The Art Institute of Chicago

The Art Institute of Chicago Interested in becoming a member? (312) 499-4111 Mission: The Art Institute of Chicago collects, preserves, and interprets works of art of the highest quality, representing the world's diverse artistic traditions, for the inspiration and education of the public and in accordance with our profession's highest ethical standards and practices.
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"The first time I glanced at [Bisa] Butler’s work I missed something crucial: her subjects float. When she translates ea...
05/10/2021
Bisa Butler’s Worlds in Cut Cloth

"The first time I glanced at [Bisa] Butler’s work I missed something crucial: her subjects float. When she translates early 20th-century photographs of mostly unknown individuals, she removes everything but the figure. Seated and standing individuals are left without chairs or ground. They float in an expanse of electrified fabric, proudly asserting themselves, free from the weight of cultural assumptions. They lean on nothing."

Hyperallergic explores the work of Bisa Butler—now on view at the Art Institute.

Birds and airplanes soar, horses gallop, purples meet yellows, cerulean blues tango with magenta in geometric patterns, foliate designs crash into damask.

CLOSING SOON—"Toulouse-Lautrec and the Celebrity Culture of Paris"Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec made a career depicting the ...
05/07/2021

CLOSING SOON—"Toulouse-Lautrec and the Celebrity Culture of Paris"

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec made a career depicting the most colorful personalities from the cabarets and dance halls of Montmartre, the Parisian neighborhood where a flamboyant nightlife exploded in the late 19th century.

Dynamic and instantly recognizable, his images once filled the streets of Paris and helped catapult his clients to fame. Explore paintings, painted objects, and rarely exhibited posters in this focused installation in Gallery 243.

Closing June 6—https://bit.ly/3k1XOa1

"My husband, John, is a professional DJ and has been spinning records since he was 12 years old... The staccato rhythms ...
05/06/2021

"My husband, John, is a professional DJ and has been spinning records since he was 12 years old... The staccato rhythms of [his] records help me keep up the pace of my work. Sometimes it almost feels like a song is being interwoven and sewn into my quilts."

Bisa Butler invites us to explore the rich intersection of music and art in her home and studio—with a playlist selected by the artist in collaboration with her husband.

The Quilter's Playlist—https://bit.ly/33iWxUi

MAY 21—Virtual Artist Talk: Laurie Anderson on the Thorne Miniature RoomsJoin pioneering multimedia artist Laurie Anders...
05/06/2021

MAY 21—Virtual Artist Talk: Laurie Anderson on the Thorne Miniature Rooms

Join pioneering multimedia artist Laurie Anderson as she explores and discusses the museum’s collection of Thorne Miniature Rooms, while also reflecting on her own groundbreaking practice in music, spoken word, visual art, and theater.

REGISTER—https://bit.ly/3xvyBuD

Free; registration required.

MAY 21—Virtual Artist Talk: Laurie Anderson on the Thorne Miniature Rooms

Join pioneering multimedia artist Laurie Anderson as she explores and discusses the museum’s collection of Thorne Miniature Rooms, while also reflecting on her own groundbreaking practice in music, spoken word, visual art, and theater.

REGISTER—https://bit.ly/3xvyBuD

Free; registration required.

Katharina Fritsch makes meticulous reproductions of everyday objects, rendering them unfamiliar through extreme shifts i...
05/05/2021

Katharina Fritsch makes meticulous reproductions of everyday objects, rendering them unfamiliar through extreme shifts in scale and either alluring or repellent color choices. Indeed, saturated and nonreflective coats of color lend her sculptures a strong sense of otherworldliness.

“I always call the starting point [for a sculpture] a vision,” she has said. “I’ll be in a tram or driving a car and I suddenly get a picture in my mind. Something completely normal turns into a miracle—something I’ve never seen before. Simple things you see every day turn into something strange, something alien.”

"Woman with Dog" is clearly scaled up— enormously so—from a small figurine made of shells, as one might find in a seaside souvenir shop. See this work on view in Gallery 296.

Katharina Fritsch makes meticulous reproductions of everyday objects, rendering them unfamiliar through extreme shifts in scale and either alluring or repellent color choices. Indeed, saturated and nonreflective coats of color lend her sculptures a strong sense of otherworldliness.

“I always call the starting point [for a sculpture] a vision,” she has said. “I’ll be in a tram or driving a car and I suddenly get a picture in my mind. Something completely normal turns into a miracle—something I’ve never seen before. Simple things you see every day turn into something strange, something alien.”

"Woman with Dog" is clearly scaled up— enormously so—from a small figurine made of shells, as one might find in a seaside souvenir shop. See this work on view in Gallery 296.

