Field Museum

Field Museum The Field Museum fuels a journey of discovery across time to enable solutions for a brighter future rich in nature and culture. We fuel a journey of discovery across time to enable solutions for a brighter future rich in nature and culture.
(22286)

Every day we contribute to groundbreaking scientific research thanks to almost 40 million specimens and artifacts in our collections and over 150 scientists on staff. Discovering, collecting, collaborating, researching, educating, conserving, solving—there’s a lot of work to do. And we’re on it. 🌎

Operating as usual

Today we're skipping #FossilFriday in favor of Fossorial Friday! A fossorial animal is one that's adapted to digging and...
09/10/2021

Today we're skipping #FossilFriday in favor of Fossorial Friday!

A fossorial animal is one that's adapted to digging and lives primarily underground. Think badgers, moles, ants, earthworms, and even clams. 🐜

If the two words seem similar it's because they both come from the same Latin word "fossa," which means "ditch."

Cue to ditch the rest of this day and get fossorial, Y/N? 😴
Kidding. We would never! 😉

🎨: Archibald Thorburn from British Mammals

Five years ago, we unveiled this striped hyena diorama, giving new life to specimens that were 120 years old. ✨Dioramas ...
09/09/2021

Five years ago, we unveiled this striped hyena diorama, giving new life to specimens that were 120 years old. ✨

Dioramas are moments frozen in time. They preserve a place and its natural history for our understanding, study, and appreciation. To create a scientifically accurate scene, the tiniest details are taken into account—from each aloe plant to paw print. 🐾

Can you find the bat-eared fox hidden among the rocks? 🦊 Next time you visit, keep an eye out for the tiny dung beetle, too. 👀

Five years ago, we unveiled this striped hyena diorama, giving new life to specimens that were 120 years old. ✨

Dioramas are moments frozen in time. They preserve a place and its natural history for our understanding, study, and appreciation. To create a scientifically accurate scene, the tiniest details are taken into account—from each aloe plant to paw print. 🐾

Can you find the bat-eared fox hidden among the rocks? 🦊 Next time you visit, keep an eye out for the tiny dung beetle, too. 👀

09/08/2021
A Rockin' Mineral Show & Tell

Our physical geology & meteorite collections manager Jim Holstein takes us on a tour of some of the 60,000 minerals, meteorites, and other marvels in his care. ☄️

He sets us straight on the difference between rocks and minerals; reminds us of the three places meteorites come from; and shows us how a mineral looks when it gets excited. 🌟

These findings stink, which is great news for Science! 💨Field researchers Molly McDonough and Adam Ferguson have determi...
09/07/2021
Meet the Spotted Skunks. They’ve Been Keeping a Secret From Us.

These findings stink, which is great news for Science! 💨

Field researchers Molly McDonough and Adam Ferguson have determined there are seven species of spotted skunks—three more than previously thought.

Adam jokingly calls these stink-butts the "acrobats of the skunk world" because they perform a handstand before spraying.

Find out how Molly and Adam have redrawn the skunk family tree ⬇️

New research using hundreds of DNA samples showed that there are seven species of these hand-standing, stink-spraying mammals.

Some days you're the raptor, some days you're the prey.Monday: Red-tailed Hawk by John AudubonTuesday: Osprey by Charles...
09/06/2021

Some days you're the raptor, some days you're the prey.
Monday: Red-tailed Hawk by John Audubon
Tuesday: Osprey by Charles Dubois
Wednesday: Osprey by John Audubon
Thursday: Eurasian Hobby by Charles Dubois
Friday: Sparrowhawk by John Hunt

Raptors, or birds of prey, are equipped with sharp talons, powerful beaks, and keen eyesight. 🗡 The term raptor comes from the Latin word "rapio," meaning to "take by force." Something eagles, hawks, vultures, falcons, owls, and other flying hunters do very well. 🦅

What's your favorite prey, er, day of the week?

Now open: The Machine Inside 🦒✨See inside nature’s mechanical marvels—and learn how they inspire us—in our newest exhibi...
09/03/2021

Now open: The Machine Inside 🦒✨

See inside nature’s mechanical marvels—and learn how they inspire us—in our newest exhibition.

How does a giraffe’s heart pump blood seven feet up to its brain? 🧠 How does a pelican’s pouch stretch to hold three gallons of water then shrink back in place?

Zoom in on trees' hidden transport systems, try “winging it” in our flying interactive, get a mouthful from animals with fast and powerful jaws, take stealthy selfies, and so much more. 😎

Run, don’t walk, to The #MachineInside!

