Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center

Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center The Chinese American Museum of Chicago - Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center (CAMOC) is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation located in Chicago, Illinois.
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Our mission is to advance the appreciation of Chinese American culture through exhibitions, education, and research and to preserve the past, present, and future of Chinese Americans primarily in the Midwest. The Museum building, formerly the Quong Yick Co., is located in Chicago's Chinatown, at 238 West 23rd Street, Chicago, IL 60616 1/2 block west of Wentworth Ave. and 3 blocks from the Chinatown station of the CTA's Red Line.

PBS Groundbreaking Documentary Series ASIAN AMERICANS, PREMIERES MAY 11 & 12, 2020!Asian Americans is a five-hour film s...
05/09/2020
Asian Americans | PBS

PBS Groundbreaking Documentary Series ASIAN AMERICANS, PREMIERES MAY 11 & 12, 2020!
Asian Americans is a five-hour film series that delivers a bold, fresh perspective on a history that matters today, more than ever. As America becomes more diverse, and more divided while facing unimaginable challenges, how do we move forward together? Told through intimate personal stories, the series will cast a new lens on U.S. history and the ongoing role that Asian Americans have played.
👉https://to.pbs.org/2yJJv6x

Asian Americans is a five-hour film series that delivers a bold, fresh perspective on a history that matters today, more than ever. As America becomes more diverse, and more divided while facing unimaginable challenges, how do we move forward together? Told through intimate personal stories, the ser...

Ceramic Statues of the 18 Arhats The original followers of the Buddha, the Eighteen Arhats have attained the four stages...
05/09/2020

Ceramic Statues of the 18 Arhats The original followers of the Buddha, the Eighteen Arhats have attained the four stages of enlightenment. Because each Arhat has its own attributes, people pray to each one for different reasons. Can you identify which five Arhats are displayed among the complete list here? Deer Sitting, Happy, Raised Bowl, Raised Pagoda, Meditating, Oversea, Elephant Riding, Laughing Lion, Open Heart, Raised Hand, Thinking, Scratched Ear, Calico Bag, Plantain, Long Eyebrow, Doorman, Taming Dragon and Taming Tiger. #AtticTreasuresII

Can you tell it's a Teapot?Teapot in Shape of House Brown teapot in the shape of a house. Body of rectangular form with ...
05/08/2020

Can you tell it's a Teapot?
Teapot in Shape of House Brown teapot in the shape of a house. Body of rectangular form with carved surface, suspended xuanshan style roof, and furnished interiors. #AtticTreasuresII

The current COVID-19 crisis is taking a distressing financial toll on many museums regardless of their type and size. In...
05/07/2020

The current COVID-19 crisis is taking a distressing financial toll on many museums regardless of their type and size. In honor of Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, we invite you to be part of our inaugural Give In May campaign by making a donation.

CAMOC is facing financial challenges that force us to cut expenses. Your support is needed now more than ever! Your support will help us sustain our operations so that we can continue our mission to advance the appreciation of Chinese American culture through exhibitions, education, public programs, and research and to preserve the past, present, and future of Chinese Americans primarily in the Midwest. #GiveinMay
Donate here: https://www.giveinmay.org/story/Rm27pf

Wear masks, save lives!!
05/07/2020

Wear masks, save lives!!

Land Transfer Document (Guangdong) Real estate transfer deed: Tam family, WoHing first name. Seller: Tam Yang (maiden na...
05/06/2020

Land Transfer Document (Guangdong) Real estate transfer deed: Tam family, WoHing first name. Seller: Tam Yang (maiden name). Husband absent from China over 20 years and did not send any money home, therefore creditors pressing for payment, so must sell house. 2.25 acres, price 432 taels. Dec. 1920 and July 1921 both dates given on document. All information translated from the Chinese. Handwritten document with 8 red official chops and 1 stamp with value of 10 cents affixed on top of document. #AtticTreasuresII

GivingTuesday Announces Day of Global Action for Giving and Unity in Response to COVID-19, #GivingTuesdayNow Brings Toge...
05/05/2020
Donate

GivingTuesday Announces Day of Global Action for Giving and Unity in Response to COVID-19, #GivingTuesdayNow Brings Together Individuals, Nonprofits, Communities, Small Businesses, Brands and more; Provides Unifying Moment for Giving Back on May 5, 2020
Please keep us in mind and consider donating to CAMOC in support of the #GivingTuesdayNow
👉Support CAMOC: http://ow.ly/bAu250zuxxA

