Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East

Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East We are a FREE museum that explores the rich history of cultures connected by the family of Semitic languages.
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Founded as the Harvard Semitic Museum in 1889, the museum moved into its present location in 1903. From the beginning, it was the home of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, a departmental library, a repository for research collections, a public educational institute, and a center for archaeological exploration. Among the Museum's early achievements were the first scientific excavations in the Holy Land (at Samaria in 1907-1912) and excavations at Nuzi and Tell el-Khaleifeh in the Sinai, where the earliest alphabet was found. During World War II, the Museum housed Naval offices and was closed to the public. In the 1970's, academic activities resumed in the museum, which is again home to the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and to the University's collections of Near Eastern archaeological artifacts. These artifacts comprise over 40,000 items, including pottery, cylinder seals, sculpture, coins and cuneiform tablets. Many are from museum-sponsored excavations in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, Cyprus, and Tunisia. In 2020, the museum was renamed the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East to better reflect the diversity of its collections. The museum remains dedicated to the use of these collections for the teaching, research, and publication of Near Eastern archaeology, history, and culture. Exhibitions include a full-scale replica of an Iron Age house, life-sized casts of famous Mesopotamian monuments, authentic mummy coffins, and tablets containing the earliest forms of writing. Like the artifacts it displays, the museum itself has a rich and nuanced history.

A week ago we kicked off our "Drawing Upon the Collections" HMSC Connects! coloring pages. To commemorate our upcoming V...
06/18/2020

A week ago we kicked off our "Drawing Upon the Collections" HMSC Connects! coloring pages. To commemorate our upcoming Virtual Summer Solstice Celebration on Saturday we are launching special #HarvardSolstice themed coloring pages from each of the museums. https://bit.ly/HMSCConnectsSolsticeColoring

Included in this mini collection is the Egyptian Sun God Ra from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East.

Ankh-khonsu was a doorkeeper in the Temple of Amun-Re at Karnak. He inherited his position from his father Ankh-en-amun. His brightly painted coffin lid is covered with images of protective deities. For the Solstice, we have highlighted the top right panel, which portrays an image of Ra. In Ancient Egypt the sun god Ra was the maker and creator of everything in the visible world, the gods in heaven, as well as heaven itself. He was most commonly depicted as a man with the head of a falcon and a solar disc encircled by a serpent on top. In Egyptian mythology, Ra was born in the east, moved across the sky in a solar boat, died in the west, and was reborn the following morning. As long as the sun continued to dawn every morning, the Egyptians believed that life would continue after death.

We hope to celebrate with you at the #virtualevent on Saturday! See the full program & RSVP here: https://bit.ly/VirtualSolsticeCelebrationProgram #ColorOurCollections #HMSCconnects

Coffin of Ankh-khonsu, painted wood; detail of painted section featuring Ra Dynasty 22, 945–712 BC, Egypt (Thebes). Gift of Theodore M. Davis, HMANE 1902.50.9
On display at the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East
From the Nile to the Euphrates exhibit.

06/17/2020
Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Celebrate the longest day of the year and mark the beginning of summer with the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture! While we can’t welcome you to our museums in person just yet, we invite you to join us via this special livestream. #HarvardSolstice

Celebrate the longest day of the year and mark the beginning of summer with the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture! While we can’t welcome you to our museums in person just yet, we invite you to join us via this special livestream.

We are looking forward to this talk about Stonehenge from English Heritage during our Virtual Summer Solstice Celebratio...
06/16/2020

We are looking forward to this talk about Stonehenge from English Heritage during our Virtual Summer Solstice Celebration Saturday! RSVP here: https://bit.ly/VirtualSolsticeRSVP #HarvardSolstice #SummerSolstice

We are so happy to announce that the curator and historian from English Heritage, the Stonehenge UNESCO World Heritage Site in England, will present during our Virtual Summer Solstice Celebration this Saturday:

https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectsVirtualSolstice2020

Go on a virtual field trip during the livestream to explore the famed English prehistoric monument, and learn why the site was important to the prehistoric peoples who built it. The session will be moderated by Jane Pickering, William and Muriel Seabury Howells Director of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology.