Last chance to see “Becoming Jane: The Evolution of Dr. Jane Goodall,” before it closes on Sept 6! 🚨 fieldmuseum.org/bec...
09/02/2021

Last chance to see “Becoming Jane: The Evolution of Dr. Jane Goodall,” before it closes on Sept 6! 🚨 fieldmuseum.org/becomingjane

Experience the life and work of Dr. Jane Goodall in this exhibition from National Geographic Museum. ✨ Step into Jane’s Tanzania field research tent, experience the sights and sounds of chimpanzees’ natural habitat, interact with a life-like hologram, learn how to #BeLikeJane, and discover the legacy of trailblazing conservationist, Dr. Jane Goodall. 🌍

Photo by Hugo Van Lawick, National Geographic

Last chance to see “Becoming Jane: The Evolution of Dr. Jane Goodall,” before it closes on Sept 6! 🚨 fieldmuseum.org/becomingjane

Experience the life and work of Dr. Jane Goodall in this exhibition from National Geographic Museum. ✨ Step into Jane’s Tanzania field research tent, experience the sights and sounds of chimpanzees’ natural habitat, interact with a life-like hologram, learn how to #BeLikeJane, and discover the legacy of trailblazing conservationist, Dr. Jane Goodall. 🌍

Photo by Hugo Van Lawick, National Geographic

09/01/2021
(Early) Mammal Movement

Ken Angielczyk is our fossil mammal curator. He studies very early mammal relatives called synapsids, and how they evolved to be the cats, bats, whales, horses, humans, and other animals you’d recognize as mammals today. 🦇🐋

When it comes to mammal spines, Ken's got your back. 😉 Mammal backbones are unusual because they’re regionalized and heterogeneous. This means various segments of the spine look different because they’re specialized to do different things.

And learn more about how all kinds of animals function in our newest exhibition opening this Friday ➡️ fieldmuseum.org/biomechanics 🎉

We see it's #TrilobiteTuesday. DYK these three-lobed marine arthropods were among the first animals with eyes? 👀We know ...
08/31/2021

We see it's #TrilobiteTuesday. DYK these three-lobed marine arthropods were among the first animals with eyes? 👀

We know this because their peepers were made of calcite mineral crystals, which easily fossilized. Some eyes are so well preserved that scientists can even study the individual lenses! 😲

But you see, not all trilobites had eyes. Scientists think blind trilobites lived where seeing was useless—like in pitch black deep water.

We see it's #TrilobiteTuesday. DYK these three-lobed marine arthropods were among the first animals with eyes? 👀

We know this because their peepers were made of calcite mineral crystals, which easily fossilized. Some eyes are so well preserved that scientists can even study the individual lenses! 😲

But you see, not all trilobites had eyes. Scientists think blind trilobites lived where seeing was useless—like in pitch black deep water.

Meet FMNH PR 12003! 👋 This Triceratops was found in 1904, and the skull has been on display for over 100 years. Today, y...
08/27/2021

Meet FMNH PR 12003! 👋 This Triceratops was found in 1904, and the skull has been on display for over 100 years. Today, you can see it in SUE the T. rex's suite.

Triceratops had a frill that could reach over three feet in width, and its horns were covered in a keratin sheath. That made 'Tops a formidable T. rex opponent—a scene you can watch play out when you visit SUE. ⚡️

Swipe through the photos to see Triceratops through the years—and when we were temporarily haunted by a friendly dino ghost back in 2019. 👻

Our very good boy wishes you a happy #NationalDogDay.While NOT a dog, Máximo the Titanosaur does love a good bone. 😉 In ...
08/26/2021

Our very good boy wishes you a happy #NationalDogDay.

While NOT a dog, Máximo the Titanosaur does love a good bone. 😉 In fact, he's got some of the biggest out there! This giant dino stretches 122 feet across our main hall and stands 28 feet tall at the head.

Patagotitan mayorum's fossils were found when a rancher near La Flecha, Argentina stumbled upon a bone in the desert terrain. 🦴 Paleontologists from Museo Paleontológico Egidio Feruglio eventually excavated over 130 fossils from at least six different individual dinosaurs, including an eight-foot-long femur.

The species name, Patagotitan mayorum, honors both the Patagonia region and the Mayo family farm on which the bones were discovered. fieldmuseum.org/titanosaur

08/25/2021
Studying Snakes and Other Herps

Our new curator of herpetology Sara Ruane already knows what you’re thinking: herpetology like herpes?? 😳 She explains that the two actually do share the same root word, which means: to crawl. Unlike the disease and how it spreads, the word herpetology refers to how reptiles and amphibians tend to move around. 🦎

She shares slithering snakes, limbless lizards, and other specimens while talking about her specialty: how snakes are related to each other and what that means in the broader context of evolutionary biology. 🐍

08/24/2021
Why some animals are shrinking

Forty years of specimens from the collection are showing that birds and other animals are shrinking as temperatures rise. 🐦🌡

These birds were collected after fatal collisions, usually with downtown buildings. Now they live a second life providing vital data for researchers.

