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The Art Institute of Chicago

The Art Institute of Chicago Interested in becoming a member? (312) 499-4111 The Art Institute of Chicago shares its singular collections with our city and the world.

We collect, care for, and interpret works of art across time, cultures, geographies, and identities, centering the vision of artists and makers.

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COMING SOON—"Salvador Dalí: The Image Disappears"See the first-ever Art Institute exhibition devoted to the quintessenti...
02/06/2023

COMING SOON—"Salvador Dalí: The Image Disappears"

See the first-ever Art Institute exhibition devoted to the quintessential Surrealist and discover 25 works created by the artist at the height of his fame, including rare loans from around the world.

Opening February 18—https://bit.ly/3QzhGSb

Kerry James Marshall describes "Africa Restored (Cheryl as Cleopatra)" as "the shape of Africa reconfigured as a cubist ...
02/04/2023

Kerry James Marshall describes "Africa Restored (Cheryl as Cleopatra)" as "the shape of Africa reconfigured as a cubist sculpture," reversing art-historical narratives of modernist painting's appropriation of African sculpture.

It formally references the 'nkisi nkondi,' or power figures, of the Democratic Republic of Congo. These sculptures were crafted as basic armatures into which layers of metals, mirrors, and nails were driven to activate their force.

Affixed to the sculpture are "medallions," or "icons," in the form of images and texts laminated in plastic that refer to figures within the black freedom movement in America as well as to Egyptian iconographies adopted by African Americans in the 1970s as a way to challenge dominant Western worldviews.

Notably, Marshall adds new elements each time the sculpture goes on view, including for this current presentation. Thus, the work can be seen as an unfinished, living sculpture—open to continued revision by the artist.

See "Africa Restored (Cheryl as Cleopatra)" by Kerry James Marshall—on view in Gallery 295.

"Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places." —Camille PissarroPissarro was a driving force behind the I...
02/03/2023

"Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places." —Camille Pissarro

Pissarro was a driving force behind the Impressionist group shows. Slightly older than the other members of the circle, he made many of the arrangements, reconciled disputes among painters, and contributed a number of canvases to all eight Impressionist exhibitions.

Pissarro's work was driven in part by his political sympathies for the poor, with the day-to-day experiences of rural life preoccupying the artist throughout his career. His paintings of laborers at rest or working in the fields reflected his belief in the central importance of the working class to French society as a whole.

See these works among six paintings by Pissarro on view at the Art Institute.

These playful drinking cups were designed to get you tipsy! In ancient Greece, potters created innovative designs that s...
02/02/2023

These playful drinking cups were designed to get you tipsy! In ancient Greece, potters created innovative designs that served a functional role while offering entertainment. These vessels often made reference to Dionysos, the god of wine and theater.

Eye cups doubled as masks when tilted back for drinking, with the handles serving as ears. And the vessels fashioned after the heads of animals could not be set down without spilling their contents, encouraging guests who held them to drink more wine.

See these objects on view at the Art Institute.

Happy ! Celebrate the rich contributions of Black artists to the museum's collection across media—in this Highlights fea...
02/01/2023

Happy ! Celebrate the rich contributions of Black artists to the museum's collection across media—in this Highlights feature: https://bit.ly/3GnuX9L

01/31/2023
Art Institute Essentials: Hannah Brown Skeele's "Fruit Piece"

On this episode of the Art Institute Essentials video series, we take a closer look at Hannah Brown Skeele's "Fruit Piece."

Skeele painted this amazingly realistic still life in 1860. The luxury foods that she depicted both reflect evolving middle-class tastes in fine art as well as the colonial economies that made these tropical products available.

Supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies

Celebrate the remarkable history of photography through the ways it has responded to and provoked changes across the wor...
01/30/2023

Celebrate the remarkable history of photography through the ways it has responded to and provoked changes across the world.

Explore more than 150 works on view in "A Field Guide to Photography and Media": http://bit.ly/3fSogoI

This exhibition accompanies the museum’s first-ever publication to survey our photography collection—to be published in Spring 2023.

This extravagant ostrich cup is reunited in our galleries with the painting that depicts it in loving detail.Dutch still...
01/29/2023

This extravagant ostrich cup is reunited in our galleries with the painting that depicts it in loving detail.

