Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center

Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center The Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center (CAMOC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation located in Chicago, Illinois.
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Our mission is to advance the appreciation of Chinese American culture through exhibitions, education, and research and to preserve the past, present, and future of Chinese Americans primarily in the Midwest. The Museum building, formerly the Quong Yick Co., is located in Chicago's Chinatown, at 238 West 23rd Street, Chicago, IL 60616 1/2 block west of Wentworth Ave. and 3 blocks from the Chinatown station of the CTA's Red Line.

Operating as usual

WGN-TV includes Chinatown as one of many diverse and culturally historic neighborhoods on Chicago's South Side. The repo...
09/14/2020

WGN-TV includes Chinatown as one of many diverse and culturally historic neighborhoods on Chicago's South Side. The reporting crew recently took a tour of the museum to cover the history of Chinatown. You can view the full coverage here: http://ow.ly/TdHj50BliCr

Grandma's chair, a stuffed bunny, a watch from Dad: all new additions from recent visitors to "Share your own Attic Trea...
09/11/2020

Grandma's chair, a stuffed bunny, a watch from Dad: all new additions from recent visitors to "Share your own Attic Treasure"! Share yours when you visit our current exhibition #AtticTreasuresII. If you can't make it in person, you can view it online here: http://bit.ly/attictreasuresII

Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community- CBCAC
09/08/2020

Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community- CBCAC

☀️ The September forecast says we can expect sunny, cheery people helping folks register to #vote and fill out the #2020Census on weekends in Chinatown!

☔ On weekdays that may feel stormy without our bubbly staff and volunteers, take shelter at the Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center to register to vote or apply to #VoteByMail!

#CountUsIn #ILCountMeIn2020 #MakeILCount #ChicagoCountMeIn2020 #ChiTownCounts #CookCountyCensus #GetCounted #BeCounted #Census2020
#November2020 #November3rd #GetOutTheVote #GetOutTheVote2020 #vote2020 #election #election2020 #2020election #November #ElectionDay

Consumer Action
09/05/2020

Consumer Action

HEALTH & WEALTH: There are many connections between physical health and financial health, from inadequate health insurance to insufficient protections to prevent the consequences of deep medical debt. Ideas for addressing them abound—and we will closely examine some of them at our online Health and Financial Wealth sessions on Sept. 29 and 30. In a 90-minute online session each day, Consumer Action will bring together non-profit and industry experts and community representatives to discuss critical topics like surprise medical billing, medical debt collection, telemedicine, and innovative solutions for access to health care for underrepresented consumers. https://www.consumer-action.org/anniversary/convening

09/04/2020
register.gotowebinar.com

Wed, Sep 9 @ 12-1pm CDT Consumer Action will host a free webinar: "Tracking the COVID-19 Economic Devastation: Workers facing job losses, and education and training strategies for recovery." Register here:
http://ow.ly/hi4y50BghMI

Visit us this month during our new museum hours! If you are not able to join us in person, you can view our current exhi...
09/02/2020

Visit us this month during our new museum hours! If you are not able to join us in person, you can view our current exhibition #AtticTreasuresII online here: https://bit.ly/attictreasuresII

9/1/2020 - 9/30/2020
Tue - Fri: 9:30am to 2pm
Sat - Sun: 11am to 3pm

Compiled by friends of the museum, the recipes in “Have you eaten yet?” represent family celebrations, festivals, and me...
08/31/2020

Compiled by friends of the museum, the recipes in “Have you eaten yet?” represent family celebrations, festivals, and memories, but especially the love of eating and cooking Chinese food. Get your copy from the museum shop or online here and start cooking! http://ow.ly/CZBz50B2OBb

SAVE THE DATE: What's at Stake for the Chinese/Chinese American Museum in the United States?: An Intergenerational Conve...
08/28/2020

SAVE THE DATE: What's at Stake for the Chinese/Chinese American Museum in the United States?: An Intergenerational Conversation

