Bristol Historical Society

Bristol Historical Society Bristol Historical Society The mission of the Bristol Historical Society is to promote an interest in local history and encourage an appreciation for its importance.

The Bristol Historical Society collects, preserves, and interprets significant historical resources to enhance the present community and provide a historical context for future growth.

Operating as usual

UPDATE: The owner has been found! Are you missing two dogs around Summer Street and Center Street? These nice neighbors ...
11/18/2021

UPDATE: The owner has been found!

Are you missing two dogs around Summer Street and Center Street? These nice neighbors are trying to find their owners. Reach them at 860-609-7499 for more information. There very cute and seem well taken care of, so please share and help them get back home.

UPDATE: The owner has been found!

Are you missing two dogs around Summer Street and Center Street? These nice neighbors are trying to find their owners. Reach them at 860-609-7499 for more information. There very cute and seem well taken care of, so please share and help them get back home.

Here is the map for the Time Frames of Bristol project!
10/30/2021

Here is the map for the Time Frames of Bristol project!

Here is the map for the Time Frames of Bristol project!

The annual "Evening on the Hill Auction" is THIS Saturday, October 23, at 98 Summer Street, Bristol.This lively evening ...
10/20/2021

The annual "Evening on the Hill Auction" is THIS Saturday, October 23, at 98 Summer Street, Bristol.

This lively evening features an auction preview and tea cup raffle that begins at 5:30 pm while guests enjoy wine, soft drinks, and finger foods.

The live auction includes collectibles, art, furniture, antiques, and the occasional fun/eclectic item; bidding begins at 7 pm. Professional auctioneer, Paul Stansel, keeps the bidding entertaining.

Advance tickets are $12 on Saturday 10-2; $15 at the door. Masks will be required for the event.

View the photos to see our wide variety of items that include Madame Alexander and Kewpie dolls, Lionel trains, Brooklyn Dodgers collectibles, and many other intriguing items! (More photos will be posted soon!)

Please join us for this event – it’s always a tremendous amount of fun and an important fundraiser for our organization.

We recently came across this 1930 pic and we would appreciate some more info about it.  (Bob Montgomery recently include...
10/18/2021

We recently came across this 1930 pic and we would appreciate some more info about it. (Bob Montgomery recently included it as a "History Mystery" in the Bristol Press.)

We believe that "FAC" stood for Forestville Athletic Club. The player in the bottom row, second from right, has been identified as Lou Nocera. Do you remember this basketball team or any of the others pictured?

Thanks!!

Tomorrow! Celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Veterans Memorial Boulevard. Saturday, October 16th from 1pm-5pm on the bou...
10/16/2021

Tomorrow! Celebrate the 100th Anniversary of Veterans Memorial Boulevard. Saturday, October 16th from 1pm-5pm on the boulevard. Opening ceremony starts at 1pm!

A special program "Serving in the Middle East: Perspectives from Those Who Were There" will be presented by Memorial Mil...
10/08/2021

A special program "Serving in the Middle East: Perspectives from Those Who Were There" will be presented by Memorial Military Museum on Sat, Nov 13th at 2pm at the Bristol Public Library, 5 High Street, Bristol, CT, RSVP by contacting the library.

The Memorial Military Museum and the Bristol Public Library special event happening this November. See all the details in the flier below and mark your calendars!

Emily, another junior historian sleuth, enjoyed our (self-guided) Scavenger Hunt the other day!  Forms are available at ...
10/05/2021

Emily, another junior historian sleuth, enjoyed our (self-guided) Scavenger Hunt the other day!

Forms are available at the children's departments of either Bristol library, the Historical Society, the Torrington Savings Bank branch on Rt. 6, the Boys and Girls Club, or downloaded at our webpage here:

https://bristolhistoricalsociety.org/event/bristol-historical-society-childrens-scavenger-hunt/?fbclid=IwAR2hWGowF-f30kt_UBV9FuUJOx3h1cAoYiX0mkLsCqlvw0ATxUmeU-xsKw0

Emily, another junior historian sleuth, enjoyed our (self-guided) Scavenger Hunt the other day!

