New York Transit Museum

New York Transit Museum The NY Transit Museum is a unique museum devoted to the impact of public transportation on the development of the New York metropolitan region.
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Visit us in Downtown Brooklyn, at our Gallery Annex at Grand Central Terminal, or our 2 Broadway store! Please respect your fellow readers and exercise appropriate restraint in drafting and submitting a post or comment. In that regard, the New York Transit Museum reserves its right to delete any post that contains language or imagery which: is off-topic, is defamatory, compromises public safety o

Visit us in Downtown Brooklyn, at our Gallery Annex at Grand Central Terminal, or our 2 Broadway store! Please respect your fellow readers and exercise appropriate restraint in drafting and submitting a post or comment. In that regard, the New York Transit Museum reserves its right to delete any post that contains language or imagery which: is off-topic, is defamatory, compromises public safety o

Operating as usual

Managers at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority - MTA's Subway Command Center shut down the subway system at 10:20...
09/11/2021

Managers at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority - MTA's Subway Command Center shut down the subway system at 10:20 am on September 11th, 2001. Halting subway service was first and foremost a safety decision. Almost immediately, crews began inspecting Lower Manhattan tunnels for bombs, and testing tracks with empty trains. Officials were concerned about the possibility of additional attacks: bridges and tunnels are high-profile targets. But with damaged signals, third rail power disruptions, and reports of water and debris filling Lower Manhattan tunnels, it was also a practical response. Terrified passengers, crowded on smoke-filled platforms, were relieved as subway operators made final stops in Lower Manhattan and carried them to safety. With subway service disrupted, New York City Transit rerouted buses to aid evacuation. MTA Metro-North Railroad and MTA LIRR dispatchers put all available trains into service to get commuters home.

Within hours, the first few subway lines were able to resume service. By the end of the day, 65% of the system was operating. When partial service resumed, planners used their knowledge of the maze-like subway system to devise new routes that avoided the crushed and flooded tunnels under Lower Manhattan. Subway service changed 40 times in the first three days after September 11th, with bus routes adjusted accordingly to support those changes. To keep New Yorkers informed (in an era before smartphones), the MTA printed and distributed updated paper maps daily. Transit staff even walked the streets with bullhorns and flyers to provide information.

Reconstruction of the Cortlandt Street station was completed ahead of schedule, and 1/9 subway service resumed by mid-September 2002—just one year after the attacks. As we commemorate the 20th anniversary of September 11th today, we’re reminded of the resiliency of New York City, and of the importance of the people whose expertise and commitment we rely on. Those who often show up in emergencies without being asked and use their unique skills to get New York moving again. Our digital exhibit, Bringing Back the City: Mass Transit Responds to Crisis, uses first person accounts, images, and artifacts to tell the story of dedicated transit workers and their resilience and heroism in times of crisis. We are forever thankful for their contributions. Learn more at bringingbackthecity.com.

Managers at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority - MTA's Subway Command Center shut down the subway system at 10:20 am on September 11th, 2001. Halting subway service was first and foremost a safety decision. Almost immediately, crews began inspecting Lower Manhattan tunnels for bombs, and testing tracks with empty trains. Officials were concerned about the possibility of additional attacks: bridges and tunnels are high-profile targets. But with damaged signals, third rail power disruptions, and reports of water and debris filling Lower Manhattan tunnels, it was also a practical response. Terrified passengers, crowded on smoke-filled platforms, were relieved as subway operators made final stops in Lower Manhattan and carried them to safety. With subway service disrupted, New York City Transit rerouted buses to aid evacuation. MTA Metro-North Railroad and MTA LIRR dispatchers put all available trains into service to get commuters home.

Within hours, the first few subway lines were able to resume service. By the end of the day, 65% of the system was operating. When partial service resumed, planners used their knowledge of the maze-like subway system to devise new routes that avoided the crushed and flooded tunnels under Lower Manhattan. Subway service changed 40 times in the first three days after September 11th, with bus routes adjusted accordingly to support those changes. To keep New Yorkers informed (in an era before smartphones), the MTA printed and distributed updated paper maps daily. Transit staff even walked the streets with bullhorns and flyers to provide information.

