A History of Mount Greenwood through Newspaper Articles and other Media

A History of Mount Greenwood through Newspaper Articles and other Media Posts are summaries of Mt Greenwood history (including photos, maps, articles) Posts are summaries of information from books, web pages, newspapers, etc.

No guarantee all information is 100% accurate, but every effort is made to verify dates, show proof, cite (or name) outside sources within posts or photo captions. This page shares neighborhood history information and is for entertainment purposes only. If you do not like a post, please refrain from posting negative or snide comments, just stop following the page.

01/03/2024
The first newspaper clip is from the Blue Island Sun Standard on December 27, 1923--over 100 years ago!  Look to see wha...
01/01/2024

The first newspaper clip is from the Blue Island Sun Standard on December 27, 1923--over 100 years ago! Look to see what the residents of Mount Greenwood were up to a century ago.

The first photo is of LeBeau's Tavern, which was in business in Mount Greenwood from 1923-1953. The photo was most likely taken between 1936 and 1938, during the installation of the neighborhood sewer system.

LeBeau's Tavern (and restaurant) was located at 3031 W. 111th Street--on the southwest corner of 111th and Whipple (formerly Utica)--where Fat Tommy's is currently located. Le Beau's opened in 1923 as a "restaurant/ice cream parlor." If the "tavern" portion of the restaurant existed at the time, it would not have been advertised during Prohibition (1920-1933). In the suburban telephone directory from 1923-1926, Le Beau's is listed as selling "soft drinks," which was often a "front" for illegally-operating taverns (during Prohibition). Owner Joseph Le Beau died in October 1948. His wife, Margaret, sold the restaurant in 1953.

By 1955, The Green Leaf Restaurant occupied the building at 3031 W. 111th Street. In October of 1966, a fire from a gas explosion destroyed the 2-story building (the Green Leaf Restaurant on 1st floor and the apartments on 2nd floor). A photo (below) from the Chicago Tribune, on Wed, Feb 23, 1966, shows the damage from the fire.

In 1967, a new building was built at 3031 W. 111th Street for Chicken Unlimited, a popular fried chicken franchise of the late 1960s to mid-1970s. A 1972 advertisement in the Chicago Tribune for the restaurant shows the style of the building built at 3031 W. 111th Street. Chicken Unlimited was in business in Mount Greenwood from 1967 to approximately 1974. Several Chicken Unlimited restaurants closed shortly before the corporation filed for bankruptcy in 1976. I believe the Mount Greenwood location was one of them.

I do not know what business(es) occupied the building from the mid-1970s to 1985--if any did. I vaguely remember a doughnut shop at that location, but I could be mistaken. The Omelette House opened at 3031 W. 111th Street in 1985 and stayed at the location until 1997--before moving to Oak Lawn. The French Kitchen occupied 3031 W. 111th from 1997 to approximately 1998. Around 2004, Vegetarian Gourmet Xpress moved into the building for about a year--followed by Veggie Bite in 2006. Fat Tommy's moved from its former location at 3256 W. 111th Street to 3031 W. 111th Street in 2009 and still occupies the building. If anyone knows exact dates or has other information on the former businesses at the location, please comment below.

Margaret LeBeau, the wife of Joseph J. LeBeau, lived to be 100 years old. She died in January 1973. An article (below) from the Suburbanite Economist, on Wednesday, November 29, 1972, tells of her life.

Interesting Note: Before Margaret (nee Flynn) and Joseph LeBeau moved to Mount Greenwood in 1913, Margaret’s brother, James J. Flynn, was a saloonkeeper on 111th Street. The 1900 U.S. Census shows that Margaret and James’s father, James J. Flynn, Sr., age 65, also lived with James, Jr. and his family at the saloon in Mount Greenwood. In 1900, Margaret and James’s mother, Margaret (nee Goggin) Flynn, age 64, was living at the Home for the Aged in Hyde Park. By 1910, James J. Flynn, Jr., his father, and his large family moved from the saloon in Mount Greenwood to a farm in Gregory, South Dakota. The 1910 U.S. Census shows that James’s brother, Anthony Flynn, lived in the Mount Greenwood saloon with his own family and was the saloonkeeper. Anthony and his family moved in some time between 1900 and 1910, when James moved out. I believe the Mount Greenwood saloon that the Flynn brothers operated was on the southeast corner of 111th and Whipple (formerly Utica) at 3023 W. 111th Street. The building was on the 1911 Sanborn Fire Insurance map, but had been replaced with a smaller building at some point before 1947 (1947 was when the 1911 Sanborn map was updated). The location of the saloon building (and the building that replaced it) is currently the outdoor patio seating for Tata’s Pizza.