Forms are available at the children's departments of either Bristol library, the Historical Society, the Torrington Savings Bank branch on Rt. 6, the Boys and Girls Club, or downloaded at our webpage here:

https://bristolhistoricalsociety.org/event/bristol-historical-society-childrens-scavenger-hunt/?fbclid=IwAR2hWGowF-f30kt_UBV9FuUJOx3h1cAoYiX0mkLsCqlvw0ATxUmeU-xsKw0

Don't miss out!  Take the childrens' walking and/or driving scavenger hunt--no matter what your age is!
10/03/2021

Don't miss out! Take the childrens' walking and/or driving scavenger hunt--no matter what your age is!

Carol Denehy and great-grandchild Charlotte enjoyed a fall afternoon on Federal Hill as they tried out the Bristol Historical Society's Scavenger Hunt.

Article #9CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONBeginning in January, the eight monthly articles commemorating the Centennial Anniversar...
10/01/2021

Article #9

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION

Beginning in January, the eight monthly articles commemorating the Centennial Anniversary of the Veterans Memorial Boulevard were initiated with the founding of the Downs Grist Mill in 1749. Little did the first settlers within our community realize that the land they were using, as the lifeblood of a fledgling community, would eventually become the eastern gateway of the stately Veterans Memorial Boulevard. The mill was taken down in 1921, so that the eastern end of the boulevard could be completed.

In 1919, Albert F. Rockwell, a true city benefactor, quit claimed to the city, for one dollar, land on South Street for the building of a new high school and the construction of what would become the Veterans Memorial Boulevard. He provided extensive financial support, as well as lending his management leadership to both projects. The Memorial Boulevard was dedicated on Armistice Day, November 21, 1921. The new Bristol High School opened in September of 1922.

The fourth article detailed the planning, construction, dedication, and festivities surrounding the Soldiers’ Memorial Monument, later to become known as the World War I Monument. This memorial was designed by Bristol architect Lieutenant Harold A. Hayden, who had served overseas during the war. Located at the intersection of Mellon Street and the boulevard, the dedication pageantry was held on Seicheprey Day, April 19, 1924.

Articles five through seven provided a description of The Veterans Memorial Park, which was dedicated on Memorial Day ,1973. This beautifully landscaped area is one of the largest war tribute parks in the country. A detailed description of all the monuments and memorials was included. The southern side, known as the Memorial Side, is dedicated to those soldiers who died while serving. The Commemorative Side, the northern section adjacent to the Pequabuck River, honors all men and women who have entered our country’s military service since colonial times.

Article eight, entitled “What and Why War”, is named for a poem written by my mother, Cecelia Elizabeth Carroll Dickau. The poem describes from a child’s perspective the significance that war has in the lives of individuals and families, even at a young age.

The trauma of war reaches far back into the fabric of our families, community and country. It is through this lens that the true significance of the Veterans Memorial Boulevard and Park should be viewed. Five significant wars and/or conflicts in which Bristol military service were required illustrated how family and community were affected: The Revolutionary War; the Civil War; World War I; World War II and the Vietnam War. Many soldiers returned with emotional or physical injuries which will be experienced for the the remainder of their lives.

The Veterans Memorial Boulevard and Park are certainly about the dedication and valor of our community’s soldiers, but it also concerns the emotions and involvement of families, as well as the concerned generous spirit of our community, sacrificing and giving so that the freedom we cherish can be maintained.

Editorial note: While writing this series of articles, I have conversed with many individuals and families that have suffered through the trauma of war. Some of the discussions centered as far back to relatives lost during World War I. I have been deeply moved by their emotions and feelings and have personally acquired a greater sense of appreciation for the significance of the Veterans Memorial Boulevard and Park.

Whether engaged in combat; losing a friend or loved one during battle; interacting with the emotionally or physically scarred returnees; being employed in war production industrial efforts; sacrificing during rationing; buying or selling war bonds or stamps or serving other war needs, most city residents have felt the presence of war during their lifetime.