08/23/2021
The Motion of a Prehistoric Ocean

Nothing like enjoying the motion of a Cambrian ocean to ease you into the week. 🏖

Can you spot the caterpillar-like Hallucigenia, the trilobite Bathyuriscus, or the many-eyed, nozzle-nosed Opabinia in this more than 500-million-year-old sea? 👀

Enjoy this Cambrian scene—and its many marvelous creatures—on the big screen in our Evolving Planet exhibition.

Were you mermaid for the heat, or do you think ice is nice? 🧜‍♀️💎 Either way, Tiffany has you covered. ✨ This tropical s...
08/20/2021

Were you mermaid for the heat, or do you think ice is nice? 🧜‍♀️💎 Either way, Tiffany has you covered. ✨

This tropical stained glass window scene once decorated the personal studio of Louis Comfort Tiffany of the famed jewelry family.

In cooler waters, this platinum pin called "The Schlumberger Bow" features a 148.5-carat aquamarine and white diamonds.

See them both in our Hall of Gems 💍 fieldmuseum.org/gems

Did you know we have an herbarium? 🌿While filing botany specimens in the room where we house dried plants, collections m...
08/19/2021

Did you know we have an herbarium? 🌿

While filing botany specimens in the room where we house dried plants, collections manager Christine Niezgoda came across a gorgeous watercolor print intermingled with the pressed plant sheets. 🎨

After some research, she discovered the print was part of a larger set of 64 lithographs—and among the Field's first acquisitions back in 1893!

These are some of the earliest lithographs from Japan, printed in black and white and then hand-painted with watercolors. Like botanical prints, these illustrations accurately depict leaf, flower, and fruit structure. But they go one step further and include detailed bark drawings, as well as the cross and longitudinal sections of the tree. 🌳 Stunning hidden history in the collection!

08/18/2021
Creating Exhibitions

Tori Lee helps the Museum tell stories through exhibitions. She’s worked on an incredible array of shows that span subject matter and scope.

Whether it’s working on a massive project that involves 100+ collaborators, like the renovation of our Native North America Hall, or an exhibition about one man’s legacy, like Carl Cotton, Tori brings the same passion and commitment. fieldmuseum.org/findingcarl

If you wanted to take a page from a young Jane Goodall’s book, that would mean awaking before sunrise every morning. Whe...
08/17/2021

If you wanted to take a page from a young Jane Goodall’s book, that would mean awaking before sunrise every morning.

When it came to her work at Gombe, Jane's equipment and requirements were minimal: patience, determination, binoculars, and a simple notebook. 📝

Jane kept extensive and meticulous records about the chimpanzees she observed. 👀 Along with shorthand notes, she also drew sketches of what she saw and kept charts and checklists of specific behaviors. At night back in her tent, she transcribed her notes into a fuller account of that day’s events.

In this notebook, Jane recorded her observations from September to December 1961. See this journal in the #BecomingJane exhibition—plus get a chance to meet Field scientists and enjoy a spectacular view of the Navy Pier fireworks—on August 25. bit.ly/LastCallBecomingJane

If you wanted to take a page from a young Jane Goodall’s book, that would mean awaking before sunrise every morning.

When it came to her work at Gombe, Jane's equipment and requirements were minimal: patience, determination, binoculars, and a simple notebook. 📝

Jane kept extensive and meticulous records about the chimpanzees she observed. 👀 Along with shorthand notes, she also drew sketches of what she saw and kept charts and checklists of specific behaviors. At night back in her tent, she transcribed her notes into a fuller account of that day’s events.

In this notebook, Jane recorded her observations from September to December 1961. See this journal in the #BecomingJane exhibition—plus get a chance to meet Field scientists and enjoy a spectacular view of the Navy Pier fireworks—on August 25. bit.ly/LastCallBecomingJane

Imagine a jaw that can crush over 8,000 pounds in one bite. A spring-like body that sprints at 80 miles per hour. 🐆 Ears...
08/16/2021

Imagine a jaw that can crush over 8,000 pounds in one bite. A spring-like body that sprints at 80 miles per hour. 🐆 Ears that act as air conditioners!

All living things, including you, contain remarkable feats of engineering. Investigate nature’s mechanical marvels in our newest special exhibition, The Machine Inside: Biomechanics, opening September 3. 🥳

Experience the mechanics behind fins, claws, jaws, and more! Test different wings in flight, pump a giraffe heart model, and assess your grip strength in this exhibition for all ages.

