Historic New England

Historic New England Historic New England is the oldest, largest, and most comprehensive regional heritage organization in the nation. We preserve and share centuries of New England heritage through historic properties, collections, archives, education programs, and more.
Historic New England is the oldest, largest, and most comprehensive regional heritage organization in the nation. We preserve and share four centuries of New England heritage through historic properties, collections, archives, education programs, and historic preservation services.
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Historic New England operates thirty-seven historic properties open to the public. Open hours and prices vary, so please visit http://www.historicnewengland.org. Many of our properties also have their own pages, which we invite you to follow.

Mission: We serve the public by preserving and presenting New England heritage.

For as long as the pandemic continues, we will continue to document it. Your contributions to our project “A Time to Rem...
06/10/2020

For as long as the pandemic continues, we will continue to document it. Your contributions to our project “A Time to Remember: New England Home Life in the COVID-19 Pandemic” are invaluable tools to help Historic New England tell the story of this unprecedented time for generations to come. We know that the meaning of “home” during this pandemic has come to mean many things—it can mean school, office, entertainment center, and hospice. The crisis and its financial impact may result in the loss of home for many. We want to know how your home life has changed because of the pandemic.

Visit HistoricNewEngland.org/explore/collections-access/a-time-to-remember to contribute to this project. #DocumentingCOVID

Looking to spruce up your spring garden? Shop our spring hosta and perennial sale from the Lyman Estate Greenhouses! 🌱 C...
06/09/2020

Looking to spruce up your spring garden? Shop our spring hosta and perennial sale from the Lyman Estate Greenhouses! 🌱 Check out our online selection of plants in all shapes, sizes, and colors, including many new and hard-to-find varieties. Our knowledgeable staff can help you choose the right hostas and perennials for your garden.

See our full selection at https://www.historicnewengland.org/visit/events/plant-sales-at-the-lyman-estate/. Then, order over the phone and schedule an appointment for contactless pickup.

After a long wait, we are excited to announce the re-opening of the grounds and landscapes at twelve of our historic pro...
06/08/2020

After a long wait, we are excited to announce the re-opening of the grounds and landscapes at twelve of our historic properties! Starting today from dawn to dusk, you can visit sites like the Eustis Estate, The Codman Estate, Roseland Cottage, and more. The properties might seem a little different with social distancing and other visitor safety protocols in place, but the open spaces, gardens, and landscapes that you love are ready for you to enjoy. Although it's free to roam the grounds, we appreciate donations and membership support, which help us maintain the land. To see a full list of open landscapes or to donate, visit https://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-new-england-opens-twelve-landscapes-in-five-states/.

Museum of African American History - Boston and Nantucket
06/05/2020

Museum of African American History - Boston and Nantucket

#FannieLouHammer #BlackLivesMatter #BlackHistory365 #ThisPlaceMatters #HistoryHappensHere #CivilRights

Follow The Robbins House for more educational resources and to learn about Concord's African American history.
06/04/2020

Follow The Robbins House for more educational resources and to learn about Concord's African American history.

Ways you can help: Read! And support black owned book stores.

06/03/2020

Historic New England stands in solidarity with voices around the country and its sister organizations in our region demanding justice for the murder of George Floyd. As a civic institution, we are firmly committed to equity, inclusiveness and social justice — and condemn racism, which must end. As preservationists, we strive for truth and authenticity in the places we protect and the stories they frame. #BlackLivesMatter

Our new President and CEO Vin Cipolla assumed his position this week. Read his letter to the Historic New England community. https://wfly.co/q1B0S

To access resources for additional education and reflection, visit https://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-new-england-stands-in-solidarity/.

06/02/2020
Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice

Center for the Study of Slavery and Justice

Welcome to the digital Slavery and Legacy Walking Tour!

As we all continue to adapt to the realities of covid-19, we hope that this tour will serve as a new and meaningful opportunity for community.

Each week we will highlight a stop on the tour, incorporating research, images, and audio clips. We encourage virtual tour participants to engage with the “question(s) to consider,” posed at the end of each stop. Responses will be shared on the tour blog.

The Center would like to especially thank Uchechukwu “Uche” Onwunaka '19 A.B. Public Policy & Africana Studies, '20 MPA for all of her hard work this past year, serving as our lead educator and developing a brochure to encourage self guided tours and a Slavery & Legacy Walking Tour website with expanded content.

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture
06/02/2020
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Today we launch Talking About Race, a new online portal designed to help individuals, families, and communities talk about racism, racial identity and the way these forces shape every aspect of American culture.