In 1913, Margaret (nee Flynn) and Joseph LeBeau, along with their 4 small children, moved to 3031 W. 111th Street. In 1913, Margaret’s brother, Anthony Flynn (and his family), most likely, still lived across the street at the saloon at 3023 W. 111th Street. The LeBeaus moved from a house that they were renting on a farm, located at 5231 S. Justine, Chicago, where Joseph worked as a proprietor of a teaming business (horses). It is likely that the LeBeaus visited their relatives at the saloon in Mount Greenwood and were aware of the empty lot across the street from the saloon at 3031 W. 111th Street.

On the 1920 U.S. Census, Anthony Flynn was living with the LeBeaus and his marital status was “single.” His wife, Emma, and their three children were living at 10129 S. Beverly Avenue with Emma’s new husband, an ice distributor, William Hansen. I’m guessing William Hansen delivered ice to the saloon. 😳 The saloon at 3023 W. 111th may have closed down by 1920, due to Prohibition, or maybe there was a fire some time between 1910 & 1920? I’m still researching that, so I’m not sure if that actual saloon building at 3023 W. 111th Street still existed in 1920.

If you are a "numbers" person, the following article from the Suburbanite Economist on April 2, 1941 may interest you.  ...
12/14/2023

If you are a "numbers" person, the following article from the Suburbanite Economist on April 2, 1941 may interest you. The article contains a lot of statistical information on Mount Greenwood, which was gathered on a land-use survey by the WPA in 1939. Created by FDR, the WPA (Works Progress Administration) was a federal program that put Americans to work on infrastructure projects during the Great Depression. The WPA did quite a bit of work in Mount Greenwood during the 1930s--most WPA workers assigned to Mount Greenwood were laborers who assisted in the paving of streets, the installation of a sewer system, the building of the 5th Mount Greenwood School at 10840 S. Homan Avenue, etc. I also included an aerial photo of Mount Greenwood from 1938 (and a map from 1903 showing the old street names in Mount Greenwood).

*Note: I am not a "numbers" person but still found the information in the article interesting.

NEW INFORMATION ADDED:  The following article provides details about a chicken-theft court case in Mount Greenwood in 19...
11/04/2023

NEW INFORMATION ADDED: The following article provides details about a chicken-theft court case in Mount Greenwood in 1917. The court was held in the Mount Greenwood Village Hall, which was also the village's police lockup. The Village Hall burned down some years later, but it stood in the location of the storefront (former chiropractor office) at 3015 W. 111th Street.

I found Anton Arlov on the 1920 U.S. Census. It appears that he lived on the west side of 113th and Spaulding in 1910, where Cassell is now located. HistoricAerials.com shows there were about six houses on that side of the street in 1938, so probably fewer in 1917. I believe Joe Boschart (also spelled as Boshart) lived on the north side of 114th Street, between Spaulding and Homan. The HistoricAerial.com photo of 1938 shows there were only 2 houses on the north side of 114th (I'm assuming they were the former homes of Joe Boschart and "John" H. Schlueter). Barely visible, the 1938 aerial photo also shows a small building (set back from one of the houses on 114th Street), which I believe is the former chicken coop of Joe Boschart.

Not long ago, I discovered a very old building in the backyard of a home on 114th Street, when I went to vote at Cassell. I was very interested in the building, which is now being used as a garage. After a friend contacted a former resident of that block, I was informed that the old building in question is actually a very old chicken coop. I believe Boshart's chicken coop--the scene of the crime in this article--is that old building!

