Museum of Miniature Houses & Other Collections

Museum of Miniature Houses & Other Collections Visit our museum and allow yourself to be transported into delightful magical miniature worlds.
(30)

The Purposes of the Museum is to preserve and exhibit quality miniature houses, room settings and single pieces, as well as other collections, so that these works of art will not be lost to future generations; to provide educational forums and workshops; to use the exhibits to show the relationship of miniature reproductions to history, architecture and the decorative arts. The Museum is a Not-for-Profit organization operating under a 501 (c) (3) tax status granted to the Museum by the Internal Revenue Service. The Museum is supported by a "Friends of The Museum" membership, grants, admission donations, and sales from the small Museum shop. The museum benefits from the direct services of over 40 volunteers on a regular basis. Over 70,000 guests have toured the Museum from all 50 states and many foreign countries. Visitors include schools, retirement homes, individual tourists, and tour bus groups. There is an active Girl Scout program providing the opportunity to earn badges while learning about interior design, architecture, spatial relationships, and history. The regular exhibits at any given time include 10-15 furnished miniature houses, most scaled 1" = 1' and ½" = 1' plus a number of partial houses, rooms, small scenes, and an artisan display case. Displays are changed seasonally. Examples of Other Collections which have been exhibited include private collections of antique hair jewelry, political campaign memorabilia, egg art, antique silhouettes, 18th century pottery, cranberry glass, Victorian fans, antique Valentines, and Depression glass. The Museum is a member of American Association of Museums and Association of Indiana Museums, Hamilton Co. Visitors Bureau, Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association, and Carmel Chamber of Commerce. Listed as an attraction in the AAA Tour Guide and Indianapolis Star.

Our Virtual GalleryKitchens tell us so much about the prevailing culture and are a reflection of its values and philosop...
07/07/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
Kitchens tell us so much about the prevailing culture and are a reflection of its values and philosophies. They play a prominent role that it plays in our lives in both the physical and social structure of the home. Kitchens started out as totally utilitarian and, being noisy, hot and messy, were relegated as far from the “living” areas of a home as possible. Throughout their history, no other room in the house underwent more changes than the kitchen, due to ever-constant advancements such as the invention of cast iron, electricity, and plumbed water.
In the 19th century, kitchen work was the purview of women only and were totally workspaces where guests would never enter. In the early 1900s, kitchens became much more efficient, especially with inventions such as gas as the preferred source of heat and the Hoosier Cabinet. In the 1930s and 1940s, technology, kitchen appliances integrated with cabinetry, helped create a sense of interior design and easy workflow with the space. In the mid-century, kitchens became more quiet, more clean and more organized. By the 1960s, designer kitchens came into vogue. Kitchens became a locus for the at-home chef. As the century came to a close, more and more often, kitchens were built for entertaining. Today, the goal of many homeowners is to have a kitchen for aesthetic pleasure along with ultimate functionality.

The Museum of Miniatures Houses and Other Collections is proud to present full-size decoys from the collection of John E...
07/05/2020

The Museum of Miniatures Houses and Other Collections is proud to present full-size decoys from the collection of John Elton Cole Jr., author of Decoys From The "Home Run" Baker Rig, including those made by Vernon Bryant, along with fine-scale miniature duck decoys made by Frank Balestrieri from our permanent collection.
Duck decoys are truly an American tradition, where for thousands of years Native Americans used floating decoys to attract waterfowl.
The museum is currently open on Saturdays from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and Sundays 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Our Virtual GalleryThe Geranium Cottage is a “one of a kind” miniature made from scratch by Tish Blackford. Tish was fro...
07/03/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
The Geranium Cottage is a “one of a kind” miniature made from scratch by Tish Blackford.
Tish was from Kentucky and she supported five children for many years by making miniatures to sell to other miniaturists, everything from painted furniture to painted signs.
For the cottage shingles, she used about seven coats of different washes to get that very unusual patina that are on old shingles. She made the wicker rockers (child-sized in the attic and human-sized downstairs). She painted designs on the furniture and made the wall painting and the heart wreaths. The pink and green doll in the window is her creation also. She made all of the geraniums that line the front of the cottage. The flagstone porch required a great deal of “cut-and-try” before she was able to get the stones sized and placed correctly.
The cottage contains many creations from well-known artisans, including a bird cage by Kumeroe, a Sir Thomas Thumb beehive, and Jane Graber pottery.
This piece won “Best of Show” at a miniature show in Indianapolis in 1992.