The Virtual Summer Solstice Celebration 2020 will begin Saturday, June 20 at 10:00 am. RSVP here to receive the full program & livestream link: https://bit.ly/VirtualSolsticeRSVP. #HarvardSolstice #HMSCconnects #MuseumFromHome #Stonehenge #VirtualFieldTrip

Photo courtesy of English Heritage Trust.

Carroll Center for the Blind
06/13/2020
Carroll Center for the Blind

Carroll Center for the Blind

Since we can’t go to the museum right now, the museum is coming to us! On June 17th from 7:30PM to 8:30PM, experience Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East's live virtual tour of the exhibition “From Stone to Silicone: Recasting Mesopotamian Monuments.” It describes newly fabricated casts from the ancient scenes that once adorned palace walls in Mesopotamia (present-day Iraq). Meticulously created by museum curators and Harvard students, these relief sculptures show how the ancient kings commemorated their military triumphs and civic achievements.

This Virtual Museum Tour for People with Vision Loss features an educator who will be “driving” and richly describing artifacts on a virtual tour with embedded label text, and 3D animations. This is an adaption of a face-to-face touch tour typically offered for visitors with partial or total vision loss. Register for free at https://reservations.hmsc.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?EventID=21

We are excited to announce the launch of "Drawing Upon the Collections: Coloring Pages." Developed directly from photogr...
06/09/2020

We are excited to announce the launch of "Drawing Upon the Collections: Coloring Pages." Developed directly from photographs and illustrations of museum objects and specimens from all four of our museums, these coloring pages provide a window into the breadth and wonder of Harvard’s collections.

If you are missing visiting our museum color in this Coffin of Ankh-khonsu, on display in From the Nile to the Euphrates. Ankh-khonsu was a doorkeeper in the Temple of Amun-Re at Karnak. He inherited his position from his father Ankh-en-amun. His brightly painted coffin lid is covered with images of protective deities. https://bit.ly/CoffinofAnkhKhonsu

Click through the rest of the pages to explore the detailed images, extend your learning, and add your own artistic perspectivesC. We’d love to see your artwork! Please share your creations with us in the comments. https://bit.ly/HMSCConnectsDrawingUponTheCollections #ColorOurCollections #HMSCconnects #MuseumMomentOfZen #MuseumAtHome

Coffin of Ankh-khonsu, painted wood, Dynasty 22, 945–712 BC, Egypt (Thebes), Gift of Theodore M. Davis, HMANE 1902.50.9.

The Harvard Art Museums take a look at textiles to reveal information about technique and materials used for their upcom...
06/01/2020
Harvard Art Museums

The Harvard Art Museums take a look at textiles to reveal information about technique and materials used for their upcoming exhibition Social Fabrics: Inscribed Textiles from Medieval Egyptian Tombs, curated by Mary McWilliams, the Norma Jean Calderwood Curator of Islamic and Later Indian Art.

Conservation fellow Julie Wertz studied a large, early Byzantine textile made in Roman Egypt to discover how it was produced.

We are pleased to present a new HMSC Connects! project. "Extraordinary Things" features intriguing objects from all four...
05/23/2020

We are pleased to present a new HMSC Connects! project. "Extraordinary Things" features intriguing objects from all four of our museums that invites you, each week, to explore each object from multiple, and sometimes surprising, perspectives. https://bit.ly/HMSCExtraordinaryThings

Apropos of everyone still mostly at home, this week's theme is "Home Sweet Home.” https://bit.ly/HMSCHomeSweetHome

Spinning tools like these were used in houses across the ancient Mediterranean region during the Iron Age (1,000–586 BCE). With a spindle in her hand, a spinner would draw fibers out of a mass of wool and twist them together to form yarn.

This spindle and spinning bowl is from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East: https://bit.ly/HMANESpinningBowl.

