Technically called an atom probe field-ion microscope, this machine is used to view the individual atoms of a solid material in three dimensions. 🔬 And it's now on display—on loan from our friends Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago—for your viewing enjoyment!

Our cosmochemist Philipp Heck and his colleague Jennika Greer use Northwestern University's current atom probe to study ancient materials created before the solar system was born. 🌌 Atom probe tomography allows Philipp and Jennika to probe 4.6 billion-year-old meteorites, atom by atom.

Very rarely nanodiamonds are found inside these space rocks, which are even older. 😲 This microscope is the only tool that can tell if a nanodiamond was formed inside or outside our solar system.

Whooo's this? It's one of two new species of screech owls described by an international research team, including our cur...
04/08/2021

Whooo's this? It's one of two new species of screech owls described by an international research team, including our curator of birds John Bates. 🦉 These nocturnal birds live in the Amazon rainforest and are cousins of the Eastern Screech Owls common in the United States.

While it's a hoot to have described new feathered friends, the Alagoas Screech Owl (pictured) and Xingu Screech Owl are already critically endangered—threatened by deforestation.

Learn how researchers studied these elusive fliers whooo live 100 feet above the forest floor, all while working alongside Amazonian critters like hand-sized tarantulas. 🕷✋ bit.ly/AmazonScreechOwls

📸: Gustavo Malacco

Whooo's this? It's one of two new species of screech owls described by an international research team, including our curator of birds John Bates. 🦉 These nocturnal birds live in the Amazon rainforest and are cousins of the Eastern Screech Owls common in the United States.

While it's a hoot to have described new feathered friends, the Alagoas Screech Owl (pictured) and Xingu Screech Owl are already critically endangered—threatened by deforestation.

Learn how researchers studied these elusive fliers whooo live 100 feet above the forest floor, all while working alongside Amazonian critters like hand-sized tarantulas. 🕷✋ bit.ly/AmazonScreechOwls

📸: Gustavo Malacco

04/07/2021
Meet A Museum Insider

Field volunteer Erryn Blake fell in love with the museum when she first visited the King Tut exhibition. She’s since become involved with Discovery Squad, Dozin with the Dinos, Collections Club, and our other programming and volunteer opportunities. Additionally, she and her family help share the Field’s mission: telling the stories of our planet and safeguarding it for future generations. 🌎

Speaking of volunteering—we need your help! 🌱 Join us online to transcribe labels from our collection April 8 - 10. No previous experience necessary ➡️ bit.ly/CollectionsClubApril

We can barely believe how you capture the details of our museum through stroke, stippling, shadow, and sketch. 🐻😍Whether...
04/06/2021

We can barely believe how you capture the details of our museum through stroke, stippling, shadow, and sketch. 🐻😍

Whether it's our furry taxidermy, fossilized bones, or soaring replicas, we love seeing your Field fan art. 💙

04/05/2021
Animals in Motion 🦅

Before you open your inbox, or when you need an afternoon break, we’re here to help you get Calm and Collected. 💆🏻‍♀️💆🏾‍♂️ Every Monday this month, we’ll share relaxing, atmospheric videos that open a window into our museum, natural history, and the world around us. 🌅

We debut Calm and Collected with a meditation on motion—how animals swim, fly, hover, flap, and otherwise navigate the depths and heights of our incredible planet. Hit play whenever you need a moment of peace with this new series.

If you're looking for eggs today, we hope you find some eggsceptional ones. 🐣 There are over 10,800 kinds of birds, and ...
04/04/2021

If you're looking for eggs today, we hope you find some eggsceptional ones. 🐣

There are over 10,800 kinds of birds, and each produces an egg unique to its species. From red to blue, shiny to matte, round to pyriform...the world of avian pediatrics is amazing. 🥚 Take a behind-the-scenes look at our egg collection—one of the largest in North America ➡️ bit.ly/EggCollection

If you're looking for eggs today, we hope you find some eggsceptional ones. 🐣

There are over 10,800 kinds of birds, and each produces an egg unique to its species. From red to blue, shiny to matte, round to pyriform...the world of avian pediatrics is amazing. 🥚 Take a behind-the-scenes look at our egg collection—one of the largest in North America ➡️ bit.ly/EggCollection

Today we wish Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE, Founder of the Jane Goodall Institute & UN Messenger of Peace the happiest of birth...
04/03/2021

Today we wish Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE, Founder of the Jane Goodall Institute & UN Messenger of Peace the happiest of birthdays! 🥳 Dr. Goodall's landmark study of chimpanzees in the wild was one of the first of its kind and redefined animal behavior research.