Our Virtual GalleryThe California Contemporary house was created and donated by Mrs. Bernice Wolf.  It is a rare example...
06/30/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
The California Contemporary house was created and donated by Mrs. Bernice Wolf. It is a rare example of a 3/4” to 1’ scale.
She said that while she was antiquing, she saw something in a far-off corner that took her breath away: a derelict custom-made dollhouse with a living room, bedroom and kitchen. Mrs. Wolf envisioned much more and decided to renovate. California contemporary living became the theme, incorporating white stucco and black awnings. Rooftop living was a must, complete with an umbrella table and hammock. A hot tub and a lap pool were the perfect luxury additions. Mrs. Wolf also added a bathroom, den, and sunroom

The museum is open to visitors on weekends.  Hours are Saturday 11-4 and Sunday 1-4.  The shop is open as well.We have t...
06/27/2020

The museum is open to visitors on weekends. Hours are Saturday 11-4 and Sunday 1-4. The shop is open as well.
We have two exhibits: Smallest of the Small and Duck Decoys, both full size and miniature.

Please note that all events planned through August 10 have been cancelled due to safety concerns.

Our Virtual Gallery: Ella Reulbach and AmericanaElla depicts human culture in miniature, specifically American life, in ...
06/26/2020

Our Virtual Gallery: Ella Reulbach and Americana

Ella depicts human culture in miniature, specifically American life, in single scenes. The vast majority of her works includes dolls, which are more expressive than realistic. Her scenes include Americana such as a Murphy bed, a vegetable cart, outdoors Christmas scene with a Flexible Flyer in the snow, a dog named Spot, a newspaper delivery by bicycle, kids visiting with Mickey Mouse, a Native American elder telling a tale, a go cart, a front porch with a picket fence, eating apples from the tree, etc.

Our Virtual Gallery: Diana Dalton's Georgian HouseDiana was the wife of a Standard Oil of Indiana executive and lived al...
06/23/2020

Our Virtual Gallery: Diana Dalton's Georgian House
Diana was the wife of a Standard Oil of Indiana executive and lived all over the world. She had gone to Parsons School of Design in New York and, to keep her hand in interior design, got into miniatures while she lived in countries including Pakistan, Egypt Venezuela and the UK. Diana was imaginative and, if she couldn’t find something she needed, she would just make it from scratch. Diana thoroughly enjoyed her passion and always had her sketchbook close, ready to figure out what was next.

Our Virtual Gallery: Hoosier HistoryA small snippet of Hoosier history can still be seen today in the form of farmhouses...
06/19/2020

Our Virtual Gallery: Hoosier History
A small snippet of Hoosier history can still be seen today in the form of farmhouses, Hoosier cabinets, Wooton desks, Depression Glass, and quilts. The farmhouse is a quintessential part of the Indiana landscape. Hoosier cabinets, named after the Hoosier Manufacturing Company of New Castle, Indiana, revolutionized kitchen organization. . The Wooton desk had as many as 110 compartments and could be locked up. Indianapolis entrepreneur, William S. Wooton, obtained the patent in 1870 and established the Wooton Desk Company, with production ending in 1884. The discovery of the Trenton Gas Field in east-central Indiana in 1887 ushered in a golden age of industry for the state. The Great Depression thrust the country into an economic downturn, with thousands of jobs being lost. Depression Glass, which started being produced in 1923, was inexpensive to manufacture and became very popular during this time. Quiltmaking is an essential facet of Hoosier history as a homespun art form made by everyday people. By 1898 cyclist Marshall W. "Major" Taylor, an African-American, held an astonishing seven world records, and he and his team drew crowds big enough to fill Madison Square Garden. More than 20,000 Amish live in Northern Indiana. Buggies are a popular form of transportation for the Amish. There is a courting buggy, with an open carriage ensuring very little privacy for the young couple.
For more detailed information about Hoosier History, please visit our website http://www.museumofminiatures.org under Permanent Exhibits.

