Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology From towering Native American totem poles and large Maya sculptures to precious artifacts of the ancient world, the Peabody Museum has one of the finest collections of human cultural history found anywhere.
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Operating as usual

10/17/2020
The Holmul Frieze (Building A, Group II) - 3D model by Peabody Museum [4432a03] - Sketchfab

Happy #InternationalArchaeologyDay! In this interactive 3D model, a 26-foot-long frieze in the ancient Maya city-state of Holmul in present-day Guatemala depicts a complex religious scene.

The central figure is the Holmul king who died around 590 and was buried in the tomb the frieze adorns. Maneuvering in the close confines of an excavated tunnel, scientists used a 3D scanner to acquire precise measurements and produce this detailed digital replica.

More pop-up information about the frieze is embedded in the model: https://sketchfab.com/3d-models/the-holmul-frieze-building-a-group-ii-4432a0388b2346eeb00f43dc5d9c955d

A 26-foot-long frieze in the city-state of Holmul depicts a complex religious scene with an inscription that suggests close ties with the Snake dynasty. The central figure is the Holmul king who died around 590 and was buried in the tomb the frieze adorns. Maneuvering in the close confines of an exc...

Happy #WorldFoodDay! #FlashbackFriday to last fall when we opened the exhibit Resetting the Table: Food and Our Changing...
10/16/2020

Happy #WorldFoodDay! #FlashbackFriday to last fall when we opened the exhibit Resetting the Table: Food and Our Changing Tastes: http://bit.ly/2rfEXAY

Joyce Chaplin, a Harvard historian of early America and the curator of the exhibit, was a guest on the #HMSCconnects! podcast, hosted by Harvard Museums of Science & Culture​ exhibit developer Jennifer Berglund.

She and Jennifer discuss the relevance of the exhibit in light of recent events, gender, coffee culture, the food industry, and the iconic Harvard class of 1913 dinner that served as the jumping off point for the exhibit.

Give a listen to the full episode here https://bit.ly/HMSCconnectspodcast and read Joyce’s recent Gazette article: https://bit.ly/ServingUpANewSocialOrderGazette #MuseumFromHome

Gallery view of an early twentieth century home kitchen. Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

Diving with a Purpose is an organization dedicated to the documentation and protection of African slave trade shipwrecks...
10/15/2020

Diving with a Purpose is an organization dedicated to the documentation and protection of African slave trade shipwrecks and the maritime history and culture of African Americans.

We are pleased to announce a special "Diving with a Purpose" virtual panel discussion taking place next Thursday, October 22nd (FREE). See more information and register here: https://bit.ly/DivingWithAPurpose

For the event Jay Haigler and Albert José Jones will share the organization’s work and recent discoveries. They will discuss the importance of submerged heritage resources in advancing the fields of maritime archaeology and ocean conservation, and the need for a better understanding of the transatlantic slave trade and its global, cultural, and social-economic impact on society. Listen to an #HMSCconnects! podcast interview with Dr. Jones: https://bit.ly/HMSCPodcastJones

Photo courtesy of Jay Haigler.

For our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620” Linda Jeffers Coombs, Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Hea...
10/12/2020

For our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620” Linda Jeffers Coombs, Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), reflects on the lives of people spent at Gay Head within the context of a grass pack basket made by Bathsheba Occouch and a historic photograph of Deacon Thomas Jeffers and Aaron Cooper.

Linda remarks, “I have lived in Mashpee for more than forty years. My two grandchildren are enrolled with the Mashpee Wampanoag tribe, as was their father and grandfather. I have worked for forty-five years as a museum educator. I recognize the beach grass from my years working in the Wampanoag Indigenous program at Plimouth Plantation, where we worked to reclaim the old skills of our ancestors. Beach grass is harvested at this time of year, late summer–early fall, when it has reached its tallest.

Once harvested, the grass must be dried in the sun until no longer green and then stored in a dry place until ready to weave. This basket is made with a twined weaving technique, which is done by hand and is the ancient traditional Wampanoag weaving method.”