Reconstruction of the Cortlandt Street station was completed ahead of schedule, and 1/9 subway service resumed by mid-September 2002—just one year after the attacks. As we commemorate the 20th anniversary of September 11th today, we’re reminded of the resiliency of New York City, and of the importance of the people whose expertise and commitment we rely on. Those who often show up in emergencies without being asked and use their unique skills to get New York moving again. Our digital exhibit, Bringing Back the City: Mass Transit Responds to Crisis, uses first person accounts, images, and artifacts to tell the story of dedicated transit workers and their resilience and heroism in times of crisis. We are forever thankful for their contributions. Learn more at bringingbackthecity.com.

The weeks and months following September 11th saw a long process of recovery as Metropolitan Transportation Authority - ...
09/10/2021

The weeks and months following September 11th saw a long process of recovery as Metropolitan Transportation Authority - MTA crews began rebuilding crushed tunnels and repairing systems to restore full service in Lower Manhattan. Beneath Ground Zero, rubble filled the subway and PATH train tunnels. To serve the people who live, work, and go to school in Lower Manhattan, it was essential to restore the 1/9 train quickly. Only after removing that debris could engineers begin assessing the damage and laying plans for ironworkers to erect new steel supports, and timbermen to rebuild walls and ceilings. Working around the clock, crews installed new track, utilities, ventilation systems, signals, and other equipment—a complex ballet of contractors, designers, and managers.

These photos by Sam Hollenshead show construction workers rebuilding a damaged section of the 1/9 train line in Lower Manhattan. Workers replaced five-miles of track from Chambers Street to South Ferry. They are shown pounding into place the clips that connect wooden ties to the rails and connecting steel beams to support the ceiling of the new Cortlandt Street station. Amazingly, the last beam was put in place in July 2002, only five months after construction began. The subway line re-opened in mid-September, a vital step in restoring a much-needed sense of normalcy to the city.
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This week marks the 20th anniversary of September 11th. In commemoration, each day the New York Transit Museum will share a story of how MTA workers from across the transit system contributed their unique skills, equipment, and knowledge of the city’s infrastructure to get New York moving again, as quickly—and safely—as possible after the attacks. Their stories are striking examples of resourcefulness, resilience, and heroism in times of crisis. Visit bringingbackthecity.com for more.

When news came of planes striking the World Trade Center, nobody was certain exactly what was happening. Like all New Yo...
09/09/2021

When news came of planes striking the World Trade Center, nobody was certain exactly what was happening. Like all New Yorkers, transit workers were shocked and confused. But they did know one thing: they would be needed. Many who were at home rushed to work, or made their way toward Ground Zero, ready to help however they could.

Within hours of the World Trade Center’s collapse, Metropolitan Transportation Authority - MTA ironworkers were on site, cutting through twisted steel to help search for survivors. MTA construction and repair crews brought a five-block-long convoy of heavy equipment to move concrete and fallen beams. Transit workers arrived with helmets, safety vests, gloves, trucks, cranes, and other vital supplies.

Thousands of MTA employees were a key part of rescue and recovery at Ground Zero—a great many of them volunteers who simply saw a need and came to help. With electricity out in Lower Manhattan, NYC Transit brought its emergency generators to run traffic signals, lighting, and computers, and provide power for the Mayor's Office of Emergency Management and key command centers. Maintenance and construction crews removed debris and searched for survivors. Bus drivers transported essential emergency personnel. Crews brought much-needed heavy equipment, from crane cars and backhoes to generators. And with communications disrupted in Lower Manhattan, MTA specialists rigged temporary networks, providing a crucial link. Alongside police, firefighters, and medical personnel, MTA employees worked the pile at Ground Zero. Many volunteered in their “spare time,” searching for survivors by day or clearing debris at night.
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This week marks the 20th anniversary of September 11th. In commemoration, each day the New York Transit Museum will share stories of how MTA workers from across the transit system contributed their unique skills, equipment, and knowledge of the city’s infrastructure to get New York moving again, as quickly—and safely—as possible after the attacks. Their stories are striking examples of resourcefulness, resilience, and heroism in times of crisis. Visit bringingbackthecity.com for more.