On Saturday October 16 (rain date October 17) from 1:00pm to 5:00pm, the City of Bristol, its Parks, Recreation, Youth & Community Services Department, the Bristol Historical Society, along with the Bristol Veterans Council, Memorial Military Museum, and many volunteers are collaboratively presenting a Centennial Anniversary Program of the Veterans Memorial Boulevard (1921 – 2021) on site. This is a time for all to honor those that have unselfishly served our country! It is also an opportunity to expand our appreciation and knowledge of the Veterans Memorial Boulevard and Park. Children’s activities are planned, and it will be a wonderful opportunity to educate our youth regarding the sacrifice made to preserve their freedom.

The program will include musical performances; in depth presentations of each memorial describing its significance; a children’s scavenger hunt; the opportunity to meet and talk with a reenactor of Albert F. Rockwell, as well as to learn about the development of the Memorial Boulevard Intradistrict Magnet School. There will be autos from the The Bristol Auto Club from the 1920’s to the present enhancing the historical timeline. More detailed information will be published prior to the celebration. A special thank you to Michael Schroeder and James Drzewiecki of the The Bristol Press for publishing these articles leading up to the park’s Centennial Celebration.

The Bristol Historical Society will also be selling their Annual Holiday ornament, which depicts the 100th Anniversary of the Veterans Memorial Boulevard. The ornaments sell for $15, and can also be purchased at City True Value on Farmington Avenue.

Also keep an eye out for commemorative postcards that will be sold by the Parks, Recreation, Youth & Community Services Department in celebration of the Centennial. The four postcards were designed by the Parks Events Committee Chair and local artist, Paula O'Keefe.

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In October, the City of Bristol, its Bristol Parks, Recreation, Youth and Community Services, and the Bristol Historical Society, along with the Bristol Veterans Council, Memorial Military Museum, and the extended community plan to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of the Memorial Boulevard which opened in 1921. The following is the ninth article in a monthly series written by Tom Dickau commemorating the centennial anniversary of the park by depicting the history behind the land, people, and events that helped shape it into the park Bristol treasures today.

In conjunction with next year’s Mum Festival, the Bristol Historical Society will be sponsoring a photography contest. D...
09/24/2021

In conjunction with next year’s Mum Festival, the Bristol Historical Society will be sponsoring a photography contest.

Details will follow, but as you take photos this weekend, be aware that one category for competition in 2022 will be photographs of the 2021 Mum Festival!

In conjunction with next year’s Mum Festival, the Bristol Historical Society will be sponsoring a photography contest.

Details will follow, but as you take photos this weekend, be aware that one category for competition in 2022 will be photographs of the 2021 Mum Festival!

The Time Frames of Bristol project is starting to go up! More to come on this amazing public arts project in conjunction...
09/22/2021

The Time Frames of Bristol project is starting to go up! More to come on this amazing public arts project in conjunction with the Bristol Arts and Culture Commission. (Also, a huge shout out to Lindsay Vigue herself and the guys from Public Works, who tackled this first batch in the morning drizzle!)

Photos from Bristol Historical Society's post
09/17/2021

Photos from Bristol Historical Society's post

Article 8/12WHAT AND WHY IS WAR?The first of seven articles written in celebration of the Centennial Anniversary of the ...
08/25/2021

Article 8/12

WHAT AND WHY IS WAR?

The first of seven articles written in celebration of the Centennial Anniversary of the Veterans Memorial Boulevard was initiated with the building of the Downs Grist Mill in the middle of the eighteenth century. Little did the first settlers of our community recognize that the land on which they built this facility, as the lifeblood of a developing community, would eventually become the eastern gateway to the Veterans Memorial Boulevard. A new and elegant gateway is now being constructed on the very land where the gristmill once stood.

In 1919, Albert F. Rockwell, industrialist, and city benefactor, contributed land and financial resources to the city, with the vision of creating a majestic boulevard and a more comprehensive high school. The Veterans Memorial Boulevard was officially dedicated on Armistice Day, November 11, 1921. The high school opened in September 1922.

On Seicheprey Day, April 19, 1924, a Soldiers’ Monument at the intersection of the boulevard and Mellon Street was dedicated. This memorial is now known as the World War I Monument. A detailed description of the dedication ceremony and monument was included.

On Memorial Day, 1973 the Veterans Memorial Park was officially dedicated. This beautifully landscaped park is one of the largest war tribute parks within our country.