Donation The Chinese-American Museum of Chicago has come a long way in its rebuilding efforts after the devastating fire of 2008. We still have a long way to go, both to rebuild our collection and …

U.S. identity papers of Ng Wah Him, laundryman. Document from Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, sworn aff...
05/04/2020

U.S. identity papers of Ng Wah Him, laundryman. Document from Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, sworn affidavit. Ng was born in San Francisco on 16th day of 6th month of 17th Kung Hsu. Age:18 years. Residence:5217 S. Halsted St., Chicago. 1910. #AtticTreasuresII

Mightycause: Nonprofit Fundraising Made Easy
05/03/2020
Mightycause: Nonprofit Fundraising Made Easy

Mightycause: Nonprofit Fundraising Made Easy

Formerly Razoo, Mightycause is your all-in-one nonprofit fundraising platform. User-friendly, customizable fundraising software and tools to engage your supporters and raise more funds.

2119 S. Wentworth Relocation Documents Highway construction re-appropriation papers, 2113 S. Wentworth Avenue, June-July...
05/02/2020

2119 S. Wentworth Relocation Documents
Highway construction re-appropriation papers, 2113 S. Wentworth Avenue, June-July, 1969. a. Claim for Relocation Payment (Non-Business) filled and signed by Marshee Ling, who occupied part of the premise from February 1940 to June 9, 1969 and was qualified for a $85 payment, on June 9, 1969. The claim was certified and signed by the District Relocation Assistant Manager on June 9, 1969. Approved and signed by District Engineer O. Badal on June 12, 1969. Parcel No. FS 9, FAP Route 7 SPUR, Section 1415, Project U-266(9), Cook County. #AtticTreasuresII

Guanyin Screen The screen depicts Guanyin, the Goddess of Mercy, seated on a lotus throne, surrounded by clouds. The god...
05/01/2020

Guanyin Screen The screen depicts Guanyin, the Goddess of Mercy, seated on a lotus throne, surrounded by clouds. The goddess is holding in her left hand a slender vase containing pure water, in her right hand a willow branch used to sprinkle pure water. Elaborately carved wood screen inlaid with ivory, mounted in a matching wood stand. Frame has carved key pattern. Apron is decorated with floral design. Late 19th to early 20th century. #AtticTreasuresII

Every 10 years, Illinois communities get ONE chance to get the funding they need for things like healthcare, schools, an...
04/30/2020
Census 2020

Every 10 years, Illinois communities get ONE chance to get the funding they need for things like healthcare, schools, and infrastructure. But it all depends on how many Illinois residents get counted in the Census. Don't let our community miss out on critical support. Visit my2020Census.gov today.
http://ow.ly/Wfwo50ztnff

Ping Tom Park Development Poster, Phase I Located in Chicago's Chinatown neighborhood, this public park commemorates Chi...
04/30/2020

Ping Tom Park Development Poster, Phase I Located in Chicago's Chinatown neighborhood, this public park commemorates Chinese American civic leader Ping Tom, and provides an urban oasis for the residents. Designed by Ernest C. Wong, Phase I of the park was completed in 1999. #AtticTreasuresII

04/30/2020

Dear CAMOC community,

Per the extended COVID-19 Executive Order, CAMOC will continue to be closed through 5/30 or until further notice.
We will send out updates by email, social media and on our website. Thank you for your continued support during this difficult time.

On Leong Architectural Block,  wooden architectural block, formerly On Leong property. Golden painted block with triple ...
04/28/2020

On Leong Architectural Block, wooden architectural block, formerly On Leong property. Golden painted block with triple red vessel designs and Chinese captions. Captions on the first block reads "yi bai shou", "na yu fu shou", and "yi jie mei shou" (embracing longevity and prosperity, praying for a long life). Raised borders carved with floral, foliage, diamond, and coin patterns. Early 20th century. #AtticTreasuresII

Frank Moy CaneThis cane belonged to Frank Moy (1874-1937), often considered the unofficial "Mayor of Chinatown." Wooden ...
04/26/2020

Frank Moy Cane
This cane belonged to Frank Moy (1874-1937), often considered the unofficial "Mayor of Chinatown." Wooden cane with elaborate silver handle depicting auspicious figures known as the Three Stars (San Xing): Happiness (Fu), Emoluments and Official Preferment (Lu), and Longevity (Shou). Happiness is in the retired-scholar attire. Emoluments and Official Preferment is draped in a long robe with :shou" characters and holding a ruyi scepter with an inscription reading "guan xing" (star of officials). Longevity carries a peach as a symbol of immortality.
Fran Moy, son of Moy Dong Chow, was a businessman and community leader of Chicago Chinatown. Moy served as the president of On Leong Chinese Merchants Association in the first three decades of the twentieth century. On Leong was the dominant organization within the local Chinese American community, and its president was dubbed as "Mayor of Chinatown" particularly for his judicial power. #AtticTreasuresII

