Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East

Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East We are a FREE museum that explores the rich history of cultures connected by the family of Semitic languages.
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Founded as the Harvard Semitic Museum in 1889, the museum moved into its present location in 1903. From the beginning, it was the home of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, a departmental library, a repository for research collections, a public educational institute, and a center for archaeological exploration. Among the Museum's early achievements were the first scientific excavations in the Holy Land (at Samaria in 1907-1912) and excavations at Nuzi and Tell el-Khaleifeh in the Sinai, where the earliest alphabet was found. During World War II, the Museum housed Naval offices and was closed to the public. In the 1970's, academic activities resumed in the museum, which is again home to the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and to the University's collections of Near Eastern archaeological artifacts. These artifacts comprise over 40,000 items, including pottery, cylinder seals, sculpture, coins and cuneiform tablets. Many are from museum-sponsored excavations in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, Cyprus, and Tunisia. In 2020, the museum was renamed the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East to better reflect the diversity of its collections. The museum remains dedicated to the use of these collections for the teaching, research, and publication of Near Eastern archaeology, history, and culture. Exhibitions include a full-scale replica of an Iron Age house, life-sized casts of famous Mesopotamian monuments, authentic mummy coffins, and tablets containing the earliest forms of writing. Like the artifacts it displays, the museum itself has a rich and nuanced history.

The Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East is in the process of renewal and revitalization. As we move forward, it firs...
04/25/2020

The Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East is in the process of renewal and revitalization. As we move forward, it first seems right to return to our roots and examine where we came from. Our exhibit "From the Nile to the Euphrates" celebrates the vision of Professor David Gordon Lyon (1852–1935), the museum’s founder and first director. Lyon assembled a rich collection of antiquities from what we now call the Middle East, including the Holy Land. See more information on Lyon's work like his glass slide photographs, archives of his excavations, and diaries, here: https://bit.ly/FromNiletoEuphrates

For #MuseumSunshine day we are sending an image of a relief sculpture of unidentified goddess, possibly Astarte, to the ...
04/21/2020

For #MuseumSunshine day we are sending an image of a relief sculpture of unidentified goddess, possibly Astarte, to the Penn Museum. The sculpture is from our exhibit Enter the Nile to Euphrates on the 2nd floor. While her body is human, her feet are a fish flipper, and a hoof. Sun and moon symbols appear behind her. The Greek inscription reads "theeapara panton" translated to "divine producer of all."

To get a closer look simply launch our virtual tour, https://bit.ly/HarvardSemiticMuseumVirtualTourApril2020, travel to the 2nd floor Foundation Peg straight ahead, and do a 180.
Merrill Collection. 1902.53.40 #museumfromhome

04/20/2020
Pyramids of Giza: Ancient Egyptian Art and Archaeology

Even though this is a challenging time, and we can't participate in classes out in the real world, there is a silver lining. Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East (formerly Harvard Semitic Museum) Director Peter Der Manuelian (Barbara Bell Professor of Egyptology, Harvard University) is presenting a FREE, eight-week course on the Pyramids of Giza through edX. It starts today, but you can still enroll! More details:
https://bit.ly/PyramidsofGizaEdXFreeCourse

Explore the archaeology, history, art, and hieroglyphs surrounding the famous Egyptian Pyramids at Giza. Learn about Old Kingdom pharaohs and elites, tombs, temples, the Sphinx, and how new technology is unlocking their secrets.

Exciting news! We are changing our name to the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East (HMANE). Museum Director Peter De...
04/15/2020
Semitic Museum is renamed Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East

Exciting news! We are changing our name to the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East (HMANE). Museum Director Peter Der Manuelian sat down with the Harvard University Gazette to talk about the change, and to chat about what’s to come for exhibits and technological initiatives.

"We wanted a more inclusive and descriptive name, one that accurately reflects the diversity of our collection … .In many ways our mission has not changed. We support the teaching mission of the University and provide a resource on the archaeology and culture of these fascinating ancient civilizations for the Cambridge community and the visiting public from all over the world. We support international scholars in their research as well.” https://bit.ly/2XAbLCN

Harvard Museum of Ancient Near East more “accurately reflects the diversity of the collection.”