Museum of Miniature Houses & Other Collections
06/18/2020

Museum of Miniature Houses & Other Collections

Special Exhibit
Duck decoys are truly an American tradition, where for thousands of years Native Americans used floating decoys to attract waterfowl. The use of floating decoys found popularity on the East Coast during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. During this time hunters trapped 100-200 ducks per day using crudely made forms. Duck decoys of the Mid-20th century to the present have moved from utilitarian to artistic. Starting June 20 decoys from the collection of John Elton Cole Jr., author of Decoys From The "Home Run" Baker Rig, along with fine-scale miniature duck decoys made by Frank Balestrieri from our permanent collection will be on display until September 6.

Special ExhibitDuck decoys are truly an American tradition, where for thousands of years Native Americans used floating ...
06/18/2020

Special Exhibit
Duck decoys are truly an American tradition, where for thousands of years Native Americans used floating decoys to attract waterfowl. The use of floating decoys found popularity on the East Coast during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. During this time hunters trapped 100-200 ducks per day using crudely made forms. Duck decoys of the Mid-20th century to the present have moved from utilitarian to artistic. Starting June 20 decoys from the collection of John Elton Cole Jr., author of Decoys From The "Home Run" Baker Rig, along with fine-scale miniature duck decoys made by Frank Balestrieri from our permanent collection will be on display until September 6.

We are proud to announce that the museum has been awarded an Arts Organization Support I grant from the Indiana Arts Com...
06/18/2020

We are proud to announce that the museum has been awarded an Arts Organization Support I grant from the Indiana Arts Commission (IAC). The grant is made possible by appropriated funds from the National Endowment for the Arts. The museum’s grant application was adjudicated by an independent volunteer panel and approved by the Board of Commissioners of the IAC.

The period covered by the grant is July 1, 2020 through June 30, 2021.

Our Virtual GalleryModel shipbuilding is as old as shipbuilding and water faring itself. They can vary in size from 1/60...
06/17/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
Model shipbuilding is as old as shipbuilding and water faring itself. They can vary in size from 1/6000 scale to a size that can carry human passengers. Besides being used as toys and architectural models, model ships served a variety of purposes throughout history. In Ancient Egypt, scaled miniature boats were placed in the Pharoah's tombs to represent boats that were used in real life, and those used to navigate the afterlife. During the Renaissance, model ships were mounted in European churches as votives to protect crews at sea. Britain's Naval supremacy in the 19th Century led to a widespread interest in model shipbuilding and the development of clubs such as the London Model Yacht Club and the Serpentine Sailing Society in the mid-1800s. In the United States, ship modeling became a popular hobby in the 1920s. The Museum of Miniature Houses and Other Collections has several scaled model ships in the permanent collection, such as the Mayflower, U.S. Revenue Cutter Eagle, and the King of Mississippi riverboat, as well as, 1" scale miniature ships to be used in scaled settings.

Our Virtual GalleryThe National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was established by President Eisenhower in 1...
06/16/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was established by President Eisenhower in 1958, after the launch of Sputnik I in October of 1957. The "Sputnik Crisis" led Congress to enact immediate action to establish measures to create space technology to tighten the technology gap and lessen the threat to national security. Initiated in 1958, Project Mercury was the United States' first man-in-space program. Project Mercury involved six one-person crewed flights between 1961 and 1963 and followed three main objectives: to orbit a manned spacecraft around the Earth, investigate man's ability to function in space, and to bring both man and spacecraft back to Earth. Among the seven astronauts selected for this mission are Alan Shepard and John Glenn. Project Gemini started as a two-person program in 1962 to build upon Project Mercury and develop long-duration flight capabilities, space rendezvous technology, and precision Earth landing methods. During this time, the Soviets were in the lead and were able to launch two manned flights before the first Gemini mission. Gemini I (1964) and Gemini 2 (1965) were uncrewed test flights before the launch of Gemini 3 in March 1965, Gus Grissom and John Young made three low Earth orbits in almost 5 hours before returning to Earth. Gemini 4 launched in June 1965, manned by James McDivitt and Ed White. The astronauts made 66 orbits in four days, with the highlight of the mission was the historic spacewalk made by Ed White. White was tethered to float freely for 20 minutes. Over the next year, Gemini performed nine more missions before ending and allowing for the rise and success of the Apollo program. Project Apollo started in 1961 after President John F. Kennedy asked Congress to commit the federal government to land a man on the moon by the end of the 1960s. Tragedy struck the project in 1967 when a fire broke out inside the cabin of Apollo I during a pre-launch test, killing everyone on board. Apollo 7 launched in October 1968 and was the first crewed flight in Project Apollo. Apollo 11 was launched via a Saturn V rocket on July 16, 1969; the spacecraft was divided into three parts: a command module, service module, and lunar module (AKA Eagle). Buzz Aldrin and Neil Armstrong landed on the moon (Sea of Tranquility) via Eagle on July 20, with Michael Collins staying at the command module. Aldrin and Armstrong spent 21.5 hours on the lunar surface. During this time, the crew performed testing, collected soil and rock samples, performed a flag-raising, and took numerous pictures and hours of video footage. The crew made splashdown near Wake Island on July 24 and began their 21-day quarantine. The Apollo 11 command module is on display at the National Air and Space Museum.