We believe memories become stories, and stories are woven into history. It is in this spirit that CAMOC is launching a n...
04/24/2020

We believe memories become stories, and stories are woven into history. It is in this spirit that CAMOC is launching a new oral history project entitled My Family Story that aims to explore, honor, and preserve the family history and cultural heritage of Chinese American communities throughout Chicago and the greater Midwest. These historical memories will directly enrich our collection and may even be featured in future exhibits. These memories could include a family photo, a favorite recipe from a grandmother, beautiful clothes and jewelry of your mother, or a song that your father used to hum.

A few ideas to participate in #MyFamilyStory:

1.Explore the history and meaning of daily objects and traditions around you. Are there items in the house or family traditions that have a connection to the past?

2.Take time for family conversations and stories that reflect on the themes of migration and cultural identity.

3.Connect family stories to American history and discuss the evolution of family traditions over time.

Support us by adding a story of your own, please send your story and picture to [email protected] or upload your story here: https://forms.gle/aSLwXe7Cwe6TTRUSA
(Please keep your story to 200 words.)

Check out our exhibition Attic Treasures II online :http://ow.ly/sVhy50zlJq0
04/23/2020
Temporary Exhibit- Attic Treasures II

Check out our exhibition Attic Treasures II online :
http://ow.ly/sVhy50zlJq0

Museums - Temporary Exhibit- Attic Treasures II, We’ve all heard stories about a friend who found some precious treasure in their attic -- a lost family heirloom or a priceless work of art -- the truth is all of us likely have objects in our attics, or closets, or basements, or somewhere else that...

Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association Grand Opening Seated man writing calligraphy as a group of adults and childr...
04/22/2020

Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association Grand Opening
Seated man writing calligraphy as a group of adults and children stand around him and observe him. Photo taken in 1985 at the Grand Opening ceremony, 250 W 22nd Pl, Chicago. #ChicagoChinatown

Grace Lai Tiger PaintingWatercolor painting of a tiger face by Grace Lai (1917-2010), complete with her signature, seal ...
04/21/2020

Grace Lai Tiger Painting
Watercolor painting of a tiger face by Grace Lai (1917-2010), complete with her signature, seal and caption in both Chinese and English. Grace Lai was a Chicago-based artist who took up painting late in life after decades assisting her husband in his sign-painting business. She specialized in views of construction sights and the Chicago skyline. This was one of the last original works she made before her death, made with the intent to be in her annual calendar. #AtticTreasuresII

Sanxian, three-stringed Chinese lute. Literally"three strings," the Sanxian is a long-neck lute with snakeskin covered s...
04/20/2020

Sanxian, three-stringed Chinese lute. Literally"three strings," the Sanxian is a long-neck lute with snakeskin covered sound box. This is a fine example of the northern style Sanxian, which is larger than the southern style. One of the tuning pegs has spiral surface and a decorative bone end piece, the other two have concentric carved lines. It may accompany narrative singing, and is often featured in folk music and opera. 45" long. Late Qing dynasty. #AtticTreasuresII

Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community- CBCAC
04/18/2020

Coalition for a Better Chinese American Community- CBCAC

Don't forget about the #WeCount Challenge with Cook County! Illinois was recently reported to be in the top ten for census responses—let's keep up this momentum!!

Visit WeCountChallenge.com to learn more about the #CookCountyCensus contest and submit your poster or video by May 1st.

#MakeILCount #ILCountMeIn2020 #BeCounted #Census2020

Calligraphy commemoration of Chinatown exhibit scroll. Couplet reads "fan rong hua bu, zao fu qiao she" (brings prosperi...
04/18/2020

Calligraphy commemoration of Chinatown exhibit scroll. Couplet reads "fan rong hua bu, zao fu qiao she" (brings prosperity to Chinatown, benefits the overseas Chinese communities). Written by calligrapher Wang Jianglin in Guangzhou, China, with 3 red chops of the calligrapher's name near bottom left and top right. From Zhen Mingde and Deng Yanhui to the City of Chicago. Label on the back reads "song zhi jia ge shi zheng fu" (for the City of Chicago) #AtticTreasuresII