An homage to the ingenuity of the human race, this NPR story tells about how Neanderthals were able to make string and r...
04/15/2020

An homage to the ingenuity of the human race, this NPR story tells about how Neanderthals were able to make string and rope from twisted plant fibers. Paleontologists recently discovered of a tool from over 40,000 years ago in Southern France indicating the use of cord in daily life.

"There's not one shred ... of evidence that Neanderthals were deficient in terms of their intelligence compared to humans." — John Shea, a paleoanthropologist at Stony Brook University in New York

Full article: https://n.pr/3eiga3f

Take a #museummomentofzen by rotating this Goddess Taweret  figurine from our collection on Sketchfab. https://bit.ly/HS...
04/11/2020

Take a #museummomentofzen by rotating this Goddess Taweret figurine from our collection on Sketchfab. https://bit.ly/HSMSketchFabTaweret

In Ancient Egyptian religion, Taweret is the protective ancient Egyptian goddess of childbirth and fertility. Her image appeared on amulets, which protected mothers and children from harm, and on household furniture like chairs, stools, and headrests.

Harvard Semitic Museum, Egypt (Thebes, tomb 34). Late Period, c. 664 - 332 BC.

04/08/2020
Horus Statue - Download Free 3D model by Harvard Semitic Museum [8ccec65] - Sketchfab

Today is #drawabirdday! While you are at home it could be a nice #studybreak or #workbreak to draw this Horus falcon figure from our Sketchfab collection: https://bit.ly/HSM3DHorus

Horus in an Ancient Egyptian diety, sometimes referred to as the god of the sky. He was worshipped from at least the late prehistoric Egypt until the Ptolemaic Kingdom and Roman Egypt. He was most often depicted as a falcon or as a man with a falcon head. #sketchfab #AncientEgypt #museumfromhome #drawingactivity

Egypt Granite SM1931.3.122 Scanned by Andréa Martinez with the Artec Spider 3D Scanner

It is definitely the time to learn the ancient art of bread making. Last summer physicist and Xbox inventor Seamus Black...
04/07/2020
The World's Oldest Leavened Bread Is Rising Again

It is definitely the time to learn the ancient art of bread making. Last summer physicist and Xbox inventor Seamus Blackley researched how to make the ultimate sourdough with ancient yeast from our partner museum the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. Try your hand at sourdough by creating your own starter. It takes patience, but the delicious result is worth it! https://bit.ly/SourdoughBreadSmithsonian #museumfromhome

This is the story behind the breads you might be baking in lockdown

We are pleased to share new features as part of our #virtualtour. Now there are hot spots on museum objects that you can...
04/03/2020

We are pleased to share new features as part of our #virtualtour. Now there are hot spots on museum objects that you can click on to see label texts, 3D Sketchfab models, videos, and more. Take in the court scene of Ashurnasirpal II, rotate a Foundation Peg 3D model, dating to the mid 3rd millennium BC, and experience AR with the Dreaming the Sphinx AR technology. Enjoy! bit.ly/HarvardSemiticMuseumVirtualTourApril2020 #museumfromhome #musetech #musesocial

Thanks to 3dpbm and The Archaeological Conservancy for sharing this story about our 3D mummy project. #museumfromhome #m...
04/01/2020
The Archaeological Conservancy

Thanks to 3dpbm and The Archaeological Conservancy for sharing this story about our 3D mummy project. #museumfromhome #museumsgomobile

View one of the models created by a team from Harvard Semitic Museum who is performing 3D scans of Ancient Egyptian sarcophagi.

#Archaeology #VirtualMuseums #3DModels #Egypt

A hopeful sentiment from our partner museum, the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments.
04/01/2020

A hopeful sentiment from our partner museum, the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments.

We are all just trying to find our way in this new landscape, and sometimes it feels like we are searching in the dark to get used to the "new normal."

This English nocturnal was used for telling the time at night by the circumpolar stars. With the instrument held upright, the Pole star is sighted through the hole and the large index rotated to align with the guards of the Big Dipper. The Regiment of the North Star told mariners how far above of below the Pole Star was true north so that they could correct their latitude observations. Note the amazing heart shaped handle. We wish you the best of luck navigating this journey! bit.ly/CHSIInstrumentoftheMonthMarch20

Date: 1650-1700
Inventory Number: 7315
#museumfromhome #museumsgomobile #visitas2020

Just in time for #NationalDoctorsDay. Tristan of Harvard Museums of Science & Culture exhibits team gathered masks and g...
03/30/2020

Just in time for #NationalDoctorsDay. Tristan of Harvard Museums of Science & Culture exhibits team gathered masks and gloves as part of the larger Harvard initiative.

