New York Transit Museum

New York Transit Museum The NY Transit Museum is a unique museum devoted to the impact of public transportation on the development of the New York metropolitan region. Visit us in Downtown Brooklyn, at our Gallery Annex at Grand Central Terminal, or our 2 Broadway store!
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When Grand Central was first built, long distance trains were the posh celebrities at the terminal and commuter lines we...
07/16/2020

When Grand Central was first built, long distance trains were the posh celebrities at the terminal and commuter lines were the less glamorous, yet vital workhorses that kept the city humming. The upper Express Concourse was reserved for long distance trains, while Commuter rails used the Suburban Concourse on the lower level, featuring 10 ticket windows, a baggage room, a telegraph office, and a newsstand. Efficient commuter service fueled New York’s prosperity, filling its skyscrapers, lofts, and factories every day with workers from across the region. It also spurred suburban growth, linking communities to midtown and playing a vital role in shaping the city.

Taken by Frank English, this #NYTMCollection photograph shows Metro-North’s commuter rail platform in 1985. Today, all commuter lines serve both levels of the terminal. What’s your favorite commuter line at Grand Central Terminal?

07/16/2020
Transit Tots - Thursday, July 16th, 2020

Have you ever wondered how a subway train knows when to stop and when to go? Learn all about subway signals and the messages they send in today's Transit Tots, and then make your own subway signal at home using cardboard, paper and markers.

#NYCsubway face masks are back in stock at the New York Transit Museum Store in both adult and kids sizes! Shop now at n...
07/15/2020

#NYCsubway face masks are back in stock at the New York Transit Museum Store in both adult and kids sizes! Shop now at nytransitmuseum.org/masks. Limited quantity available - act fast!

07/15/2020

Due to unforeseen circumstances, the Transit Trivia Summer League has been canceled. We are disappointed that we won't be able to launch our Trivia League at this time, but hope you'll join us for other virtual programs throughout the summer.

Those who purchased tickets have been notified and will be refunded in full. Please stay tuned and check our calendar for upcoming events.

The 72nd Street station is one of the first 28 stations of the New York City subway. When opened in 1904, the station’s ...
07/15/2020

The 72nd Street station is one of the first 28 stations of the New York City subway. When opened in 1904, the station’s original structure did not meet the IRT’s standards because it contained only one entrance, which was accessible through a control house between 71st and 72nd Street. The station also had narrow platforms and stairways, with no crossovers or crossunders because the control house contained separate turnstiles and token booths for each platform side. In 2002, the station received a major renovation, including a second, larger control house between 72nd and 73rd Streets and more wide north end platforms.

This #NYTMCollection survey photograph documents the north end of the 72nd Street station’s southbound platform on August 22nd, 1957. During this time, the station’s platforms were extended to accommodate longer trains. Today, the station is served by the 1/2/3 trains.

Taken by Granville W. Pulls, this #NYTMCollection photograph documents Atlantic Avenue in 1907. Pictured near the center...
07/15/2020

Taken by Granville W. Pulls, this #NYTMCollection photograph documents Atlantic Avenue in 1907. Pictured near the center of the photograph, the Church of the Redeemer first opened in 1866 and was designed by Patrick C. Keely (1816 - 1896), who mainly designed churches and institutional buildings. During the BMT Fourth Avenue Line's construction (today’s D, N, and R trains), the designers of the Pacific Street station felt the church was important enough to incorporate mosaics in the subway station below depicting its arches.

Although the church was razed in 2016, the Pacific Street station's mosaics remain a stunning example of Dual Contracts station ornamentation.

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1975, the first two R-46 trains entered revenue service on the F and N lines. R-46 cars w...
07/14/2020

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1975, the first two R-46 trains entered revenue service on the F and N lines. R-46 cars were built by the Pullman Standard Company for the B division between 1975 and 1978. The fleet was manufactured to be nearly identical to the R-44s that began serving the New York City subway just a few years earlier. Thankfully, unlike the R-44, experimental carpeting was not installed on R-46s! Instead, the R-46 came equipped with more practical, durable, and hygienic rubber flooring.

Due to various issues, the arrival of the R-46 fleet was delayed by three years. Considered to be “lemons,” the cars were overhauled to improve various mechanical functions and fix car-body defects. Today, the remaining R-46 fleet serve the A/C, N/W/Q, and Rockaway Park Shuttle lines.

