American Writers Museum

American Writers Museum We invite you to visit us, and experience American literature in a new, unique way!
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The American Writers Museum's mission is to excite audiences about the impact of American writers - past, present and future - in shaping our collective histories, cultures, identities, and daily lives. The American Writers Museum:
- Educates the public about American writers – past and present
- Engages visitors to the Museum in exploring the many exciting worlds created by the spoken and written

word
- Enriches and deepens appreciation for good writing in all its forms
- Inspires people of all ages and from all walks of life to discover, or rediscover, a love of reading and writing
-Through innovative and dynamic state-of- the-art exhibitions, as well as compelling programming, The American Writers Museum educates, enriches, provokes and inspires the public.

 , Grace Fredrica Edwards was an American mystery author and director of the Harlem Writers Guild, the oldest organizati...
01/03/2024

, Grace Fredrica Edwards was an American mystery author and director of the Harlem Writers Guild, the oldest organization of black writers.

Edwards got her bachelor's degree from the City College of New York and just a few years later, earned her master's of fine arts. After receiving her own degrees, she taught creative writing at Marymount Manhattan and Hunter Colleges, Hofstra University, and the Frederick Douglass Creative Arts Center.

She began writing at the age of 7, but it wasn't until she was 55 that Edwards' first novel was published. Almost ten years later she published her first mystery novel, IF I SHOULD DIE, when she was 64. IF I SHOULD DIE featured the protagonist Mali Anderson, a Black, female amateur detective, and was followed by five more books in the series. The Mali Anderson series is set against the backdrop of Harlem, Edwards' hometown, and explores themes of culture, identity, and social issues.

Grace Edwards' novels, although fictional, had hints of her own life and experiences intertwined; her unique perspectives on being Black and female in America while highlighting the tumultuous social conditions of the time gives her work a distinct power that has lasted even after her death.

Next week, join us in celebrating all of the new works that entered the public domain this year with our first Get Lit o...
01/02/2024

Next week, join us in celebrating all of the new works that entered the public domain this year with our first Get Lit of 2024! We've got lots of fun things planned, so you won't want to miss out on this once-in-a-lifetime celebration where creativity knows no bounds! Tickets here https://bit.ly/48oSgyf

 , John Hope Franklin was an eminent historian. His best-known work, FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM, chronicles the history of ...
01/02/2024

, John Hope Franklin was an eminent historian. His best-known work, FROM SLAVERY TO FREEDOM, chronicles the history of African Americans from their origins in Africa, slavery in the Western Hemisphere, their struggles for freedom, migrations, and their continued search for racial equity. It is considered a landmark in African-American historiography and has sold more than three million copies.

Franklin was born in Oklahoma, to Mollie Parker and the civil rights lawyer Buck Colbert Franklin, best known for defending African-American survivors of the 1921 Tulsa race massacre. His parents named him after John Hope, a well-known educator at the time who became the first African-American president of Atlanta University.

John Hope Franklin graduated from Fisk University in Nashville and then received his doctorate from Harvard University in 1941. Later, he was a professor at Howard University, head of the history department at Brooklyn College, led the history department at the University of Chicago, and was an appointee to a named chair in history at Duke University. Franklin's challenge with his work in education was to, "weave into the fabric of American history enough of the presence of blacks so that the story of the United States could be told adequately and fairly."

In addition to his scholarly contributions, Franklin was actively involved in the civil rights movement. He participated in various initiatives, including serving on the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund team in the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case in 1954, which led to the desegregation of public schools in the United States.

John Hope Franklin received numerous awards and honors throughout his career, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1995. He was also the president of the American Historical Association, breaking barriers as the first African American to hold this position.

Franklin

May the New Year bring you new joy, new adventures, and of course, new books!
01/01/2024

May the New Year bring you new joy, new adventures, and of course, new books!

We’re on the “last page” of 2023. Before you close the book on this year, please consider making a tax-deductible contri...
12/31/2023

We’re on the “last page” of 2023. Before you close the book on this year, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution to the American Writers Museum.

We have big plans for 2024 - a new special exhibit, the second American Writers Festival, author programs, and events - but we need your support.

We look forward to seeing you in the new year. Thank you for considering a year-end gift!