The two distinct sides of this park were described with details describing each monument or memorial. The Memorial Side, on the south side of the boulevard, beginning with the Revolutionary War, is dedicated to those who died during service. The Commemorative Side on the boulevard’s north side, next to the Pequabuck River, honors all who served since colonial times

WHAT AND WHY IS WAR?

(Editorial Note) This article, the eighth in the series, will conclude with a poem written by my mother, Cecelia Elizabeth Carroll Dickau. It describes from a child’s perspective the significance, even at a young age, that war has on individuals and families.

The Veterans Memorial Boulevard, as well as the memorials and monuments located within the Veteran Memorial Park have been described in detail within previous articles. These are the brick-and-mortar aspects associated with the remembrance and recognition of the valor and service of our military personnel throughout the years. Wars and conflicts are not only about city residents being away from their homes fighting in distant lands, but also encompass our entire society.

Whether for political ideology; economic or territorial gains; revolt against a ruling authority or tyranny; maintenance of dignity, freedom, or human rights, or for a variety of other reasons, the trauma of war reaches back into the very fabric of our families, communities, and country. It is through this lens that the true significance of the Veterans Memorial Boulevard and Park should be viewed.

Five significant wars and/or conflicts in which Bristol’s military service were required will be utilized to illustrate how local families and our community were involved and affected.

THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

Bristol became an official town in 1785. Prior to that time, two major religions with differing beliefs, the Congregationalist, and the Episcopalians, harmoniously co-existed on Federal Hill. When the independence movement to separate from England began, the peaceful relationship between the two religions came to an abrupt and violent end. Family members often had differing religious affiliations, which pitted them against other family members. As in all wars, each side felt it was justified in its position and was willing to aggressively support their beliefs. The Episcopalians, known as Tories or Loyalists, supported the British King and the Church of England, while the Congregationalists desired a complete separation from both. Being the larger of the two churches, its members vilified, persecuted, punished and physically assaulted the Loyalists. Being afraid for their lives, they fled to the Chippens Hill area, often utilizing a well-hidden cave, later known as Tory’s Den, as a safe haven. The Episcopal Church would not return to Bristol until 1834.

The Federal Hill Green was utilized as a military training ground during these times. Several community residents were killed during the War of Independence, while others died of illnesses while serving.

At age eighteen, Moses Dunbar and his wife, Phoebe Jerome, left the Congregational Church to become Episcopalians. His father totally disowned him at this time. He was later captured as a Loyalist spy and was found guilty of treason. He was hanged on the site of today’s Trinity College. Residing in the eventual Bristol area, he was the only Connecticut resident to be executed for this crime.

Even before becoming the town of Bristol, our community felt the physical and emotional trauma of war.

THE CIVIL WAR

Whether viewed from the cultural or moral issue of slavery as an institution; from the perspective of slavery as an economic necessity or from the perspective of the federal government exerting undue control over the states, our nation faced a crossroad from 1861 – 1865 during the Civil War. The unity of our country was being challenged.

Similar to the Revolutionary War, and all wars, both the Union and Confederate sides felt a justification for defending their position. Local families were once again rifted with fathers, sons and brothers fighting against each other, because they held opposing beliefs.

It should be recognized that rich Connecticut and Bristol residents also owned slaves, utilized mainly as household servants. This included Samuel Newell, the first pastor of the Congregational Church, and landowner William Jerome, who owned several slaves. Although treated better than their Southern counterparts, they were never-the-less sold and traded as economic commodities. Many local residents were against the war, fearing a loss of slave service and their monetary value. Those opposed to the war were known as copperheads. Clock maker Elisha N. Welch, a copperhead and Bristol’s first millionaire, was opposed to the war feeling it would devastate his southern clock market.

For these reasons, city residents often held conflicting views, causing a great deal of friction within the community.

Fifty-four residents of our community were killed, others died in prisoner camps, and many returned with traumatic physical and mental issues. Forestville resident and Commander of Company K of the Sixteenth Connecticut Volunteer Regiment, Newton S. Manross, was killed in the deadly Battle of Antietam during his first military action. This company was comprised mainly of Bristol/Forestville citizens.

The War Between the States once again shows the depth and feelings of the community involvement away from the battlefield.