Dutch still lifes of opulent objects tend to signify human vanity and the fleeting nature of wealth. In this painting, artist Pieter van Roestraeten captured specific heirlooms belonging to the Whitfield family of England, who may have commissioned the painting to convey their longevity and prosperity through generations.

See the painting and the Ostrich Cup on view together in Gallery 234.

In this article, trace the roughly 50-year journey of these elaborate vessels as they traveled from China to France and ...
01/28/2023
Pair of Mounted Vases by Jean Claude Duplessis | The Art Institute of Chicago

In this article, trace the roughly 50-year journey of these elaborate vessels as they traveled from China to France and were extravagantly transformed along the way.

These exuberant and luxurious vases exemplify the rich cultural and commercial ties between China and Europe in the early modern period.

Despite their limited palette, these black-and-white works have a presence, immediacy, and expressive power. Explore str...
01/27/2023

Despite their limited palette, these black-and-white works have a presence, immediacy, and expressive power. Explore striking artworks that span nearly 250 years—in the exhibition "Monochromatic Japanese Prints": https://bit.ly/3fDEIsl

"A Lákt (bentwood box) is one of the most prized possessions in our culture dating back thousands of years. Constructed ...
01/26/2023

"A Lákt (bentwood box) is one of the most prized possessions in our culture dating back thousands of years. Constructed from a plank of cedar with three kerf cuts that is steamed and bent, they were used in cooking, food storage, and trading as well as to store our At.oow (sacred clan objects) and regalia. Painted and carved boxes were typically owned by Clan Chiefs and symbolized wealth when displayed at our Ku èex' (potlatch ceremony). The 'formline' style was a specific design for bentwood boxes that emphasized abstraction, and boxes were typically left unnamed by the carver. The Clan Chief would interpret the elements he saw in the design, and name it. There is no word for 'art' in our language; the boxes are extremely beautiful yet functional and serve a purpose in our culture." —Artist James Johnson

See this work on view in Gallery 264.

At first glance, "Self-Portrait of My Sister" (1941) appears to be a straightforward representation of a young woman in ...
01/25/2023

At first glance, "Self-Portrait of My Sister" (1941) appears to be a straightforward representation of a young woman in hat and gloves.

The title's contradictory language, however, reveals that this painting is a riddle. Chicagoan Gertrude Abercrombie was an only child—she had no sister to portray.

Abercrombie initially referred to this painting as “Portrait of Artist as Ideal.” This language, coupled with her reference to a fictitious sister, hints at a desire to be a different person, a longing that she could indulge through her painting.

She used self-portraiture as a means of trying on new personas and appearances. In this stark and saturated painting, the figure’s absurdly long neck, shockingly blue eyes, and lush brown hair emanate a strange power and improbable beauty.

See “Self-Portrait of My Sister” by Gertrude Abercrombie on view in Gallery 262.

This painting depicts the final moments in the life of Saint Peter Martyr, a friar murdered in the 13th century. The art...
01/24/2023

This painting depicts the final moments in the life of Saint Peter Martyr, a friar murdered in the 13th century. The artist focused attention on the contrasting emotional states of the serenely resigned saint and his elegantly brutish assailant.

The painter Giovanni Girolamo Savoldo created a darkly poetic style of his own, investing the Lombard artistic tradition of literal realism with the rich textural and atmospheric affects of Titian and other Venetian painters. Savoldo's figures are endowed with a complex interior psychology, and his landscapes and draperies are notable for their luminosity.

See "The Death of St. Peter Martyr" (1530/35) on view in Gallery 206.

As though capturing the brief impression of a passerby, Édouard Manet depicted a young Parisienne with a glass of beer a...
01/23/2023

As though capturing the brief impression of a passerby, Édouard Manet depicted a young Parisienne with a glass of beer at her side. The woman's face consists of just a few quick strokes applied to the white-primed canvas like makeup.

During the late 19th century, Parisian cafés were the gathering places of artists and writers and were ideal locations for observing the urban scene. While the figure appears to be seated outdoors, evidence has come to light indicating that Manet posed her in his studio in front of a canvas of a garden that he had previously painted.

See "Woman Reading" among eight works by Manet on view at the Art Institute.