Émilie Charmy was among the first women to exhibit paintings in the Fauvist style. Traveling to rugged sites on France’s...
05/03/2021

Émilie Charmy was among the first women to exhibit paintings in the Fauvist style. Traveling to rugged sites on France’s Mediterranean coast, such as L’Estaque, depicted here, she created landscapes suffused with emotion and subjective expression.

Laying down vibrant color in broad unstructured planes, Charmy composed the scene as a collection of loosely joined organic forms. The swelling and tapering shapes along the composition’s edges produce a dynamic sense of movement that dissipates at the center, where we glimpse the calm waters of the Bay of Marseille.

One of the first paintings by a woman to enter the museum's holdings of modern art, this is the 90th year "L'Estaque" has been part of the Art Institute's collection.

See Émilie Charmy's "L'Estaque" on view in Gallery 391.

Émilie Charmy was among the first women to exhibit paintings in the Fauvist style. Traveling to rugged sites on France’s Mediterranean coast, such as L’Estaque, depicted here, she created landscapes suffused with emotion and subjective expression.

Laying down vibrant color in broad unstructured planes, Charmy composed the scene as a collection of loosely joined organic forms. The swelling and tapering shapes along the composition’s edges produce a dynamic sense of movement that dissipates at the center, where we glimpse the calm waters of the Bay of Marseille.

One of the first paintings by a woman to enter the museum's holdings of modern art, this is the 90th year "L'Estaque" has been part of the Art Institute's collection.

See Émilie Charmy's "L'Estaque" on view in Gallery 391.

Our current rotation in Gallery 10 spans the full history of photography, from 19th-century daguerreotypes to contempora...
04/30/2021

Our current rotation in Gallery 10 spans the full history of photography, from 19th-century daguerreotypes to contemporary works that push the boundaries of the medium.

EXPLORE—https://bit.ly/3arirIU

Although French by birth and training, Nicolas Poussin spent most of his career in Rome, immersed in the study of ancien...
04/29/2021

Although French by birth and training, Nicolas Poussin spent most of his career in Rome, immersed in the study of ancient art, where he painted classically inspired works for an educated elite. His art has long been considered the embodiment of the ideals of 17th-century classicism.

In this painting, Saint John, one of the four Evangelists who wrote the Gospels of the New Testament, reclines beside his attribute, the eagle. He is depicted as a powerful old man, presumably after retiring to the Greek island of Patmos to write his gospel and the book of Revelation at the end of his life.

To suggest the vanished glory of the ancient world, Poussin carefully constructed an idealized setting for the saint, complete with an obelisk, a temple, and column fragments. Human-made and natural forms were adjusted according to principles of geometry and logic to convey the measured order of the scene. Even the profile view of Saint John is in harmony with the classical landscape.

See Nicolas Poussin's "Landscape with Saint John on Patmos" (1640) on view in Gallery 209.

Although French by birth and training, Nicolas Poussin spent most of his career in Rome, immersed in the study of ancient art, where he painted classically inspired works for an educated elite. His art has long been considered the embodiment of the ideals of 17th-century classicism.

In this painting, Saint John, one of the four Evangelists who wrote the Gospels of the New Testament, reclines beside his attribute, the eagle. He is depicted as a powerful old man, presumably after retiring to the Greek island of Patmos to write his gospel and the book of Revelation at the end of his life.

To suggest the vanished glory of the ancient world, Poussin carefully constructed an idealized setting for the saint, complete with an obelisk, a temple, and column fragments. Human-made and natural forms were adjusted according to principles of geometry and logic to convey the measured order of the scene. Even the profile view of Saint John is in harmony with the classical landscape.

See Nicolas Poussin's "Landscape with Saint John on Patmos" (1640) on view in Gallery 209.

Prints designed by Japanese artist Itō Shinsui (1898–1972) feature traditional subjects, bold colors, and realism that w...
04/28/2021

Prints designed by Japanese artist Itō Shinsui (1898–1972) feature traditional subjects, bold colors, and realism that went beyond 19th-century norms, a combination that achieved remarkable commercial success.

In his homeland his reputation rested upon his paintings, but Shinsui’s technically accomplished prints were more popular overseas, which encouraged him to design works specifically for foreign audiences.

See the exhibition "Modernity and Nostalgia: The Prints of Itō Shinsui" before it closes June 13.

EXPLORE—https://bit.ly/2PDWYVN

MAY 5—Virtual Conversation: Caroline Kent—Not buried, just under the surfaceWhat are the conditions from which a new vis...
04/28/2021

MAY 5—Virtual Conversation: Caroline Kent—Not buried, just under the surface

What are the conditions from which a new visual language can emerge?

Join Chicago-based artist Caroline Kent for a conversation with Art Institute curators on the intimate vocabularies that shape her practice as an abstract painter. Free with registration.

REGISTER—https://bit.ly/2QoqVtD

MAY 5—Virtual Conversation: Caroline Kent—Not buried, just under the surface

What are the conditions from which a new visual language can emerge?