WORLD WAR I

World War I, originally named, “The war to end all wars”, certainly did not fulfill its optimistic premise. However, this war did lay a foundation for future growth within the city. The contribution of our community’s immigrant population, previously considered socially, politically, and intellectually inferior by the Yankee aristocratic members of the city, was of necessity recognized. Fighting next to each other, with their lives dependent on one another through communication and cooperation, relationships developed. When returning from war the immigrants became more fully assimilated within the city.

World War I also brought about a new approach to an organized military, as well as a systematic community involvement to assist families and military personnel. Recognizing the myriad facets associated with war, residents willingly donated time, money, and labor.

Selective Service Systems were organized around the country. This would end the haphazard volunteering used during the War Between the States. Bristol, knowing that this system was being developed, laid previous groundwork. A Draft Board was quickly organized, which held its first obligatory registration day on June 5, 1917. This would become an annual event. Candidates were summoned for physical examinations which were held at the Armory (Redmen’s Hall) on Prospect Street and later at the high school on Summer Street. Qualified men were assigned a number by the draft board and would be inducted by a lottery number system conducted in Washington D.C. Enlisted men generally disembarked from the Bristol Railroad Station. The mayor, members of the Red Cross and other personnel were there to see them off. This became a weekly occurrence.

Many city residents were unable to serve for a variety of reasons: women were excluded, many men were beyond military age; some were involved in essential industries; physical limitations disqualified others and men were often exempt due to family needs or responsibilities. These thousands of Bristol residents contributed in a variety of ways to the war effort.

Factories transitioned to war production needs. This created an abundance of employment opportunities, which paid abnormally high wages. Women joined the work force. Men and women often worked extended hours to meet war quotas.

The Bristol Chapter of the American Red Cross solicited female volunteers to knit clothing, hospital gowns, bandages, and other supplies. These volunteers also raised funds for the war effort. A Home Service Section was established. They assisted families to secure food and other necessities. They also assisted in writing letters and sending them off to the soldiers. They also helped to complete any paperwork connected with the war, such as securing medical or death benefits.

The War Savings Committee involved the entire community by conducting four Liberty Loan Drives, as well as a Victory Loan Program. National quotas were set for each community. Through the generosity of city residents, Bristol nearly doubled their requested amounts and contributed over five million dollars.

The entire community became involved in war rationing. Housewives signed self-denying pledge cards indicating they would not use products essential for war. They also limited the use of sugar, flour, pork, fats, and fuel. Special days were observed throughout the city: gasless Sunday, heatless Monday (factories, stores and offices were ordered closed), wheatless Tuesday, meatless Wednesday, and pork¬-less Saturday. Cultivation of land was used for private gardens.

Miscellaneous activities also supported the war. The Bristol Public Library joined a National Book Campaign and sent thousands of books and periodicals overseas. The Bristol Press and a variety of factory newsletters published soldiers’ letters back home. Every week, at all city theaters and at loan rallies, Four-Minute Speakers, only permitted four minutes but well-scripted, would address attendees regarding the war and solicit funds or items as needed.

Yes, indeed, the entire city contributed to the war’s success!

WORLD WAR II

During World War II, many of the programs utilized during the First World War were implemented. The entire City of Bristol once again mobilized to assist the cause.

Industry transitioned to war production needs. Women played an even greater role than during WWI.

School children, boys and girls scouts, boys’ and girls’ club members and newspaper carriers delivered messages and purchased war stamps and bonds. They also assisted in the salvage collection of materials needed by the armed forces: paper, aluminum, other metals, fat, rubber and used clothing. Churches and civic and fraternal organizations assisted in these activities, as well as providing significant funding. Some children and young adults served as enemy aircraft spotters on Chippens Hill.

Farmers attempted to increase production, growing crops needed by the military. Public gardens were provided at no expense to families to grow food for their own consumption.

Strict rationing regulations were implemented. Items such as sugar, gasoline, tires, automobiles and designated foods were extremely scarce. Families needed to contribute in this manner.

The entire community was subjected to and had to endure long periods of nightly black-outs and mock air raid drills.

The Bristol Chapter of the American Red Cross and the Bristol Hospital jointly sponsored nurse’s aide training classes in the event of local emergencies. Female volunteers continued to make bandages, gauze, hospital gowns and other necessities. The Red Cross also conducted emergency blood banks.

