Harvard Museum of Natural History

Harvard Museum of Natural History Explore 16 galleries showcasing dinosaurs, mammals, meteorites, birds, rare minerals and gemstones, the world-famous Glass Flowers, and life in New England forests and marine waters.
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The Harvard Museum of Natural History presents to the public Harvard’s natural history collections and research of scientists across the University. Its historic displays include the world-famous Blaschka "Glass Flowers"; an extensive collection of minerals and meteorites; fossil, taxidermied, and jarred specimens. New and changing exhibitions highlight current science and address contemporary issues including climate change and new insights into evolutionary biology. The museum offers a wide array of lectures, classes, and programs for learners of all ages, from school children to adults. The HMNH is one of the four Harvard Museums of Science & Culture. See website for admission information.

02/27/2020
Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Join us at 6 pm on Thursday as B. L. Turner II examines the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

Don't we all wish we could have a lizard genus named after us? The honor goes to Edward O. Wilson!
02/27/2020

Don't we all wish we could have a lizard genus named after us? The honor goes to Edward O. Wilson!

Today MCZ Director James Hanken presented Edward O. Wilson with a framed photograph of "Wilsonosaura", a newly described lizard genus named in Professor Wilson's honor. We thank Edgar Lehr @illinoiswesleyan for the lovely framed print. Photograph by Jennifer Berglund @harvardmuseumsofscienceandculture #mczherpetology

02/26/2020
Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology

This looks like a fun family event this Saturday at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Admission gets into the Harvard Museum of Natural History as well!

Are you inspired? Create your own Play-Doh cupcakes and more at the family event Dig into Dinner Feb. 29, 1-4 pm in the new Resetting the Table exhibition. Enter to win dinner for two at a Harvard Square restaurant.

See more at https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/dig-into-dinner

02/26/2020
Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Join us at 6 pm on Thursday as B. L. Turner II examines the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

Ancient Maya civilization suffered a major demise between the 10th and 11th centuries, coinciding with a prolonged droug...
02/25/2020

Ancient Maya civilization suffered a major demise between the 10th and 11th centuries, coinciding with a prolonged drought, providing compelling evidence that climate change played a role in the collapse of the Maya.

In the free, public lecture, "The Ancient Maya Response to Climate Change: A Cautionary Tale" on Thursday, February 27th, B.L. Turner, Regents Professor and Gilbert F. White Professor of Environment and Society, School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning and the School of Sustainability, Arizona State University, will examine this evidence, and the complex social and environmental conditions that affected Maya societies.

6pm in Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. Free event parking at the 52 Oxford Street Garage: http://bit.ly/52OxfordStreetParkingGarage.

Gordon R. Willey Lecture and Reception. Presented by the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology and the Harvard Museum of Natural History in collaboration with the Mexico, Central America, and Caribbean Program at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard.

This event will be live-streamed on the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture (HMSC) page. A recording of this program will be available on the HMSC Lecture Videos page approximately three weeks after the lecture.

More details: http://bit.ly/AncientMayaResponse

Photo by Billie Turner II, Becan Archaeological Site, Campeche, Mexico.

The sense of smell plays a critical role in human behavior, from warning us of potential dangers to attracting us to cer...
02/23/2020

The sense of smell plays a critical role in human behavior, from warning us of potential dangers to attracting us to certain foods, places, and people. Harvard scientists Catherine Dulac and Venkatesh Murthy study the molecules, cells, and brain circuits that underlie olfaction and the social behaviors that aromas can elicit. In this program, they will engage in a conversation with internationally recognized olfactive expert Dawn Goldworm (12.29) to discuss how neurobiological research on olfaction relates to our everyday experiences.

Free and open to the public Wednesday, February 26th 6pm.
Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA. Free event parking at the 52 Oxford Street Garage. Advance registration is recommended.

Presented by the Harvard Museum of Natural History in collaboration with the Harvard Brain Science Initiative. More details: http://bit.ly/OlfactionLectureHMNH

02/21/2020
Fermentophone Sound

The music made by the sound of the fermentation process is oddly meditative. Hear artist Josh Rosenstock speak about his fermentophone installation tomorrow, Saturday, February 22nd, from 2pm - 3pm. Find Josh adjusting and tweaking the microphones and bubbling jars in the Microbial Life gallery. https://hmnh.harvard.edu/Fermentophone-artist

Join us for this free lecture tonight! Dr. Mark Margres explores how we can help the Tasmanian Devil escape extinction a...
02/20/2020
Science in the News

Join us for this free lecture tonight! Dr. Mark Margres explores how we can help the Tasmanian Devil escape extinction as they struggle with two infectious cancers in the wild. Livestream available on our page at 6pm EST. Free parking at the 52 Oxford Street Garage. #CambridgeMA #harvardsquare

The Tasmanian devil is the world’s largest living carnivorous marsupial, and it is at risk of extinction due to two rare, contagious cancers. Join the Harvard Museum of Science and Culture tomorrow, where Mark Margres will discuss how this species is adapting in response to these diseases, and what can be learned about human cancers from studying the disease in other animal species!