Woks 'n' Things Exterior SignLight box sign with red and navy blue lettering formerly mounted above Woks 'n' Things stor...
04/17/2020

Woks 'n' Things Exterior Sign
Light box sign with red and navy blue lettering formerly mounted above Woks 'n' Things store. It closed its doors in 2015. It was a Chinese cookware specialty store located at 2234 S. Wentworth Avenue. 1960s. #AtticTreasuresII

[Updated Version with Details] Yuen's Family wooden altar, painted red. Couplet translates to "Descended from seven sage...
04/16/2020

[Updated Version with Details] Yuen's Family wooden altar, painted red. Couplet translates to "Descended from seven sages of the bamboo grove; bloodline from the city of Chenliu enriches people of today. To trillion sons." #AtticTreasuresII

Buck Hoy (1901-1980), the most prominent photographer in Chicago's Chinatown, was recognized for portraits and pictorial...
04/15/2020

Buck Hoy (1901-1980), the most prominent photographer in Chicago's Chinatown, was recognized for portraits and pictorial photographs. With background in painting, Hoy acquired his first camera in 1931, and opened Buck's Photo and Art Studio on 235 W. Cermak Road in 1933. From 1936 to 1950, Hoy's work was exhibited at salons and features on professional magazines. Here Hoy is taking a photograph in the field, with tall grass in foreground. Photograph by Eugene Kung, Hoy's mentee, in Chicago in 1952. #AtticTreasuresII

A large crowd densely packed down the whole street and under the Chinatown Gateway at the first Chinatown Fair in Chicag...
04/14/2020

A large crowd densely packed down the whole street and under the Chinatown Gateway at the first Chinatown Fair in Chicago on July 29, 1979. #ChicagoChinatown

Wedding BasketLacquered octagon-shaped wedding basket with hand-painted sides. Lid depicts a young man courting a young ...
04/12/2020

Wedding Basket
Lacquered octagon-shaped wedding basket with hand-painted sides. Lid depicts a young man courting a young woman with her maid in a courtyard. Base and shoulder are decorated with key and floral patterns. A Chinese wedding basket is a traditional part of a bride's dowry and is used to transfer gifts on wedding day. #AtticTreasuresII

04/10/2020
Google Forms - create and analyze surveys, for free.

Dear CAMOC Community,

As many of you may be spending more time at home now, this is an excellent opportunity for you to share a memory or story of your family’s history with us. It will enrich our collection of the varied histories of Chinese Americans throughout Chicagoland and the greater Midwest. Also attach a relevant photo if available. We look forward to hearing your family memory/story! #MyFamilyStory

Support us by adding a story of your own, please send your story to [email protected] or upload your story HERE: http://ow.ly/VPOn50zbflK
(Please keep your story to 200 words.)

Create a new survey on your own or with others at the same time. Choose from a variety of survey types and analyze results in Google Forms. Free from Google.

Exterior of St. Therese Chinese Catholic School, 247 W. 23rd Street , Chicago, right across the street of CAMOC . From t...
04/10/2020

Exterior of St. Therese Chinese Catholic School, 247 W. 23rd Street , Chicago, right across the street of CAMOC . From the Chicago Daily News Newspaper archives, April 29, 1961. #ChicagoChinatown

Xingshigu DrumXingshigu, single-headed barrel drum. Wood base and sides, leather top riveted to wood, metal rings fixed ...
04/09/2020

Xingshigu Drum
Xingshigu, single-headed barrel drum. Wood base and sides, leather top riveted to wood, metal rings fixed to sides. Made in Guangzhou, China. Purchased by Tom Chan, father-in-law of donor, in the 1920's in Chicago. #AtticTreasuresII

Coin SwordA coin sword is a form of talisman unique to southern China. An auspicious coin sword is believed to hold powe...
04/08/2020

Coin Sword
A coin sword is a form of talisman unique to southern China. An auspicious coin sword is believed to hold power that can ward off evil spirits. It is constructed by fastening approximately 100 coins on to a metal rod with golden and red cords. The coins in this sword are almost all issued in Guangxu period (1875-1908). #AtticTreasuresII

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238 W 23rd St
Chicago, IL
60616

Opening Hours

Tuesday 09:30 - 14:00
Wednesday 09:30 - 14:00
Thursday 09:30 - 14:00
Friday 09:30 - 14:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(312) 949-1000

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Our mission is to advance the appreciation of Chinese American culture through exhibitions, education, and research and to preserve the past, present, and future of Chinese Americans primarily in the Midwest. The Museum building, formerly the Quong Yick Co., is located in Chicago's Chinatown, at 238 West 23rd Street, Chicago, IL 60616 1/2 block west of Wentworth Ave. and 3 blocks from the Chinatown station of the CTA's Red Line.