Housing developments were constructed quickly to accommodate the influx of industrial workers and the eventual return of soldiers.

Attacked on our own soil, the very existence of our country was jeopardized. In addition to the soldiers that left our community to preserve our freedom, the entire City of Bristol rallied to insure our country’s victory.

VIETNAM WAR

The Vietnam War, lasting nearly a decade, was the longest war to that time in which our country ever engaged. This was a highly divisive conflict with strong opposition and many protests occurring! Some resented the war on moral and ethical grounds, citing the violence and devastation that would transpire. Others reasoned that our country was inserting itself into another nation’s civil war. The third, and probably the most accurate premise, was that the war lacked a clear objective and appeared to be unwinnable!

Bristol, as always, answered the call of duty, sending its residents into service. Seventeen local soldiers died during this conflict, with over 58,000 United States citizens offering the supreme sacrifice!

Editorial note: The author of this article had a friend die in Vietnam; another was strongly affected by the Agent Orange defoliation chemicals; and a third committed su***de after returning. This is the trauma of war!

Our community, like all U.S. communities, had ambivalent feelings regarding our involvement. The length of the war perhaps diminished its significance in the minds of people as they continued with their daily lives. It was over there, far away from us! Unless directly affected, some lost their connection with the war’s significance!

When soldiers arrived home, at a variety of times due to the war’s longevity, there was little reaction to their return. Some felt they were treated poorly, even held accountable, as if they caused the war. There were no Welcome Home Parades or support that our heroes had received when returning from WWII!

Many soldiers returned with emotional and physical injuries and will carry these scars for the remainder of their lives. Many suffered Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), having lived 24/7 with survival hopes, while also witnessing the atrocities of combat! Anxiety, anger, shame and even guilt oftentimes still permeate the daily lives of many Vietnam veterans, many who will never share or
discuss their involvement. Our community and nation owe these veterans a major debt of gratitude!

THE VETERANS MEMORIAL BOULEVARD AND PARK - ITS MEANING TO OUR CITY

Our community must truly understand the significance of war on our soldiers, families, and community during the past and present times. The Veterans Memorial Boulevard and Park are certainly about the dedication and valor of soldiers, but also concerns family involvement and emotions, as well as the concerned, generous spirit of our community willing to sacrifice so that the freedom we cherish can be maintained and perhaps be shared by others around the world.

WHAT AND WHY IS WAR?

The following poem written by my mother, Cecelia Elizabeth Carroll Dickau, shows the subtle but meaningful impact war can have on family and children. My very first childhood memory, indelibly etched, is that my father would not be home to celebrate my birthday. I am the baby in the carriage. My brothers, Ed and Art have their faces pressed against the windowpane.

Two wistful faces pressed against the pane,
Waiting for their Daddy, to come home again.
Baby is in his carriage, he smiles and coos,
When he is quiet, we know he’s lonesome too.
For Daddy is a soldier, and Mommy says he will make it right,
So, when we are big boys, we won’t have to fight.
Mommy takes good care of us, and smiles on us at play,
She sees that we are alright, each day that you are away.
When it comes to airplanes and our electric trains,
Somehow Daddy, things don’t seem quite the same.
Though we love our Mommy, because she is good and true,
Soon, if we are good boys, can’t we have our Daddy too?
Perhaps it would be easier for little boys to be good,
If someone would explain things, in words we understood.
I guess it is pretty hard to tell boys, who are not yet four,
The answer to their question, “What and Why is War?”

—Cecelia Elizabeth Carroll

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This coming October, the City of Bristol, its Bristol Parks, Recreation, Youth and Community Services, and the Bristol Historical Society, along with the Bristol Veterans Council, Memorial Military Museum, and the extended community plan to celebrate the one hundredth anniversary of the Memorial Boulevard which opened in 1921. The following is the eighth article in a monthly series written by Tom Dickau commemorating the centennial anniversary of the park by depicting the history behind the land, people, and events that helped shape it into the park Bristol treasures today.