Have you ever seen anyone spin raw wool into yarn using a spinning wheel? Many people today still use yarns to make clothing and other textiles. Weaving on a loom is one method. What are some others? Images and comments welcome. #crafturday #HMSCconnects #museumfromhome

Spindle (replica) and Whorl, 1934.9.273 with yarn; Spinning bowl (replica), 2003.5.2. Copyright President and Fellows of Harvard College Spindle and Spinning Bowl, Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East.

Look at these amazing pyramids people created as part of a monument building contest from the Archaeological Institute o...
05/22/2020

Look at these amazing pyramids people created as part of a monument building contest from the Archaeological Institute of America.

The results are in for the final week of the AIA’s International Archaeology Day Build Your Own Monument contest! Thank you to everyone who participated & to this week’s celebrity judge! View the winning Pyramids at Giza entries: archaeological.org/results-for-week-4-build-your-own-monument-pyramids-at-giza/.
#pubarch #IAD2020 #BuildYourOwnMonument

Our latest HMSC Connects! podcast episode just dropped. Jennifer Berglund, HMSC exhibit developer, interviews Adam J. Aj...
05/20/2020

Our latest HMSC Connects! podcast episode just dropped. Jennifer Berglund, HMSC exhibit developer, interviews Adam J. Aja, PhD, Assistant Curator of Collections, Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, Assistant Director, Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon, Chief Stratigrapher, Tel Shimron Excavations: https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectspodcast.

Adam hunts for treasures from the ancient past, managing over 40k objects as part of his work at the museum. He says, "Archaeological collections can remain important years after they've been removed from the soil because technology and science continue to advance. We don't know how new discoveries can be applied to these old collections. In fact that's one of the great strengths of the HMANE collections, because we have these abandoned or previously published archaeological collections that we continually tap into for new studies."

Future episodes will feature Dave Unger from the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments and Diana Zlatanovski of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology talking about collections—the value of them, their Museum’s collection in particular, and their history of collecting.

Photo courtesy of the Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon, Photographer: Melissa Aja. #HMSCconnects #MuseumPodcast #Archaeology #AncientNearEast #MuseumFromHome

#MuseumAtHome with our new digital offerings for all ages and interests. #InternationalMuseumDay
05/18/2020

#MuseumAtHome with our new digital offerings for all ages and interests. #InternationalMuseumDay

Check out our new page of virtual, #MuseumAtHome digital offerings: HMSC Connects! https://bit.ly/HMSCconnects

We have resources for all ages and interests including virtual events like Summer Solstice, a new podcast from our exhibits team, HMSC story time, a family e-news, and the HMSC Explorers Club feed, with much more to come. #MuseumDay #IMD2020 #InternationalMuseumDay

The virtual tour of the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East is a great way to #museumfromhome, and learn more about ...
05/16/2020

The virtual tour of the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East is a great way to #museumfromhome, and learn more about ancient cultures. This helpful video takes you through each step of the tour to help you use the tools to fully discover the context behind each object. Video tutorial: https://bit.ly/HMANEVirtualTourTutorial
Link to the virtual tour: https://bit.ly/HMANEVirtualTourHome #technologyMW

HMSC has a new podcast! A future episode will feature Adam Aja, Assistant Curator of the Collections, Harvard Museum of ...
05/15/2020

HMSC has a new podcast! A future episode will feature Adam Aja, Assistant Curator of the Collections, Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, Assistant Director, Leon Levy Expedition to Ashkelon, &
Chief Stratigrapher, Tel Shimron Excavations. #HMSCconnects

We are pleased to announce the launch of the HMSC Connects! podcast, a weekly podcast hosted by Harvard Museums of Science & Culture exhibit developer Jennifer Berglund. https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectspodcast

In each episode Jennifer goes behind the scenes of the four museums to talk to the scholars, researchers, collection keepers, exhibit designers, and other fascinating individuals who keep the museums humming along and create a compelling array of exhibits and programs. Jennifer and her guests explore the connections between us, our big, beautiful world, and even what lies beyond.