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THE DAY OF THE GOLDEN SPIKE – May 10, 1869 Sunday, May 10, 2020, marks the 151st anniversary of “The Day of the Golden Spike” of the Transcontinental Railroad. On this monumental day in 1869, for the Transcontinental Railroad, the Central Pacific Railroad and Union Pacific Railroad rail lines joined together, after nearly seven years of construction, uniting the nation and laying the foundation for its growth, economic progress and improved way of life. The ceremony brought together the Central Pacific’s Jupiter and Union Pacific’s No. 119 engines at Promontory Summit, Utah. Bein Yiu Chung, my great great grandfather was one worker of the Canton (Guangdong) Army. From Hoyping (Kaiping) of Canton, between 1865 and 1869, he and his 12,000 colleagues toiled to build The Iron Road from California thru Nevada to Utah at America, for Central Pacific. From AsAm News, his and his descendants’ stories on Gold Mountain (Gum Saan): APA Heritage Month: Story of my Ancestors Who Built The Transcontinental Railroad; https://asamnews.com/2018/05/03/apa-heritage-month-story-of-my-ancestors-who-built-the-transcontinental-railroad/ ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0
THE CHINESE LAUNDRYMAN – Sun Yoke Tong, My Beloved Grandfather For your muse, I wrote a story for AsAm News about Chinese laundries in America. My purpose was a tribute to Sun Yoke Tong, my beloved grandfather. From Hoyping (Kaiping), he came to Gold Mountain (America) as a “paper son,” because of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act by Congress. He owned the Sun Tong Laundry in downtown of Santa Barbara on the Gold Coast of California. https://asamnews.com/2020/04/30/how-racism-and-discrimination-made-working-in-a-laundry-the-job-of-last-resort-for-chinese-in-america/ ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0
CHINESE NEW YEAR (YEAR OF THE RAT) CELEBRATION AT CHINESE HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA – “MY ODYSSEY – Between Two Worlds” Documentary Film On Saturday, February 8, 2020, the Chinese Historical Society of America welcomed the Year of the Rat at San Francisco Chinatown. Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong, presented his documentary film, “MY ODYSSEY – Between Two Worlds.” It chronicles Dr. Chong’s journey to discover his Zhang ancestral roots from Kaiping, Guangdong China to Gold Mountain, America. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIWS1F-Dhx0 Raymond Douglas Chong’s journey in search of his family roots in Kaiping, Guangdong, China leads to his ancestral village where he uncovers its peasant history, since 1506. With remarkable footprints, Chong traces his family’s five generation migrations to America from Kaiping. Following great-great-great and great-great grandfathers who worked as laborers in gold fields during the California Gold Rush (1849) and the Far West’s Transcontinental Railroad (1865-1869). Then during the restrictive 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act which banned migrating workers and women. His great grandfather owned an opium den and gambling hall (1892-1926) at Boston Chinatown. Chong’s grandfather joined a credit partnership, opening a foodway of Chop Suey (Cantonese cuisine) house (1923-1936) at Cambridge’s Central Square. And his father served with the United States Navy during World War II (1943-1945). And later, partly owned a Chinese nightclub (1946-1950) at Gateway of San Francisco Chinatown. At end of the prelude, his final remarks: “This is MY ODYSSEY – Between Two Worlds.” It is your journey. In a way, it is in by blood, in my bones, and in my thoughts. I have come full circle, being American, becoming Chinese.” The documentary film is a production of Generations, Sugar Land, Texas, and Alvin Wright Communications, Houston, Texas.
GIM SUEY CHONG - Congressional Gold Medal Veteran The Chinese American Citizens Alliance (CACA) has spearheaded the Chinese American WWII Veterans Recognition Project is to recognize, honor and celebrate the military service of Chinese Americans who fought in World War II. Their work ensures that the achievements and contributions of the ‘greatest generation’ will never be forgotten. The Chinese American WWII Veterans Recognition Project will hold the national Congressional Gold Medal Ceremony in Washington, DC on Wednesday, April 29, 2020. For your muse, the below Congressional Gold Medal Veteran profile of Gim Suey Chong, my late father. A victim of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act. The great grandson of Chinese railroad worker on the Transcontinental Railroad (1865-1869). https://www.caww2.org/profile10 “Gim Suey Chong – Navy Gim Suey Chong was a 5th generation sojourner to Gold