07/14/2020
Transit Tots - Tuesday, July 14th, 2020

How do we move around above ground? Today in Transit Tots, we’ll talk about all things buses! We’ll read a favorite story about surface transit and then create a bus out of everyday objects found around our homes.

Think you know our transit system backwards and forwards? Study up and put your knowledge to good use by driving your te...
07/14/2020

Think you know our transit system backwards and forwards? Study up and put your knowledge to good use by driving your team to victory at the #NYTransitMuseum’s first-ever virtual #TransitTrivia Summer League. Round one kicks off at 6pm next Tuesday! Act fast – register now at nytransitmuseum.org/transittriviasummerleague1/.

Need a warm up? Answer these #trivia questions in the comments below!

1. What is the name of the MTA’s new contactless fare collection system and what does it stand for?
2. Who designed the Diamond Jubilee token for the NYC subway’s 75th Anniversary?
3. When did the MTA discontinue use of double letters to indicate local subway services?
4. What is the NYC Subway’s deepest station in the system at over 170ft below street level?
5. Which of the following items isn't sold in the New York Transit Museum Store: tea towels, toothbrushes, luggage tags, or coasters?
6. What main feature was first introduced in the bus pictured here?

The State-of-the-Art-Car (SOAC) was a heavy rail transit demonstrator car built in the 1972 by the U.S. Department of Tr...
07/13/2020

The State-of-the-Art-Car (SOAC) was a heavy rail transit demonstrator car built in the 1972 by the U.S. Department of Transportation's Urban Mass Transportation Administration (UMTA), designed as part of the Urban Rail and Rapid Vehicle and Systems Program. The car’s purpose was to demonstrate current technologies and innovations of the rapid transit vehicle, such as reliability, safety, and comfort - for example, they were particularly quiet and equipped with air conditioning. These two prototypes were built by the St. Louis Car Company and based on the designs of the R-44 subway car.

The demonstrator State-of-the-Art-Cars were tested at the DOT’s High Speed Ground Test Center in Pueblo, Colorado. From there on, they traveled through the country and ran in limited service for six rapid transit systems, including the MBTA Red Line in Boston and the CTA Skokie Line in Chicago! In New York City, SOAC service ran from May 17, 1974 through July 19, 1974, operating on the A, D, E, & N lines.

Commuters enjoyed riding the SOAC, the responses were an overall success – however, the UMTA decided otherwise and the cars were never put into production. In 1989 they were acquired by the Seashore Trolley Museum in Kennebunkport, Maine, where you can see them today.

Did you know that plans for the IND’s Jamaica – 179th Street Station date all the way back to 1928? Opened in December o...
07/11/2020

Did you know that plans for the IND’s Jamaica – 179th Street Station date all the way back to 1928? Opened in December of 1950 on the Queens Boulevard line, the IND originally planned to extend the line only up to 169th Street in 1937. However, the 169th Street station’s structure did not provide as a good terminus for a four-track line and an extension was deemed necessary. After delays and changes, construction of the Jamaica – 179th Street station began with a ground-breaking ceremony in 1947 and was completed in 1950. In the 1980s, the station received a major renovation, including the replacement of its IND-styled purple tiling with blue and orange stripes.

Taken in 1990, this #NYTMCollection photograph shows transit workers installing electronic signage in the IND’s 179th Street station. Since its 1980s renovation, the station received continuous modernization and is served by the F train at all times.

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1905, the IRT Lexington Avenue Line was extended south to the Bowling Green station. At t...
07/10/2020

#TodayinHistory: #OnThisDay in 1905, the IRT Lexington Avenue Line was extended south to the Bowling Green station. At the time, there was no IRT service in Brooklyn, so all Downtown bound trains on the line terminated at South Ferry. In 1908, the Joralemon Street Tunnel opened, and a second island platform was soon constructed at Bowling Green along with a third track. Once they were completed, all rush-hour trains provided service to Brooklyn, with a two-car Bowling Green – South Ferry Shuttle train.

The Bowling Green – South Ferry shuttle service continued to operate until 1977, when it was discontinued due to budget cuts. Shortly after the shuttle service was terminated, Bowling Green went through renovations, where it lost one island platform on the western side of the station and gained a side platform to the east.

Do you remember the Bowling Green – South Ferry Shuttle service?