Donate here https://bit.ly/3I9NbzT

The museum will be closed Monday, New Year's Day but will reopen Thursday, January 4th. See you then! 🥂
12/29/2023

The museum will be closed Monday, New Year's Day but will reopen Thursday, January 4th. See you then! 🥂

The AWM needs your support.The American Writers Museum’s fiscal year ends in two days. It has been our most challenging ...
12/29/2023

The AWM needs your support.

The American Writers Museum’s fiscal year ends in two days. It has been our most challenging year for fundraising since we opened in 2017. But, challenges only make us more determined to fulfill the great potential of this one-of-a-kind museum.

If you have already made a year-end gift, thank you. If you have not, but you’ve been thinking about it, there’s no time like the present! Donate here https://bit.ly/3I9NbzT

Thank you!

Your gift to the Museum's Annual Fund provides immediate support for new exhibits and programs that explore American writers and enduring influence.

Next week, Get Lit with us at our first happy hour event of 2024. Join the American Writers Museum as we raise our glass...
12/28/2023

Next week, Get Lit with us at our first happy hour event of 2024. Join the American Writers Museum as we raise our glasses to welcome an exciting array of new works entering the public domain in 2024!

Join us for the Opening Ceremony as we symbolically unlock the works and release them into the public domain, then tune in and participate in the Public Domain Read-A-Thon. Select a previously copyrighted work and read it LIVE on our social media! Finally, help us commemorate this historic event by contributing to a special Public Domain Time Capsule filled with personal reflections, literary mementos, and predictions for the literary landscape of the future, locked away until January 2025.

Tickets on sale now! https://bit.ly/3RNnwBA

Together with our community, the AWM brings the voices of American authors to life through interactive exhibits, program...
12/27/2023

Together with our community, the AWM brings the voices of American authors to life through interactive exhibits, programs with today’s writers, and our Write In youth education program that inspires the next generation of great American writers.

But we can only do this with your support. Please consider making a year-end contribution to the American Writers Museum for more of the exhibits and programs you love. All gifts made before December 31 qualify for a 2023 tax deduction.

Donate here! https://bit.ly/3I9NbzT

Thank you for your support - we look forward to seeing you in 2024!

“Develop an interest in life as you see it; the people, things, literature, music - the world is so rich, simply throbbi...
12/26/2023

“Develop an interest in life as you see it; the people, things, literature, music - the world is so rich, simply throbbing with rich treasures, beautiful souls and interesting people. Forget yourself.”
― Henry Miller

, Henry Miller was an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer. He is credited with developing a new type of semi-autobiographical novel that blends different literary elements, from character study to stream of consciousness to free association.

Much of Miller's life was marked by various jobs and travels. After almost 40 years living in various neighborhoods and cities in New York, he spent 9 years in Paris, where he immersed himself in the city's vibrant artistic and literary scene. His most famous work, TROPIC OF CANCER, published in 1934, is a semi-autobiographical novel that explores his experiences in Paris, blending elements of fiction and autobiography. The book faced censorship and legal challenges in several countries due to its explicit content and unconventional narrative style.

After Paris, Miller stayed in Greece for a year with British novelist Lawrence Durrell. He described his stay in THE COLOSSUS OF MAROUSSI, an impressionist travelogue that Miller considered his best work. After Greece, he briefly moved back to New York before moving to California where he would reside for the rest of his life.

Throughout his career, Miller's writing delved into themes of sexuality, existentialism, and the human condition. He developed a distinctive, stream-of-consciousness writing style that influenced subsequent generations of writers. In addition to TROPIC OF CANCER Miller's notable works include TROPIC OF CAPRICORN, BLACK SPRING, and THE ROSY CRUCIFICION trilogy.

Despite the criticism for his explicit content and unconventional approach, Miller gained a cult following and is considered a key figure in 20th-century literature. His works reflect his exploration of freedom, individuality, and the pursuit of a meaningful life. and his literary legacy continues to spark discussions and debates on art, censorship, and the boundaries of expression.

Don't forget about our staff picks this month— perfect to cozy up with by the fire during the holidays! 📖 https://bit.ly...
12/26/2023

Don't forget about our staff picks this month— perfect to cozy up with by the fire during the holidays! 📖 https://bit.ly/48IqLzZ

Merry Christmas from all of us at the American Writers Museum! Don't forget, the museum will be open tomorrow and Wednes...
12/25/2023

Merry Christmas from all of us at the American Writers Museum! Don't forget, the museum will be open tomorrow and Wednesday for the holidays 🎄🎅❄

12/22/2023

Happy Holidays from the AWM! The museum will be closed Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, but as a special holiday treat, we'll be open on Tuesday and Wednesday the 26th and 27th!