09/08/2021
BRINGING BACK THE CITY: CHAOS AT CORTLANDT STREET

The impact of the September 11 attack in New York City was unprecedented. So too was the heroic response of MTA employees.

Subway operators. Bus drivers. Track workers. Superintendents. Electricians. Mechanics. Workers from across the transit system contributed their unique skills, equipment, and knowledge of the city’s infrastructure. They evacuated frightened citizens, transported first responders, and proved an irreplaceable resource in the process of rescue and recovery.

In this video from our online exhibit, Bringing Back the City: Mass Transit Responds to Crisis, retired Train Operator Hector Ramirez recounts his experience operating a train through Cortlandt Street station on September 11th, 2001. Terrified passengers, crowded on smoke-filled platforms, were relieved as subway operators like Ramirez made final stops in Lower Manhattan and carried them to safety. Astonishingly, despite the unprecedented scope of the damage, no lives were lost anywhere in the subway system that day.

Visit bringingbackthecity.com to see more interviews with MTA employees who were on the front lines during and after September 11th.

On September 11th the world saw the destruction in New York’s skyline and streets. Metropolitan Transportation Authority...
09/08/2021

On September 11th the world saw the destruction in New York’s skyline and streets. Metropolitan Transportation Authority - MTA workers and passengers also saw its devastating impact below ground. The falling towers crushed the Cortlandt Street station. Massive building beams shot like spears through seven feet of earth, through the station’s brick and concrete ceiling, and into the track bed below. Astonishingly, despite the unprecedented scope of the damage, no lives were lost anywhere in the subway system that day.

In 2018, artist Ann Hamilton created CHORUS, an expansive field of woven text in marble mosaic for the rebuilt WTC Cortlandt station. Commissioned by MTA Arts & Design, the artwork spans 4,350 square feet and frames the subway station platforms. Horizontal lines of text from the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights (1948) cross and intersect with the most familiar and often-repeated phrases from the preamble to the United States Declaration of Independence (1776)

TODAY at 5pm, artist Ann Hamilton; Jan Ramirez, National September 11 Memorial & Museum Chief Curator; and Sandra Bloodworth, director of MTA Arts & Design, will come together for a free virtual discussion about the project. RSVP now at nytransitmuseum.org/programs.
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This week marks the 20th anniversary of September 11th. In commemoration, each day @NYTransitMuseum will share a story of how @MTA workers from across the transit system contributed their unique skills, equipment, and knowledge of the city’s infrastructure to get New York moving again, as quickly—and safely—as possible after the attacks. Their stories are striking examples of resourcefulness, resilience, and heroism in times of crisis. Visit bringingbackthecity.com for more.

MTA bus 2185 was used for express bus service when it was badly damaged in the September 11th terrorist attacks on the W...
09/07/2021

MTA bus 2185 was used for express bus service when it was badly damaged in the September 11th terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center. Covered in dust, ash and falling debris on the morning of 9/11, the express coach could have been written off and sent off to scrap. Instead, the MTA chose to rebuild her as a symbol of NYC Transit’s resiliency and a rolling example of the dedication of the agency’s employees. Full repairs took about three years and when they were completed, workers developed a design for a paint job that would highlight the special coach, allowing it to stand out, both in the depot and on the street. She was christened “Pamela” to honor a victim of the attack and now features an American flag on her sides and a "9/11/2001: Never Forget" graphic. With its distinctive red, white and blue paint job, it is a source of pride to the MTA employees who remember the once heavily damaged hulk as it sat on the street 20 years ago near Ground Zero.

This week marks the 20th anniversary of September 11th. In commemoration, each day the New York Transit Museum will share a story of how MTA workers from across the transit system contributed their unique skills, equipment, and knowledge of the city’s infrastructure to get New York moving again, as quickly—and safely—as possible after the attacks. Their stories are striking examples of the MTA's resourcefulness, resilience, and heroism in times of crisis. Visit bringingbackthecity.com for more.