Virtual Summer Camp classes begin on Monday! In our first-ever online summer camp programs, transit-obsessed kids can se...
07/10/2020
Virtual Summer Camp - New York Transit Museum

Virtual Summer Camp classes begin on Monday! In our first-ever online summer camp programs, transit-obsessed kids can see the Museum’s vintage train cars, dive into stories about important historical figures, examine photographs from the Museum’s collections, and make art and science projects right at home.

Classes are $10 per child - sign up for one class or join us for the whole week! Learn more at nytransitmuseum.org/SummerCamp.

Join the Transit Museum for a week of virtual summer fun and explore the stories that photographs can tell about public transit and New York City. Read more ›

07/09/2020
Transit Tots - Thursday, July 9th, 2020

Have you ever seen art that lights up? Explore some examples of art that uses light in the New York subway system in today's Transit Tots, and then learn how to make your own light art at home.

📢  Spread the word! Six new puzzles have been added to our Puzzles & Games collection at the NYTM Store! Ranging from 50...
07/08/2020

📢 Spread the word! Six new puzzles have been added to our Puzzles & Games collection at the NYTM Store! Ranging from 500 to 1,000 pieces, each colorful puzzle features a vibrant #MTAArts poster design.

Available for purchase online at nytransitmuseumstore.com/kids/toys-trains/puzzles-games.html.

Calling all puzzle fans! New York Transit Museum has six new jigsaw puzzles featuring #MTAArts posters by artists Ebony Bolt, Jasu Hu, Yuko Shimizu, Yohey Horish*ta, Megan Berkheiser and Mike Caldwell, and Philippe Lechien. Available through the NYTM online store: https://www.nytransitmuseumstore.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=Puzzle

In May of 1955, the main portion of the Third Avenue Elevated line closed from Chatham Square all the way to East 149th ...
07/08/2020

In May of 1955, the main portion of the Third Avenue Elevated line closed from Chatham Square all the way to East 149th Street in the Bronx, ending elevated line service in Manhattan. First operated by the New York Elevated Railway, and later acquired by the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT), the original segment of the line opened from South Ferry to Grand Central Depot in August of 1878. This #NYTMCollection artifact is a glass sign from the 14th Street station, part of the first and main portion on the Third Avenue Elevated.

Dating back to 1880, the 14th Street sign features Bohemian-styled blue glass, acid cut back to clear and matte glass, with its original wooden frame and hardware for hanging. How does this sign differ from our present-day subway signage?

Join us for our first ever #TransitTrivia Summer League and test your knowledge of all things NYC transit! You’ll have f...
07/07/2020

Join us for our first ever #TransitTrivia Summer League and test your knowledge of all things NYC transit! You’ll have four chances to join the fun - sign up for one, a few, or all four dates to be in the running to be crowned League champions!

Every Tuesday at 6pm between July 21st and August 14th, we’ll offer some straight-up NYC transit Q&A, along with a special variety round – music, movies, photos, games and puzzles, all on a transit theme. Plus, each installment will offer the chance to boost your score by correctly identifying a mystery object – there will be clues along the way, and a reveal from one of our amazing archivists just before we announce the evening’s results. Each night will be a contest unto itself, but the team with the best score after all four rounds will be crowned champions of our first-ever Transit Trivia Summer League!

Tickets at nytransitmuseum.org/TransitTriviaSummerLeague1.

07/07/2020
Transit Tots - Tuesday, July 7th, 2020

Have you ever heard of a place called Redbird Reef? In today's Transit Tots, meet our underwater friends Cecil and Fiona and hear the story of some retired subway cars that found themselves in a very unexpected place. Then, sing and dance along with a classic transit tune!

On December 28th, 1906, the BMT Canarsie line opened between Atlantic Avenue and Rockaway Parkway. The six stations – At...
07/07/2020

On December 28th, 1906, the BMT Canarsie line opened between Atlantic Avenue and Rockaway Parkway. The six stations – Atlantic Avenue, Sutter Avenue, Livonia Avenue, New Lots Avenue, East 105th Street, and Rockaway Parkway – make up the oldest segment of the BMT Canarsie line, which originated as a steam railroad connecting Canarsie Pier and East New York.

These #NYTMCollection photographs show construction on a later portion of the BMT Canarsie line in the 1920s.