For this first episode, “Andrew Williston and the Museum’s Big Collection of Fishes,” she speaks with Andrew Williston, who manages the Museum of Comparative Zoology's Ichthyology collection, an assemblage of one and a half million specimens of preserved fishes.

They delve into topics around forming collections, the upcoming Sharks exhibit at the Harvard Museum of Natural History, his love of baseball cards, robotic viper fish, biodiversity, and more. Andrew says, "People tend to have a knee jerk reaction towards sharks. I hope one thing that people get out of this exhibit is to move past their initial reaction to the word shark."

Future episodes will feature Adam Aja from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, Dave Unger from the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, and Diana Zlatanovski of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology talking about collections—the value of them, their Museum’s collection in particular, and their history of collecting. #HMSCconnects

A huge thank you to nurses from our partner museum the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology to kick off Museum We...
05/11/2020

A huge thank you to nurses from our partner museum the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology to kick off Museum Week! #HeroesMW

We're kicking off MuseumWeek with a heartfelt thank you to all of the nurses, medical staff, first responders, researchers, essential, and front line workers out there helping to keep us safe. #HeroesMW #MuseumWeek #togetherMW #NursesWeek

As an army sergeant during the Korean War, Roger Marshutz documented life in Pusan. PM 2003.17.313. Gift of Roger Marshutz (Photographer), 1929. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.

Join us next Friday, May 15th, 12pm to 12:30pm, for a FREE, live, zoom-based session with a museum educator on how to us...
05/08/2020

Join us next Friday, May 15th, 12pm to 12:30pm, for a FREE, live, zoom-based session with a museum educator on how to use our #virtualtours. https://bit.ly/HMANELiveTour

Pour an ancient Near Eastern-themed libation of your choice and learn how to enter the 3D museum, walk its immersive galleries, encounter pop-up extras on Queen Hetepheres’ throne and a newly conserved mummy coffin, and discover how to free all the embedded videos, documents, and special features that bring the ancient Near East alive.

Ask the educator technical questions during the virtual event, and get a link to a recording of the event afterward. You will be equipped to return at leisure and virtually explore the museum with friends and family.

Advance registration required by Tuesday, May 12. Registrants will receive a link and simple instructions on how to attend.

05/03/2020
Alabastron - Download Free 3D model by Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East [bf1266d] - Sketchfab

An alabastron is a small type of pottery or glass vessel used in the ancient world for holding oil, especially perfume or massage oils. They originated around the 11th century BC in ancient Egypt as containers carved from alabaster – hence the name – but spread via ancient Greece to other parts of the classical world. See more on Sketchfab: https://bit.ly/HMANEAlabastron3D. #museumfromhome #crafturday

Egypt Alabaster SM1931.3.110 Scanned by Andréa Martinez with the Artec Spider 3D Scanner

04/29/2020
The Epic of Gilgamesh, Lecture by Andrew George

Celebrate #NationalPoetryMonth by listening to this fascinating lecture on The Epic of Gilgamesh from Dr. Andrew George (University of London).

"Artists, poets, musicians, dramatists, operatists, librettists have fed on the ancient story of Gilgamesh and turned it into their own property, which is only right. That they could do so is a sign of the humanity and importance of the ancient epic ... .I thought of five ways that we can approach ... this old poem. We're going to talk again about the story, ... archeology and decipherment, ... how the poem is reconstructed ... the aesthetics of the text, and ... does it mean anything to us 4,000 years later? Is there a message in this ancient poem?"

View on our HMSC lecture page: https://bit.ly/HMSCEpicofGilgameshLecture or YouTube:
https://bit.ly/HMSCEpicofGilgameshLectureYT

Andrew George, Professor of Babylonian, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London The Epic of Gilgamesh is a 4,000-year-old Mesopot...

The Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East is in the process of renewal and revitalization. As we move forward, it firs...
04/25/2020

The Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East is in the process of renewal and revitalization. As we move forward, it first seems right to return to our roots and examine where we came from. Our exhibit "From the Nile to the Euphrates" celebrates the vision of Professor David Gordon Lyon (1852–1935), the museum’s founder and first director. Lyon assembled a rich collection of antiquities from what we now call the Middle East, including the Holy Land. See more information on Lyon's work like his glass slide photographs, archives of his excavations, and diaries, here: https://bit.ly/FromNiletoEuphrates

For #MuseumSunshine day we are sending an image of a relief sculpture of unidentified goddess, possibly Astarte, to the ...
04/21/2020

For #MuseumSunshine day we are sending an image of a relief sculpture of unidentified goddess, possibly Astarte, to the Penn Museum. The sculpture is from our exhibit Enter the Nile to Euphrates on the 2nd floor. While her body is human, her feet are a fish flipper, and a hoof. Sun and moon symbols appear behind her. The Greek inscription reads "theeapara panton" translated to "divine producer of all."

To get a closer look simply launch our virtual tour, https://bit.ly/HarvardSemiticMuseumVirtualTourApril2020, travel to the 2nd floor Foundation Peg straight ahead, and do a 180.
Merrill Collection. 1902.53.40 #museumfromhome

04/20/2020
Pyramids of Giza: Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology

Even though this is a challenging time, and we can't participate in classes out in the real world, there is a silver lining. Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East (formerly Harvard Semitic Museum) Director Peter Der Manuelian (Barbara Bell Professor of Egyptology, Harvard University) is presenting a FREE, eight-week course on the Pyramids of Giza through edX. It starts today, but you can still enroll! More details:
https://bit.ly/PyramidsofGizaEdXFreeCourse

Explore the archaeology, history, art, and hieroglyphs surrounding the famous Egyptian Pyramids at Giza. Learn about Old Kingdom pharaohs and elites, tombs, temples, the Sphinx, and how new technology is unlocking their secrets.

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Founded as the Harvard Semitic Museum in 1889, the museum moved into its present location in 1903. From the beginning, it was the home of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, a departmental library, a repository for research collections, a public educational institute, and a center for archaeological exploration. Among the museum's early achievements were the first scientific excavations in the Holy Land (at Samaria in 1907-1912) and excavations at Nuzi and Tell el-Khaleifeh in the Sinai, where the earliest alphabet was found. During World War II, the museum housed Naval offices and was closed to the public. In the 1970s, academic activities resumed in the museum, which is again home to the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and to the University's collections of Near Eastern archaeological artifacts. These artifacts comprise over 40,000 items, including pottery, cylinder seals, sculpture, coins, and cuneiform tablets. Many are from museum-sponsored excavations in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, Cyprus, and Tunisia.

In 2020, the museum was renamed the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East to better reflect the diversity of its collections. The museum remains dedicated to the use of these collections for the teaching, research, and publication of Near Eastern archaeology, history, and culture. Exhibitions include a full-scale replica of an Iron Age home, life-sized casts of famous Mesopotamian monuments, authentic mummy coffins, and tablets containing the earliest forms of writing. Like the artifacts it displays, the museum itself has a rich and nuanced history.


