University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center

University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center The Hanna Holborn Gray Special Collections Research Center is home to the University of Chicago Library’s rare books, archives, and manuscripts.
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Find us on Tumblr: http://uchicagoscrc.tumblr.com/ Instagram: UChicagoSCRC Twitter: @uchicagoscrc

Mission: The mission of the Special Collections Research Center, the principal repository for and steward of the Library's rare books, manuscripts, University Archives, and the Chicago Jazz Archives, is to provide primary sources to stimulate, enrich, and support research, teaching, learning, and administration at the University of Chicago. Special Collections makes these resources available to a broad constituency as part of the University's engagement with the larger community of scholars and independent researchers.

Operating as usual

11/11/2020

Video introduction to safety protocols when visiting the University of Chicago Library’s Hanna Holborn Gray Special Collections Research Center during the COVID-19 pandemic.

TRANSCRIPTION

[Upbeat instrumental pop music plays in the background]

Patron carrying bag and books walks down hallway leading to the front door of the Hannah Holborn Gray Special Collections Research Center in the Joseph Regenstein Library. She pauses six feet from the door and make eye contact with a staff member inside at the Center’s front desk.

[Captions] When you arrive at the Special Collections Research Center, you will queue outside the front doors. Signs on the floor mark a spot for you to wait.

Staff member walks from front desk and opens Center’s front door for the patron. Both people are wearing face masks.

[Caption] A staff member will open the door for you and welcome you into the Center.

Staff member motions for patron to follower her inside the Center and points out the bottle of hand sanitizer on a small table in the lobby to the left of the entryway.

[Caption] Hand sanitizer is provided for you in the Center’s lobby.

Patron walks over to the bottle of hand sanitizer and uses it to clean her hands.

Camera cuts to patron standing in front of the Center’s front desk. Staff member stands six feet away behind the desk. The desk has a plexiglass partition. Staff member pantomimes telling the patron that she will need to lock her bags and outerwear in one of the Center’s lockers. The staff member also pantomimes that pens are not allowed in the Reading Room, and that the patron should use a pencil instead.

[Captions] Staff will ask you to place your bags and outerwear into a locker. They will remind you that you must use a pencil instead of a pen in the Reading Room.

Camera cuts to patron walking away from the front desk and down a hallway to the Center’s locker room.

[Caption] Proceed down the hallway to the locker room.

Camera cuts to locker room where available lockers are marked with numbered signs every six feet. Patron opens a locker door, places her belongings inside the locker, and removes the key from the locker. The key has a large, white, plastic tag attached to it. The patron takes the key with her, along with her notebook and pencil. She follows blue tape marks on the floor that direct her out of the locker room and back to the Center’s lobby.

[Caption] Signs mark available lockers. Secure your belongings in a locker and take the key with you. A pathway out of the locker room is marked on the floor.

Camera cuts to patron standing next to the Center’s front desk and near the Reading Room doors. The staff member is behind the front desk. She motions to the patron that she will need to fill out forms if the patron wishes to take photographs of materials or if the patron needs to order scans of materials. The staff member points to the patron’s reserved table in the reading room.

[Captions] Staff will tell you which table and cart is reserved for you in the Reading Room. You will fill out forms if you wish to take photos or if you need scans.

Patron uses her elbow to push the push-plate button to the left of the Reading Room door. The doors to the Reading Room swing open (outward) automatically.

[Caption] Push the button to open the door into the Reading Room.

Patron walks to her reserved table and chair in one corner of the Reading Room. A book cart sits next to the table. Her requested boxes and book are on the cart. A foam cradle is on the table for the book. A self-service photography form and a scan order form are also sitting on the table. An adjustable-height table for persons in wheelchairs is visible nearby. The patron sits down at the table.

[Caption] Proceed to your reserved table. The items you requested will be on a cart.

The patron rises from her chair and makes her way to the northeast corner of the Reading Room. A small table sits in this corner with cleaning supplies and hand sanitizer. The patron takes a spray bottle with cleaning fluid and a paper towel back to her table. She wipes down the table top and the arms of the chair.

[Caption] When you are done, use the provided cleaning supplies to wipe down your table and chair.

The patron returns the cleaning supplies to the table in the corner. She disposes of the paper towel in a trash can next to the table. She uses hand sanitizer to clean her hands.

[Caption] Hand sanitizer is provided in the Reading Room.
The patron uses her elbow to push the push-plate button affixed to the wall to the left of the Reading Room door. The doors swing open automatically, and the patron exits the Reading Room.

[Caption] Use the push button to open the door and exit the Reading Room.

Words appear on the screen: Thank you for wearing a mask and following all safety guidelines. We look forward to welcoming you!