On December 28th, 1906, the BMT Canarsie line opened between Atlantic Avenue and Rockaway Parkway. The six stations – At...
07/07/2020

On December 28th, 1906, the BMT Canarsie line opened between Atlantic Avenue and Rockaway Parkway. The six stations – Atlantic Avenue, Sutter Avenue, Livonia Avenue, New Lots Avenue, East 105th Street, and Rockaway Parkway – make up the oldest segment of the BMT Canarsie line, which originated as a steam railroad connecting Canarsie Pier and East New York.

These #NYTMCollection photographs show construction on a later portion of the BMT Canarsie line in the 1920s.

Taken by subway construction photographer Granville W. Pullis, this #NYTMCollection photograph depicts the 170th Street ...
07/06/2020

Taken by subway construction photographer Granville W. Pullis, this #NYTMCollection photograph depicts the 170th Street Public Market in 1929. Only a few blocks away from the Grand Concourse in the Bronx, the 170th Street Market was a gathering place for neighborhood residents. Pictured on the right of the market, Friedhoffer’s bakery was a popular store that survived into the 1970s; their bread was baked on the premises several times a day.

Photographers documenting New York City subway construction often photographed entire blocks to document the conditions of the roads and sidewalks, and to identify and document local businesses, such as the 170th Street Public Market and Friedhoffer’s bakery.

Opened in July 1919, the 49th Street station was originally constructed in a similar style to other stations along the B...
07/06/2020

Opened in July 1919, the 49th Street station was originally constructed in a similar style to other stations along the BMT Broadway line. However, the station received an experimental renovation of new red glazed tiling, terrazzo flooring, and sound proofing ceilings in 1973. After more recent renovations, only one entrance/exit remains with the red glazed tiling at 47th Street station on the southbound platform.

This #NYTMCollection photograph shows two commuters viewing the Vignelli map at the BMT 49th Street station in the 1970s. What’s your favorite feature of this station?

When the subway system was unified in 1940, few steps were taken to streamline the jumble of signs that occurred when th...
07/05/2020

When the subway system was unified in 1940, few steps were taken to streamline the jumble of signs that occurred when the three separate operating companies became one, and later when service changes occurred. To address the growing confusion, the design firm Unimark was hired in 1967 to improve the New York Transit Authority’s wayfinding and signage.

Part of Unimark’s plan was to use only one typeface across all signage, called Standard (also known as Akzidenz Grotesk). Standard originated in the late 19th century, and its lack of ornamentation made it a good choice for easily readable information at a variety of sizes and distances.

As more digital signmaking tools adopted the similar-looking Helvetica as the replacement for Standard, it became more difficult for the MTA to continue its use. In 1989, Helvetica became the official typeface for the New York City Subway.

NYPL The New York Public Library, Brooklyn Public Library, & Queens Public Library cardholders are invited to join Associate Curator Jodi Shapiro for an exclusive digital discussion exploring the evolution of New York City transit signage this Wednesday! Check out our upcoming discussions at nytransitmuseum.org/programs and RSVP now.

It’s our birthday! #OnThisDay in 1976, a group of New York City Transit employees opened the New York City Transit Exhib...
07/04/2020

It’s our birthday! #OnThisDay in 1976, a group of New York City Transit employees opened the New York City Transit Exhibition, as a part of the United States Bicentennial celebrations. Over fifteen different vintage subway and elevated cars, and a variety of exhibits dedicated to the rich and sprawling history of mass transit in New York were displayed in our beloved Court Street station that had been decommissioned 30 years earlier. The exhibit was only intended to last a few months but proved to be so popular that its run was continually extended.

In 1989, the Transit Exhibit was officially established as the New York Transit Museum, and in 1995 Friends of the New York Transit Museum, a 501c3 non-profit organization was established to promote and raise funds for the Museum’s operations, exhibits, and programming. As we mark our 44th Anniversary, we know it would not have been possible without the support of you – our visitors, who turned a temporary exhibition into the thriving cultural institution we are today.

What is your favorite memory made at the #NYTransitMuseum?

Opened in 1885, the BMT Jamaica line includes the former BMT Lexington Avenue line between Gates Avenue and Van Siclen A...
07/03/2020

Opened in 1885, the BMT Jamaica line includes the former BMT Lexington Avenue line between Gates Avenue and Van Siclen Avenue, the oldest elevated structure remaining in the #NYCsubway system. Originally operating from Broadway Ferry in Williamsburg, Brooklyn to 168th Street in Jamaica, Queens, the Broadway Ferry and Driggs Avenue stations were closed in 1916 and later demolished. In December of 1988, another section of the line was demolished between the Metropolitan Avenue and 168th Street stations, during the IND Queens Boulevard line’s arrival. Today, the line remains in use between Marcy Avenue and 121st Street, serving the J and Z trains, along with M trains west of Myrtle Avenue.