Learn more: s.si.edu/2XLsrFU #APeoplesJourney #ANationsStory

Richard Haynes Jr. (b. 1949) is a New Hampshire-based artist nationally recognized for his paintings and photographs. Hi...
06/01/2020

Richard Haynes Jr. (b. 1949) is a New Hampshire-based artist nationally recognized for his paintings and photographs. His art is rooted in social justice activism, and particularly in confronting racial divides through unity.

In 2018, Haynes took up an artist residency at Gov. John Langdon House, where he completed a painting of Cyrus Bruce. In 1783, Bruce, a formerly enslaved Black man, began working for Gov. John Langdon. Because few people in Bruce’s situation were recorded for posterity, Haynes imagined the servant's appearance in this painting. This pose suggests Bruce’s authority, and his shadow seems to move forward toward new opportunities. Yet the door knocker resembles a question mark, leading us to wonder about Bruce’s fate.

More than 200 years later, in this painful time, we find hope in the millions speaking out to ensure that Black American stories are no longer lost to history. #BlackLivesMatter

What object from our collection made Jen Widmark, our registrar, quite literally laugh out loud when she first came acro...
05/29/2020

What object from our collection made Jen Widmark, our registrar, quite literally laugh out loud when she first came across it? This hasty pudding spoon! For today’s “Favorite Things,” we’re taking a closer look at this quirky piece of cutlery.

“I’ve catalogued collections of spoons, painted accession numbers on the backs of long spoon handles, and cleaned many a spoon for exhibition display. Never before, though, had I heard of a special spoon for pudding, particularly the hastiest kind…It turns out that hasty pudding is merely a sort of porridge, traditionally made from cornmeal. It is mentioned in one verse of the song ‘Yankee Doodle,’ and is also a social club at Harvard University.”

Visit https://www.historicnewengland.org/favorite-things-a-hasty-pudding-spoon/ to learn more from Jen about the hasty pudding spoon and other peculiar pieces from our collection.

Right on time! At the close of #PreservationMonth, our preservation work on the Lyman Estate is complete. For the past y...
05/28/2020

Right on time! At the close of #PreservationMonth, our preservation work on the Lyman Estate is complete. For the past year, the property care team has been working to replace the entire gutter system around the house’s veranda. Updating and reinstalling the drainage system while keeping historic architectural features like cornices intact was no easy feat, but the finished product will protect the house structure from future damage. Check out the difference between these great before and after photos!

#PreservationMonth doesn’t have to end in May. Your donations and memberships directly help us fund our preservation projects—the gutter installation was just one of many in-progress property care projects at our sites. Become a member at the Sustainer level or above and get access to our exclusive e-newsletter, “News and Notes for Homeowners,” which provides tips and tricks maintaining your historic home, and receive personalized advice from our expert staff.
HistoricNewEngland.org/Membership
HistoricNewEngland.org/Donate

This #WeddingWednesday, we have an exciting announcement for couples hoping to tie the knot: we are now offering intimat...
05/27/2020

This #WeddingWednesday, we have an exciting announcement for couples hoping to tie the knot: we are now offering intimate wedding ceremony packages at a special rate! For less than $500, you can have a beautiful, impromptu wedding at one of eleven of our historic properties, while maintaining social distancing and safety guidelines. We know that these are challenging times, but every couple deserves its special day. If your initial wedding plans have changed, or if you’re simply looking for a quiet ceremony, get started with your Historic New England wedding package today.

Visit https://www.historicnewengland.org/historic-new-england-offers-micro-wedding-ceremonies-during-covid-19-closure/ for more details.

📸 courtesy of Lisa Rigby Photography

Historic New England is committed to recording and documenting how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting people’s lives ...
05/26/2020

Historic New England is committed to recording and documenting how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting people’s lives at home. We want to know how your home life has changed because of the pandemic.

To do this we need your help—we want to hear your stories about home life and coronavirus. We’ve started a crowdsourced project to document life during the pandemic, which you can contribute to by filling out the form linked below. Your materials and insights will help us tell the story of this unprecedented time for generations to come.

Visit https://www.historicnewengland.org/explore/collections-access/a-time-to-remember/ to contribute your thoughts to this project, and use the #DocumentingCOVID to share your story.

