Harvard Museums of Science & Culture

Harvard Museums of Science & Culture The Harvard Museums of Science & Culture is a partnership of six museums at Harvard University. The mission of the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture (HMSC) is to foster curiosity and a spirit of discovery in visitors of all ages, enhancing public understanding of and appreciation for the natural world, science, and human cultures.
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HMSC works in concert with Harvard faculty, museum curators, and students, as well as with members of the extended Harvard community to provide interdisciplinary exhibitions, events and lectures, and educational programs for students, teachers, and the general public. HMSC will draw primarily upon the extensive collections of the member museums and upon the research of their faculty and curators. The Harvard Museums of Science & Culture consortium includes: Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments Harvard Museum of Natural History Harvard Semitic Museum Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology HOURS AND ADMISSION Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments http://chsi.harvard.edu/visit-us Harvard Museum of Natural History http://hmnh.harvard.edu/plan-your-visit Harvard Semitic Museum http://semiticmuseum.fas.harvard.edu/visit Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology https://www.peabody.harvard.edu/visit

Operating as usual

Jennifer Berglund from the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture exhibits department interviews her talented colleague Sy...
09/09/2020

Jennifer Berglund from the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture exhibits department interviews her talented colleague Sylvie Laborde for the latest episode of the HMSC Connects! podcast. https://hmsc.harvard.edu/podcast.

In this episode they walk you through Sylvie’s childhood encounters with the power of color plus the exhibit design process: from the seed of the idea, to the creation of the space, and how they engage visitors along the way.

Sylvie describes of her work on “Microbial Life” in the Harvard Museum of Natural History, “Every visitor could relate to the kitchen. The question was: how can we highlight things in the kitchen in order to carry the content, and find stories that would touch our visitors? Everything has to be a standalone, and part of one storyline. My role as a designer is not to make something pretty. It's to make it accessible for visitors to learn. How everything holds together is what makes it a successful exhibit.”

Photo courtesy of Andrew Shaper.

Our HMNH Educators have another summer science week on deck 9/14 - 9/18. Registration ends Monday: https://bit.ly/Spinel...
09/06/2020

Our HMNH Educators have another summer science week on deck 9/14 - 9/18. Registration ends Monday: https://bit.ly/SpinelessWondersRegistration. Hope you can join!

Many schools have a delayed opening this year. If you need a fun and educational experience to keep your kids engaged for the week of 9/14 - 9/18 sign up for our last Summer Science Week: Spineless Wonders, grades 1-4.
http://bit.ly/HMNHSpinelessWonders

Come explore the amazing world of insects, spiders, and other invertebrates, virtually, at the museum! During the live Zoom sessions, see a tarantula up close, help find millipedes, and listen to the hiss of a giant cockroach. Complete your own investigations at home as you learn how to collect and study creepy crawlies. A small packet of special collecting materials will be sent to your home to help with your discoveries.

Registration closes this Monday: http://bit.ly/SpinelessWondersRegistration

Harvard University
09/01/2020

Harvard University

Remy the cat visited with some friends, who were taking a socially-distanced break in Harvard Yard.

Photo: Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer

What do a fossilized horseshoe crab, a medicine bottle, a Statuette of Imhotep, and a perfusion pump have in common? The...
08/27/2020

What do a fossilized horseshoe crab, a medicine bottle, a Statuette of Imhotep, and a perfusion pump have in common? They are all objects from our #MuseumCollections that represent the power of healing. Read more about each Extraordinary Thing here:
http://bit.ly/HMSCHealingHands #HMSCconnects

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
08/26/2020

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology

Happy #NationalDogDay! Check out the "Top Dogs" portfolio of Extraordinary Things.

Selected from each of the four Harvard Museums of Science & Culture the "Top Dogs" include members of the canine family like the gray wolf, and a magnetic dog toy with a surprising Cold War agenda. Learn why ancient Egyptians associated jackals with the afterlife, and why Inuit sled dogs have been honored in Canada.

https://hmsc.harvard.edu/top-dogs

Ivory Dog Sled Carving: Gift of Chauncey C. Nash, 1964. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, PM 64-34-10/43938

Today is #WomensEqualityDay, a day to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the #19thAmendment, which granted women the r...
08/26/2020

Today is #WomensEqualityDay, a day to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the #19thAmendment, which granted women the right to vote in 1920.

We created a line-up of fun museum resources to help you celebrate! https://bit.ly/HMSCCelebratingWomen #Suffrage100

Listen to the empowering stories behind some of Harvard's top talents with the #HMSCconnects! podcast: https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectspodcast.

Discover four extraordinary things from the collections that celebrate women’s work: https://bit.ly/WomensWorkExtraordinaryThings.