Anton Artov moved from Mount Greenwood by 1918. After managing a farm in Deerfield, Illinois, Artov became a shoemaker and had his own shoe repair business at 5677 W. Madison in Chicago. He later moved his business and residence to Sandwich, Illinois, where he passed away in 1959.

The only records I could find for “Joe Boschart (Boshart)" were an arrest in Pullman for the murder of Chicago Police Patrolman Henry Mandleco (wrong last name of "Handeleche" was printed in the Edwardsville newspaper) and U.S. Censuses listing Boschart as an inmate of Joliet State Prison in 1920, 1930, 1940. While I'm not positive these records are for the Mount Greenwood "Joe Boshart" mentioned in the article, the details of Patrolman Mandleco's murder on April 23, 1919 (in the following link from the Chicago Police Department's Memorial Foundation) lead me to believe he is one in the same. I also suspect Anton Artov was not guilty of stealing Joe’s chickens—Anton may have been stealing HIS chickens back from Joe! What do you think?

https://cpdmemorial.org/fallen-officers/patrolman-henry-august-mandleco-star-1403/

The chicken-theft article also mentions "Hygienic Restaurant." I believe a hygienic restaurant was similar to a vegetarian or "clean" food restaurant (I guess one was located in Mount Greenwood in 1917--where?).

"During the early 20th century, contaminated food, milk, and water caused many foodborne infections, including typhoid fever, tuberculosis, botulism, and scarlet fever (and cholera). In 1906, Upton Sinclair described in his novel, "The Jungle," the unwholesome working environment in the Chicago meat-packing industry and the unsanitary conditions under which food was produced. Public awareness dramatically increased and led to the passage of the 1906 Pure Food and Drug Act. Once the sources and characteristics of foodborne diseases were identified--long before vaccines or antibiotics--they could be controlled by handwashing, sanitation, refrigeration, pasteurization, and pesticide application. Healthier animal care, feeding, and processing also improved food supply safety . . .
"Before 1910, no legislation existed to ensure the safety of food and feed crops that were sprayed and dusted with pesticides. In 1910, the first pesticide legislation was designed to protect consumers from impure or improperly labeled products." (Britannica.com)

I'm assuming hygienic restaurants, as well as other hygienic items, were an American trend in the early 1900s, due to the scientific discoveries of that time.

If anyone is interested…From Patch.com:Visitation for UAAF First Lt. Edward T. McGuire will take place at 9 a.m. this Sa...
10/20/2023

If anyone is interested…

From Patch.com:

Visitation for UAAF First Lt. Edward T. McGuire will take place at 9 a.m. this Saturday, Oct. 28, with a Mass of Christian Burial immediately following at 11 a.m., at Most Holy Redeemer Church, 9525 S. Lawndale, Evergreen Park.

After the service, the hearse carrying McGuire’s remains will be escorted to Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Alsip, escorted by Chicago, Alsip, and Oak Lawn police and fire, and motorcycles from Rolling Thunder, Inc. Illinois, Patriot Guard Riders, American Legion Riders, VFW and Combat veterans. McGuire will be buried with full military hours.

Waiting on the Patch to publish the funeral procession route to the cemetery.

MIA 80 years, USAAF 1st Lt. Edward McGuire will get a hero's welcome home to the South Side where he will be buried with military honors.

Read what was going on in the neighborhood in the Spring of 1971!  In the Spring of 1971, many neighborhood residents:  ...
09/09/2023

Read what was going on in the neighborhood in the Spring of 1971!

In the Spring of 1971, many neighborhood residents: attended Greater Mount Greenwood Youth Baseball games, located at 115th and Homan; celebrated scouting achievements at Mount Greenwood United Methodist Church, located at 110th & St. Louis; honored fallen soldiers at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, located at 6001 W. 111th Street; and planted trees at Mount Greenwood Park, located at 3645 W. 111th Street.

Unfortunately, in addition to these pleasant events, the Spring of 1971 was also witness to quite a bit of trouble in the neighborhood. According to a Suburbanite Economist newspaper article, some unruly youths in Mount Greenwood caused much terror and vandalism in the neighborhood.