Join Chicago-based artist Caroline Kent for a conversation with Art Institute curators on the intimate vocabularies that shape her practice as an abstract painter. Free with registration.

REGISTER—https://bit.ly/2QoqVtD

In the spring of 1948, René Magritte debuted an astonishing body of work, including the painting seen here, in which he ...
04/27/2021

In the spring of 1948, René Magritte debuted an astonishing body of work, including the painting seen here, in which he set out to challenge the notion of artistic sincerity. Radiantly expressive and looking nothing like his paintings of the previous two decades, this new style—termed his période vache, or “nasty style”—used lurid colors and crude paint handling to convey the ongoing unease of Europe after the Second World War.

"Seasickness," arguably the most iconic painting from this moment, has no nautical elements. Yet the title is paid off by a garish sport coat and slab of ham sweltering in the sun that were intended to make viewers feel mild visual nausea. As Magritte explained at the time: “I live in a very unpleasant world... that’s why my painting is a battle, or rather a counteroffensive.”

See "Le mal de mer (Seasickness)" (1947–48) among seven works by Magritte now on view at the Art Institute.

In the spring of 1948, René Magritte debuted an astonishing body of work, including the painting seen here, in which he set out to challenge the notion of artistic sincerity. Radiantly expressive and looking nothing like his paintings of the previous two decades, this new style—termed his période vache, or “nasty style”—used lurid colors and crude paint handling to convey the ongoing unease of Europe after the Second World War.

"Seasickness," arguably the most iconic painting from this moment, has no nautical elements. Yet the title is paid off by a garish sport coat and slab of ham sweltering in the sun that were intended to make viewers feel mild visual nausea. As Magritte explained at the time: “I live in a very unpleasant world... that’s why my painting is a battle, or rather a counteroffensive.”

See "Le mal de mer (Seasickness)" (1947–48) among seven works by Magritte now on view at the Art Institute.

COMING SOON—"Landscape in Light: The Tiffany Window at the Art Institute of Chicago"Made over 100 years ago at Tiffany S...
04/26/2021

COMING SOON—"Landscape in Light: The Tiffany Window at the Art Institute of Chicago"

Made over 100 years ago at Tiffany Studios, the monumental Hartwell Memorial Window is a pinnacle achievement in the medium of stained glass.

Learn more about this magnificent work—opening to the public on May 29: https://bit.ly/2Qpm5fP

A story 100 years in the making, "Monet and Chicago" traces the city's century-long connection to Claude Monet—with rare...
04/26/2021

A story 100 years in the making, "Monet and Chicago" traces the city's century-long connection to Claude Monet—with rarely exhibited works alongside the Impressionist's most famous paintings.

TICKETS—https://bit.ly/3wUUu6l

Advance tickets are required. Please visit our website for new hours and updated visitor policies.

Five works by the American painter Mark Rothko, ranging from 1949 until 1954, show the artist at the height of his abili...
04/23/2021

Five works by the American painter Mark Rothko, ranging from 1949 until 1954, show the artist at the height of his ability to create deeply experiential paintings that radiate light as if through an inner source.

Installed in Gallery 293, these five luminescent works by Rothko join "Untitled", 1989, by the pioneering conceptual artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres, a self-portrait represented as a running text comprising historic events and dates of personal significance, the content of which may shift and evolve over time.

LEARN MORE—https://bit.ly/3cDrNms

Five works by the American painter Mark Rothko, ranging from 1949 until 1954, show the artist at the height of his ability to create deeply experiential paintings that radiate light as if through an inner source.

Installed in Gallery 293, these five luminescent works by Rothko join "Untitled", 1989, by the pioneering conceptual artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres, a self-portrait represented as a running text comprising historic events and dates of personal significance, the content of which may shift and evolve over time.

LEARN MORE—https://bit.ly/3cDrNms

The goal in conserving these works was not to hide the damage—the scars tell their own story.We take a closer look at tw...
04/22/2021
Caring for Two Woodcuts by Martin Puryear | The Art Institute of Chicago

The goal in conserving these works was not to hide the damage—the scars tell their own story.

We take a closer look at two prints by Martin Puryear to learn how conservator Mary Broadway revives and prolongs the lives of objects.

Though most famous for his sculptures, drawing and printmaking have always been essential parts of Martin Puryear's practice.

Celebrate Earth Day 🌍 with a series of virtual programs and resources exploring the natural world.Join us for conversati...
04/22/2021

Celebrate Earth Day 🌍 with a series of virtual programs and resources exploring the natural world.

Join us for conversations, art-making activities, and live performances designed to inspire creative action and reflection at home.