DATE: Thu, Sep 24
Time: 7 - 8:30 CST
Location: Virtual Space
RSVP here: https://bit.ly/3kYqu3N

What does the future of Chinese/Chinese American museums look like both locally and nationally amid the various major crises we are facing, including the pandemic, the BLM uprising, and the rising anti-Asian sentiment? How does the museum encourage the participation among younger generations? What are the differences in terms of priorities, visions, values, and politics among different generations in the Chinese diaspora? How do we reconcile these differences and build cross-generational alliances? This event aims at opening up space for intergenerational conversations for us to strategize for the future of Chinese museums in the United States. We particularly encourage high school, college students, and young professionals to join us for this conversation.

In 1962, Hardin Park was demolished to build the Dan Ryan Expressway. After three decades, Ping Tom Park (named after be...
08/21/2020
The Park That Brought Green Space to Chinatown

In 1962, Hardin Park was demolished to build the Dan Ryan Expressway. After three decades, Ping Tom Park (named after beloved community leader Ping Tom) finally opened in 1999. Fun fact: it was also the finish point of The Amazing Race in 2005!
http://ow.ly/iKZS50AWFZC

For decades, Chicago's Chinatown neighborhood didn't have a park or any significant green space. Roughly 20 years ago, that changed. Get to know the story of Ping Tom Park, one of the city's hidden gems.

Looking for some quarantine reading? Raymond Lee's memoir "Growing up in Chicago's Chinatown: The Stories of Raymond Lee...
08/14/2020

Looking for some quarantine reading? Raymond Lee's memoir "Growing up in Chicago's Chinatown: The Stories of Raymond Lee" offers an insider perspective on the history of Chinatown. You can purchase it in person at the museum or from our online book shop!
https://ccamuseum.org/product/growing-up-in-chicagos-chinatown/

Photos from Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center's post
08/12/2020

Photos from Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center's post

Associate Board
08/12/2020
Associate Board

Associate Board

Chinatown Museum Foundation, which governs the Chinese American Museum of Chicago, is forming an Associate Board with the purpose of generating new opportunities for the Museum, especially with...

Did you know that the earliest use of the kite recorded was in China? It is said that Chinese philosophers Mozi and Lu B...
08/11/2020

Did you know that the earliest use of the kite recorded was in China? It is said that Chinese philosophers Mozi and Lu Ban invented it during the Warring States Period (475-221 BC). Here is one of the three kites we have on view now in #AtticTreasuresII

Did you know that Chinese-Americans also fought in the Civil War, for both the Union and the Confederacy? Though their r...
08/08/2020
The hidden history of Chinese-Americans in the Civil War

Did you know that Chinese-Americans also fought in the Civil War, for both the Union and the Confederacy? Though their ranks were likely small, they played an important role in a strange moment in American history.
http://ow.ly/VXMy50AKzqH

Even in a nation obsessed with its civil war, the United States glosses over the role of Chinese-American soldiers who fought on both sides.

Visit us this month during our updated museum hours!8/1/20 - 8/31/20Tue - Fri: 10am - 2pm (previously 10am - 1pm)Sat - S...
08/01/2020

Visit us this month during our updated museum hours!

8/1/20 - 8/31/20
Tue - Fri: 10am - 2pm (previously 10am - 1pm)
Sat - Sun: 11am - 3pm

See you soon!

Designed under the supervision of Paul Gerhardt, the city architect, and funded by the federal government's depression-e...
07/31/2020

Designed under the supervision of Paul Gerhardt, the city architect, and funded by the federal government's depression-era, the station has existed at this address since the 19th century. The trucks and the ambulance bear Chinese and Arabic numerals, as well as a dragon logo created especially for Chinatown station.

Relations between the station and the community are good, as shown by the care firemen took in protecting the Museum's exhibits while putting out the 2008 fire.