Note: The Spring of 1971 began the championship season for the Babe Ruth League's White Sox team, managed by Robert Lamberty, and coached by Rich Ralphson, Tom Malloy, and Dave Aggen.

The following articles are from the Suburbanite Economist, Chicago, Illinois, and the Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, in the Spring of 1971.

I recently came across the following article from the Morgan Park Suburban Star newspaper, which was dated July 3, 1924....
08/03/2023

I recently came across the following article from the Morgan Park Suburban Star newspaper, which was dated July 3, 1924. The article contains excerpts from a paper written by a Washington Heights resident, Alice Sarah Barnard. Not to be confused with her paternal aunt (the Washington Heights grammar school's namesake, Alice Lucretia Barnard), Alice Sarah Barnard was a retired schoolteacher, who shared her memories of growing up, during the mid-to-late nineteenth century, on the Blue Island Ridge.

Alice S. Barnard was born in her family's home (on her family's farm) in 1854, which was located near present-day 101st Street and Longwood Drive. Some of today's southwest-side of Chicago neighborhoods and surrounding suburbs were scarcely-populated farm areas back then and were referred to as "North Blue Island," in Worth Township, Cook County, Illinois. As populations increased in these areas, towns formed. Washington Heights, Morgan Park, Beverly, and Mount Greenwood were some of these towns; they eventually incorporated as villages. Another township in Cook County--Calumet Township--incorporated in 1862, and claimed a few of these areas. In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, some of the villages in Worth and Calumet Townships, independently, annexed to the city of Chicago (which is Lake Township).

Lane's Island (mentioned in the article) was a nearby area, west of the Blue Island Ridge, that became parts of suburban Alsip and Worth. Black Oak, the original name of Oak Lawn, was also a nearby area.

In her paper, Alice S. Barnard recalls a lot of interesting information about the area from growing up on the Blue Island Ridge. This article prompted me to research more about Alice S. Barnard's family (I will be sharing that information in another post).

Note: Putting the time frame into perspective was unbelievable for me: Alice S. Barnard was seventy years old in 1924--the year when the following article was published (my grandma was born in 1924!). The article was published 99 years ago; therefore, Alice S. Barnard was born 169 years ago!

I hope you enjoy Alice Sarah Barnard's memories as much as I did!

In 1987, Mount Greenwood's own, Kathy Guthrie, participated in the Special Olympics held in South Bend, Indiana, at Notr...
07/14/2023

In 1987, Mount Greenwood's own, Kathy Guthrie, participated in the Special Olympics held in South Bend, Indiana, at Notre Dame. Kathy participated in Aquatics (swimming) at the Special Olympics. Kathy went on to become a very talented artist; she created many beautiful paintings through Garden Center Services in Burbank. The articles below tell of Kathy's journey to the Special Olympics in 1987 and of her creative talent as a painter.

Update: I recently learned that Jackie Guthrie, Kathy’s sister, is the new Mount Greenwood Park Supervisor. Am I correct?

Are any of these athletic, young ladies related to you??  The photos below are of Mount Greenwood Park's Championship Vo...
07/14/2023

Are any of these athletic, young ladies related to you?? The photos below are of Mount Greenwood Park's Championship Volleyball Teams from October 1971! The photo is from the Suburbanite Economist on Sunday, October 03, 1971.🏐🥇

In the Chicago Tribune, on Sunday, September 15, 1974, a letter was published in the "Public Forum" section of the newsp...
07/12/2023

In the Chicago Tribune, on Sunday, September 15, 1974, a letter was published in the "Public Forum" section of the newspaper. It was written by Mount Greenwood resident, William Stanton. Stanton had been a member of many neighborhood organizations and served on several special committees in Mount Greenwood. Stanton knew firsthand the difficulty of fundraising, so he felt it was necessary to expose the long-time, secret supporters of the neighborhood's events. ❤️

From the late-1950s to the early-1960s, the Chicago Tribune featured a "Food Reporter Asks Shoppers" article on Fridays....
07/11/2023

From the late-1950s to the early-1960s, the Chicago Tribune featured a "Food Reporter Asks Shoppers" article on Fridays. People (mostly housewives) would mail questions to the food reporter. Each week, the food reporter would select one of the questions and ask random shoppers at Chicagoland supermarkets to answer the question chosen.