The University of Chicago Library
11/01/2020

The University of Chicago Library

In addition to Halloween, tonight marks the 50th anniversary of the dedication of the Joseph Regenstein Library.

Alumna Kathy Chiang, AB'72, remembers the early days in Regenstein. "My fifth year at Chicago, I was in the Library School and I was a 'super page' working with the other student pages in the Special Collections department. I was there when the Joseph Halle Schaffner Collection in the History of Science arrived. Robert Rosenthal was the Curator. It was pretty special when he unwrapped Newton's 'Principia.'
#Regat50

Happy Halloween!
10/31/2020

Happy Halloween!

Help the University of Chicago Library's Special Collections Research Center document the experiences of the UChicago co...
10/26/2020
Library Guides: Special Collections Research Center COVID-19 Archive: Home

Help the University of Chicago Library's Special Collections Research Center document the experiences of the UChicago community during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Future historians, scientists, leaders, and others will someday want to know how our University community responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. What did we do to keep people safe while still fulfilling our mission? How did our education, our jobs, our relationships, our lives change? How did we engage with others - locally and globally - to fight this disease and its repercussions?

You can help us document this significant moment in history by contributing your story. Tell us about your experience during the pandemic; on campus, at home, in the lab, in the field, or wherever you are. What have you seen, felt, done?

Click on the image to learn more!

Library Guides: Special Collections Research Center COVID-19 Archive: Home

Zonia Baber worked as an associate professor and head of geography and geology in the Department of Education at the Uni...
10/20/2020
The Woman Who Transformed How We Teach Geography

Zonia Baber worked as an associate professor and head of geography and geology in the Department of Education at the University of Chicago. She was also the principal of the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools.

By blending education and activism, Zonia Baber made geography a means of uniting—not conquering—the globe

Take a peak at a recent interview with our Assistant University Archivist about collecting your Covid-19 stories.If you ...
10/01/2020
University Libraries, State Museum Want Your COVID-19 Stories

Take a peak at a recent interview with our Assistant University Archivist about collecting your Covid-19 stories.

If you are interested in contributing please check out our page about the project: https://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/covid19archive

Share your experiences through written stories, art, videos and more. “This is a case where if you save it, I’m happy to receive it,” said Eileen Ielmini of the University of Chicago Library’s Special Collections Research Center.

Coming soon: Appointments for Special Collections and Other Mediated CollectionsMaterials that can only be consulted in ...
09/28/2020
Autumn 2020 On-Site Library Services Begin

Coming soon: Appointments for Special Collections and Other Mediated Collections
Materials that can only be consulted in the Library, such as rare books, archives, microfilm, and other mediated collections, will become available for use through pre-booked appointments.

Consultation of materials from the Special Collections Research Center will be available by appointment only beginning October 8 on Thursdays from noon to 2 p.m., and Fridays from 10 a.m. to noon.

This week, the Library will begin welcoming faculty, students and staff back to campus and reconnecting them with Library collections and spaces. Read about our new offerings for the Autumn Quarter.

09/21/2020
How EVERY Team Got Its Name & Identity!

Do you know the connection between The University of Chicago and the NFL? 🏈

Ever wonder how the NFL got to be where it is today? Sit back, relax, and enjoy the Evolution of the NFL. #NFL100 The NFL Throwback is your home for all thin...

A new web exhibit has launched (has been born?) for the 2019 exhibition, "The Fetus in Utero: From Mystery to Social Med...
09/16/2020

A new web exhibit has launched (has been born?) for the 2019 exhibition, "The Fetus in Utero: From Mystery to Social Media." https://the-fetus-in-utero.rcc.uchicago.edu

Curators Brian Callender, MD, Assistant Professor of Medicine at University of Chicago Division of Biological Sciences; and Margaret Carlyle, Postdoctoral Researcher and Instructor at Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge collaborated with Teodora Szasz and Ashleigh Cassemere-Stanfield of The University of Chicago Research Computing Center to create the new virtual exhibit.

Once restricted to the privacy of the doctor’s office, ultrasound images of the fetus are now immediately recognizable in the public arena, through advertising and social media, where posts tagged “baby’s first pic” are commonplace. These depictions of the fetus in utero have become iconic and are arguably the most easily recognized medical image. How and why did this happen? And at what price and to what end?

The exhibition takes an historical approach to this question by exploring the complex evolution of the fetal image in Western Christian culture over the past 500 years.

Theodore Roosevelt succeeded the presidency of the U.S. on this day in 1901, when William McKinley died one week after b...
09/14/2020

Theodore Roosevelt succeeded the presidency of the U.S. on this day in 1901, when William McKinley died one week after being shot by anarchist Leon Czolgosz. Both presidents received honorary Doctor of Laws degrees from @uchicago, McKinley in 1898, Roosevelt in 1903. #uchicagohistory

Our colleagues at The Black Metropolis Research Consortium (BMRC) have developed a wonderful resource for documenting yo...
08/31/2020

Our colleagues at The Black Metropolis Research Consortium (BMRC) have developed a wonderful resource for documenting your family history.