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Address

98 Summer St
Bristol, CT
06010-5051

Opening Hours

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Saturday 10am - 2pm

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(860) 583-6309

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Comments

I have been sending emails to various people at the Historical Society trying to find out about and book a slot for the Christmas Fair. I do not know if something with my email is putting them into junk at your end but I have sent 4 messages, but as yet I have not received one reply which is not like you.. Please can you send information either her via Facebook or my email is [email protected] Hope to hear from you soon.... Barry Eva
Hello again friends - I'm wondering if anyone has seen the portrait of Seth Greene recently. Ellie mentioned that y'all came across it back in the spring when changing over some exhibits. It apparently has his name on the back, and it's not currently on display. I'd be thrilled to just see a picture of it. I recently received several documents of his that my grandmother kept, including several appointments from the US Postmaster General and an 1876 letter agreement to get the foundation dug for my grandparents house at 241 Central :) Thanks in advance!
I understand that the portrait of Bristol's past postmaster Seth Greene is safely at the BHS - fantastic! I imagine that portrait might be the one that my grandmother Madeleine McKnight had at her house, and she would most certainly have wanted the BHS to have it if she didn't donate it herself. I would love to have a good picture of it - next time someone is there with a good phone camera I'd be hugely grateful. I don't remember at all what he looked like, and the era of digital photography makes these things simple :) Thanks in advance! Looking forward to visiting in person in November.
Researching for a friend, In what year did the old South Side School , where the BOE is presently located, open to neighborhood students?
I read some comments that said this might come back to be shown in the US..
Andrew McKnight is coming back to Federal Hill to perform more of his historical folk songs on Saturday night, the 10th at 7 p.m.. Hope to see some folks there. He'll be sharing a new song which tells more of Bristol's history. Call 860.582.1061 or [email protected] for the location and to reserve a seat.
I have often said that "The Witch's Dungeon Classic Movie Museum" is a combined effort of many talented friends who volunteer their time and expertise. Our unsung hero - TOM DICKAU, came to the rescue when "The Witch's Dungeon" had no home in 2014, we may have had to take it to New York, but he invited us to move our museum into The Bristol Historical Society, when he was president at that time. So our museum retained that unbroken continuous record since 1966, and lead to our 50th anniversary in Bristol for 2016, which Tom was also a major part of that event. Since 2014, the "Dungeon" has had visitors from 23 different countries, all over the world, and over 40 states, all greeted cordially at the main entrance by Mr. Dickau. Since there is currently no elevator at the Historical Society for us to be permanently open on the second floor, Tom has spent many late hours helping me set up the museum, and take it down, each season, which is a massive job! Plus so many other supportive efforts he has done for our museum. This July 19th - he was also greatly assisting with the visual presentation of our "Amusement Park Art" program. Sadly Tom wants to take time off this season, and will not be hosting and greeting guests to"The Dungeon" this fall. But we all greatly appreciate the efforts this gentleman and dear friend has given the museum.
In the 1960's my Dad knocked down the plaster and lath walls in our house on Lincoln Ave. The space between the plaster and outer walls was filled with stuff that we assumed had fallen down from the upstairs??. Leather shoes, (rotted) Civil War era newspaper clippings that disintegrated soon after they were discovered and a mass of tangled metal rings. No idea what they were and they are long gone. I do have one old ice skate and a wooden mortar and pestle if they are of interest to the society ...or anyone who reads this page. I thought I could add pictures... the skate is the kind with the blade that curves up in the front. the wood a metal are sound but the leather is brittle.
Did VI still have the Hodges Photography collection? They once had the old glass plates from which the pictures were produced.
My fiancé and his brother stumbled upon a very nice find within our insulated wall. It’s a booklet of Bristol Hospital made in 1924. The hospital was founded in 1921, so we are very excited to show this item.
MARY HOULE, I JUST WAS GIVEN A BOX FULL OF CHRISTMAS ORNAMENTS COULD I BRING IT DOWN TO YOU TO SEE IF YOU COULD SELL THEM AT THE GIFT SHOP MARY S.
Hi everybody :) I make resource in Europe about medieval saddles. I am looking for book: "The roof bosses and vaults of Bristol cathedral". There is important informations about historical saddles. I cant find out it in my country. There is any possible if you have taht book and take me scan of pages: 16, 21, 26 ?