Happy Lunar New Year! 🐇 🎉An enormous rabbit fills the entire surface of this Japanese print, created in the Year of the ...
01/22/2023

Happy Lunar New Year! 🐇 🎉

An enormous rabbit fills the entire surface of this Japanese print, created in the Year of the Rabbit, 1867.

The curious, sacklike quality of the rabbit’s body is also a reference to the large white bag of Hotei, one of the gods of good fortune, who often appears on New Year visual art. Believed to live on the moon as a companion of the Moon Goddess, the rabbit’s body is also rounded out to suggest a lopsided moon, emphasized by its silvery outline.

We wish everyone hope and prosperity in 2023! 🐰 ✨

Visitors and critics were shocked and fascinated when Ivan Albright's "Picture of Dorian Gray" first appeared at the Art...
01/21/2023

Visitors and critics were shocked and fascinated when Ivan Albright's "Picture of Dorian Gray" first appeared at the Art Institute in 1945. The Chicago Tribune reported that the museum had "a heck of a time handling the crowds flocking to see his painting."

In this article, we explore how Albright's distinct style still attracts and repulses audiences today: https://bit.ly/3ZRxsMs

“Art is to console those who are broken by life.”This vibrant painting dates to the last year of Vincent van Gogh's life...
01/20/2023

“Art is to console those who are broken by life.”

This vibrant painting dates to the last year of Vincent van Gogh's life. Institutionalized during this time, Van Gogh made a number of copies of the work of artists he admired.

For this image, he copied a wood engraving from Honoré Daumier’s "Physiology of Drinking," a parody on the four ages of man. Van Gogh's devotion to the poorest members of society had been expressed, even before the decision to become a painter, in his stint as a lay preacher in the Belgian coal-mining district.

Somewhat softening his own depiction of these four ungainly figures, there is real pathos in Van Gogh's version and real desperation in the earnest concentration with which they drink, as if to quench a spiritual as well as physical thirst.

See "The Drinkers" among six paintings by Van Gogh—now on view at the Art Institute.

Though largely forgotten today, French academic painters were once among the most popular artists in Europe. Their reali...
01/19/2023

Though largely forgotten today, French academic painters were once among the most popular artists in Europe. Their realistic depictions of n**e women and classical subjects made them mainstays of the Paris Salon and also a central target of the young Impressionists who regarded their work as overly polished and conservative.

In Jules Joseph Lefebvre's "Odalisque," a woman reclines in a dimly lit interior filled with textiles, fruits, and luxury goods evocative of the Arab world. The painting's setting and title suggest the figure is a courtesan in a harem. This imagined setting—a space historically forbidden to men—provided narrative context for the n**e and appealed to the sexual and colonialist fantasies of European audiences.

See "Odalisque" (1874) on view in Gallery 223.

In this moody, quiet, and romantic painting, Chicago artist Herman Menzel employed flowing forms and flat areas of color...
01/18/2023

In this moody, quiet, and romantic painting, Chicago artist Herman Menzel employed flowing forms and flat areas of color, with a stylized tree silhouetted against an expansive red mountain and a churning sky of blue and violet.

Menzel drew inspiration from the everyday subjects around him, from city dwellers and industrial scenes to fishermen and rural landscapes. Here, the artist combined his observations of a horse from an Illinois farm with those of a visit in 1929 to the mountainous terrain of Woodstock, New York.

See "The White Horse" (1929) on view in Gallery 178.

Undergraduates are encouraged to apply to our Summer Intensive, a weeklong program where students learn more about museu...
01/17/2023

Undergraduates are encouraged to apply to our Summer Intensive, a weeklong program where students learn more about museum professions through workshops, behind-the-scenes tours, field trips, and networking events.

Students who complete the program are eligible to apply for a part-time two-year fellowship at the museum.

For more information, visit artic.edu/summer-intensive

Deadline to apply to the Summer Intensive is February 28.

Most surviving paintings from 15th-century northern Europe served a religious purpose. They depicted Christ's infancy, h...
01/17/2023

Most surviving paintings from 15th-century northern Europe served a religious purpose. They depicted Christ's infancy, his death on the cross, and the lives of the saints for display on altars in churches and chapels, or provided a focus for private devotion at home.