The six "Food Reporter Asks Shoppers" articles below feature shoppers at the following southwest-side supermarkets: High-Low, located at 10340 S. Pulaski, Oak Lawn, IL; High-Low, located at 9435 S. Western, Chicago, IL; A & P, located at 3545 W. 95th Street, Evergreen Park, IL; and Kroger, located at 95th & Western Ave., Evergreen Park, IL (in Evergreen Plaza). You may recognize some of the shoppers who answered the questions asked by the food reporter!

I included Historicaerial.com photos of the supermarkets' locations in 1961 and Google Earth images of the same locations in 2023.
There is also a 1958 ad for Evergreen Plaza showing the location of the Kroger supermarket.

Thirty-five years ago, Deborah Brady of Brady's Drugstore, along with many other Mount Greenwood small business owners, ...
07/09/2023

Thirty-five years ago, Deborah Brady of Brady's Drugstore, along with many other Mount Greenwood small business owners, knew that building a Walgreens in Mount Greenwood would most certainly mean the death of many mom-and-pop shops on 111th Street. Brady was quoted in the following Chicago Tribune article as saying, ". . . there are a lot of little shops on the block that will be hurt eventually." And, she was right.

Having been in business for only six years, at the time the article was published (in 1988), Deborah and Tim Brady knew the future of their business was at risk. Located at 3235 W. 111th Street (the building formerly occupied by Dodge Drugs), Brady's Drugstore was across the street from the proposed Walgreens location. The Bradys knew that Walgreens could easily meet the Mount Greenwood community's prescription needs, and it had a network of nearby Walgreens stores at its disposal. In addition to the pharmacy, Walgreens had a large liquor department, which offered weekly liquor sales that greatly undercut its competition. Walgreens also had cosmetics, greeting cards, food, pet care items, toys, film developing, small gifts, to***co products, household items, etc. No mom-and-pop store (offering similar items and/or services) could compete with Walgreens' prices.

Many Mount Greenwood residents supported the small business owners' opposition to Walgreens; they signed petitions and attended community meetings. Unfortunately, Walgreens had the support of the Mount Greenwood Chamber of Commerce, the Mount Greenwood Civic Association, and the Mount Greenwood National Bank. The mom-and-pop shops in Mount Greenwood didn't stand a chance.

Unsurprisingly, the mom-and-pop shops lost the fight. By 1989, Walgreens had opened on the northwest corner of 111th and Kedzie, and several small businesses on 111th Street and on Kedzie Avenue suffered because of it. I can't say with 100% certainty which mom-and-pop shops were forced to close, due to the opening of Walgreens in Mount Greenwood, but I do remember many shops closed their doors for good--shortly after Walgreens came to town.

Newman Pharmacy, located at 3458 W. 111th Street, closed in the early 1990s, after being in business in Mount Greenwood since 1963. If I'm remembering correctly, I think the long-time pharmacist at Newman's then partnered with the Bradys, and Brady's Drugstore (Pharmacy) became more of a medical equipment/supply store (or something along those lines). Brady's managed to stay in business in Mount Greenwood for another 25 years or so, but, sadly, the store has been "temporarily" closed since the Covid pandemic began. In my opinion, Brady's Pharmacy in Mount Greenwood doesn't look like it's going to reopen. Monaco Pharmacy, located at 3156 W. 103rd Street (formerly Monaco Rexall Drugs at 3138 W. 103rd Street) closed its doors by 1991, after 30 years in Mount Greenwood. Universal Liquors, located at 3119 W. 111th Street, closed by 1990, after being in business in Mount Greenwood for nearly 40 years (Gradley's Bar and Deli opened in its place during the early-1990s but only lasted a few years itself). The card shop mentioned in the article, which I assume was The Card and Candle Shop, located at 3146 W. 111th Street, closed after about 20 years in business--sometime between the late-1990s and early-2000s (around 2006, Schools Are Us, a school uniform shop, opened it its location). The candy store mentioned in the article may have been Al's Sugar Shack, which was located at 3252 W. 111th Street (at one point in time) during the 1980s (Al's Sugar Shack moved to different locations in Mount Greenwood twice during the 1980s). Another long-time liquor store location, just north of Burger King, at 11010 S. Kedzie, closed by 1990 (I can't remember if it was Emil's Liquors or Tony's II when it closed). For Less Liquors, located at 11114 S. Kedzie, closed in 1989, after about 10 years in business. Also, Able Camera and Video, located at 11040 S. Kedzie, closed around 1993.