Photograph of 37 8th graders graduating from St. Therese School. Headshots of Sr. Frances Horan, Rev. Thomas Bauer, prin...
07/26/2020

Photograph of 37 8th graders graduating from St. Therese School. Headshots of Sr. Frances Horan, Rev. Thomas Bauer, principal H.S. Barrientos, and image of the school building are also featured. Founded in 1941, St. Therese Chinese Catholic School was the first Catholic school for Chinese children in the Midwest. 1980. #AtticTreasuresII

A Must-See treasure from our AT II exhibit:Wooden cane with elaborate silver handle depicting auspicious figures known a...
07/24/2020

A Must-See treasure from our AT II exhibit:
Wooden cane with elaborate silver handle depicting auspicious figures known as the Three Stars (San Xing): Happiness (Fu), Emoluments and Official Preferment (Lu), and Longevity (Shou).

Happiness is in the retired-scholar attire. Emoluments and Official Preferment is draped in a long robe with :shou" characters and holding a ruyi scepter with an inscription reading "guan xing" (star of officials). Longevity carries a peach as a symbol of immortality.

This cane belonged to Frank Moy (1874-1937), often considered the unofficial "Mayor of Chinatown."

#AtticTreasuresII

07/18/2020
【Prevue】Heritage on Fingertips--Episode Five -Gold Lacquered Wood Carving

Amazing documentary shows the whole process of how to use graver as pen and wood as paper to carefully carve for thousands of times based on ingenious design, to lacquer the handiwork, to paste gold on it and finally make it a magnificent piece of art.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4if6irRC008

Gold lacquered wood carving has a history of more than one thousand years. According to historical document, “Gold lacquered wood carving of Chaoyang began i...

Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community- CBCAC
07/16/2020

Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community- CBCAC

🌿 Chinatown Census Yard Signs 🌿

Pick up free yard signs at the Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center (please check the museum's hours) to help your neighbors remember to answer the #2020Census!

Our team is already having fun with the signs and had planted some in Ping Tom Park. Tag us if you post pictures of the yard signs!

#ILCountMeIn2020 #MakeILCount #ChicagoCountMeIn2020
#ChiTownCounts #CookCountyCensus #BeCounted #Census2020

Completed in 1928, The Pui Tak Building (Former On Leong Building) was designed by the Chicago based architectural firm ...
07/13/2020

Completed in 1928, The Pui Tak Building (Former On Leong Building) was designed by the Chicago based architectural firm of Michaelsen and Rognstad.
The official Landmarks website says that "the Oriental-style design was derived from the architecture of the Guangdong province of China." However this is not true. The architects gave themselves a crash course in traditional Chinese architecture through referencing a series of books on the subject. The overall design and decorative details are not Chinese but instead represent Michaelson's or Rognstad's reinvention of Chinese forms. They did a good job anyway. With a budget of a million dollars, they produced the finest large building in any North American Chinatown.
The decorative tiles on the walls of the building are American, not Chinese, made by the Teco Pottery Company in Crystal Lake, Illinois. Teco vases and flower pots had similar glazes and now considered to be highly collectible. #ChicagoChinatown #Chinatownhistory

Only 2 days left for gift giveaway! Come visit us and get your gift this weekend.🎁
07/10/2020

Only 2 days left for gift giveaway! Come visit us and get your gift this weekend.🎁

Dear CAMOC Community,We sincerely invite you to participate and support our Together Against COVID-19 project to record ...
07/08/2020

Dear CAMOC Community,
We sincerely invite you to participate and support our Together Against COVID-19 project to record the experience and stories during the fight against the epidemic. Every story is very important to us, we look forward to hearing your story. Please see below for details and feel free to share this announcement with your friends and family.