The patrons who commissioned these works wanted traditional images. The most innovative painters of the period—like Rogier van der Weyden or Jean Hey (the Master of Moulins)—knew how to recast authoritative devotional types of the Virgin and Child or Christ's descent from the cross into powerfully expressive new forms, exploiting the medium of oil paint to achieve rich effects of texture and light. Their compositions were repeated with variations in their workshops and by their followers.

See these devotional paintings on view in Gallery 202.

Today marks Martin Luther King Jr. Day, celebrating King’s enduring contributions to civil rights.As part of Dr. King's ...
01/16/2023

Today marks Martin Luther King Jr. Day, celebrating King’s enduring contributions to civil rights.

As part of Dr. King's Poor Peoples Campaign, the Chicago Freedom Movement sought to raise awareness about the impoverished living conditions of African Americans and other minorities as a result of the city's discriminatory housing practices. They urged change through non-violent action, including protest marches and boycotts.

This photograph by Robert Sengstacke captures a historic moment on July 24, 1965, when King spoke from the back of a truck at Robert Taylor Homes in Bronzeville on Chicago’s South Side, the largest public housing project in the world at the time.

To lead the Chicago Freedom Movement, King moved to the city with his family in early 1966, into a building in the North Lawndale neighborhood. They marched in the all-white neighborhoods of Gage Park and Marquette Park. Cameras and news reporters captured the attacks on peaceful protesters, which served as a catalyst for change and earned the sympathy and support of Americans across the country.

On April 11, 1968—one week after Dr. King was assassinated—president Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1968. Title VIII, known as the Fair Housing Act, banned housing discrimination under federal law.

"What I wanted was to look for beauty in the everyday world, to catch the joy and swing of modern American life." —Bessi...
01/15/2023

"What I wanted was to look for beauty in the everyday world, to catch the joy and swing of modern American life." —Bessie Potter Vonnoh

Today, her name remains unfamiliar to many art enthusiasts and scholars, but at the turn of the 20th century, Bessie Potter Vonnoh made headlines. At 22 years old, she became the first named woman sculptor represented in the Art Institute's permanent collection.

Explore the fascinating story and remarkable career of this turn of the 20th-century sculptor in an article from curator Annelise K. Madsen: https://bit.ly/3Qqe5ph

NOW OPEN—"Himali Singh Soin: Static Range"Conceived as an immersive environment, "Static Range" presents a constellation...
01/12/2023

NOW OPEN—"Himali Singh Soin: Static Range"

Conceived as an immersive environment, "Static Range" presents a constellation of media, including poetry, sound, video, textile, ceramic, and works on paper.

Artist and writer Himali Singh Soin presents this transnational project—exploring the intertwined histories and futures of nuclear landscapes—in her first solo exhibition in the United States.

LEARN MORE—https://bit.ly/3iZIfDn

"[He] saw his men’s bodies, saw their conquerorHulking hugely above them and lickingTheir lamentable wounds with his blo...
01/11/2023

"[He] saw his men’s bodies, saw their conqueror
Hulking hugely above them and licking
Their lamentable wounds with his bloody tongue."

In the ancient epic, Ovid's Metamorphosis, Cadmus arrives to find his soldiers devoured by a dragon. Vowing revenge, the prince can be see in the background slaying the beast.

The great Dutch Mannerist Hendrick Goltzius was at the height of his fame as a printmaker and publisher when he engraved this dramatic scene in 1588. Like other Netherlandish artists in his time, Goltzius studied Classical antiquity to understand the ideal representation of the human face and body and to develop his own imaginative repertoire.

See "The Dragon Devouring the Companions of Cadmus" on view in Gallery 213.

"I just let my brain rest when I paint flowers." —Pierre-Auguste RenoirRenoir’s interest in flowers as an artistic subje...
01/10/2023

"I just let my brain rest when I paint flowers." —Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Renoir’s interest in flowers as an artistic subject can be dated to at least the early 1880s. He may have had the opportunity to admire paintings of the flower by Claude Monet made in 1878 and 1881.

First imported to France from East Asia during the French Revolution, chrysanthemums are a late summer flower appreciated for their strong scent and exceptional range of color and shape. Renoir’s "Chrysanthemums" makes no reference to setting and may represent one of the bouquets that the artist loved to keep in his home to paint when the impulse came upon him.

See "Chrysanthemums" among 11 works by Renoir now on view at the Art Institute.