02/19/2020
Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Join us as Mark Margres discusses how Tasmanian devils are adapting to two rare, contagious cancers, and what can be learned about human cancers from studying the disease in other animal species.

The Tasmanian devil is the world’s largest living carnivorous marsupial. This species was once abundant in Australia, bu...
02/19/2020

The Tasmanian devil is the world’s largest living carnivorous marsupial. This species was once abundant in Australia, but today is only found on the island of Tasmania, where it is at risk of extinction due to two rare, contagious cancers. Mark Margres, Sarah and Daniel Hardy Fellow in Conservation Biology, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, will discuss how this species is adapting in response to these diseases and what can be learned about human cancers from studying the diseases.

FREE and open to the public with Livestream on our page. Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138. Free event parking at the 52 Oxford Street Garage. More information: http://bit.ly/MargresTasmanianDevilLecture.

02/18/2020
Joshua Rosenstock speaks about his fermentophone project

Our artist talk with Joshua Rosenstock, creator of the fermentophone, was a hit this morning. We enjoyed hearing Josh speak about the sounds he can create using the fermentation process, and fermentation traditions across cultures.

Come experience the magic sounds from Josh Rosenstock's fermentophone, and meet the artist, Tuesday, 2/18, 10am-11am.
02/17/2020
Microbial Life: A Universe at the Edge of Sight

Come experience the magic sounds from Josh Rosenstock's fermentophone, and meet the artist, Tuesday, 2/18, 10am-11am.

Microbial Life: A Universe at the Edge of Sight Harvard’s Microbial Science Initiative bacteria organisms microbes microbiome

Smile, it's Saturday, and it's #hippoday! Come see this happy guy in our Africa gallery. Hippos mainly eat aquatic plant...
02/15/2020

Smile, it's Saturday, and it's #hippoday! Come see this happy guy in our Africa gallery. Hippos mainly eat aquatic plants and live in mangrove swamps. Doesn't seem like a bad life, huh?

We are proud of our Science Education Partner Ben Goulet-Scott for organizing this biodiversity trip in Panama!
02/13/2020
Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University

We are proud of our Science Education Partner Ben Goulet-Scott for organizing this biodiversity trip in Panama!

Arboretum Fellows Ben Goulet-Scott and Jacob Suissa recently travelled to the rainforest in Panama to gain a better understanding of how biodiversity can persevere in the face of climate change, deforestation, and human disturbance.

Read more in the Harvard Gazette, see beautiful images and a video from their trip.

We are excited about this Evolution Matters lecture with William "Ned" Friedman, Arnold Professor of Organismic and Evol...
02/12/2020
Who Discovered Evolution?

We are excited about this Evolution Matters lecture with William "Ned" Friedman, Arnold Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Director of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Harvard.

In his upcoming talk "Who Discovered Evolution?" William will speak about how Charles Darwin is commonly cited as the person who “discovered” evolution. But, the historical record shows that roughly seventy different individuals published work on the topic of evolution between 1748 and 1859, the year that Darwin published On the Origin of Species.

These early thinkers, now almost entirely forgotten, included biologists, geologists, horticulturists, physicians, clergymen, atheists, philosophers, teachers, and poets. William Friedman will discuss the ideas of these pre-Darwinian evolutionists, place Darwin in a broader historical context, and examine the nature of scientific discovery and attribution.

Free and open to the public with livestream on our page. Tuesday, March 3, 2020, 6:00pm. Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge. Free event parking at the 52 Oxford Street Garage.

Presented by the Harvard Museum of Natural History and the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments. #DarwinDay

The Evolution Matters series supported by a generous gift from Drs. Herman and Joan Suit. More information: http://bit.ly/WhoDiscoveredEvolutionFriedman

We've got so much in store for you this Spring! Our program guide is fresh off the press. The four museums that represen...
02/11/2020

We've got so much in store for you this Spring! Our program guide is fresh off the press. The four museums that represent the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture are at the heart of a community dedicated to advancing research, teaching, and to offering rewarding learning experiences for all ages.

The programs and exhibitions in our current season help answer the questions, "what makes chocolate good?, "who really discovered evolution?" and how did people trade and live in the ancient Mediterranean? Visitors can meet scientists, discover innovations that shaped the Glass Flowers, and explore the science of smell, the gender of food, and climate change in Ancient Maya civilization. If you have a free weekend take a sketching workshop, or attend our popular annual event, the Summer Solstice!