EXPLORE—https://bit.ly/2Qwl9FS

This imposing head probably comes from a full-length sculpture of an apostle that was one of the column or jamb figures ...
04/21/2021

This imposing head probably comes from a full-length sculpture of an apostle that was one of the column or jamb figures flanking the portals of the west facade of Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. Showing the heritage of ancient and Byzantine models, it bears all the stylistic hallmarks of the beginning of the Gothic style in the region around the year 1200.

The head is said to have been found during excavations for the modernization of Paris in the mid-19th century. Medieval sculpture from Notre-Dame was purposefully damaged in the 1790s during the French Revolution because of its presumed royal associations. Fragments of some of the sculptures removed at the order of the revolutionary tribunal were buried out of a lingering respect for its tradition and quality, to be rediscovered in later years.

See "Head of an Apostle" (c. 1210) on view in Gallery 236.

This imposing head probably comes from a full-length sculpture of an apostle that was one of the column or jamb figures flanking the portals of the west facade of Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris. Showing the heritage of ancient and Byzantine models, it bears all the stylistic hallmarks of the beginning of the Gothic style in the region around the year 1200.

The head is said to have been found during excavations for the modernization of Paris in the mid-19th century. Medieval sculpture from Notre-Dame was purposefully damaged in the 1790s during the French Revolution because of its presumed royal associations. Fragments of some of the sculptures removed at the order of the revolutionary tribunal were buried out of a lingering respect for its tradition and quality, to be rediscovered in later years.

See "Head of an Apostle" (c. 1210) on view in Gallery 236.

This Friday! Virtual Conversation: Rem Koolhaas—Exhibition MakingRem Koolhaas is a Pritzker Prize-winning Dutch architec...
04/20/2021

This Friday! Virtual Conversation: Rem Koolhaas—Exhibition Making

Rem Koolhaas is a Pritzker Prize-winning Dutch architect, theorist, and urbanist. For this year’s Butler-VanderLinden Lecture on Architecture, Koolhaas discusses a fundamental strand of his practice—exhibition making—with Irene Sunwoo, the museum’s new John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design. This event is free with registration.

REGISTER—https://bit.ly/3n2n01o

This Friday! Virtual Conversation: Rem Koolhaas—Exhibition Making

Rem Koolhaas is a Pritzker Prize-winning Dutch architect, theorist, and urbanist. For this year’s Butler-VanderLinden Lecture on Architecture, Koolhaas discusses a fundamental strand of his practice—exhibition making—with Irene Sunwoo, the museum’s new John H. Bryan Chair and Curator of Architecture and Design. This event is free with registration.

REGISTER—https://bit.ly/3n2n01o

Address

111 S Michigan Ave
Chicago, IL
60603-6404

Using Public Transportation The Art Institute is located just one block east of the Loop and is easily accessible via the city's "El" train system. The Brown, Green, Orange, Pink, and Purple lines all stop above ground at Adams/Wabash, one block west of the museum. The Red and Blue lines stop underground at Monroe, just a few blocks away. A number of bus lines also stop in front of the museum. Currently, El fare is $2.25 per adult. Visit the Chicago Transit Authority's website for route, schedule, and fare details. Metra is Chicago's commuter rail transit system. The Art Institute is accessible from both the Van Buren and Millennium stations, which are underground just one to two blocks south and north (respectively) along Michigan Avenue. Visit Metra's website for route, schedule, and fare details.

Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 18:00
Thursday 11:00 - 18:00
Friday 11:00 - 18:00
Saturday 11:00 - 18:00
Sunday 11:00 - 18:00

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(312) 443-3600

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The Art of Manuel Miranda. Talonio Kis. Mixed Media on Paper, 8” x 7,” 1991.
Vincent van Gogh Art Tour Live Stream. Join us: https://evensplatform.com/van-gogh-paintings/ Join us: https://evensplatform.com/van-gogh-paintings/
Walter Mariga.
Larry Norton.
#Davinci prediction of President Donald J. Trump and Joe Biden see trump praying for that second term, i find solace knowing that at his age he reincarnate and continue to be him self as i have over the generations continued to be me. even spading my blood line could never kill my thoughts and soul in time... Jami Scott Newman expect some new art and prediction before my death
Happy New Year! Have there been any plans to reschedule the Frida Kahlo exhibit for 2021? Thank you.
The Art of Manuel Miranda. Tolaly Tiram. Acrylic on Paper, 9” x 7,” 2002.
The Art of Manuel Miranda. Potis Celis. Mixed Media on Paper, 6” x 10,” 1994.
Hello, I took this picture 2 years ago, in The Art Institute, when I was in Chicago around april. I am surching the name of the painter and the name of the work. Anyone who can help me? Thanks a lot!
Создание СЕМИ Агрошкол в НСО где Работают мои дипломники ИПФ ФТП НГПИ НГПУ +!!!!!
The Art of Manuel Miranda. Cryta Rista. Ink on Paper, 5” x 8,” 1992.