Escape the cold to explore an iconic art collection. Illinois residents receive FREE weekday admission—Monday, Thursday,...
01/09/2023

Escape the cold to explore an iconic art collection. Illinois residents receive FREE weekday admission—Monday, Thursday, and Friday—now until March 24.

GET FREE TICKETS—https://bit.ly/3VIbvvK

"For years, I was terrified of ghosts. I didn’t like to walk up stairs when lights were out below me. People told me tha...
01/07/2023

"For years, I was terrified of ghosts. I didn’t like to walk up stairs when lights were out below me. People told me that ghosts weren’t real—common sense. Leonora Carrington had little use for common sense. She was a surrealist, a painter who summoned her ghosts and brought them to life on her canvas. To consider her paintings is to be filled with questions."

Quotes can be mantras, reflections, or warnings. Hear from our staff as they reflect on the words of artists who have inspired them: https://bit.ly/3IsBCE7

Explore Korean ceramics across the centuries, from exquisite 12th-century celadons to contemporary works that carry the ...
01/06/2023

Explore Korean ceramics across the centuries, from exquisite 12th-century celadons to contemporary works that carry the artistic heritage of Korea's past into the present day—now on view at the Art Institute.

The domestic scenes, portraits, and n**es painted by John Currin have been called "American grotesque," as unsettling as...
01/05/2023

The domestic scenes, portraits, and n**es painted by John Currin have been called "American grotesque," as unsettling as they are meticulously rendered.

"Stamford after Brunch" (2000) captures the giddy camaraderie of three women with soft, childlike arms and improbably scrawny, angular legs. While the figures laugh, drink martinis, and smoke ci**rs, the winter landscape outside stands in acute contrast to the interior comforts of warm conversation and lightweight clothing.

See this painting by John Currin on view in Gallery 296.

Final days! Don't miss this vibrant exhibition of works by David Hockney, one of England’s most versatile and inventive ...
01/04/2023

Final days! Don't miss this vibrant exhibition of works by David Hockney, one of England’s most versatile and inventive artists.

"David Hockney: The Arrival of Spring, Normandy, 2020" closes January 9.

LEARN MORE—https://bit.ly/3yHL7Ka

Make the most of your holiday break with a visit to the Art Institute—free for kids under 14 and Chicago teens under 18....
01/03/2023

Make the most of your holiday break with a visit to the Art Institute—free for kids under 14 and Chicago teens under 18.

VISIT—artic.edu

There's nothing in the world like the love of a parent. 💞A mother and child are portrayed with vivid intensity in this c...
01/02/2023

There's nothing in the world like the love of a parent. 💞

A mother and child are portrayed with vivid intensity in this compassionate rendering, contrasting the mother's direct gaze with the charming appeal of the baby's chubby face. The rapid brushwork used to describe the clothing and the swaddling blanket contributes to the freshness of this depiction.

The American artist Julius Gari Melchers studied in Paris before settling in Holland, where he specialized in depictions of peasant life, inspired by contemporary Dutch painters of the Hague School. In 1906, "Mother and Child" was exhibited at both the Paris Salon and the Art Institute.

See this painting on view in Gallery 273.

Address

111 S Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
60603

Using Public Transportation The Art Institute is located just one block east of the Loop and is easily accessible via the city's "El" train system. The Brown, Green, Orange, Pink, and Purple lines all stop above ground at Adams/Wabash, one block west of the museum. The Red and Blue lines stop underground at Monroe, just a few blocks away. A number of bus lines also stop in front of the museum. Currently, El fare is $2.25 per adult. Visit the Chicago Transit Authority's website for route, schedule, and fare details. Metra is Chicago's commuter rail transit system. The Art Institute is accessible from both the Van Buren and Millennium stations, which are underground just one to two blocks south and north (respectively) along Michigan Avenue. Visit Metra's website for route, schedule, and fare details.

Opening Hours

Monday 11am - 5pm
Thursday 11am - 8pm
Friday 11am - 5pm
Saturday 11am - 5pm
Sunday 11am - 5pm

Telephone

(312) 443-3600

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After the firing of the DOCENTS at The Art Institute after all the work they did on their OWN TIME, all the dedication of their time and their lives they gave to this institute, I will never visit this Place again. Shame on you.
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