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We have a common ancient ancestor of the patrilineal Jewish priestly caste known as Kohanim (singular "Kohen", also spelled "Cohen"). According to the Hebrew Bible, this ancestor was Aaron, Aaron was born an raised in Egypt near a town called Avaris, (modern day Tell el-Dab'a) where recent ancient DNA studies of, the inner part, of petrous bones and the cementum layer in teeth roots, are currently yielding invaluable insights into this common ancestor.(see link below) Let's get the word out that these DNA results are being withheld from the public. My reasons are not religious but merely a desire to know the truth about these common set of genetic markers in both Ashkenazi and Sefardi Kohanim worldwide which clearly indicates an origin 3,300 years B.P. the approximate time of the Exodus from Egypt and in the lifetime of Aharon HaKohen.
Harvard's Semitic Museum is home to a vast collection of artifacts from all across the ancient Near East https://perceptivetravel.com/blog/2019/03/19/harvard-semitic-museum-exploring-ancient-near-east/?
SDEFD
Genetics and sport performance: current challenges and directions to the future The future of genetic studies involving athletes is promising. In recent years, many polymorphisms have been associated with athletic phenotypes, but definitive conformation of association and the underlying physiological mechanisms are proven difficult tasks. The challenges to progress in this novel area are enormous, but a variety of experimental approaches can be used to unravel part of the mystery. Researchers and the general population should be conscious about the implications of the misuse of the genetic information. While some people may claim that genetic information could be used to detect talent and to drive athletic development, it must be noted that there is no scientific evidences for the predictive value of genetic in sports. The most appropriate statement at the moment is that genetics is only one out of many contributing factors to the athletic performance, and sometimes it may play only secondary roles. It will be a long way until we know exactly what is the role of genetics for each sport and which are, at the molecular level, the variants accounting for this and how they work. #Genetic; #Polymorphism; #Athletes; #Sports; #Performance. #ReaxingInternational www.reaxing.sl
Exercise is a “Wonder Drug” Exercise is Medicine is an important new initiative being promoted to all physicians and healthcare providers. Support of reviewing and publishing physical activity guidelines every five years in order to address public health issues. Overweight and obesity lead these issues today, but with implementing physical activity benchmarks, we may begin to lessen the epidemic and improve health trends. 1) Exercise and regular physical activity are important to health and the prevention and treatment of many chronic diseases. 2) More should be done to address physical activity and exercise in healthcare settings. 3) #ACSM and #AMA are making efforts to bring a greater focus on physical activity and exercise in healthcare settings. Healthcare organizations (including #AAPSM and #APMA), physicians, and other professionals, regardless of specialty, are being challenged to assess, to advocate for, and to review every patient’s physical activity program during every comprehensive visit. Regular Exercise It has been suggested that the hardest part of regular exercise is the “regular”, not the actual, exercise. Unfit patients should be encouraged to healthy lifes style changes, including: regular exercise, consuming smaller and healthier food portions , and smoking ces sation. Be a role model for patients and your children and lead by example! Karen Langone, DPM, president of the AAPSM, has continued the charge as part of the Board’s initiative regarding exercise. She references a recent study that confirmed that doctors who exercise are more committed and comfortable in counseling patients on incorporating exercise into their lifestyles. She believes that exercise is the most empowering tool we can give our patients. Listed below are important highlights, which you can use to discuss with your patients, friends, and families: 1) Our longevity depends on three factors: genetics, environment, and behavior. It is our behavior that is most problematic and that has lead to the leading causes of death (cardiac disease, cancer, and stroke) in the U.S. 2) The most preventable factors of premature death are tobacco use and physical inactivity. In 2004, a “tipping point” occurred with tobacco, when the number of exsmokers outnumbered the number of current smokers. 3) The death rate for a fit 80 year old is lower than that of a sedentary 60 year old. 4) Exercise is a “wonder drug” and everyone should take it. 5) We need to move from a treatment-oriented society to a prevention-oriented society. 6) Childhood obesity is our number one health problem in the first time in our history, our youth will have a shorter life span than adults, which is a terrible, embarrassing comment on our nation’s current health. 7) Healthy food choices and lifestyle choices need to be part of the solution for healthy living. www.reaxing.sl #WonderDrug #Younger #Leaner #Healthier #AliveLonger #RegularExercise #BrainBooster #Happiness #Agin #Vitality #ReaxingInternational #Reaxing
Dear Semetic Meuseum lovers, We would like to invte you to explore the spiritual and magical beliefs of cultures, from ancient Egypt to modern Japan, as we discuss gods, the universe, cosmos, dreams and so much more! Join our enthusiastic team of more than 20 teachers from Université Catholique de Louvain in an exciting journey, starting on May 3, 2018 and ending only in a year, thanks to our self-paced MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) «Oriental Beliefs: Between Reason and Traditions». It is informative, funny and completely free. And there are absolutely no pre-requisites, except your own enthusiasm and sense of curiosity!