The American Writers Museum is the perfect venue for your next event! Our space offers a unique experience, combining th...
12/21/2023

The American Writers Museum is the perfect venue for your next event! Our space offers a unique experience, combining the rich history of American writing with the charm of a cozy, intimate atmosphere. We can accommodate a range of events for up to 250 people — whatever you can imagine, we can help make it happen. Inquire today!

The American Writers Museum is the perfect venue for your next event! Our state-of-the-art space offers a truly unique experience, combining the rich history...

 is an upcoming film centered on book bans. Partially shot right here at the AWM, the film includes a cast of teenagers ...
12/21/2023

is an upcoming film centered on book bans. Partially shot right here at the AWM, the film includes a cast of teenagers stirring public protests, criminal charges, profanity-laced school board meetings, and more. You can help the film by making a year-end, tax-deductible contribution at https://bit.ly/3ROV8yO

Happy National Crossword Puzzle Day! Crossword puzzles began resembling the puzzles we know today around 1910, but long ...
12/21/2023

Happy National Crossword Puzzle Day! Crossword puzzles began resembling the puzzles we know today around 1910, but long before that, in 1862, the phrase “cross word puzzle” was first written in an American children’s magazine. By the 1920s, crosswords were beginning to gain attention; cartoon characters were depicted working on the puzzles, a humorous squib in the Boston Globe described a wife desperate for her husband to collect a crossword puzzle for her, and blurbs noting public interest were published in papers and magazines. People even swarmed libraries for access to dictionaries and encyclopedias to help them solve the puzzles!

However, not all of the attention was positive. An editorial from none other than The New York Times gave a scathing review in 1924, describing the puzzles as a "primitive form of mental exercise." 18 years later, The New York Times would finally publish its own crossword in order to lift spirits during World War II. Today it is widely regarded as an icon in American culture. From its initial publication in 1942 until 1969, Margaret Farrar was the NYTs puzzle editor, followed by two successors until the puzzle's current editor Will Shortz, took over in 1993.

Need a last minute gift idea? How about an AWM Membership! Head to our website to find all of our membership options and...
12/20/2023

Need a last minute gift idea? How about an AWM Membership! Head to our website to find all of our membership options and give the gift of the AWM today!

https://bit.ly/3zKxJV2

Thanks to everyone who came to Get Lit: Sun, Surf, Santa Claus! Take a look at some of your stunning holiday looks, ocea...
12/19/2023

Thanks to everyone who came to Get Lit: Sun, Surf, Santa Claus! Take a look at some of your stunning holiday looks, ocean-inspired cookies, and our very own Carey Claus!🎅⛄📖

❄‘Twas the night before the holidays,when all through the museum,there were stories to be told,of hair clips and reindee...
12/18/2023

❄‘Twas the night before the holidays,
when all through the museum,
there were stories to be told,
of hair clips and reindeer…❄

Only a few weeks left to catch our 'Twas the Night Before: Holiday Tour! Come to the museum any day at 3pm before December 31st to catch the tour and learn about the words that have helped to shape our holiday celebrations! The tour is free with museum admission.

We've got exciting things coming in 2024!Our monthly happy hour series is continuing in January! Grab your friends for a...
12/18/2023

We've got exciting things coming in 2024!

Our monthly happy hour series is continuing in January! Grab your friends for an after-hours treat on the second Tuesday of every month, from 5:30 pm - 8 pm. The AWM will serve up drinks, music, and special activities to get you LIT. Plus, all of our exhibits will be open for you to explore!

Check out each month's offerings below! Learn more and grab your tickets now at https://bit.ly/46aOAj1
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January 9, 2024: Public Domain Party
Start the new year off right with a literary soirée like no other! Join us as we raise our glasses to welcome an exciting array of new works entering the public domain in 2024. Help us commemorate this historic event by contributing to our time capsule, locked away until January 2025!

February 14, 2024: Down with Love
Love skeptics, heartbreak survivors, and those who have had enough of Cupid’s arrows rejoice! A fan favorite from earlier this year, join us again in 2024 for a night of unapologetic revelry and celebration at Down with Love.