親愛的朋友,
我們誠摯的邀請您參與和支持我們的同心抗疫COVID-19 項目來記錄對抗疫情期間的經歷和故事。對於我們來說,每一個故事都非常珍貴,我們期待聽到您的故事。詳情信息請看下文,歡迎您轉發邀請親朋好友來支持我們的項目。

CAMOC started this special collection with the goal of recording the experiences and stories of individuals, families, and organizations during these unprecedented times. The Together Against Covid-19 Collection will include various forms of content, which can be photos, videos, articles, audios, letters, paintings, certificates, or any form you can think of. If you are not sure whether your content fits our collection or you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Please send your story to [email protected] , with the subject Together Against Covid-19 Collection. And please include your contact information , including full name, organization or community if applicable, email, phone number, and mailing address.

同心抗疫 COVID-19 項目將記錄疫情下個人、家庭,以及組織的經歷和故事。項目內容將涵蓋所有表達形式,例如照片、影片、文章、錄音、信件、畫作、證書,或任何您能想到的任何表達方式。如果您不確定您的故事是否符合我們的項目或有任何問題,歡迎您聯繫我們。

請將您的故事以郵件方式發送至 [email protected] ,標題 同心抗疫 COVID-19。請務必在郵件中寫明個人信息,包括姓名、組織名稱(如果有)、電子郵箱、電話,和郵寄地址。#COVID19 #Coronavirus

Check out the amazing details of this hardwood throne chair. Chinese coins suspended from bat holder, 2 women holding fa...
07/06/2020

Check out the amazing details of this hardwood throne chair. Chinese coins suspended from bat holder, 2 women holding fans, 3 women and 2 children on waves, confronting foo lions with fruit. On arm rails: dragons with open mouths. On apron: hanging fruit and shou character. Come visit our Attic Treasures II exhibit and see all the beautiful details in person.

Happy 4th of July! We are open July 4th at 11AM, stop by the museum and check out our exhibits before lunch in Chinatown...
07/04/2020

Happy 4th of July! We are open July 4th at 11AM, stop by the museum and check out our exhibits before lunch in Chinatown.

Address

238 W 23rd St
Chicago, IL
60616

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 14:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 14:00
Thursday 10:00 - 14:00
Friday 10:00 - 14:00
Saturday 11:00 - 15:00
Sunday 11:00 - 15:00

Telephone

(312) 949-1000

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Our mission is to advance the appreciation of Chinese American culture through exhibitions, education, and research and to preserve the past, present, and future of Chinese Americans primarily in the Midwest. The Museum building, formerly the Quong Yick Co., is located in Chicago's Chinatown, at 238 West 23rd Street, Chicago, IL 60616 1/2 block west of Wentworth Ave. and 3 blocks from the Chinatown station of the CTA's Red Line.