Mountain, America. He and his forefathers were from Yung Lew Gong village, in the heart of Hoyping near the magnificent Tam Kiang river of Kwangtung province of Cathay. Gim was born in the 9th gray brick house on the 6th narrow alley on December 26, 1922. In 1932, Gim embarked on his intrepid immigration to Gold Mountain, America. Because of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, a cruel racist federal law, Gim assumed the persona as a paper son, of his uncle Hung Quock Chong. On April 20, 1932, he arrived at the seaport of Boston. At the Central Square of Cambridge, between Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Gim began his life in America. At the Imperial Restaurant on 2 Central Square, Moi Chung, his father, was partner and manager of this first-class Chop Suey house for American and Chinese customers. During the height of the Great Depression, Gim and Moi Chung left Boston from South Station. In 1936, they arrived at busy Union Station in Los Angeles to settle at Little Tokyo, the heart of the vibrant Nikkei community of the Southland near City Hall in Downtown. It was a bustling neighborhood of restaurants, stores, and markets during the heyday of Little Tokyo. Moi Chung worked at the Nikko Low Chinese Restaurant on 339 ½ East First Street, owned by a cousin from Hoyping. After graduating from Belmont High School, Gim was certified as a qualified aircraft mechanic at Curtiss-Wright Technical Institute in Glendale. Pan American Airways System hired him as a mechanic’s helper. He enlisted with United States Naval Reserve on May 18, 1943 as seaman, first class, During World War II, his all-Chinese crew diligently maintained the China Clipper, the world-famous flying boat and other seaplanes, to and from Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. They performed crucial maintenance at Treasure Island Station on the San Francisco Bay, east of San Francisco. He was discharged on December 7, 1945. In 1946, Gim invested his savings as a junior partner of the Kubla Khan Theater Restaurant on 414 Grant Avenue in San Francisco Chinatown, with Eddie Pond, who came from Hong Kong. The time was the zenith of The Golden Age of Chinese Nightclubs. After the sad demise of the Kubla Khan, in 1950, Gim returned to Los Angeles. He and Moi Chung resided in Chinatown at College Hotel on Broadway, during the heyday of Chinatown. Amidst an exotic cluster of Cantonese restaurants, shops, and markets, West Gate, Central Plaza, and East Gate dominated the panorama. From 1950 to 1978, Gim worked for Lockheed-California Company, as a quality assurance inspector of military aircrafts in Burbank. During the Cold War period, it was known as the Golden Age of Aviation in the San Fernando Valley. From 1950 to 1974, he also worked as a waiter during weekends at the Far East Café on 347 East First Street in Little Tokyo, with its iconic Chop Suey neon sign. This premier bistro was known for its delicate and bright China-Meshi dishes, a Japanese version of Chop Suey. On January 14, 1955, Gim happily married Miss Seen Hoy Tong in Los Angeles. In 1956, Gim was proud father of two sons, Raymond Douglas Chong, and Michael George Chong. On December 2, 1979, Gim Suey Chong died in Los Angeles, the City of Angels.” ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/…/family-web…/zhang-odyssey/#0 Image may contain: 12 people Image may contain: 1 person
ASAMNEWS – Far East Deep South – A Poignant Story of Chinese Families during Segregation Era of the Deep South For AsAmNews, I wrote a story about a new documentary by Baldwin Chiu and Larissa Lam, “Far East Deep South.” ““Far East Deep South,” a new 76-minute documentary that follows the Chiu Family on a surprising journey through Mississippi in search of their lost family history. Along the way, they meet a diverse group of local residents and historians, who shed light on the racially complex history of the early Chinese in the segregated South. Their emotional journey also leads them to discover how exclusionary immigration laws like the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 impacted their family and how deep their roots run in America.” https://asamnews.com/2020/03/05/film-traces-chinese-american-familys-history-in-the-deep-south/ ********** The Collected Works of Dr. Raymond Douglas Chong. http://www.chineselovepoetry.com Raymond Douglas Chong’s works speak the language of love, igniting passion in the souls of his readers and listeners. Exploring his poetry, his stories and his music is to tenderly touch the essence of love, and the angst of loves lost. Mobile: 1.510.915.9810 Email: [email protected] WeChat ID: raymonddouglaschong The Zhang Clan Odyssey website: https://orq.mychinaroots.com/services/family-websites/zhang-odyssey/#0