Color your way through the HMSC collections with coloring pages that represent women's accomplishments throughout history: https://bit.ly/CelebratingWomenColoringPages.

Join Carol for Story Time as she reads Dinosaur Lady by Linda Skeers: https://bit.ly/StoryTimeDinosaurLady.

Print out the "Women in Science" booklet & learn the special fold technique: https://bit.ly/MariaCelesteLunaWomenInScienceBooklet / http://bit.ly/WomenInScienceBookletFold

Learn about women in history along with the HMSC Explorers Club on Instagram: https://bit.ly/HMSCExplorersClubIG

Painting image credit: Mummy Portrait of a Woman with Earrings, c. 130-140 CE, Ancient & Byzantine World, Africa, Antinoopolis (Egypt), Roman Imperial period, Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Gift of Dr. Denman W. Ross, 1923, 1923.60, Asian and Mediterranean Art. https://hvrd.art/o/219609 © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

For our final episode celebrating the #WomensVote100 we explore the work of a woman in an exciting field: the art and ar...
08/26/2020

For our final episode celebrating the #WomensVote100 we explore the work of a woman in an exciting field: the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt. Jennifer Berglund speaks with Jen Thum, the Assistant Director of Academic Engagement, Assistant Research Curator, and Inga Maren Otto Curatorial Fellow at the Harvard Art Museums.

Jen holds a special reverence for the artifacts she researches, many of which are related to Egyptian burials, she says, “We need to study the Egyptian past and make real evidence and good sources available to students and the public alike. We should be proud of them as part of the accomplishments of our species. We should recognize that Egypt is an African culture that did this. We get a chance to reflect on how what we leave behind will say about us in the future. The next time you put on a shoe, or pick up a pencil, those are going to be artifacts one day. What will they say about you?”

Listen to the full episode here: https://hmscconnects.podbean.com.

Mummy Portrait of a Woman with Earrings, c. 130-140 CE, Ancient & Byzantine World, Africa, Antinoopolis (Egypt), Roman Imperial period, Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Gift of Dr. Denman W. Ross, 1923.60, Asian and Mediterranean Art, © President and Fellows of Harvard College. https://hvrd.art/o/219609

Ushabti of Nesbanebdjed, 380-343 BCE, Ancient & Byzantine World, Africa, Egypt (Ancient), Late Period, Dynasty 30, to Ptolemaic, Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Gift of Eric R. Kaufman, L. '67, 2019.354, Asian and Mediterranean Art, © President and Fellows of Harvard College. https://hvrd.art/o/367944

Tomb Relief of the Official Ptahshepses, 2323-2150 BCE, Ancient & Byzantine World, Africa, Egypt (Ancient), Old Kingdom, Dynasty 6, Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum, Gift of Nanette Rodney Kelekian in memory of George and Ilse Hanfmann, 1993.222, Asian and Mediterranean Art, © President and Fellows of Harvard College. https://hvrd.art/o/303779.

For our third episode celebrating the Women’s #Suffrage Centennial this month our HMSC Connects! podcast host Jennifer B...
08/20/2020

For our third episode celebrating the Women’s #Suffrage Centennial this month our HMSC Connects! podcast host Jennifer Berglund sits down with Professor Evelynn Hammonds, Chair of the Harvard Department of the History of Science. Evelynn talks about her interest in physics at an early age, her rise in academia as a minority, and a woman, and her work as a consultant to Margot Shetterly, the author of Hidden Figures.

Early in her career, Professor Hammonds discovered more urgent questions about the lack of women, particularly Women of Color, in scientific disciplines. She says, “It was very difficult for white people to believe that Black people could do science, and especially physics. I think as an African American woman, I carried the double burden. You’re constantly having to prove yourself over and over again. We were trying to carve a space out for ourselves to just be able to do our work and follow our passion.”

Listen to the full episode here: https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectspodcast. #HMSCconnects #Podcast

Image credit: Don West, fotografiks.

This month we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the #19thAmendment, granting women the right to vot...
08/18/2020

This month we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the #19thAmendment, granting women the right to vote in the United States.

We created a line-up of resources to celebrate and learn about women that have been at the forefront of scientific, cultural, social, and economic progress over the past 100 years. https://bit.ly/HMSCCelebratingWomen

For her podcast Jennifer Berglund interviews leading Harvard scholars such as Professors Sara Schechner, Reed Gochberg, and Evelynn Hammonds about their groundbreaking work, and women who influenced them:

You can also eplore objects from our collections that represent "women's work" including Victorian-style beadwork, silver bracelets (see coloring page below), a Dimetrodon fossil, and a special telescope used by researchers from the Harvard College Observatory.

Unleash your inner artist with our coloring pages featuring a Glass Flowers bouquet, an octant created by Janet Talor, an illustration of Piedras Negras, and silver bracelets from Palestine.