Many of our public lectures are now live streamed on Facebook— don't miss the chance to watch a world-renowned expert if you can't make the lecture in person. We hope to see you at one of our events!

Deep in the ocean, beyond all but the dimmest sunlight, resides the greatest, and perhaps strangest, concentration of li...
02/11/2020

Deep in the ocean, beyond all but the dimmest sunlight, resides the greatest, and perhaps strangest, concentration of life on Earth. Known as the #OceanTwilightZone, their habitat is one of the ocean’s most mysterious, and one scientists are only beginning to understand. Starting Saturday, 2/15, we will highlight the discovery, importance, and bizarre inhabitants of this fascinating place with a new video-based mini-exhibit in our Marine Life gallery. Photos courtesy of Paul Caiger, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI).

02/10/2020
Lobster War: The Fight Over the World's Richest Fishing Grounds

Lobster War, the documentary film about how climate change has affected a centuries-old fishing conflict between the US and Canada, is now available across all platforms. Watch on iTunes, Google Play, YouTube, Amazon Prime Video, and Vimeo. It will also be available from cable providers, including Comcast, Verizon Fios, Dish Network, and many others. In Canada, it will be available on Shaw and Telus. Blu-rays discs are now available also for sale on Amazon, Target, and other sites. Watch Lobster War: The Fight Over the World's Richest Fishing Grounds and learn more about this interesting issue.

"Lobster War" is available now to watch across all major streaming platforms. The award-winning film focuses on how climate change has aggravated a centuries-old conflict between the US and Canada over some of the world’s richest fishing grounds. Watch it tonight!

Stream now: https://www.amazon.com/Lobster-War-Richest-Fishing-Grounds/dp/B082VF45C4/ref=tmm_aiv_swatch_1?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1579617945&sr=8-1&fbclid=IwAR36vylz3lKi8XoW6sCsf_xZ212lt97805Okk7xwmjwd2EGYCSvVrSohL-w

Come see Josh Rosenstock's fermentophone in action at #iheartscience today! If you can't make it today he will be giving...
02/08/2020

Come see Josh Rosenstock's fermentophone in action at #iheartscience today! If you can't make it today he will be giving talks on 2/18 & 2/22. http://bit.ly/Fermentophonetalk

02/08/2020
Bug diorama at I Heart Science

It’s hard to choose where to put your bug. There are so many beautiful spots! Thanks to Martha in education for creating the stage. #iheartscience

We will have special talks from Harvard scientists in Classroom B (off Great Mammal Hall) during the #IHeartScience fest...
02/07/2020
Harvard Museum of Natural History

We will have special talks from Harvard scientists in Classroom B (off Great Mammal Hall) during the #IHeartScience festivities tomorrow. Shoyo Sato, Giribet Lab, will present on the amazing world of spiders at 11am, followed by a talk on tardigrades from Marc Mapalo, Ortega-Hernandez Lab. Then at 2pm don't miss Christina Rogers (Hecht Lab) talk about dog behavior. See you there! http://bit.ly/IHeartScienceHMNH

Get to know some of the graduate students presenting at #IHeartScience tomorrow. Emily Kerr works with the Gordon Resear...
02/07/2020

Get to know some of the graduate students presenting at #IHeartScience tomorrow. Emily Kerr works with the
Gordon Research Group in the Harvard University Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology. Her project is centered around renewable energy.

She says, "As renewable energy sources like solar and wind become more prominent, we are faced with the dilemma of what to do when the wind stops blowing and the sun sets. One solution is to store energy during periods when a lot is available and release it when less renewable energy is being produced. I study redox flow batteries, a type of battery where molecules that hold energy are dissolved in water or another liquid and pumped past pieces of carbon paper where they can exchange energy before being pumped back into separate tanks. There batteries have the potential to be low cost, safe and easy to scale to provide the amount of energy needed for grid-scale storage."

Find out more about renewable energy and hear other scientists present 10am - 4pm. Free parking in the 52 Oxford Street garage. Regular admission rates apply. http://bit.ly/IHeartScienceHMNH

Drop on by #IHeartScience tomorrow, Saturday, 2/8, 10am - 4pm, and see the fermentophone in action! Free parking in the ...
02/07/2020
HubWeek

Drop on by #IHeartScience tomorrow, Saturday, 2/8, 10am - 4pm, and see the fermentophone in action! Free parking in the 52 Oxford St. garage. Regular admission rates apply.