This full-scale reproduction of the throne of Egyptian Queen Hetepheres is one of our favorite displays in the museum. I...
03/28/2020

This full-scale reproduction of the throne of Egyptian Queen Hetepheres is one of our favorite displays in the museum. In 1925, the Harvard University—Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Expedition discovered a small, unfinished chamber almost 100 feet underground at the famous site of Giza. It contained the deteriorated burial equipment, sarcophagus, and other objects belonging to Queen Hetepheres, mother of King Khufu, the pharaoh who built the Great Pyramid nearby.

The Giza Project team created a 3D digital model of the tomb and its contents, and then used a computer-controlled, five-axis milling machine, plus lots of human labor, to fabricate the chair. The chair’s materials are based on the ancient original: cedar, bright blue faience tiles, gold foil, gesso, cordage seating, and copper.

The goal of this museum display and research tool was to reconstruct the chair’s iconography, and to document the ancient workflow that the Egyptians used to construct such a masterpiece from the Pyramid Age. bit.ly/QueenHetepheresThrone #womenhistorymonth #museumfromhome #museumsgomobile #Visitas2020

Even though we are closed right now, you can explore our exhibits like the Dream Stela, Queen Hetepheres' throne, From t...
03/26/2020

Even though we are closed right now, you can explore our exhibits like the Dream Stela, Queen Hetepheres' throne, From the Nile to the Euphrates, and From Stone to Silicone through our virtual tour: bit.ly/HarvardSemiticMuseumVirtualTour

The Dream Stela exhibit displays a resin cast of the Dream Stela: the original can be found between the paws of the Great Sphinx. If you have the Dreaming the Sphinx app on your phone you can travel to virtually go to the Dream Stela on the 2nd floor and "stand" on the spot marked on the floor, launch the app on your phone, & select "Start at Museum": you will get the Augemented Reality translation. Good news! The VR sphinx also works in-app.
#museumfromhome #Visitas2020 #Musetech
#Musesocial #MuseumsGoMobile

In a new blog on Sketchfab Peter Der Manuelian, Director of the #Harvard Semitic Museum, shares how his team from the th...
03/25/2020
Three Ancient Egyptian Coffins at Harvard University

In a new blog on Sketchfab Peter Der Manuelian, Director of the #Harvard Semitic Museum, shares how his team from the the museum, the Harvard Art Museums, UCL, Harvard University Herbaria and Libraries, Harvard Extension School, and more, used 3D technology to study three Egyptian coffins: https://bit.ly/PeterDerManuelianSketchfabBlog #museumfromhome #museumsgomobile #sketchfab #Visitas2020

"In January 2020 we devoted a week ... to comprehensive documentation of our three mummy cases. They belong to three ancient Egyptians employed in Temple of Amun-Re at Karnak: two men (Pa-di-mut, a priest and metal engraver, and Ankh-khonsu, a doorkeeper) and one woman (Mut-iy-iy, a singer), all from the “Third Intermediate Period,” or Egyptian Dynasty 22 (about 945–712 BC) ... .Most had not been opened in decades, and in one case we had no idea if there was decoration inside the coffin or not. The goal was to create interactive 3D models of the coffins, inside and out, to display on Sketchfab, and eventually for an interactive exhibit for the visiting public and world community ... .Being able to rotate the coffins, stop and start the animation, and even “climb inside” are all welcome and useful features." —Peter Der Manuelian

Harvard Semitic Museum Director Peter Der Manuelian shares how his team used 3D to study three Egyptian coffins, unopened for decades.

Even though the museum is closed, would you like to borrow one of our galleries to spice up your background for live mee...
03/24/2020

Even though the museum is closed, would you like to borrow one of our galleries to spice up your background for live meetings online? Our staffer Ashley is rocking the Mesopotamian gallery virtual background.