I am not claiming that all of these small businesses (mentioned above) closed BECAUSE of Walgreens, but I am sure they all lost business because of Walgreens, forcing some of them to close. Without the support of neighborhood business organizations/associations, mom-and pop shops will continue to disappear. While large, corporate-run businesses may be attractive, by offering more items/services at lower prices, as well as providing more jobs, I think they take all the charm away from neighborhoods like Mount Greenwood (just my opinion).

Up until the 1960s or 70s, many Mount Greenwood residents called 111th Street and Kedzie Avenue "The Village." The name goes back to when Mount Greenwood was a village--before annexing to Chicago in 1926. Many residents of Mount Greenwood Village were truck farmers; they lived on and farmed one-acre blocks of land or sections consisting of several lots. To socialize with neighbors or to shop, residents of Mount Greenwood would go up to "The Village," where most of the businesses and churches were located (111th Street and Kedzie Avenue). The term, "The Village," stuck around--long after truck farming ended in Mount Greenwood.

Many small businesses on 111th Street and Kedzie Avenue, during the 1950s and 60s, even used "Village" in their businesses' names--Village Liquors, Village Gift Box, Village Currency Exchange, Village Hobby Shop, New Village Liquor and Tap, Village Lanes, etc. Other businesses used "Hilltop" in their businesses' names--Hilltop Restaurant, Hilltop Nursery, Hilltop Finer Foods and Bakery, etc. Hilltop was the name of the region and the telephone exchange prefix for the area.

The point I'm trying to make . . . decades after Mount Greenwood became a part of Chicago, people in Mount Greenwood would still call the business areas in the neighborhood "The Village," and business owners would still use "Village," "Hilltop," and "Mount Greenwood" in their businesses' names because they liked and appreciated the "small-town feel." One online article defined the phrase “small-town feel” as "it evokes a quiet, laid-back lifestyle in a close-knit community where people know each other, can rely on each other, and where people are connected." After annexing to Chicago, the people of Mount Greenwood kept the small-town feel in the neighborhood alive--for decades. In more recent years, that small-town feel has been disappearing from Mount Greenwood with each passing year. Music is no longer played over speakers attached to the outside of businesses on 111th. The annual "Sidewalk Sale" is long gone. The only parades held in the neighborhood are for opening day at the Merrionette Park Fields or to kickoff the Mount Greenwood Colts football/cheerleading season. There are no more movies, dinners, award ceremonies, or neighborhood dances held at the American Legion Hall---there is no American Legion Hall (or any type of large banquet hall for the community)! There are no more carnivals in Mount Greenwood--not since Saint Christina Fest ended in the mid-1990s. "Party in the Park" is done. Is the park pool even open this year? Don't get me wrong, I am extremely grateful for the few neighborhood events we do have, but we should be having so many more.