March 12, 2024: Pub Night
Raise your glasses and don your finest green attire because we’re bringing the heart and soul of Irish pubs to life at the March Get Lit! At this event, we’re celebrating the works of Irish-American writers and the stories told every day in pubs across the country with pub trivia, a scavenger hunt, and more!

“There exists, for everyone, a sentence - a series of words - that has the power to destroy you. Another sentence exists...
12/16/2023

“There exists, for everyone, a sentence - a series of words - that has the power to destroy you. Another sentence exists, another series of words, that could heal you. If you're lucky you will get the second, but you can be certain of getting the first.”
― Philip K. Dick, Valis

, Phillip K. Dick was an American science fiction author. His work spanned many topics and often explored different social and philosophical questions, from human nature to altered states of consciousness. With over 150 published works, he is considered to be one of the most important figures in science fiction writing today.

Philip K. Dick was born in Chicago. However, he and his family moved to the San Francisco Bay area when he was still very young, after which he spent the rest of his life in California. While his personal life would be riddled with failed relationships, drug abuse, and severe bouts of mental illness, he remained a prolific author.

Dick began publishing science fiction stories at the age of 23. During his lifetime he published 44 novels and over 100 short stories. He did not find much success until 1962, ten years after he first began publishing, when his alternative history novel, THE MAN IN THE HIGH CASTLE, won the Hugo Award for best novel. His writing inspired films such as "Blade Runner" and "The Matrix," as well as other writers like Ursula K. Le Guin and Jonathan Lethem.

Influenced by the 1960s counterculture as well as his own hallucinations, Philip K. Dick’s science fiction blended traditional genre tropes such as the usefulness and/or dangers of advanced technology with subjects like drug abuse, insanity, and the nature of reality itself.

12/15/2023

If you missed out on seeing Gabriel Bump at the museum last week, don't worry! This week on our Author Talks Podcast, award-winning author Gabriel Bump discusses his new novel THE NEW NATURALS, a touching, timely novel about an attempt to found an underground Black utopia and the interwoven stories of those drawn to it.

Listen here or wherever you get your podcasts!
https://bit.ly/48d7Wod

“Oh, magic hour, when a child first knows she can read printed words.”― Betty Smith, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn , Betty Sm...
12/15/2023

“Oh, magic hour, when a child first knows she can read printed words.”
― Betty Smith, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

, Betty Smith was an American playwright and author. Her early life and experiences were the inspiration for the novel, A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN (1943).

Born Elisabeth Wehner in Brooklyn, 1896, she was raised by a relatively poor family of German immigrants. As a child, she moved several times to various tenement buildings before settling into the tenement her 1943 novel was set in. By this time, she had already developed her passion for writing. She had to quit school before finishing, in order to support her family.

Shortly after, she married George Smith and they moved to Michigan so he could attend law school. Betty Smith planned to resume her education after their move, but after giving birth to their twin daughters, she decided to wait until the girls were old enough for school before she also returned. When that time came, she studied writing, literature, journalism, and drama, at the University of Michigan, despite having never finished high school. It did not take long for her talent to be credited, when she received her first award at the University.

She and George divorced in 1933, but she kept his surname for her budding writing career, even through the two other marriages that followed this separation. It was the Federal Theatre Project that finally moved her to Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Her financial struggles, and the work and cost of raising two children, did not interfere with her writing practice. Betty Smith received many awards and fellowships throughout her career, and several of her stories were adapted into plays and movies.

50 years ago, American author Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings passed away. Rawlings was best known for her evocative and poigna...
12/14/2023

50 years ago, American author Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings passed away. Rawlings was best known for her evocative and poignant depictions of rural Florida life. Her breakthrough came with the publication of her first novel, SOUTH MOON UNDER in 1933, which depicted the struggles of a backwoods family in Florida. However, it was her second novel, THE YEARLING, that shot her to literary fame. The novel, set in the Florida scrublands, tells the coming-of-age story of a young boy and his relationship with a fawn. THE YEARLING earned Rawlings the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1939 and became a classic of American literature.

Despite her relatively brief career, her impact on American literature remains significant, and her contributions to the portrayal of the rural South endure through her timeless works. The Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Historic State Park, located at her former home in Cross Creek, Florida, preserves her legacy and allows visitors to explore the environment that inspired her writing.