Opened in 1977, the Linden Shop and Yard is the only shop in the transit system dedicated to rehabilitating and replacin...
09/07/2021

Opened in 1977, the Linden Shop and Yard is the only shop in the transit system dedicated to rehabilitating and replacing subway track and switch gear. Although it has connections to the IRT New Lots Line and BMT Canarsie Line, it is one of the few facilities without a third rail and with a rare connection from the subway to the mainline United States rail network.

Taken by James Giovan, this photograph shows a Vacuum Train at Linden Yard in October of 2013. Vacuum trains travel through the subway system to remove refuse that has accumulated on trackbeds by means of suction. Have you ever spotted a Vacuum Train?

Opened in 1977, the Linden Shop and Yard is the only shop in the transit system dedicated to rehabilitating and replacing subway track and switch gear. Although it has connections to the IRT New Lots Line and BMT Canarsie Line, it is one of the few facilities without a third rail and with a rare connection from the subway to the mainline United States rail network.

Taken by James Giovan, this photograph shows a Vacuum Train at Linden Yard in October of 2013. Vacuum trains travel through the subway system to remove refuse that has accumulated on trackbeds by means of suction. Have you ever spotted a Vacuum Train?

#LaborDay: These #NYTMCollection images provide a glimpse into the lives of workers of the Fifth Avenue Coach Company, a...
09/06/2021

#LaborDay: These #NYTMCollection images provide a glimpse into the lives of workers of the Fifth Avenue Coach Company, a precursor to MTA buses. The F.A.C.C. began with horse-drawn omnibuses, but became famous for introducing motor buses to the streets of New York. In these archival images, we see the emphasis that the F.A.C.C. put on providing benefits and amenities for the employees that would help create and maintain good relations and motivated workers. In between training in the Garage and Conductor’s Instruction Rooms and working in the Body Construction Shop, these workers enjoyed meals at the Employee Restaurant and bonded over a game of pool in the Employee Club Room.

Happy #LaborDay! Today, we’re celebrating the thousands of workers, past and present, who built our transit system and k...
09/06/2021

Happy #LaborDay! Today, we’re celebrating the thousands of workers, past and present, who built our transit system and keep it running 24/7. Taken by Pierre P. Pullis, this #NYTMCollection photo shows construction of the 50th Street station in 1902. The early subway system was hailed as an engineering marvel, but despite using the best equipment of the time, progress most often depended on a man with a pickaxe and shovel. Many of the toughest tasks in the creation of the #NYCsubway system were accomplished by African-American and immigrant tunnel workers. As you ride the train today, think of the workers from the early years of the 20th century whose labor made your neighborhood and your commute possible. Their achievement is monumental.

Happy #LaborDay! Today, we’re celebrating the thousands of workers, past and present, who built our transit system and keep it running 24/7. Taken by Pierre P. Pullis, this #NYTMCollection photo shows construction of the 50th Street station in 1902. The early subway system was hailed as an engineering marvel, but despite using the best equipment of the time, progress most often depended on a man with a pickaxe and shovel. Many of the toughest tasks in the creation of the #NYCsubway system were accomplished by African-American and immigrant tunnel workers. As you ride the train today, think of the workers from the early years of the 20th century whose labor made your neighborhood and your commute possible. Their achievement is monumental.

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99 Schermerhorn Street
Brooklyn, NY
11201

Located at 99 Schermerhorn Street Brooklyn, NY 11201, and accessible by over 20 subway and bus lines.

Opening Hours

Friday 11am - 4pm
Saturday 11am - 4pm
Sunday 11am - 4pm

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(718) 694-1600

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About the New York Transit Museum

Found in 1976, the New York Transit Museum is one of only a few museums in the world dedicated to telling the story of urban public transportation. The Museum collects, exhibits, interprets, and preserves the history, sociology, and technology of public transportation systems in the New York metropolitan region, and conducts research and educational programs that make our extensive collections accessible and meaningful to a broad audience.