On May 21, you can experience the exhibition "Becoming Jane: The Evolution of Dr. Jane Goodall" in person at the Field, but today celebrate her legacy with National Geographic Museum's virtual tour ➡️ vr.nationalgeographic.org/615-2/

Today we wish Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE, Founder of the Jane Goodall Institute & UN Messenger of Peace the happiest of birthdays! 🥳 Dr. Goodall's landmark study of chimpanzees in the wild was one of the first of its kind and redefined animal behavior research.

On May 21, you can experience the exhibition "Becoming Jane: The Evolution of Dr. Jane Goodall" in person at the Field, but today celebrate her legacy with National Geographic Museum's virtual tour ➡️ vr.nationalgeographic.org/615-2/

Last chance to see this jawsome replica for a while! 👀 Megalodon swims out of Stanley Field Hall on Monday, April 12. 🦈W...
04/02/2021

Last chance to see this jawsome replica for a while! 👀 Megalodon swims out of Stanley Field Hall on Monday, April 12. 🦈

We had thought our apex predator would remain on display until the summer but these are wild waters, friends. Good news: Meg is making way for exciting things around the museum. Don't "probe" us—we'll share soon... 😉

📸: thechicagogoodlife, Instagram

Last chance to see this jawsome replica for a while! 👀 Megalodon swims out of Stanley Field Hall on Monday, April 12. 🦈

We had thought our apex predator would remain on display until the summer but these are wild waters, friends. Good news: Meg is making way for exciting things around the museum. Don't "probe" us—we'll share soon... 😉

📸: thechicagogoodlife, Instagram

Due to capacity limits, all tickets are sold out for today, Friday, April 2. We're sorry for any inconvenience and hope ...
04/02/2021

Due to capacity limits, all tickets are sold out for today, Friday, April 2. We're sorry for any inconvenience and hope to see you soon. Reserve tickets for a future visit here ✨➡️ fieldmuseum.org/visit

Due to capacity limits, all tickets are sold out for today, Friday, April 2. We're sorry for any inconvenience and hope to see you soon. Reserve tickets for a future visit here ✨➡️ fieldmuseum.org/visit

SUE the T. rex wasn't joking when they debuted a new line of merchandise last month without our consent. But we're not f...
04/01/2021

SUE the T. rex wasn't joking when they debuted a new line of merchandise last month without our consent.

But we're not fools. We see the excellent array of tanks and tees, the bold colors, the quirky designs. We see your sparkling eyes and big smiles as you rep your favorite theropod.

So on this first day of April, it is without deceit that we encourage you to shop in SUEpport of our small (forelimb) business owner ➡️ suethetrex.threadless.com

03/31/2021
Working with Native Communities

We’re live with Meranda Roberts (Northern Paiute and Xicanx), co-curator of the Apsáalooke Women & Warriors exhibition. She talks with Learning Facilitator Anna Villanyi about her work as one of 70+ collaborators on the museum's Native North America Hall and her role working with Native communities.

Join us for Meet A Museum Insider every Wednesday at 2:30pm on Facebook Live, and watch previous episodes here ➡️ bit.ly/MuseumInsider

One might assume people who get sick have weaker immune systems or no prior immunity to the offending pathogen. Similar ...
03/30/2021

One might assume people who get sick have weaker immune systems or no prior immunity to the offending pathogen. Similar arguments are often used to explain why Indigenous American communities were so affected by disease following contact with European outsiders. The assertion is that Indigenous peoples had no prior exposure to European diseases, and that lack of immunity resulted in great spread of new illnesses.

But, by comparing events from a pandemic event in 1540s Mesoamerica with the unfolding COVID-19 pandemic, Curator of Anthropology Gary Feinman and Anthropology Collections Manager Stacy Drake found that disease does not operate based on biology alone. The disease that killed up to 90% of the Indigenous population of Teposcolula-Yucudaa, for example, was bacterial, not viral—meaning prior exposure to this pathogen did not greatly influence immunity. Instead, the pathogen spread with such devastating effect as a result of Colonial-era policies that severely altered Indigenous ways of life. This led to a rapid decline in economy, environment, agriculture, and politics and also paved the way for famine, stress, and more rapid and severe disease spread.