“To refuse to fight for love that is both free and responsible is in a sense to reject the possibility of love itself.”―...
12/14/2023

“To refuse to fight for love that is both free and responsible is in a sense to reject the possibility of love itself.”
― Ellen Willis

, Ellen Willis was an influential American journalist, cultural critic, and feminist. Born in New York City, she became a prominent voice in the realms of music criticism, feminism, and politics.

Willis was born in Manhattan and attended Barnard College as an undergraduate. She then studied comparative literature at the graduate level at University of California, Berkeley before beginning her career as a music journalist in the 1960s. It was then that she began contributing to publications such as The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and The Village Voice. Her work as a music critic was characterized by a deep engagement with the social and political implications of popular music, challenging conventional norms and pushing the boundaries of cultural criticism.

As a feminist, Willis was a key figure in the second wave of feminism during the 1960s and 1970s. She co-founded the radical feminist group Redstockings and later became an important voice in the women's liberation movement. In the 1980s, she helped found No More Nice Girls, a theater and protest group that centered on abortion rights.

Throughout her career, Ellen Willis maintained a commitment to exploring topics rooted in radicalism, religion, and rock & roll. However, that didn't stop her from embracing other subjects; over the course of her career, she wrote on topics like psychoanalysis, the O.J. Simpson trial, and even Monica Lewinsky, always imparting her distinct tone into her work.

Ellen Willis's intellectual curiosity and dedication to social justice continued until her passing in 2006, but her legacy endures through her written work. A 2014 collection of her essays, THE ESSENTIAL ELLEN WILLIS, received the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism.

Discover the words of Black writers at home with our   Reading List.Read now at https://bit.ly/3yhwVao.
12/13/2023

Discover the words of Black writers at home with our Reading List.

Read now at https://bit.ly/3yhwVao.

“It goes without saying that a fine short poem can have the resonance and depth of an entire novel.”― James Wright, Sele...
12/13/2023

“It goes without saying that a fine short poem can have the resonance and depth of an entire novel.”
― James Wright, Selected Poems

, James Wright was an American poet, considered by many as one of America's best contemporaries. His work has been admired, as well as critiqued, by many, often for the same reasons; Wright's experimentation with language and style made him stand out from other poets at the time, leading critics to describe his work as, "badly marred by conversationality," or "a style of pastoral surrealism," depending on who was asked (Poetry Foundation).

James Wright was born and grew up in Martins Ferry, Ohio. He attended Kenyon College, where he graduated cm laude and Phi Beta Kappa. He then received a Fulbright Fellowship to study at the University of Vienna, before attending the University of Washington to earn his master's and doctoral degrees.

Wright's entrance into the literary scene began with the publication of THE GREEN WALL, a collection of formalist verse poetry that won him the Yale Younger Poets Prize. However, after being influenced by Spanish surrealists, Wright released himself from the confines of fixed meter and began to experiment with language; THE BRANCH WILL NOT BREAK was the result. Considered the turning point of his career, this book of poems deviated from his previous style, playing with loose structure, open verse, and themes not often seen in his other works. He often wrote of loneliness and alienation, things he was familiar with through his battle with depression; however, THE BRANCH WILL NOT BREAK expresses optimism and faith in the human spirit.

James Wright was elected as a fellow of the Academy of American Poets in 1971, and one year later, his COLLECTED POEMS won the Pulitzer Prize. It was only after his death that Wright developed a cult following for his work, situating him amongst other great poets. Fellow Pulitzer winner and poet Mary Oliver wrote THREE POEMS FOR JAMES WRIGHT after his death, and hundreds of writers gathered every year between 1981 and 2007 for the James Wright Poetry Festival held in his hometown of Martins Ferry.

12/12/2023

TONIGHT! Join us from 5:30-8 for this month's happy hour Get Lit: Sun, Surf, Santa!

Click here for tickets 😎
https://bit.ly/3uRrtMr

Whether you participated in National Novel Writing Month, you're writing a short story, or you just want to learn how to...
12/12/2023

Whether you participated in National Novel Writing Month, you're writing a short story, or you just want to learn how to become a better writer…we’re here to help you achieve your writing goals! Check out our blog for list of past programs and author talks that include specific tips and tricks for moments throughout the writing process. https://bit.ly/47O5l4e

12/11/2023

The most LIT happy hour in Chicago! Join us every month for our Get Lit museum nights, an after-hours event series from 5:30 to 8:00 pm. There's a new theme every month with special activities, cocktails & more. And make sure you come TOMORROW for Get Lit: Sun, Surf, Santa! 🎅📚

Don't forget about our new membership levels and special membership discounts! Sign up yourself or give a gift to the re...
12/11/2023

Don't forget about our new membership levels and special membership discounts! Sign up yourself or give a gift to the readers and writers in your life 📚📝

https://bit.ly/3zKxJV2

Today is Christmas card day! Head over to the typewriters and make your own Christmas cards to share with loved ones; we...
12/09/2023

Today is Christmas card day! Head over to the typewriters and make your own Christmas cards to share with loved ones; we'll supply everything you need —including lines from some winter poems in case you need some inspiration!