Select Maya monuments, the Great Mammal Hall, and more from the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture. No Hollywood-style green-screen special effect setup required.

https://bit.ly/HMSCZoomBackgrounds #MuseumFromHome #MuseumsGoMobile

We are so grateful for our museum partners on this #whyilovemuseumsday. Shout out to our colleagues at the Peabody Museu...
03/18/2020

We are so grateful for our museum partners on this #whyilovemuseumsday. Shout out to our colleagues at the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard Museum of Natural History, Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments & Harvard Art Museums today, in spite of our current challenges. 💌

Share with us why you love our museums for #whyilovemuseumsday on 3/18!
03/13/2020

Share with us why you love our museums for #whyilovemuseumsday on 3/18!

Mark Your Calendars! #WhyILoveMuseums is back March 18th
(Also supporting #5WomenArtists and #MuseumMomentofZen!)

We are monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak & prioritize the safety of our visitors, staff, students, and volu...
03/12/2020

We are monitoring the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak & prioritize the safety of our visitors, staff, students, and volunteers. We are closing to the public at the end of business on Thursday, March 12 until further notice. Thank you for understanding. http://bit.ly/HSMCovid

03/04/2020
Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Join us at 6 pm on Thursday, March 5th, as Bob Brier discusses what is known about the design, propulsion, and function of the 4,600-year-old Khufu Boat, based on recent tank tests conducted on a model.

02/18/2020
Opening ancient coffins

A project to make complete digital records of three 3,000-year-old coffins turns up a painting of a deity.

Read the whole story: http://bit.ly/2u9aAxL

Researchers and conservators opened three ancient Egyptian coffins at the Harvard Semitic Museum last month, discovering a never-before-documented image, whi...

We are happy to host two lectures this Spring, plus the opening of our Mediterranean Marketplaces exhibit on 4/5. We hop...
02/14/2020

We are happy to host two lectures this Spring, plus the opening of our Mediterranean Marketplaces exhibit on 4/5. We hope to see you there!

Free Public Lecture: The Khufu Boat with Bob Brier, Senior Research Fellow, Long Island University
Thursday, 3/5, 6pm
http://bit.ly/KhufuBoat

Free Public Lecture: Apprenticeship in Ancient Egypt with Willeke Wendrich, Joan Silsbee Chair of African Cultural Archaeology; Professor of Egyptian Archaeology and Digital Humanities, University of California, Los Angeles
Monday, 4/20, 6pm
http://bit.ly/ApprenticeshipinAncientEgypt

We've got so much in store for you this Spring! Our program guide is fresh off the press. The four museums that represent the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture are at the heart of a community dedicated to advancing research, teaching, and to offering rewarding learning experiences for all ages.

The programs and exhibitions in our current season help answer the questions, "what makes chocolate good?, "who really discovered evolution?" and how did people trade and live in the ancient Mediterranean? Visitors can meet scientists, discover innovations that shaped the Glass Flowers, and explore the science of smell, the gender of food, and climate change in Ancient Maya civilization. If you have a free weekend take a sketching workshop, or attend our popular annual event, the Summer Solstice!

Many of our public lectures are now live streamed on Facebook— don't miss the chance to watch a world-renowned expert if you can't make the lecture in person. We hope to see you at one of our events!

02/13/2020
Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Join us at 6 pm as Fayza Haikal examines Egyptian society's cultural expressions from antiquity to the present, focusing on language, spirituality, superstitions, funerary traditions, and folklore.

We are pleased to host the talk "Ancient Egyptian Culture and Its Continuity in Modern Egypt" with Fayza Haikal, Profess...
02/13/2020

We are pleased to host the talk "Ancient Egyptian Culture and Its Continuity in Modern Egypt" with Fayza Haikal, Professor of Egyptology, The American University in Cairo, tonight! (Thursday, 2/13)

Egypt’s recorded history spans six thousand years and is therefore one of the longest and best known in the world. Today, Egyptians practice several religious, artistic, and social traditions that can be traced to ancient Egypt, demonstrating the power and longevity of cultural memory. Drawing on research in archaeology, Egyptian art, writing, and culture, Fayza Haikal will examine Egyptian society’s cultural expressions from antiquity to the present, focusing on language, spirituality, superstitions, funerary traditions, and folklore.