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ASAM NEWS - The Forgotten Chinese Massacre at Hells Canyon For AsAm News, I wrote an article about “The Forgotten Chinese Massacre at Hells Canyon” on the Snake River in Oregon. A gang of horse thieves murdered 34 Chinese gold miners in 1887, for gold dust. The slain Chinese never got justice since the Whites were found innocent by the jury. The community of Wallowa County intentionally forget the Chinese Massacre. https://asamnews.com/2020/09/14/hells-canyon-massacre-left-34-chinese-gold-miners-dead-in-hidden-chapter-in-u-s-history/ ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0
HELLS CANYON ON THE SNAKE RIVER – The Worst Massacre of Chinese in America. At Hells Canyon along the Snake River in Oregon, a granite memorial silently marks: “Site of the 1887 massacre of as many as 34 Chinese gold miners. No one was held accountable.” Gregory Nokes, wrote the first authoritative account of the long-forgotten 1887 massacre of as many as 34 Chinese gold miners in Oregon's Hells Canyon, the deepest canyon in North America, in “Massacred for Gold – The Chinese in Hells Canyon.” http://osupress.oregonstate.edu/book/massacred-for-gold ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0
THE SECOND TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD – The Chinese Railroad Workers After “Day of the Golden Spike” on May 10, 1869, at Promontory Point in Utah, when rails of Central Railroad Company and Union Pacific Railroad joined together, as the First Transcontinental Railroad, the Chinese railroad workers, the Army of Canton, relentlessly build more transcontinental railroads across the vast American West. The Second Transcontinental Railroad was built by the Southern Pacific Railroad Company and Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company. From the west, San Francisco, thru Los Angeles, Yuma, and Tucson, and from the east, Kansas City, Albuquerque, toward Deming, New Mexico, their rails joined together. Over 850 Chinese railroad workers labored across the barren deserts. On March 8, 1881, officials celebrated the joining of the Second Transcontinental Railroad on “Day of the Silver Spike” at Deming in New Mexico. I am writing a journal article about the Chinese railroad workers of the Second Transcontinental Railroad. If you are descendant of one of them, please share their story with me. Thanks. https://www.railswest.com/history/secondtranscontinental.html ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0
MOI CHUNG – Royal Restaurant at Boston Chinatown and Imperial Restaurant at Cambridge Central Square In his Passionate Foodie blog, Richard Auffrey, a Massachusetts attorney, wrote a wonderful story – “The First Restaurants in Boston’s Chinatown: A Deeper Look Into Two Restaurants (Part 8).” He vividly described two Chop Suey restaurants owned by Moi Chung, my grandfather. Chop Suey is the American version of Cantonese dishes of the early sojourners and pioneers from Kwangtung (Guangdong). During the era of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 (1882 to 1943), Chinese operated restaurants in partnership to get the precious merchant status for exemption from the racist immigration restrictions. As grandson of a Transcontinental Railroad Chinese worker, Moi Chung, a native of Hoyping (Kaiping), operated Royal Restaurant in Boston Chinatown. Then, he operated the Imperial Restaurant at Cambridge Central Square. Richard Auffrey gave more contents to the restaurants, based on his meticulous research. https://passionatefoodie.blogspot.com/2020/06/the-first-restaurants-in-bostons.html ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0
CONNIE YOUNG YU – Her Family Story on PBS Asian Americans After the premiere of PBS Asian Americans documentary series, for AsAm News, I wrote an article about Connie Young Yu, “In her own words: Connie Young Yu shares her thoughts on being a descendant of Chinese railroad workers.” Connie’s family story began in 1866 when her great grandfather worked on Transcontinental Railroad. Her grandfather and grandmother experienced the cruelties of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act. Her father honorably served the U.S. Army during World War II and Korean War. https://asamnews.com/2020/05/27/a-living-legacy-of-a-chinese-railroad-workers-steams-into-the-future/ ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0
TRANSCONTINENTAL RAILROAD – Spike 150 Celebration, May 10, 2019 On Friday, May 10, 2019, Connie Young Yu, historian and Chinese railroad worker descendant represented Chinese Historical Society of America, at the Spike 150 celebration. Her speech opened the event at Promontory Point, Utah, celebrating the 150th Anniversary of the U.S. Transcontinental Railroad. Connie’s speech paid homage to Chinese railroad workers and called for the reclaiming of immigrants’ rightful place in history. ““I felt such elation,” said Connie Young Yu. In her speech at the ceremony on Friday, Ms. Yu paid tribute to the Chinese laborers’ courage and sacrifice.” Directed by Barre Fong, filmmaker, “2019 Connie Young Yu at Spike 150 Celebration, Promontory Summit, Utah”: https://vimeo.com/338326576 ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0