In this archival photo from May 1919, a crowd is gathered at city hall in Lynn, Mass. for a military parade to commemora...
05/25/2020

In this archival photo from May 1919, a crowd is gathered at city hall in Lynn, Mass. for a military parade to commemorate soldiers returning from World War I. Next to the hall is a large memorial to those who did not return, and the inscription reads, “Soldiers of Lynn who died for their country in the war against Germany and Austria-Hungary.” #MemorialDay

Until you can see the exhibition in person this fall, preview “Artful Stories” virtually! Artful Stories brings together...
05/22/2020

Until you can see the exhibition in person this fall, preview “Artful Stories” virtually! Artful Stories brings together more than forty of the best works of art from our collection made in or about New England spanning more than 200 years. Through an immersive experience on our Eustis Estate web app, you can view each gallery of the exhibition, zoom in on paintings to take a closer look, read artist biographies, see behind the scenes conservation work, watch videos, and more.

Explore the exhibition at Eustis.Estate/topic/exhibitions.

🖼️ "Homeward Bound," John George Brown, 1878
🖼️ "Hera," Marie Euphrosyne Stillman, late 1880s

Artwork from students at Berwick Academy lines the walls of Sarah Orne Jewett House Museum & Visitor Center in our exhib...
05/21/2020

Artwork from students at Berwick Academy lines the walls of Sarah Orne Jewett House Museum & Visitor Center in our exhibition "Make History: Community as Classroom." The exhibition serves as a deep dive into the students' learning about South Berwick, and about Sarah Orne Jewett, an alumna of the school. The gallery walls are filled with the layout of published magazines, all designed, edited and, produced by students. Community connection is more important than ever right now, and this exhibition showcases that importance through the intersection of art, education, and history.

Visit HistoricNewEngland.org/CommunityAsClassroom to explore the exhibition now.

05/21/2020
Boston Preservation Alliance

Watch our very own Ken Turino chat with The Trustees and Boston Preservation Alliance about what historic spaces will look like after coronavirus shutdowns.

Alicia Leuba of The Trustees and Ken Turino of Historic New England talk about museums and historic places post COVID. Our newest episode of Tidbits of Preservation is live.

In continuation of Walter Gropius’s birthday week celebration is today’s “Favorite Things” pick—the white clapboards at ...
05/20/2020

In continuation of Walter Gropius’s birthday week celebration is today’s “Favorite Things” pick—the white clapboards at Gropius House. As Site Manager Wendy Hubbard’s favorite things, these clapboards are used in a non-traditional way to add visual interest to the home.

“In the interior hallway, the clapboard is brought inside and applied vertically where the wooden surface makes a practical and aesthetic background for artwork. The clapboard resonates with other vertical elements in the interior hallway such as the ripple glass windows and vertical chrome banisters to move the eye upward, creating visual spaciousness.”

Visit https://www.historicnewengland.org/favorite-things-the-white-clapboards-at-gropius-house/ to hear more from Wendy about Gropius House’s unique visual elements.

05/19/2020
Preservation Month: Plaster Readhesion at Hamilton House

For this week’s celebration of #PreservationMonth, watch one of our property care team members demo a plaster repair technique used at Hamilton House. Natasha Klemek demonstrates plaster readhesion: a technique in which unstable plaster is reattached to its lath.

Historic New England preserves the past for present and future generations, which we largely accomplish through building preservation projects like these. To support our preservation work, consider making a donation or becoming a member. HistoricNewEngland.org/get-involved-donate

https://youtu.be/O1ZGfZ5frDk

Learn how architectural conservators save historic plaster in this look at restoration work at Hamilton House in South Berwick, Maine. Natasha Klemek demonst...

#OnThisDay in 1883, Walter Gropius was born! In celebration of his birthday this year, check out the most recent issue o...
05/18/2020

#OnThisDay in 1883, Walter Gropius was born! In celebration of his birthday this year, check out the most recent issue of Curio Magazine, entirely dedicated to Gropius House and the Bauhaus style.

Curio25 offers a visual examination of Gropius’s family home in Lincoln, Mass. Through his modernist approach to design, Walter Gropius redefined what "home" could look like, evidenced by the family’s personal touches still present in the home. In rich images captured by photographer Kate Sears, you can see Gropius House in intimate detail.

Visit curio.work/issue-25- to view the full issue online. Then, explore the house room by room and find out more about the family on our web app, Gropius.House.
📸 Kate Sears

05/15/2020

For the last segment of our Lyman Estate Greenhouses walkthrough series, we’re taking you on a stroll through the camellia house. 🌺 The 1820 room was originally built for growing peach trees, but now houses these beautiful flowers. See our 100-year-old collection of camellias, as well as tropical azaleas, orchids, and more. #MuseumFromHome

Meet Malcolm Rockefeller, the subject of this week’s “Favorite Things” series! This very special rocking horse is Object...
05/13/2020

Meet Malcolm Rockefeller, the subject of this week’s “Favorite Things” series! This very special rocking horse is Objects Conservator Michaela Neiro’s favorite thing from Marrett House. (The runner up? A wall fish plaque called Marlin Brando.)