Learn more about both museum objects, and Linda: http://bit.ly/JeffersBasket & http://bit.ly/JeffersPhotographPMAE #IndigenousPeoplesDay

Grass pack basket. Museum Purchase, Huntington Frothingham Wolcott Fund, 1932. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, PM 32-79-10/K156

Photograph of Deacon Thomas Jeffers and Aaron Cooper (left to right). Museum Collection. Courtesy of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, Harvard University, PM 2004.1.283.11

Today marks #IndigenousPeoplesDay, an opportunity to celebrate native peoples and their history. The Peabody Museum has ...
10/12/2020

Today marks #IndigenousPeoplesDay, an opportunity to celebrate native peoples and their history. The Peabody Museum has asked Wampanoag tribal members to reflect on collections spanning the 17th to 20th centuries and stewarded by the Peabody Museum. Explore our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620” here: http://bit.ly/ListeningWampanoagVoices

Included in the new exhibit is a unique perspective on anchors from Jonathan James-Perry, Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah), culture bearer, leader, historian, artist, and professional speaker.

He says, “Anchors are very important in our culture because we are seafaring people. I am very appreciative that I can look at this anchor that was carefully made with stone and iron and other materials and that it has lasted. And I am able to anchor myself by looking at it, touching it, seeing it, and understanding its connection to my ancestry.” http://bit.ly/JJPAnchor

Link to the full exhibit: http://bit.ly/ListeningWampanoagVoices

Killock. Gift of Dr. Lombard C. Jones, 1925. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, PM 25-16-10/98182

Thanks to the The ARTery for a profile of our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620.” Meredith ...
10/12/2020
Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices

Thanks to the The ARTery for a profile of our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620.”

Meredith Vasta, our collections steward, is quoted: “When I read things about health disparities, or educational disparities, or other contemporary issues I never see statistics on native people, even though there are lots of indigenous people living in Boston ... .Early on, we decided to blur the focus on the 17th century. We wanted to look at more contemporary lives and perspectives of Wampanoag people.”

Full article: http://bit.ly/WBURWampanoagVoices #IndigenousPeoplesDay

“Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620” features native artists, storytellers and researchers discussing some of their cultural items and photographs that are housed in the museum’s collection.

Zoë Harris is a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe who has lived on Cape Cod for most of her life. She has been activ...
10/11/2020

Zoë Harris is a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe who has lived on Cape Cod for most of her life. She has been actively involved with her tribe’s language project and has worked with Wampanoag youth for many years.

For our new online exhibit, “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620,” launching on Indigenous Peoples Day tomorrow Zoe talks about the craftmanship of basket weaving, “These baskets are a true testament to the versatility and resilience of Indigenous people and craft. There's a whole other layer to consider when you think about how this woman had to collect the materials … then actually sit down and create these pieces. I think that these pieces prove that when you take the time to create something, it will not disappoint.”

Listen to Zoe, and learn more about the art of basket weaving: http://bit.ly/ZoeHarrisSplintBaskets

Splint baskets. Gift of Dr. Lombard C. Jones, 1904. ©President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, PM 04-37-10/63616 (left) and PM 04-37-10/63618 (right).

Thanks to the The Vineyard Gazette for highlighting our new online exhibit, "Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620....
10/11/2020

Thanks to the The Vineyard Gazette for highlighting our new online exhibit, "Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620." http://bit.ly/VineyardGazetteWampanoag

Top, left to right: Zoë Harris, Elizabeth James-Perry, Jonathan James-Perry; Middle, left to right: Phillip Wynne photo (detail) by David L. Gray, Linda Jeffers Coombs, Paula Peters photo (detail) by Matika Wilbur; Bottom, Alyssa Harris

Our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620” launches on Indigenous Peoples Day on Monday. Elizab...
10/10/2020

Our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620” launches on Indigenous Peoples Day on Monday.

Elizabeth James-Perry is a textile artist, marine biologist, and member of the Aquinnah Wampanoag tribe of Gay Head, on the island of Noepe (Martha’s Vineyard). Her fine artwork focuses on Northeastern Woodlands Algonquian artistic expressions: wampum shell carving and diplomacy, sustainable weaving, and natural dyeing methods. Elizabeth’s is a perspective that combines art and an appreciation for Native storytelling and traditional environmental knowledge in her ways of relating to coastal North Atlantic life.