(Getting back to the businesses) It's quite obvious that the business areas in Mount Greenwood were designed before Americans desired lots of space; the Mount Greenwood business areas definitely lack the spread-out, suburban-feel many of us have grown accustomed to. Parking is extremely limited, but Mount Greenwood's business areas still have a lot of charm. Due to online shopping, suburban shopping malls are beginning to shutter. Wouldn't now be the perfect time to revamp the small business areas in Mount Greenwood? Many people still prefer to shop in brick and mortar stores, which are plentiful in Mount Greenwood. Mount Greenwood should seize this opportunity to bring the small-town feel back to the neighborhood business areas. Cafes, diners, specialty shops, boutiques, a hobby shop, a bakery, a banquet hall, a gift shop, a pet shop, an ice cream shop, a book store? There are so many possibilities! Just look at downtown Lagrange, downtown Tinley Park, and downtown Oak Park--Mount Greenwood could be just as quaint. Don't get me wrong, I'm not trying to bash big, corporate stores, like Walgreens and Dollar Tree (I shop at both, just like everyone else); I just think Mount Greenwood would be better off without any more of them. I really hope that Mount Greenwood will try to preserve and improve its existing, commercial buildings (what's left of the ""small-town feel in our business areas) before any more buildings are razed. By preserving and cosmetically-improving the buildings we already have, Mount Greenwood could be so much more charming and attractive to new small businesses.

I really hope the people of Mount Greenwood--residents, business owners, business organizations/associations/committees--get on the same page and develop a strict building preservation/improvement plan for the business areas. There are too many vacant storefronts in the neighborhood; the situation will only get worse if no "positive" action is taken to improve the appearances of existing businesses.

As for the parking situation, it doesn't have to be so terrible. Some of the existing businesses with ample parking should be forced to share their lots or at least allow their lots to be used after their businesses close for the day (some businesses do this already). I will never understand why Burger King has such a huge south parking lot, which no one uses (with signs posted saying any car that isn't a Burger King patron will be towed), while the new, "bigger" library has about 6 parking spots. The old library building on the east side of 110th & Kedzie even has its own parking lot now! I also don't understand the logic used when designing the building and parking lot where Rosati's is located or the plaza by Walgreens that eliminated so many potential parking spots (again, just my thoughts and opinions).

The following article is from the Chicago Tribune on Wednesday, January 20, 1988.

Young Mount Greenwood parishioners of Saint Christina Catholic Church were given awards in May 1963. The article below i...
07/08/2023

Young Mount Greenwood parishioners of Saint Christina Catholic Church were given awards in May 1963. The article below includes photos from the 1963 May Crowning ceremony in Mary's Plaza at Saint Christina and the presentation of Parvuli Dei medals--the highest honors the Catholic Church bestows Cub Scouts--by Saint Christina Church's pastor, the Reverend John Ireland Gallery.

The following article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on Sunday, June 02, 1963, The article and photos contain the names of many Mount Greenwood children, so make sure to read them all! You may see YOUR name or the name of your parent or grandparent!!

Happy Fourth of July!! Read what was going on in Mount Greenwood around the 4th of July holiday nearly 100 years ago!  I...
07/04/2023

Happy Fourth of July!!

Read what was going on in Mount Greenwood around the 4th of July holiday nearly 100 years ago!

In 1924, the Mount Greenwood Civic Association (formerly the MG Improvement Assn) held a carnival near 111th & Kedzie. The festival was most likely held where Burger King is now located on the west side of 110th and Kedzie (there were several "early" dances held on the empty Burger King land) or it may have been held on the NE corner of 111th & Sawyer (later carnivals were held on the Sawyer corner).

In the immediate weeks following the conclusion of the carnival, several Mount Greenwood businesses and homes were raided by Morgan Park's newly formed Morgan Park Law Enforcement League. The League's mission was to rid the "deplorable" village of Mount Greenwood of alcohol. The sale of alcohol was prohibited in 1924, due to Prohibition, so Morgan Park was finally able to get some satisfaction. "Dry" Morgan Park had been trying to shut down Mount Greenwood saloons since they first opened in the late 1800s.

Around July 4th, in 1927, the Parkwood Baptist Mission Church, on 104th and Spaulding, was rebuilt. The original church was damaged severely during a bad storm that year. There is a photo of the new church below.

Unfortunately, I did not find any photos in historic newspapers of the Monster Festival and Fourth of July Celebration of 1924, but the July 10th "neighborhood news" article reveals that there was a Ferris Wheel.

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