Hear about the life and work of pioneering paleontologist Mary Anning in this week's Story Time. Carol reads Dinosaur Lady: The Daring Discoveries of Mary Anning, the First Paleontologist by Linda Skeers, illustrations by Márta Alvarez Miguéns (Sourcebooks, 2020).

Discover even more about women scientists with this beautifully illustrated booklet from Maria Celeste Luna.

Watch this space! All month our sister Instagram channel the HMSC Explorers Club will be sharing reflections on women from history.

Enjoy! #WomensVote100 #HMSCconnects #ColorOurCollections #MuseumAtHome

Look at our museum collections from a variety of, sometimes surprising, perspectives with our #MuseumAtHome series "Extr...
08/14/2020

Look at our museum collections from a variety of, sometimes surprising, perspectives with our #MuseumAtHome series "Extraordinary Things."

This week we rally around the theme of "Women's Work" as we come up on the anniversary of the 19th amendment, granting women the right to vote (8/18).

Find out more about the women behind a boot-shaped object featuring Victorian-style beadwork, silver bracelets from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, how a Dimetrodon fossil is studied using 3D technology, and the telescope the female "computers" from the Harvard College Observatory used to study spectra. https://bit.ly/WomensWorkExtraordinaryThings #HMSCconnects

We continue our celebration of women’s achievements in science with this week’s #HMSCconnects! podcast episode. Host Jen...
08/12/2020

We continue our celebration of women’s achievements in science with this week’s #HMSCconnects! podcast episode. Host Jennifer Berglund speaks with Sara Schechner, David P. Wheatland Curator of the Harvard Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments.

Sara studied physics as a Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study | Harvard University student in the 1970s, as part of the last class of females that had to apply directly to Radcliffe, rather than Harvard College.

She follows in the inspiring paths of the women appointed by Director Edward Pickering to work at the Harvard College Observatory (now Center for Astrophysics l Harvard & Smithsonian): Williamina Fleming and Henrietta Swan Leavitt.

Schechner says, “I'm very encouraged by how great the changes have been, and the opportunities for young women to be in the sciences and make their contributions known. Today, we don't bat an eye at a woman doctor or lawyer or head of a company and stuff where, when I went to college, that was very unusual. I've lived through a lot of major changes, and it's good to see them going in the right direction.”

Listen to the full episode here: https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectspodcast and explore Sara’s nature and science inspired quilts and sundials: https://www.altazimutharts.com.

Image of Sara in 1980, in Cambridge, England, as a grad student in History and Philosophy of Science. Credit to Sara Schechner.

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
08/12/2020

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology

Happy World #ElephantDay! This ebony carving from the Semliki Forest region of Uganda. Semliki National Park is one Uganda’s newest national parks, containing a tropical forest, hot springs, a river, and among its many live animals, elephants. Help conserve and protect African and Asian elephants from the numerous threats they face: https://bit.ly/HelpAnElephant.

Gift of Dr. John C. Phillips, 1924. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, PM 24-32-50/B3764

This week’s #HMSCconnects! podcast episode kicks off this month’s celebration of Women’s Suffrage. Host Jennifer Berglun...
08/05/2020

This week’s #HMSCconnects! podcast episode kicks off this month’s celebration of Women’s Suffrage.

Host Jennifer Berglund interviews Reed Gochberg, Harvard Assistant Director of Studies, History and Literature, about an exhibit she’s guest curating on the early history of women working at the Museum of Comparative Zoology. The exhibit will focus on the behind the scenes of work that women were doing at the museum in the 19th century, like cataloging and organizing specimens, writing exhibit labels, and preparing materials for public exhibition.

Reed says, “I was really intrigued by the questions of invisible labor and uncredited work of women who worked at the museum as secretaries, assistants, and eventually, as curators. It is important for us to understand how these collections came to Harvard, how they were organized and maintained, and also how they were then made available to be used in research, teaching, and public programs. It opens up this larger story about women’s involvement in scientific institutions during this time period. Their legacy lives on in the people who are still working at the museum.”

Listen to the full episode here: https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectspodcast. #Podcast #MuseumFromHome

Image courtesy of Christine Barron.

08/03/2020
Shark Skin video: Streamlined Swimmers digital exhibit

Shark skin is unique in the fish world. It is covered in denticles, microscopic structures coated with an enamel-like substance, and are more like teeth than scales. As part of our newly launched ocean experience and digital exhibit, Sharks: Streamlined Swimmers, we created a new video on shark skin in partnership with Marine Biologist Molly Gabler-Smith.