Your collections are treasures, a piece of history. Check out our new Legacy Management Resource Portal! Our Guide to Managing Your Archives teaches you how to archive your own collections, while our Guide to Donating Archival Materials explains how to donate collections to a repository. We hope that this resource will push forward our mission of preserving and sharing the legacies of Black Chicago history. Please share widely! https://bmrc.lib.uchicago.edu/resources/legacy-management-resources-portal/

American Experience | PBS
08/25/2020

American Experience | PBS

Ida B. Wells exposed racial violence in the South before lending her strength as an advocate for women's right to vote. For her and many Black women, the causes were inextricably linked.

Exploring Race Founded in 2018, Exploring Race is an online magazine run by students of color at the University of Chica...
08/24/2020

Exploring Race Founded in 2018, Exploring Race is an online magazine run by students of color at the University of Chicago.They publish stories written by students at UChicago, about their day-to-day experiences with race on campus.

08/24/2020
The People's Picture

The People's Picture

We are thrilled to unveil a very special commission ‘Our Story: Portraits of Change’, with the Women's Vote 100, produced by Purpose Entertainment. The giant portrait of iconic suffragist and civil rights leader, Ida B. Wells, is an interactive photo mosaic commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment and women’s right to vote in the United States.

The final mosaic, a 1,000 square feet installation, is now on display on the marble floor at Union Station, Washington D.C. from 24-28 August 2020. The artwork is made up of thousands of portraits and stories from the US suffrage movement, with each image telling its own story about the fight for women's right to vote.

An interactive online version is also available for visitors to zoom in on the photos, explore suffragist portraits and stories, and find out more about the many programs and events happening nationwide to commemorate the Suffrage Centennial in 2020.

Suffragists began their fight for women’s equality in 1848 when they demanded the right to vote during the first Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York. For the next 72 years, women lobbied, marched, picketed, and protested for the right to the ballot. Today, 100 years later, more than 68 million women vote in elections because of the courageous suffragists who never gave up. With this artwork, we honor their dedicated efforts to expand American democracy.

Visit www.ourstory100.com to learn more.

Happening today!
08/19/2020

Happening today!

REGISTER and JOIN US on Wednesday August 19, 2020, 7:00-8:00 PM CST to learn more about Black Women Suffragists.
**A virtual event hosted by the Chicago chapter of the National Organization for Women**

08/17/2020

We were honored to provide images of Ida B. Wells to support Our Story: 100 Years of Women’s Right to Vote.

The Nineteenth Amendment, guaranteeing women’s right to vote, was ratified on August 18th, 1920.

Source: ourstory100.com

In honor of Romance Awareness Month, we feature select novels from the Alfred Willis Collection of African-American Popu...
08/03/2020

In honor of Romance Awareness Month, we feature select novels from the Alfred Willis Collection of African-American Popular Fiction.

This is a collection of over 1200 paperback volumes of African-American popular fiction, chiefly romance novels. The collection includes a copy of Entwined Destinies by Elsie Washington (writing under the pseudonym, Rosalind Welles), published by Dell in 1980 and described as the first mass-market, paperback original written by an African American to feature African American characters.

All the major writers, series, and imprints in this genre are very well represented. Among the publishers are Arabesque, BET Books; Kimani, Indigo, and Urban Books; Pocket Books, Signet, and St. Martin’s. Authors include prolific and popular African-American romance writers such as Brenda Jackson, the first in this genre to appear on the New York Times bestseller list, and Rochelle Alers; and others whose work crosses categories and audiences, for example Terry McMillan. The collection was formed by Alfred Willis, a 1986 graduate of the Graduate Library School at the University of Chicago.

Library staff are online, featuring our very own Catherine Uecker!
08/03/2020
Library staff are online: Catherine Uecker

Library staff are online, featuring our very own Catherine Uecker!

Library Staff are Online provides a glimpse of the work UChicago Library staff are doing remotely. Catherine Uecker of Special Collections shares her story.

UChicago History
07/16/2020
UChicago History

UChicago History

University of Chicago Special Collections Research Center is collecting materials documenting the experiences of the UChicago community during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Consider submitting to this archive. Future historians of everyday life will thank you!

https://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/covid19archive

Future historians, scientists, leaders, and others will want to know how our University community responded to the COVID...
07/08/2020

Future historians, scientists, leaders, and others will want to know how our University community responded to the COVID-19 pandemic. Help us document the experiences of the #UChicago community during the #COVID19 #pandemic by contributing your story: https://guides.lib.uchicago.edu/covid19archive

Photo by Marcus Winkler on Unsplash.