QINGMING FESTIVAL – At Canton (part 1) By Raymond Douglas Chong (Zhang Weiming) THE MOURNING DAY A drizzling rain falls like tears on the mourning day; The mourner's heart is going to break on his way. "Where can a wine shop be found to drown my sad hours?" A cowherd points to a cot amid apricot flowers. - Du Mu 清明 清明时节雨纷纷 路上行人欲断魂。 借问酒家何处有 牧童遥指杏花村。 - 杜牧 Canton - Prelude Since a fateful wintry Thursday on January 30, 2003, as a sixth generation American Born Chinese (ABC), I have passionately explored my ancestral roots from America (Gold Mountain) to China (Cathay), toward Guangdong (Canton). My quest had led to a mythical place, Kaiping (Hoyping), The Land of Peace, nestled midst hilly cosmos and teeming rivers. I gradually learned about the epic tales of my Zhang Clan at Long Gang Li (Village of Dragon Hill), since 1506 A.D. during the Ming Dynasty. My odyssey climaxed with Qingming Festival at my Long Gang Li in Canton, when it inspired my heart, my soul, and my mind. Qingming Festival, also called Tomb Sweeping Day or Pure Brightness, is the spring tradition to go and sweep tombs and to show respect to their ancestors. Long Gang Li – Aura Kaiping County Kaiping County lies in the southwest region of the rich Zhu Jiang (Pearl River) Delta near Jiangmen City (Kongmoon) of Guangdong Province in The People’s Republic of China. Facing the South China Sea, it is a fertile land of rice and fish, with a beautiful evergreen panorama of vales, glens, and mesas. Long Gang Li Long Gang Li is located in the Chishui Township of Kaiping County of Jiangmen City. It lies on the east bank of Tan Jiang (Tan River) Valley near the glorious emerald Mount of the Eight Immortals Cross the Sea. Long Gang means dragon hill. The five-clawed dragon was an imperial symbol of the Chinese emperors. My ancient Village has a long history that extends back to 1506 A.D. when a duck farmer found it during the Ming Dynasty. Today, about 100 people, mostly babies and elders, of the Zhang Clan live in this crumbling Village among rice fields, vegetable gardens, tropical fruit orchards, and fishponds near bamboo groves. In diaspora, hundreds of Zhang descendants live and work overseas in Southeast Asia and the Americas. Midst the Village, three magnificent Diaolou soar above the houses. Diaolou are tall fortress towers made of concrete. Their architectural style was a fusion of Chinese and Western cultures. Around the three Diaolou, there are six shrines and two banyan trees. There were shrines for gnomes for the old villages: Xiang Bei Li and Lian Tang Li. Near a pond: The Pond of Lotus with the God of the Land and The God of Grain. Another one: Lead a Long Life and Never Die and A God. Near the Zhang Clan Diaolou, there is a shrine for Divinity of Grain and Earth. At the Diao Ge watchtower, I found a plaque that read Donation List for Rebuilding Long Gang Li Wen Ge (East Gate). It included the names of Zhang Peilan (my great grandfather) and Zhang Xishou (my grandfather) as donors. This Diaolou on the east end, protected the villagers from bandits during turmoil of early 20th century. From atop of the Diaolou, one is mesmerized by vista of this ancient Village, the surrounding tropical landscape, and the lush rolling hills, at this idyllic paradise. My ancestral home is at the ninth house of the sixth alley and through a narrow alley, an early twentieth-century house made of gray brick and topped with a red tile roof, the house built by Zhang Peilan (Hoy Lun Chung). It has parlor with a skylight, two kitchens and two bedrooms on the ground brick floor. The upper wood floor contained the family altar and storage lofts. Both kitchens had brick hearths with shrines. The parlor had a rice grinding pit and a water basin with a God of Heaven shrine below the family altar. The couplets on the Zhang family altar read: The Light of the Lamp Can Bring Bright Future. Above the lintel of a parlor door, a stuccowork showed a soaring dragon with two peaches. On the other parlor door, the stuccowork depicted a soaring phoenix. At the family altar, the three ancestral tablets proclaim: Altars of Zhang Family Generations: Thirty-Seventh Generation Hua Chong and His Wife. The ancestral panel proclaims The Altar of the Thirty-Ninth Generation: Zhang Yao and His Wife and also mentions the fortieth, forty-first, and forty-second generations. At the center of Long Gang Li, Zhang Shiquan ancestral temple remains after the Cultural Revolution. A portrait of him and his wife grace the temple. ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0