The Museum of Miniature Houses will reopen on a limited schedule beginning Saturday June 20.  The museum will be open on...
06/15/2020

The Museum of Miniature Houses will reopen on a limited schedule beginning Saturday June 20. The museum will be open on weekends only for the time being. Saturday hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday hours are 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. The shop will also be open during those hours. No admission fee is charged just to shop.
See the new exhibit: The Smallest of the Small. The standard 1" scale (to one foot) is the most commonly used in miniature design but many miniaturists prefer to go even smaller. This exhibit showcases miniatures in smaller scales, such as ½” and ¼”.

Our Virtual GalleryNow more than ever, healthcare workers should be celebrated as the heroes that they are! The last cen...
06/15/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
Now more than ever, healthcare workers should be celebrated as the heroes that they are! The last century has seen a significant advancement in technology and procedures to help treat the sick. The Museum of Miniature Houses has several scale-miniatures of medical instruments in the permanent collection, everything from a skeletal model to a jar of syringes.

Our Virtual GallerySome favorite famous figures from our permanent collection include our small scale dolls of some fami...
06/14/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
Some favorite famous figures from our permanent collection include our small scale dolls of some familiar faces including Mickey and Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, and Winnie the Pooh.

Our Virtual GalleryMany view the hobby of creating and collecting miniatures to be for the adult who refuses to give up ...
06/13/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
Many view the hobby of creating and collecting miniatures to be for the adult who refuses to give up on their childhood love of dollhouses and building the dollhouse they never had as kids. We couldn't agree more with this sentiment; miniatures are for big kids! Replicating familiar toys into miniature size is a great way to capture childhood nostalgia.

Our Virtual GalleryJapanese culture is no stranger to miniatures - the haiku, a 17 syllable poem, the bonsai is a tree g...
06/12/2020

Our Virtual Gallery
Japanese culture is no stranger to miniatures - the haiku, a 17 syllable poem, the bonsai is a tree grown in a small pot, and netsukes, small carved sculptures worn on a cord as part of men's clothing. These are just a few examples of miniaturism in Japanese culture, but it goes much deeper. Re-ment is one of many companies to sell miniature Hinamatsuri sets; these sets are set up to commemorate the March 3 festival. Hinamatsuri, or Girl's Day, celebrates femininity and to pray for their health and happiness. The doll set represents the imperial family and their attendants. In 2007, Kiichi Yoshinaga, a highly skilled miniaturist from Carmel's sister city Kawachinagano-City, Osaka, traveled to Carmel to participate in the Carmel Arts Festival. During his visit, the Museum acquired three of his handmade miniature traditional miniature farmhouses. The Historic Village of Shirakawa-go is a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of the excellent preservation of the Gasshō-style house ("prayer-hands construction" style). A steeply-slanting thatched roof characterizes it, resembling two hands joined in prayer. Traditional Japanese men's garments did not have pockets, so to make sure that personal belongings could be worn, containers called sagemono were developed to be hung on cords. These containers were secured with intricately carved toggles, known as netsuke. The theme of miniatures usually reflected important aspects of folklore.

Address

111 E Main St
Carmel, IN
46032-1823

Opening Hours

Saturday 11:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(317) 575-9466

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Museum of Miniature Houses & Other Collections posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Museum of Miniature Houses & Other Collections:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Other Museums in Carmel

Show All

Comments

*** Mark your calendars*** Click on picture to enlarge.
Hi Elaine, I had a great time at the Museum. You have an awesome collection! Gen
Thank you again for this little dino! Enjoyed our tour.