As archaeologists, Gary and Stacy stress we must look to examples from the past to prepare for current and future events. Biological factors play a role in how susceptible we may be to disease, but our actions in how we all participate in communities and society—and the ways in which governments and citizens respond to and prepare for events like the COVID-19 pandemic—greatly affect the outcomes and our ability to "beat the virus."

One might assume people who get sick have weaker immune systems or no prior immunity to the offending pathogen. Similar arguments are often used to explain why Indigenous American communities were so affected by disease following contact with European outsiders. The assertion is that Indigenous peoples had no prior exposure to European diseases, and that lack of immunity resulted in great spread of new illnesses.

But, by comparing events from a pandemic event in 1540s Mesoamerica with the unfolding COVID-19 pandemic, Curator of Anthropology Gary Feinman and Anthropology Collections Manager Stacy Drake found that disease does not operate based on biology alone. The disease that killed up to 90% of the Indigenous population of Teposcolula-Yucudaa, for example, was bacterial, not viral—meaning prior exposure to this pathogen did not greatly influence immunity. Instead, the pathogen spread with such devastating effect as a result of Colonial-era policies that severely altered Indigenous ways of life. This led to a rapid decline in economy, environment, agriculture, and politics and also paved the way for famine, stress, and more rapid and severe disease spread.

As archaeologists, Gary and Stacy stress we must look to examples from the past to prepare for current and future events. Biological factors play a role in how susceptible we may be to disease, but our actions in how we all participate in communities and society—and the ways in which governments and citizens respond to and prepare for events like the COVID-19 pandemic—greatly affect the outcomes and our ability to "beat the virus."

Any paleontology fans in the feed? ⚒ Meet Az Klymiuk, Akiko Shinya, Adrienne Stroup, and Pia Viglietti—paleo rockstars w...
03/29/2021

Any paleontology fans in the feed? ⚒ Meet Az Klymiuk, Akiko Shinya, Adrienne Stroup, and Pia Viglietti—paleo rockstars who collectively hold ten degrees across geology, ecology, museum studies, cultural heritage preservation, and more.

Their daily work takes them out in the field, down in the collections, deep into databases, and all around the world. Read how they’re forging their paths and you can, too ➡️ bit.ly/WorkingInPaleontology

Who has visited SUE the T. rex in the past two years? 🦖✋ If our fierce fossils’ light show dazzled you, it’s thanks to L...
03/26/2021

Who has visited SUE the T. rex in the past two years? 🦖✋

If our fierce fossils’ light show dazzled you, it’s thanks to Latoya Flowers. She was the lead on this project and used her skills as a media producer to create projection mapping onto SUE’s fossilized bones.

Hear how Latoya made a 67-million-year-old dinosaur even more lit 🔥➡️ bit.ly/LatoyaOnSUE

This mapping took hundreds of hours and dozens of sessions tweaking the projection to match the skeleton perfectly. Latoya chose neon colors to personify a bold theropod presence. ⚡️

In preparation for the SUE traveling exhibition, Latoya collaborated with lighting designers to recreate the show using theatrical and UV lighting. Now visitors around the country can enjoy the same experience whether they’re seeing replica SUE in Des Moines or Denver. 👀

Happy Feathursday! 🦚 This male Fork-tailed Flycatcher rests on a loblolly bay shrub painted by Maria Martin. She illustr...
03/25/2021

Happy Feathursday! 🦚 This male Fork-tailed Flycatcher rests on a loblolly bay shrub painted by Maria Martin. She illustrated many of the botanicals and insects that appear throughout John J. Audubon's renowned Birds of America. 🦅

This iconic book depicts 435 North American birds at life-size. While this masterpiece was his life's work, Audubon didn't paint the four volumes alone. 📚 Other artists, like Maria Martin, contributed to the beautiful and scientifically accurate backgrounds that appear throughout Birds of America. 🦆#WomensHistoryMonth

Happy Feathursday! 🦚 This male Fork-tailed Flycatcher rests on a loblolly bay shrub painted by Maria Martin. She illustrated many of the botanicals and insects that appear throughout John J. Audubon's renowned Birds of America. 🦅

This iconic book depicts 435 North American birds at life-size. While this masterpiece was his life's work, Audubon didn't paint the four volumes alone. 📚 Other artists, like Maria Martin, contributed to the beautiful and scientifically accurate backgrounds that appear throughout Birds of America. 🦆#WomensHistoryMonth

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1400 S Lake Shore Dr
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60605

For more information about getting to The Field Museum, please visit our website at www.fieldmuseum.org and click on Plan Your Visit.

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