The Transit Museum is committed to preserving the stories of the people behind transportation – the extraordinary engineers, the workers who labored in the tunnels over 100 years ago, the communities that were drastically transformed, and the ever-evolving technology, design, and ridership of a system that runs 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

Housed underground in an authentic 1936 subway station in Downtown Brooklyn, the Transit Museum’s main location spans a full city block, with a working platform that is home to a rotating selection of twenty vintage subway and elevated cars dating back to the early 1900s. Between our main location and our Gallery at Grand Central Terminal, the Transit Museum welcomes more than half a million visitors every year.

Transit Museum visitors can explore the vintage cars, sit at the wheel of a city bus, step through a time tunnel of turnstiles, and explore changing exhibits that highlight the cultural, social and technological history — and future — of mass transit.

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Newyork Subway Train News!!! #newyork #subway #train #accident
10 Reasons Why New-York Is The Best | Life In New-York City-2021
Rest in Peace Mike Hanna.
When is the Brooklyn museum going to reopen?
FOR ALL YOU NEW YORK SUBWAY RIDERS WHO SLIP AND FALL ON PIDGEON P**P Everyone has seen and smelled that pasty textured, white colored crap on the NY Transit Authority’s subways. It's not only disgusting. It's unhealthy. At least twice-a-day NY Subway riders are forced to dodge pigeon p**p as if they’re dancing through raindrops. But of course, this isn’t rain drops, it’s pigeon p**p, According to Seinfeld, we have a deal with the pigeons: They get out of our way when we drive and we look the other way when they p**p on statues and subway stairways. But when the NY Transit Authority doesn’t regularly clean up their uninvited guests’ Pidgeon droppings, the deal is not only off, but it will cost them Big Bucks for the injuries they cause to NY subway passengers. Bob Genis, https://www.soningenis.com/, is the only trial lawyer in New York city that has ever successfully held the NY Transit Authority responsible for any NY subway rider’s injuries sustained as a result of falling, due to unremoved pigeon p**p, which was on the exterior steps leading from the elevated train platform down to the street below, to the tune of $8 Million dollars. No other trial lawyer has ever won a case for falls, due to Pidgeon droppings, caused by the NY Transit Authority’s negligence. On September 21, 1997, Bob’s client, Shelton Stewart, slipped and fell, at the NYCTA White Plains Road elevated subway station. He sustained a contusion to his cervical spine requiring a laminectomy and fusion. He suffered from pre-existing spinal stenosis, a prior herniated cervical disc that required surgery, and at the time of his injury, future surgery had already been recommended. Shelton’s injuries are serious and permanent. At trial, Shelton testified that he always saw pigeon excrement all over the station, that he often saw it on the stairs where he fell, that he had complained repeatedly to station workers, that he saw it 14 hours before the accident, and that he saw it again at the time of the accident. The station cleaner agreed that pigeons often left their droppings throughout the station, and while he denied seeing accumulations of droppings on the steps, he also stated that he had experience cleaning the droppings on a daily basis from the steps. He also testified that part of his duties included cleaning the steps of the droppings, and while he denied that the droppings were slippery, (WTF?), he also stated that he was trained to put sand over the droppings because they were slippery, and to then clean them off the steps.... (Now that's some real brilliant logic - Hey?) There was more than sufficient evidence from which the jury could infer that the NY Transit Authority had actual knowledge that pigeons regularly left their droppings on the stairway which were regularly permitted to remain for an unreasonable period of time. Watch “JUSTICE IN AMERICA – Shelton Stewart’s Story” https://insiderexclusive.com/justice-in-america-shelton-stewarts-story/
any word on any reopening date?
A bittersweet acquisition. These square bodied Dressel tail lamps are almost as old as the entire elevated system itself. This pair was removed off of an MUDC car on its very last week of service in Manhattan. They are much older than the IRT "flip" style used on Hi-V's, etc.
My favorite t shirt on the first day if school September 1976. Mom went to NYC and all I got was this shirt of the map of the NYC subway lines.
WHEN IS THE MUSEUM REOPENING