🎶 What does the musical soundtrack to active fermentation sound like? Find out for yourself by listening to the fermentophone, a musical instrument played by live bacteria and yeast. Somerville-based multimedia artist Joshua Pablo Rosenstock will be active on his creation at the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture's "I Heart Science" festival on Saturday: http://bit.ly/39aHkFY

Come to the museum through 2/23 to hear the musical microbe sounds of Josh Rosenstock's Fermentophone, new in our Microb...
02/06/2020
The ARTery

Come to the museum through 2/23 to hear the musical microbe sounds of Josh Rosenstock's Fermentophone, new in our Microbial Life gallery. Artist talks will be held on 2/18 from 10am-11am, and 2/22 from 2pm-3pm.

Have nothing to do this weekend, but would like to get out of the house? We've got the perfect list of things to do to get you out this weekend!

02/06/2020
Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Join us as Carla Martin examines the cacao-chocolate industry and highlights the often-conflicting goals that can create gaps in social and environmental responsibility.

Join us as Carla Martin examines the cacao-chocolate industry and highlights the often-conflicting goals that can create gaps in social and environmental responsibility.

We are excited to host our annual I Heart Science Festival this coming Saturday, 2/8. Come anytime from 10am to 4pm to m...
02/03/2020

We are excited to host our annual I Heart Science Festival this coming Saturday, 2/8. Come anytime from 10am to 4pm to meet scientists who investigate fossils, microbes, carnivorous plants, and more. Check out the newly installed Fermentophone in the Microbial Life gallery, and hear multimedia artist Joshua Rosenstock explain how the microbe-based musical instrument works! All ages are welcome. Regular museum admission rates apply Free event parking in the 52 Oxford Street Garage. http://bit.ly/IHeartScienceHMNH

Remember, If you are a Massachusetts resident you can enter the Harvard Museum of Natural History & the Peabody Museum o...
01/26/2020

Remember, If you are a Massachusetts resident you can enter the Harvard Museum of Natural History & the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology (connected on the 3rd floor) FREE on Sunday mornings 9am - 12pm. Proof of residency required. Stop by the Semitic Museum & the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments (11am - 4pm) while you are in the area; always FREE Sunday - Friday. Thanks to Greg Cook for the shout out on the Wonderland blog! http://bit.ly/2RlABTp

The The Virginia Living Museum kicked off the New Year with their new exhibit Tiny Titans: Dinosaur Eggs and Babies, dev...
01/23/2020

The The Virginia Living Museum kicked off the New Year with their new exhibit Tiny Titans: Dinosaur Eggs and Babies, developed by Charlie & Florence Magovern of The Stone Company (CO) in association with the Harvard Museum of Natural History. This hands-on exhibit offers an astounding array of authentic dinosaur eggs and nests collected from all over the globe. If you are in the Newport News area before 5/3 stop by and see! http://bit.ly/3aBsN7E

Dino Eggs have officially hatched at the VLM! Tiny Titans: Dinosaur Eggs and Babies opens today 🦕. Member Preview 9-11am. Open to the public beginning at 11am!

Interesting article about how New England forests were managed historically via Harvard Forest.
01/22/2020
Harvard Forest

Interesting article about how New England forests were managed historically via Harvard Forest.

Wildfire & other forest issues often prompt discussions of how, for millennia, Native people burned and cleared forests as a management tool. Many landscapes are now managed with this historical precedent in mind.

But a new archaeological & paleo-climate study in the journal Nature Sustainability shows that in the Northeastern U.S., these practices were not the norm. Mature, old-growth forests grew nearly everywhere, even on coasts. Intensive land management arrived with the Europeans, only a few hundred years ago. Today, keeping with ancient historical precedent in New England means keeping mature forests as forests.

To manage our ecologically valuable open landscapes today, instead of fire, which was rare, the authors point to the merits of timber harvest and animal grazing - the same tools that helped those landscapes thrive 200 years ago.

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26 Oxford St
Cambridge, MA
02138

MBTA Red Line to Harvard Square. 8-minute walk to museum.

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I have a couple very early American additions of Darwin given to me years ago by a Clark Univ. Professor.
Found out about this place due to it's inclusion in my page-a-day calendar, which features cool sights to see around the world!
My son found this at his grandparents house. We’d love to know what it is!
Open today??
The whole exhibit was amazing. I loved this place, however when it was time to leave it was pouring outside. My mom almost 80 years old and with asthma had to wait outside because they asked us to leave because it was time to close. We were just waiting in the lobby for the person to pick up us. My mom got a very bad cold from the visit and I was very disappointed of the lack of compassion.
ALOYSIUS LILIUS AUTHOR OF THE GREGORIAN REFORM OF THE CALENDAR. https://www.facebook.com/areacnrfi/posts/2255396894691637
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