Listen to the history of the eel trap and the sash in Elizabeth’s own words: http://bit.ly/EJPEelTrap & http://bit.ly/EJPSash

Our latest #HMSCconnects podcast launched this week. Elizabeth is joined by Peabody Collections Steward Meredith Vasta: http://bit.ly/WampanoagPerspectivesonMuseumObjects

Eel trap. Gift of Dr. Lombard C. Jones, 1917. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, PM 17-16-10/87069

Wool sash ornamented with beads. Gift of the American Antiquarian Society, 1890 © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, PM 90-17-10/49333

Alyssa Harris, a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe of Cape Cod, is a historical educator at Plimoth Patuxet. She tea...
10/09/2020

Alyssa Harris, a member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe of Cape Cod, is a historical educator at Plimoth Patuxet. She teaches people all around the world about her native history and culture. She is also one of the youngest proficient speakers in the Wampanoag language, a language that wasn’t spoken for over 150 years.

For the upcoming online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620” Alyssa describes the beautiful carrying baskets woven by her ancestors: “It can be used as a purse, but it can also be stored inside a home and act like a dresser or drawer. It's used for storing personal belongings. Wampanoag people were so skilled at weaving that they could weave baskets so tightly that they can hold water.”

Learn more about the carrying baskets and hear Alyssa:
http://bit.ly/AlyssaHarrisBaskets & http://bit.ly/CarryingBasketsPMAE

Carrying baskets. Gift of Dr. Lombard C. Jones, 1929. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, PM 29-24-10/98429

For our upcoming online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620,” officially launching on Indigenous Peoples...
10/09/2020

For our upcoming online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620,” officially launching on Indigenous Peoples Day (Monday, October 12th), Phillip Wynne, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe of Cape Cod (Otter Clan), reflects on a collection of dried and smoked herring, and the Sudbury Bow:

“I have always been grateful to live and be of a place with so many intertwined cycles of life. Our ancestors set the rhythm of our very culture to these natural cycles. Now these things are still alive within Mashpee culture. You still hear folks around town asking each other, ‘You see the herring run yet?’ A few years ago, I got a chance to reproduce this beautiful self-bow using similar technologies and techniques that our ancestors used. What really resonates with me is the people that gifted me that knowledge, the memories we made along the way. It amazed me how this was one of, if not the only, surviving bow from the time period, but I could go to people within the community and ask how to make these things. And it connects us through time, through museum artifacts to living memory.”

Learn more and hear the full audio: http://bit.ly/PhillipWynneHerring & http://bit.ly/PhillipWynneSudburyBow

Dried and partly smoked herring. Gift of Robert Kornfeld, 1939. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, PM 39-42-10/18404; Phillip Wynne photo (detail) by David L. Gray.

The Sudbury bow. Gift of the American Antiquarian Society, 1895. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, PM 95-20-10/49340; Phillip Wynne photo (detail) by David L. Gray.

Join us for a Free, Virtual Eduardo Matos Moctezuma series lecture next Thursday, October 15th at 6pm EST. Learn more an...
10/09/2020

Join us for a Free, Virtual Eduardo Matos Moctezuma series lecture next Thursday, October 15th at 6pm EST. Learn more and register here: https://bit.ly/TheObisidianMirrorLecture

Focusing on Mexico’s pre-Hispanic past, Juan Villoro, Professor Emeritus, prize-winning author, playwright, and journalist, and screenwriter, will explore the intimate and evocative relationships among literature, archaeology, and culture in the special talk: The Obsidian Mirror: Literature and Archaeology in Mexico.

Co-sponsored by the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies at Harvard, the Harvard Divinity School, the Moses Mesoamerican Archive, and the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology.

Photo: © Javier Hinojosa, INAH /Secretaría de Cultura

Our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620,” goes live on Indigenous Peoples Day (Monday, Octobe...
10/09/2020

Our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620,” goes live on Indigenous Peoples Day (Monday, October 12th). Read a special statement about the project from Paula Peters, a politically, socially, and culturally active member of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe:

"In 2020, the year that marks four centuries since the voyage of the Mayflower, the anniversary is being commemorated internationally for establishing the first colony that would be the foothold of New England. But a point too often lost or undersold is that colonization does not occur without people being colonized, subjugated, oppressed, even killed to accommodate the colonizer. Colonization happened to, not for, the Wampanoag. But we have endured. In this online exhibit, the Peabody Museum is giving us the opportunity to illustrate that point by lending contemporary Wampanoag voices to objects that were made, held, worn, consumed and otherwise made useful by our ancestors generations, if not centuries ago. These words attest to the significance of the objects and our continued relevance to them. We are still here to acknowledge them, learn from them, talk about them, and give gratitude to the creator for them."—Paula Peters (Mashpee Wampanoag)

Explore the full exhibit here: http://bit.ly/ListeningWampanoagVoices

Photo by Matika Wilbur

Four hundred years have passed since the Wampanoag Nation encountered English immigrants who settled on the shores of th...
10/08/2020

Four hundred years have passed since the Wampanoag Nation encountered English immigrants who settled on the shores of their land at Patuxet—now called Plymouth.