Molly is a Postdoctoral Fellow in George Lauder's lab at the Harvard Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and knows a lot about shark skin and locomotion. Hear here talk about the unique structure of shark skin and how it enables them to move efficiently and elegantly through the water. See the full online exhibit to learn how body design in many shark species has been honed over hundreds of millions of years to increase swimming performance. https://bit.ly/HMSCSharksOnlineExhibit #HMSCconnects

Happy #ColoringBookDay! Color in these brand new, ocean-inspired coloring pages as part of our new #HMSCconnects oceans ...
08/02/2020

Happy #ColoringBookDay! Color in these brand new, ocean-inspired coloring pages as part of our new #HMSCconnects oceans experience. Color your way through our collections with coloring pages based on the Devonshire cup coral from the Blaschka Sea Creatures in Glass collection, a Makau fishhook from mid 19th century Hawaii, found in the Peabody Museum, a Wall Mural from the Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East, and a Zoetrope ocean cartoon strip from the CHSI collection.

Explore the detailed images, extend your learning, and add your own artistic perspectives. Share your creations with us in the comments or with the hashtags #ColorOurCollections & #HMSCconnects! Happy coloring! https://bit.ly/HMSCOceansColoringPages #MuseumFromHome

Attention dog lovers! This week's theme for our Extraordinary Things series is "Top Dogs." https://bit.ly/HMSCTopDogsSel...
08/01/2020

Attention dog lovers! This week's theme for our Extraordinary Things series is "Top Dogs." https://bit.ly/HMSCTopDogs

Selected from each of the four Harvard Museums of Science & Culture the selection features "Top Dogs," including members of the canine family like the gray wolf, and a magnetic dog toy with a surprising Cold War agenda. Learn why ancient Egyptians associated jackals with the afterlife, and why Inuit sled dogs have been honored in Canada. #HMSCconnects #MuseumFromHome

We are happy to present you with the HMSC Connects! oceans experience, featuring a new digital exhibition on sharks, a l...
07/31/2020

We are happy to present you with the HMSC Connects! oceans experience, featuring a new digital exhibition on sharks, a live marine animal snack time, podcasts featuring interviews with marine experts, ocean-inspired coloring pages, and more family resources.

Explore our full menu at home at your leisure and discover the wonder of what the ocean holds. Plus, find hidden treasures in your own backyard with the HMSC Explorers Club Instagram. https://bit.ly/HMSConnectsOceansExperience #HMSCconnects #MuseumAtHome

07/30/2020
Harvard Museum of Natural History

Do you know what a sand shark eats? Or where sand sharks can be found in the ocean? Learn more about these sharks and the story of Eugenie Clark, as known as The Shark Lady! #HMSCconnects

This week’s story is Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean's Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating, illustrated by Marta Alvarez Miguens (Sourcebooks Explore, 2017).

What is your favorite shark? Celeste Luna has created a special shark-inspired coloring page and matching activity to go with her Story Time so you can further explore fun facts about sharks, such as where they live, what they eat, and what kind of teeth they have: https://bit.ly/HMSCSharkActivity. #HMSCconnects

We are honored to present an interview with Dr. Albert Jose Jones, a marine biologist and diver by trade, as well as a r...
07/29/2020

We are honored to present an interview with Dr. Albert Jose Jones, a marine biologist and diver by trade, as well as a retired professor of Marine Science at the University of the District of Columbia. We look forward to his HMSC Connects! virtual talk this fall.

Dr. Jones cofounded the National Association of Black Scuba Divers, and is among the founding members of Diving With A Purpose, a group of Black scuba divers who locate and document sunken slave ships around the world. The work behind Diving With A Purpose is to uncover the largely forgotten history of the harrowing journeys made by millions of captured, enslaved Africans across the Atlantic Ocean. In addition to asking him about that work, Jennifer learns more about how his early love of nature ultimately led him to a lifetime in the ocean, and how he has used that passion to educate and inspire thousands of divers and non-divers across the world.

Listen to the full episode here: https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectspodcast.

If you’d like to learn more about Diving With A Purpose, here’s a link to a short film about the Slave Wrecks Project, an international network of researchers and institutions hosted by the National Museum of African American History & Culture: https://bit.ly/NatGeoSlaveWrecks.

Images courtesy of Eric Hanauer (color photograph) and the Underwater Adventure Seekers (black and white photograph). #HMSCconnects #MuseumFromHome

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26 Oxford St
Cambridge, MA
02138

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Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
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Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
Sunday 09:00 - 17:00

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(617) 496-1638

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Selva Ozelli “Art in the Time of Corona”: https://www.facebook.com/527889230574675/posts/3281134275250143/
I´m brasilian and I love learning new languages.I believe that by learning a language you can also learn a lot about the people that speak it.I current speak Portuguese,I am trying to learn English.So please feel free to correct me my little English,because English is not my first language.So feel free to ask problems you have with the language I speak.I have complete second graded but I´ve never went to the University.I hope you a wonderful day.God bless you for your help me
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