“I loathe the expression “What makes him tick.” It is the American mind, looking for simple and singular solutions, that...
12/08/2023

“I loathe the expression “What makes him tick.” It is the American mind, looking for simple and singular solutions, that uses the foolish expression. A person not only ticks, he also chimes and strikes the hour, falls and breaks and has to be put together again, and sometimes stops like an electric clock in a thunderstorm. ”
― James Thurber

, James Thurber was an American cartoonist, humorist, and author. He is best known for his cartoons and short stories, published often in The New Yorker magazine. His quirky characters quickly made him a success and he is still considered one of the greatest American humorists of the 20th century.

Thurber was born in Columbus, Ohio. His mother was a humorist herself and her jokes and theatrics greatly influenced Thurber's own work; many of his characters and stories are inspired by her. When Thurber was seven, a game of "William Tell" with his brothers went wrong, and he ended up shot in the eye and blinded. Throughout his life, he lost vision in his other eye, rendering him completely blind. However, this never stopped Thurber from drawing or writing.

James Thurber's career took off when he joined The New Yorker magazine in 1927, where he became a crucial part of the publication's identity. His cartoons, characterized by simple yet expressive lines, often featured anthropomorphic animals and whimsical scenes that captured the essence of human nature and societal quirks.

Beyond his contributions to cartooning, Thurber was a prolific writer. He penned numerous essays, short stories, and plays, showcasing his unique sense of humor. One of his most famous works, "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," a short story that explores the imaginative daydreams of an ordinary man, has been adapted twice into movies.

James Thurber's legacy endures as his contributions to literature and cartooning continue to be celebrated. His unique blend of humor and distinctive artistic style have left an indelible mark on American culture. Thurber passed away on November 2, 1961, but his work continues to inspire and entertain readers to this day.

12/07/2023

Don't forget about our holiday tour this month! Immerse yourself in the museum in a new way with 'Twas the Night Before. Only until the end of December!

Happy Hanukkah from the AWM!
12/07/2023

Happy Hanukkah from the AWM!

Last night, American screenwriter Norman Lear passed away. Lear produced, wrote, created, or developed over 100 shows, i...
12/06/2023

Last night, American screenwriter Norman Lear passed away. Lear produced, wrote, created, or developed over 100 shows, including One Day at a Time, All in the Family, and Good Times. For his work, he won many awards; six Emmys, two Peabody Awards, the National Medal of Arts, the Kennedy Center Honors, and the Golden Globe Carol Burnett Award, among others. Beyond his work in TV, he was also known for his political activism and supported many liberal causes.

Our December staff picks are here! We've got short stories, memoirs, sci fi, and so much more this month! And if you did...
12/06/2023

Our December staff picks are here! We've got short stories, memoirs, sci fi, and so much more this month! And if you didn't know, our staff picks are available on Bookshop.org, which benefits independent bookstores. Could make a great gift for the holidays 😉❄

Click here to find the full list! https://americanwritersmuseum.org/awm-staff-picks-december-2023/

12/06/2023

We have a new episode of our Author Talks Podcast out now! Author Claire Kumagai discusses her debut young adult novel CATFISH ROLLING, a wholly original and mind-bending debut YA novel about memory, family, and an earthquake that breaks apart time.

https://bit.ly/4a2zu1h

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180 N. Michigan Avenue, 2nd Floor
Chicago, IL
60601

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Sunday 10am - 5pm

Telephone

(312) 374-8790

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Educate, Engage, Inspire

The American Writers Museum is the first museum of its kind in the nation, dedicated the writers who have shaped the course of history with their words. With interactive, hands-on exhibits, the AWM is a literature-lover’s playground and an educational experience unlike any other. Here at the AWM we celebrate past writers, promote current writers, and inspire the next generation of writers. Plan your visit today!


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