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SCIENCE IS LAME WITHOUT AFFECTIONATE BEND TOWARDS NATURE Hear the sound of nature and change what can be done to control pollution for survival and now is the time before it becomes late. Be a bird and not a crisis watcher. Science is lame without the nature. The nature is understandable with love and this is the ultimate source to fight climate change. The universe is in codes of sound with inter- dependence of matter and action with reaction. It is the common sound language for the security and auto function of billions of stars, planets and galaxies. Very few of the universe is visible from which infinity can be confirmed. Whatever is visible is also a treasure to link up with the universal sound language. Sound of language carries clues in reflection and deflection of light, both relate matter. The light is life. Reflection is derived from shining objects and deflection occurs through matter travel. In the process sound waves transmit communications to light up the entire universe. It never faces light absence as numerous objects like the visible sun and the moon deriving light from the sun must be operational elsewhere in the universal chains with safe distance like among objects. It implies the universal clock denotes standard timings and there is no time dilation. Because of objects rotation effect, day and night show up. If everything would have been static, there would not have been any separate day and night scenario. The universal clock may be running on oversell fluctuations in the light presentation and here actual reflection and deflection concerning the objects including the earth having day and night is not the constraint. Sound of the common language is through matter waves only (visible and invisible) in its open book as experienced on the earth in beautiful seasons. Because of the purity of universal existence its auto run is balanced and safe. This gets disturbed due to nothing else but pollution and depending upon its range from object to object, crises occur. If atmosphere agrees with the universal harmonious journey, calamities would be absent. It is now the time to cut on dependence on quick artificial comforts to substitute the existing natural ones (without any infra-structure and expense) causing imbalance in the climate. We must score at the earliest to hold on pollution as it would further add to the ageing of the earth and may not respond to discovery formulas. The nature is on automatic communication with one language through sound waves and its script is linked in twisted wave lines and sound in matter inter dependence and action-reaction thereof on equal footing. This signal would pave way to decipher the code language and understand visible and invisible too to enable switching on immediate steps to control pollution. Be sure everything does not happen sudden and the nature is kind to give the signal. It is still not too late to read it for welfare moves. Very close is the human body to search the universal language. Besides it is the perfect system of sensing and action for input and output by which living is made easy and healthy. It offers signals for any imbalance. There are many beautiful languages but the body understands the messages conveyed in the respective language modes. Human body operates on auto run like the universe and probably this connected tool would be a guide to understand the universal secrets for application suitably on the earth for developments. The energy of the nature is self-made with 2 Inherent remedial actions needed as the living but requiring external medication in the event of body imbalance mainly due to pollution impact. The harmonious universal energy is a live wire to keep up equilibrium and balance and when it is off the run due to heavy impact pollutants spread, natural calamities line up. Summing up the theory of relativity is between the living energy and that of the universe; both can safely function when conditions are pollution free. Nature by itself will not create any imbalance by pollution but living operations do so. See the wonder of the nature, it has given in the minutest form all essentials to even an ant and made self-reliant to live on. To prevent pollution there is another avenue. Staple food in any region depends upon what grows there naturally and it is healthy and acceptable to the environment. Likewise what suits the atmosphere, construction material can be thought of. Further natural light and wind directions are vital. Architects all over the world can come forward in presenting buildings both for residential and other purposes in such a way to agree with the prevailing climatic conditions. This would carry not only aesthetic sense but get tuned with the nature also and help avoid artificial gadgets for comforts. Such an approach would save on cost besides healthy living with the nature in true sense. Immediate step is to stop pollution besides locating pollutants for which the study of surrounding waves would be ideal as it would give instant impact on the life. Blanket ban on deforestation should be in effect. Forestation should cover three fourth of the surface area. By these measures rainfall will be adequate for all. Crops will flourish. Dust will settle down everywhere to help health care. Other resources including precious metals like gold etc. will be in plenty without any pollution. Bicycle promotion in all possible ways will add to the pollution free endeavors. Time alone will time happenings. It is high time to undo errors so as not to draw ire from the nature. Nature completes the circle and nothing can move beyond. The strength of the nature can be cited in a small example; can any artificial comfort take the place of pleasant sun shine during winter or resting under the full moon night! H V Navangul Age 84
A working model of a electromagnetic mass accelerator (mobile test bench) in HD quality https://youtu.be/9YQyjPITDho https://youtu.be/Sm1rZ-ZeHlc https://youtu.be/M6CUHnvI2Ek https://youtu.be/nCgz02bR058 https://youtu.be/FFBHuCnkUzU