Taken by Ralph Curcio, this #NYTMCollection photograph depicts the former 168th Street Station in 1976. This photograph, amongst many from the Ralph Curcio Collection, documents stations that have since been demolished or extensively rehabilitated. Which stations do you remember from the demolished portion of the BMT Jamaica line?

Address

99 Schermerhorn Street
Brooklyn, NY
11201

Located at 99 Schermerhorn Street Brooklyn, NY 11201, and accessible by over 20 subway and bus lines.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(718) 694-1600

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About the New York Transit Museum

Found in 1976, the New York Transit Museum is one of only a few museums in the world dedicated to telling the story of urban public transportation. The Museum collects, exhibits, interprets, and preserves the history, sociology, and technology of public transportation systems in the New York metropolitan region, and conducts research and educational programs that make our extensive collections accessible and meaningful to a broad audience.

The Transit Museum is committed to preserving the stories of the people behind transportation – the extraordinary engineers, the workers who labored in the tunnels over 100 years ago, the communities that were drastically transformed, and the ever-evolving technology, design, and ridership of a system that runs 24 hours a day, every day of the year.

Housed underground in an authentic 1936 subway station in Downtown Brooklyn, the Transit Museum’s main location spans a full city block, with a working platform that is home to a rotating selection of twenty vintage subway and elevated cars dating back to the early 1900s. Between our main location and our Gallery at Grand Central Terminal, the Transit Museum welcomes more than half a million visitors every year.

Transit Museum visitors can explore the vintage cars, sit at the wheel of a city bus, step through a time tunnel of turnstiles, and explore changing exhibits that highlight the cultural, social and technological history — and future — of mass transit.

The New York Transit Museum was established in 1976 as an initiative of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA). Friends of the New York Transit Museum, a 501c3 not-for-profit organization, was established in 1995 to promote and raise funds for the Museum’s operations and programs.

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Comments

we have reviewed your museum on our international portal, which talks about museums.
I used to stand at the ENY LIRR Station and think about all of the rail and road structures above and below me including Broadway Junction. I wonder if anyone has a drawing or drawings showing all the rail lines in elevation from the deepest underground (LIRR Bay Ridge line, I think) to the highest elevated subway. If not, I think it would be a great project.
N train r68
N train r68
I REALLY GOTTA GI TO THE TRANSIT MUSEUM FOLKS.
Will there be a parade of trains this year?
Nice job on the GCT online exhibit. Though I was surprised to hear that ESA will now open (maybe) in 2023, not 2022. FYI, I was a member of the ESA Citizens Task Force back in 1996, and at the time, LIRR officials took many of us on a tour of the LIRR tube for ESA from the Queens end. You could hear the subway line running above us at the time. Back then, I figured, ok, maybe 10 years for ESA!😔
** COVID DATA -- SPREAD ON PUBLIC TRANSPORT ** According to the data COVID cases follow along: - Subway Routes - NJ Transit Lines - Long Island Rail Road / Metro North - Amtrak Cases seem to decrease at end of transit lines. = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = -Source 1: https://coronavirus.health.ny.gov/county-county-breakdown-positive-cases -Source 2: https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/Coronavirus/CTDPHCOVID19summary3262020.pdf?la=en -Source 3: https://projects.nj.com/coronavirus-tracker/assets/data/counts.json -Source 4: https://www.wgal.com/…/coronavirus-covid19-in-penn…/31924015# -Data Tools: Python, Tableau #COVID #COVID19 #CoronaVirus #AstoriaVirus #Corona #MTA #Subway #LIRR #NJTransit #Amtrak #Tableau #TheTruth #Cuomo #WashYourHands #NewRochelle #NY #NYC #Westchester #Bronx
NY Transit Museum doing digital slide talks, not quite a podcast, not actually a video. Polly Desjarlais is terrific talking about Jennings and early civil rights activism on transportation.😀
How can I buy a print of Moonlight Madness. I’m a native New Yorker living in Arizona.
N Train R68A
N Train R68A