Harvard has had a relationship with the Wampanoag and other local tribal communities for nearly as long. In acknowledgment of this early history, the Peabody Museum has asked Wampanoag tribal members to reflect on collections spanning the seventeenth to twentieth centuries and stewarded by the Peabody Museum.

Get a sneak peek at the new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620,” officially launching on Indigenous Peoples Day (Monday, October 12th). Listen in as they share memories, thoughts, and reflections about collection items made by their ancestors and relatives and learn how Wampanoag life and culture continues to flourish today. http://bit.ly/ListeningWampanoagVoices

Top, left to right: Zoë Harris, Elizabeth James-Perry, Jonathan James-Perry; Middle, left to right: Phillip Wynne photo (detail) by David L. Gray, Linda Jeffers Coombs, Paula Peters photo (detail) by Matika Wilbur; Bottom, Alyssa Harris

For this week’s #HMSCconnects! podcast, we view museum collections through the unique perspectives of Elizabeth James-Pe...
10/07/2020

For this week’s #HMSCconnects! podcast, we view museum collections through the unique perspectives of Elizabeth James-Perry, a textile artist, marine biologist, and member of the Aquinnah Wampanoag tribe, and Meredith Vasta, our collections steward and a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians. They collaborated on our new online exhibit “Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620,” officially launching on Indigenous Peoples Day.

Host Jennifer Berglund and her guests explore the origins of a mysterious sash once attributed to the famed 17th-century Wampanoag Metacom, who was also known by his adopted English name King Philip—and best known for King Philip’s War. The women also discuss an eel trap donated to the museum in 1917, as well as the processes and natural materials used in their creation.

Elizabeth James Perry says, “Through connecting with the spaces, materials, and techniques, I’m experiencing life the same way people have here in the Northeast for thousands of years. There’s a big difference between recapturing traditional ecological knowledge and growing up with it.”

Meredith talks about working with Elizabeth on the project, “Elizabeth sees materials and dyes and techniques in such a different way than I do. It’s almost like eavesdropping on a conversation between a contemporary artist and the artist who made that historical item … it transcends time and space.’”

Listen to the full episode here: https://hmsc.harvard.edu/podcast.

Photos: Eel trap. Gift of Dr. Lombard C. Jones, 1917. © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, PM# 17-16-10/87069. Wool sash ornamented with beads. Gift of the American Antiquarian Society, 1890 © President and Fellows of Harvard College, Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, PM 90-17-10/49333.