Presented by the Harvard Semitic Museum. FREE public lecture, 6pm, with livestream. Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge. FREE event parking at the 52 Oxford Street Garage. http://bit.ly/HaikalLecture #FolkloreThursday

01/27/2020

Students from Harvard’s Museum Collections Care class helped create these 3D models of three mummy coffins all dated ca. 1000 BC. Now the models can be opened to reveal the images painted inside, and the traces of a resin substance that remain from ancient rituals. It’s Sketchfab's Cultural Heritage and History Top 10 pick for the week! This project has been made possible by the generosity of the Dean’s Competitive Fund.

More information on each of the three coffins: https://skfb.ly/6PVBy

01/27/2020
Sketchfab View of Coffins of Pa-di-mut, Mut-iy-y, and Ankh-Khonsu

Students from Harvard’s Museum Collections Care class helped create these 3D models of three mummy coffins all dated ca. 1000 BC. Now the models can be opened to reveal the images painted inside, and the traces of a resin substance that remain from ancient rituals. It’s Sketchfab's Cultural Heritage and History Top 10 pick for the week! This project has been made possible by the generosity of the Dean’s Competitive Fund.

More information on each of the coffins of Pa-di-mut, Mut-iy-y, and Ankh-Khonsu: https://skfb.ly/6PVBy

Remember, If you are a Massachusetts resident you can enter tthe Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology and the Harva...
01/26/2020

Remember, If you are a Massachusetts resident you can enter tthe Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology and the Harvard Museum of Natural History (connected on the 3rd floor) FREE on Sunday mornings 9am - 12pm. Proof of residency required. Stop by the Semitic Museum & the Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments (11am - 4pm) while you are in the area; always FREE Sunday - Friday. Thanks to Greg Cook for the shout out on the Wonderland blog! http://bit.ly/2RlABTp

We have three richly painted mummy coffins on display, all dated ca. 1000 B.C. We have devoted the past week to photogra...
01/23/2020

We have three richly painted mummy coffins on display, all dated ca. 1000 B.C. We have devoted the past week to photographing, 3-D scanning, scientifically analyzing and conserving all three.

To create a workspace, we’ve taken over the Museum’s second-floor gallery, as well as two adjacent Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations seminar rooms. All three mummy coffins were removed from their display cases, and their lids were taken off to reveal the decorations inside. This project has been made possible by the generosity of the Dean’s Competitive Fund.

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6 Divinity Ave
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02138

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Founded as the Harvard Semitic Museum in 1889, the museum moved into its present location in 1903. From the beginning, it was the home of the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, a departmental library, a repository for research collections, a public educational institute, and a center for archaeological exploration. Among the museum's early achievements were the first scientific excavations in the Holy Land (at Samaria in 1907-1912) and excavations at Nuzi and Tell el-Khaleifeh in the Sinai, where the earliest alphabet was found. During World War II, the museum housed Naval offices and was closed to the public. In the 1970s, academic activities resumed in the museum, which is again home to the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations, and to the University's collections of Near Eastern archaeological artifacts. These artifacts comprise over 40,000 items, including pottery, cylinder seals, sculpture, coins, and cuneiform tablets. Many are from museum-sponsored excavations in Israel, Jordan, Iraq, Egypt, Cyprus, and Tunisia.

In 2020, the museum was renamed the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East to better reflect the diversity of its collections. The museum remains dedicated to the use of these collections for the teaching, research, and publication of Near Eastern archaeology, history, and culture. Exhibitions include a full-scale replica of an Iron Age home, life-sized casts of famous Mesopotamian monuments, authentic mummy coffins, and tablets containing the earliest forms of writing. Like the artifacts it displays, the museum itself has a rich and nuanced history.