“In the conservation lab, any object that has a face is instantly special and requires a fun name. This was a very fancy toy, so he deserved a fancy name! We thought Malcolm Rockefeller was perfect…In 2012 we did extensive conservation on the Marrett House rocking horse. This is my favorite kind of object to treat: mixed materials…All this work made Malcolm look much better: fit for exhibition, but still looking his age.”

Read more about the conservation work done on Malcolm at https://www.historicnewengland.org/favorite-things-a-rocking-horse-at-marrett-house/.

Volunteers for the Casey Family Papers digitization project are transcribing hundreds of fascinating letters between civ...
05/12/2020

Volunteers for the Casey Family Papers digitization project are transcribing hundreds of fascinating letters between civil engineer Bernard R. Green to Brigadier General Thomas Lincoln Casey.

The two worked together on multiple building projects, most notably the Washington Monument; the State, War, and Navy Building (now the Eisenhower Executive Office Building); and the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress, where he served as Superintendent of Construction. Green’s wit and wry sense of humor make transcribing his letters all the more enjoyable—and on top of that, his handwriting is among the most legible of the Casey Family Papers!

Visit https://www.historicnewengland.org/letters-from-bernard-r-green-to-thomas-lincoln-casey-reveal-an-inside-look-at-washington/ to read more about their correspondence.

📸 Cyanotype Album Library of Congress, c.1894-c.1895 (Interior); Cyanotype Constructing the Library of Congress, South Front, June 16, 1891

May is #PreservationMonth! To celebrate historic places across America, today we’re highlighting a classic feature of ma...
05/11/2020

May is #PreservationMonth! To celebrate historic places across America, today we’re highlighting a classic feature of many New England homes: “sleeping porches.” Popularized in the early twentieth century, these porches are characterized by screened-in walls or windows and plenty of comfortable seating. Why? Apart from being a place to spend with family, sleeping porches were thought to promote health and wellness, allowing people to sleep outside in the cool night air without the fear of getting bitten by bugs. They can be built into the ground floor or higher stories of the house. Have you seen any sleeping porches before?

Apart from overseeing the preservation of our own properties, we offer support for homeowners of historic houses. Members at the Sustainer level and above get specialized advice for their old-house questions, directly from our expert staff. Become a member, or upgrade your membership to get personalized guidance, at HistoricNewEngland.org/get-involved/memberships. #MembershipMonday

05/08/2020

Today’s #MuseumMomentofZen is perfect for orchid fans! This Lyman Estate Greenhouses video walkthrough takes you through the pondhouse and the lower sales house. These rooms house many varieties of orchids, plus plenty of other flowers types, such as kalanchoes and aeoniums.

Tune in next Wednesday, 5/13, to view our Sheep-Shearing Livestream event! Watch Hugo have his first ever fleecing at Sp...
05/07/2020

Tune in next Wednesday, 5/13, to view our Sheep-Shearing Livestream event! Watch Hugo have his first ever fleecing at Spencer-Peirce-Little Farm, and see how an experienced shearer can remove the fleece in almost one piece. Then ask our vet a question in the online chat.

If you'd like to sponsor the spring care of Hugo and his friends, you can make a donation that will directly contribute to shearing, vaccinations, and hoof trimmings. If you select the $125 level or above, we'll even send you (or a gift recipient) a before-and-after picture of Hugo and a sample of his wool! Visit https://my.historicnewengland.org/6863/10295 to register.

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Historic New England operates thirty-seven historic properties open to the public. Open hours and prices vary, so please visit HistoricNewEngland.org. Many of our properties also have their own pages, which we invite you to follow.


Comments

Release of The Noble Train The story of a twenty five year old Boston bookseller who dragged 60 tons of cannons to George Washington and saved the American Revolution
hppiest day in my life walking Bristol beach/BYE see you in heaven
Roger that...talking to a fellow visitor at the Spencer-Peirce-Little Farm in Newbury, MA today, I discovered that she hadn't seen Roger the donkey anywhere...and then this...made me smile :-)
I have keys that belonged to Charles C. Walker of Manchester, I would like to donate them to you if you would have them. I have tried to locate his family with no luck.
Peak foliage is just around the bend!
I was just reading the Fall/Winter newsletter like it was a novel! There are so many great things coming up, I can't believe it! Looking forward to seeing a lot more of the properties in the next months!
Misery Island 1962 ~ 1900 Beverly Farms Ma.