Sneak a peek at #MachineInside ➡️ fieldmuseum.org/machineinside

Who's scared of Friday the 13th? Is it Friday the 13th? We're not scared. But maybe let us know when it's Saturday. 😳Tar...
08/13/2021

Who's scared of Friday the 13th? Is it Friday the 13th? We're not scared. But maybe let us know when it's Saturday. 😳

Tarsiers are palm-sized primates found in the islands of Southeast Asia, specifically the forests of the Philippines and Indonesia. 🌿

Their small brains have a huge visual cortex to process information from those large eyes. All the better to see things sneaking up on you! 👀

The tarsier is also known for its especially long ankle bones (or tarsals), helping it leap huge distances relative to its compact body size. These mammals can also rotate their heads in an owl-like way, making up for the fact that their humongous eyes are fixed in position.

Would you rather be an excellent jumper or have an extra twisty head? 🐸🦉

Who's scared of Friday the 13th? Is it Friday the 13th? We're not scared. But maybe let us know when it's Saturday. 😳

Tarsiers are palm-sized primates found in the islands of Southeast Asia, specifically the forests of the Philippines and Indonesia. 🌿

Their small brains have a huge visual cortex to process information from those large eyes. All the better to see things sneaking up on you! 👀

The tarsier is also known for its especially long ankle bones (or tarsals), helping it leap huge distances relative to its compact body size. These mammals can also rotate their heads in an owl-like way, making up for the fact that their humongous eyes are fixed in position.

Would you rather be an excellent jumper or have an extra twisty head? 🐸🦉

Happy Unearth Day, SUE! 🦖 🎉It was 31 years ago today that Sue Hendrickson discovered the world’s most complete T. rex. ⚒...
08/12/2021

Happy Unearth Day, SUE! 🦖 🎉

It was 31 years ago today that Sue Hendrickson discovered the world’s most complete T. rex. ⚒ Approximately 250 of the 380 known bones in the Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton were unearthed, meaning this fierce fossil is 90% complete by bone volume.

Researchers around the world have studied SUE to learn more about tyrannosaurs: how they lived and for how long; how fast they grew and how fast they moved—just for starters!

SUE has also contributed to our understanding of theropods at huge body size, and how this carnivore fit into the North American Cretaceous ecosystem.

Let's give it up for the world's oldest Leo ✨ fieldmuseum.org/sue

08/11/2021
Herpetology Show & Tell

Herpetology collections assistant Josh Mata gives us a ribbeting show & tell of reptile and amphibian specimens! 🐸

In between demonstrating how a reticulated python uses its impressive fangs and the enormous size of an alligator snapping turtle, Josh explains how his work is like a librarian's—and why museum collections are so important.

We'd be lyin' if we said we didn't love World Lion Day. 🦁It's a chance to sink our teeth into a fan favorite: the Tsavo ...
08/10/2021

We'd be lyin' if we said we didn't love World Lion Day. 🦁

It's a chance to sink our teeth into a fan favorite: the Tsavo Lions.

These iconic cats have long-fascinated visitors. But most people only know them for their notorious hankering for humans. In fact, it's now believed bad teeth were to blame for these man-eaters’ preference for people. 🦷

By studying the lions' skulls, researchers found that the wear patterns on their teeth resembled those of zoo lions, which eat soft foods and don't crack bones. Additionally, X-ray imaging showed that these felines suffered from severe dental issues, including a root-tip abscess in one lion’s canine. 😩

It's likely these lions switched to humans simply because they were easier to catch and chew. Tap right meow for more on these maneless males ➡️ fieldmuseum.org/tsavolions

We'd be lyin' if we said we didn't love World Lion Day. 🦁

It's a chance to sink our teeth into a fan favorite: the Tsavo Lions.

These iconic cats have long-fascinated visitors. But most people only know them for their notorious hankering for humans. In fact, it's now believed bad teeth were to blame for these man-eaters’ preference for people. 🦷

By studying the lions' skulls, researchers found that the wear patterns on their teeth resembled those of zoo lions, which eat soft foods and don't crack bones. Additionally, X-ray imaging showed that these felines suffered from severe dental issues, including a root-tip abscess in one lion’s canine. 😩

It's likely these lions switched to humans simply because they were easier to catch and chew. Tap right meow for more on these maneless males ➡️ fieldmuseum.org/tsavolions

Address

1400 S Lake Shore Dr
Chicago, IL
60605

For more information about getting to The Field Museum, please visit our website at www.fieldmuseum.org and click on Plan Your Visit.

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 5pm
Tuesday 9am - 5pm
Wednesday 9am - 5pm
Thursday 9am - 5pm
Friday 9am - 5pm
Saturday 9am - 5pm
Sunday 9am - 5pm

Telephone

(312) 922-9410

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Field Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby museums


Other Science Museums in Chicago

Show All