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We have a common ancient ancestor of the patrilineal Jewish priestly caste known as Kohanim (singular "Kohen", also spelled "Cohen"). According to the Hebrew Bible, this ancestor was Aaron, Aaron was born an raised in Egypt near a town called Avaris, (modern day Tell el-Dab'a) where recent ancient DNA studies of, the inner part, of petrous bones and the cementum layer in teeth roots, are currently yielding invaluable insights into this common ancestor.(see link below) Let's get the word out that these DNA results are being withheld from the public. My reasons are not religious but merely a desire to know the truth about these common set of genetic markers in both Ashkenazi and Sefardi Kohanim worldwide which clearly indicates an origin 3,300 years B.P. the approximate time of the Exodus from Egypt and in the lifetime of Aharon HaKohen.
Harvard's Semitic Museum is home to a vast collection of artifacts from all across the ancient Near East https://perceptivetravel.com/blog/2019/03/19/harvard-semitic-museum-exploring-ancient-near-east/?
SDEFD
Genetics and sport performance: current challenges and directions to the future The future of genetic studies involving athletes is promising. In recent years, many polymorphisms have been associated with athletic phenotypes, but definitive conformation of association and the underlying physiological mechanisms are proven difficult tasks. The challenges to progress in this novel area are enormous, but a variety of experimental approaches can be used to unravel part of the mystery. Researchers and the general population should be conscious about the implications of the misuse of the genetic information. While some people may claim that genetic information could be used to detect talent and to drive athletic development, it must be noted that there is no scientific evidences for the predictive value of genetic in sports. The most appropriate statement at the moment is that genetics is only one out of many contributing factors to the athletic performance, and sometimes it may play only secondary roles. It will be a long way until we know exactly what is the role of genetics for each sport and which are, at the molecular level, the variants accounting for this and how they work. #Genetic; #Polymorphism; #Athletes; #Sports; #Performance. #ReaxingInternational www.reaxing.sl
Exercise is a “Wonder Drug” Exercise is Medicine is an important new initiative being promoted to all physicians and healthcare providers. Support of reviewing and publishing physical activity guidelines every five years in order to address public health issues. Overweight and obesity lead these issues today, but with implementing physical activity benchmarks, we may begin to lessen the epidemic and improve health trends. 1) Exercise and regular physical activity are important to health and the prevention and treatment of many chronic diseases. 2) More should be done to address physical activity and exercise in healthcare settings. 3) #ACSM and #AMA are making efforts to bring a greater focus on physical activity and exercise in healthcare settings. Healthcare organizations (including #AAPSM and #APMA), physicians, and other professionals, regardless of specialty, are being challenged to assess, to advocate for, and to review every patient’s physical activity program during every comprehensive visit. Regular Exercise It has been suggested that the hardest part of regular exercise is the “regular”, not the actual, exercise. Unfit patients should be encouraged to healthy lifes style changes, including: regular exercise, consuming smaller and healthier food portions , and smoking ces sation. Be a role model for patients and your children and lead by example! Karen Langone, DPM, president of the AAPSM, has continued the charge as part of the Board’s initiative regarding exercise. She references a recent study that confirmed that doctors who exercise are more committed and comfortable in counseling patients on incorporating exercise into their lifestyles. She believes that exercise is the most empowering tool we can give our patients. Listed below are important highlights, which you can use to discuss with your patients, friends, and families: 1) Our longevity depends on three factors: genetics, environment, and behavior. It is our behavior that is most problematic and that has lead to the leading causes of death (cardiac disease, cancer, and stroke) in the U.S. 2) The most preventable factors of premature death are tobacco use and physical inactivity. In 2004, a “tipping point” occurred with tobacco, when the number of exsmokers outnumbered the number of current smokers. 3) The death rate for a fit 80 year old is lower than that of a sedentary 60 year old. 4) Exercise is a “wonder drug” and everyone should take it. 5) We need to move from a treatment-oriented society to a prevention-oriented society. 6) Childhood obesity is our number one health problem in the first time in our history, our youth will have a shorter life span than adults, which is a terrible, embarrassing comment on our nation’s current health. 7) Healthy food choices and lifestyle choices need to be part of the solution for healthy living. www.reaxing.sl #WonderDrug #Younger #Leaner #Healthier #AliveLonger #RegularExercise #BrainBooster #Happiness #Agin #Vitality #ReaxingInternational #Reaxing
Dear Semetic Meuseum lovers, We would like to invte you to explore the spiritual and magical beliefs of cultures, from ancient Egypt to modern Japan, as we discuss gods, the universe, cosmos, dreams and so much more! Join our enthusiastic team of more than 20 teachers from Université Catholique de Louvain in an exciting journey, starting on May 3, 2018 and ending only in a year, thanks to our self-paced MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) «Oriental Beliefs: Between Reason and Traditions». It is informative, funny and completely free. And there are absolutely no pre-requisites, except your own enthusiasm and sense of curiosity!