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Better not to die not to see you no more coz i love you more, i'm your one avid one in one.
What is the closing date for the Arts of War exhibition?
Wednesday, October 3, 6:00 pm New Poets of Native Nations Heid E. Erdrich, Poet, Writer, and Filmmaker Tacey M. Atsitty, Poet Eric L. Gansworth, Professor of English and Lowery Writer-in-Residence, Canisius College New Poets of Native Nations (Graywolf Press, July 2018) gathers the work of 21 poets of diverse ages, styles, languages, and tribal affiliations to present the extraordinary range of new Native poetry. The publication features long narratives, political outcries, experimental works, and traditional lyrics—and the result is an essential anthology of some of the best poets writing today. Heid Erdrich, editor of the anthology, will discuss the poets’ literary approaches and their relevance to contemporary American poetry. Tacey Atsitty and Eric Gansworth, poets featured in the anthology, will read their work as part of this program. Lecture, Reading & Book Signing. Free and open to the public. Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 Free event parking available at 52 Oxford Street Garage Presented by Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology in collaboration with the Harvard University Native American Program and the Woodberry Poetry Room at Harvard University
I have been finding artifacts here in Oregon for twenty years. Hundreds of examples have been posted at facebook.com/stonespeaker
Wish to express gratitude to Meredith Vasta for referring me to some sources that may provide me with some expertise on the Yupi'ik/Yup'iak shaman ceremonial mask gifted to me in Bethel and likely from the Hooper Bay region,circa 1920s. I look forward to learning more and sharing it with the world. Wado, -Justine Baker, CWY Nation & resident of Alaska
24th Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists - Reflecting Futures Barcelona, 5-8 September https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2018 CALL FOR PAPERS – 2 Sessions (#302 and #598) The deadline for submitting or modifying an abstract is 15 February 2018, 23h59 CET. https://www.e-a-a.org/EAA2018/Programme SESSION: #302 Gendered, diverse, inclusive archaeological museums? Proposals and experiences for a more equal approach to heritage «During the last decades more and more archaeological museums started to include a gender perspective and developed new exhibitions and educational projects. By establishing a critical attitude towards the traditional androcentric discourses and gender roles, museums started to make not only women, but also other marginalized groups in society more visible. Modern archaeological exhibitions seem to be more diverse and inclusive. Therefore, it is time to present and discuss the different experiences carried out in recent years in European archaeological museums with more gendered, diverse and inclusive approaches, in order to develop a framework of reflection in a “museology of gender and diversity”, conceived as a more integrative, social and egalitarian approach to the heritage presented there. Paper and poster proposals may include topics like - theoretical advances in the studies of gender archaeology and its reflection in museums - museums as an educational tool to achieve gender equality - experiences in community museums and temporary exhibitions - public studies as a diagnostic tool to advance in education of equality - aspects of communication, journalism and merchandising - experiences of museum educational service and informative departments With the organization of this session, we intend to highlight the idea that archaeological museums can transmit an inclusive history that helps to make visible the traditionally marginalized groups of society, in order to contribute to a more egalitarian education and to provide a more equal approach to heritage. Keywords: Museums, archaeology, gender, diversity, Heritage» Main organiser: Prof. Lourdes PRADOS TORREIRA (Spain) Co-organisers: Prof. Doris Gutsmiedl-Schümann (Germany) Dr. Ana Cristina Martins (Portugal) SESSION: #598 Archaeology and interdisciplinarity & interdisciplinarity in archaeology: stories of a long and diversified journey (19th-21st centuries) «Rooted in scientific areas as diverse as architecture and geology, archaeology was affirmed in the 19th century through collaboration with other disciplines such as philology and anthropology. On the other hand, archaeology played a fundamental role in the establishment of the fields of conservation and restoration. Meanwhile, it was contemplated in heritage policy and legislation, contributed to the production of knowledge divulged in different supports and ways, as well as to the development of the tourism. Bringing together interests, purposes and procedures defined by different actors, individual and collective, public and private, local, regional, national and transnational, archaeology has been evolving theoretically and methodologically due to new ways of looking at the past. New ways that have been and are being generated by (and together to) other human and social sciences, as well as enhanced and / or urged by exact and natural sciences. This session invites papers and posters dealing with topics such as: - archaeology and other sciences; - interdisciplinarity, reanalysis and reuses of the past; - archaeology, heritage preservation and museums; - teaching archaeology; - archaeology, journalism, mass communication, digital platforms and new social nets; - archaeology, cultural tourism and sustainable development. Following the previous seminar organized within the research project ‘InterArq-Archaeology and Interdisciplinarity’ (Barcelona, 2017) this session aims to obtain a broader (geographical, chronological and thematic) picture. Keywords: Archaeology, Interdisciplinarity; Reanalysis; Reuses.» Main organiser: Dr. Ana Cristina MARTINS (Portugal) Co-organisers: Prof. Isabel Ordieres Díez (Spain)
[REGISTRATIONS EXTENDED / OPEN AND CLOSED PANELS] Dear Colleagues, we're here to #remind you: You only have TWO days to register your panel! The registration for Open Panels and Closed panels at the 18th IUAES World Congress - Florianópolis, Brazil ARE EXTENDED. According to our new schedule http://www.iuaes2018.org/conteudo/view?ID_CONTEUDO=436) the proposers will be able to submit their proposals through the registration system (http://www.iuaes2018.org/inscricoes/capa) until the 15th of November, 2017. There are 38 thematic axes and you can check them here: http://www.iuaes2018.org/site/capa. #IUAESCongress #IUAESBrazil #IUAES www.iuaes2018.org