Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum The Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum is dedicated to telling the story of December 16, 1773. http://www.bostonteapartyship.com/
(420)

The Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum is dedicated to telling the story of December 16, 1773. Join Sam Adams and the Sons of Liberty as we take part in the single most important event leading up to the American Revolution! Throw tea overboard from one of two fully-restored 18th century sailing vessels. See the Robinson Half Chest, one of only two known surviving tea chests from the Boston Tea Party of 1773. Be inspired by the award-winning film "Let it Begin Here". Come relive the famous night that forever changed the course of American History! Follow us on our other social media channels to stay up to date with all things Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum! Twitter: @BostonTeaShip https://twitter.com/bostonteaship Instagram: @BostonTeaPartyShips https://www.instagram.com/bostonteapartyships/ Pinterest: Historic Tours of America https://www.pinterest.com/historictours YouTube: BostonTeaPartyShips https://www.youtube.com/user/bostonteapartyships

WARDROBE WEDNESDAY: For our special events, people get the chance to portray historical figures not usually encountered ...
06/03/2020

WARDROBE WEDNESDAY: For our special events, people get the chance to portray historical figures not usually encountered at our museum, which makes for an exciting wardrobe challenge! Even in a time with less sartorial variation than we have today, clothing was very much an expression of who one was as a person, conveying class, personality, age, and in some cases, religious affiliation. Though we might not necessarily know how to interpret someone’s clothing directly, even small details have a subconscious effect on how someone is perceived, whether they’re a modern day person on the street, or an 18th century radical.
.
The 246th Anniversary and Annual Reenactment of the Boston Tea Party was one such event where everyone got to wear something new-to-them: on the left is Mr. Fisher, a loyalist, wearing a suit that you will have seen on John Hancock if you’ve ever attended one of our “Huzzah! Tavern Nights” performances!
.
On the other end of the political scale of 1770s Boston, is the hardware merchant, leader of the North End gang, and notable Son of Liberty, William Molineux, on the right.
.
Hence, he got the chance to wear the orange coat previously featured in a Wardrobe post - it seemed an appropriately intense color for such an intense personality. We had fun adding a pair of black leather gloves at the last minute, which he wore for the event but which don’t make an appearance here. They added to the imposing demeanor already created by the performance rather well, considering what a small detail gloves seem to be!

#SundayFunday! How well do you know your #HuzzahTrivia!? How many people were arrested for their involvement in the Bost...
05/31/2020

#SundayFunday! How well do you know your #HuzzahTrivia!?

How many people were arrested for their involvement in the Boston Tea Party?
a. 1
b. 50
c. 12

Boston in 2020 looks quite different than at its founding in 1630, or in this early map showing “The Town of Boston in N...
05/29/2020

Boston in 2020 looks quite different than at its founding in 1630, or in this early map showing “The Town of Boston in New England” by Capt. John Bonner, 1722.

The original land was a peninsula, connected to the mainland by a narrow strip of land called an isthmus. This isthmus, also known as Boston Neck, would be washed out during high tide, making Boston an island.

The topography and geography of this area has changed quite a bit through various landfill projects since this 1722 image.

Huzzah! It's #ThursdayTrivia. What is the answer to today's #huzzahtrivia question? ⬇️ a. James Bruceb. Hezekiah Coffinc...
05/28/2020

Huzzah! It's #ThursdayTrivia. What is the answer to today's #huzzahtrivia question? ⬇️

a. James Bruce
b. Hezekiah Coffin
c. Joseph Loring

Wardrobe Wednesday brings us another match of one of our outfits (and our building façade!) to a swatch in the Dyer’s Me...
05/27/2020

Wardrobe Wednesday brings us another match of one of our outfits (and our building façade!) to a swatch in the Dyer’s Memoir: this time, Burnt Cinnamon!

“Cinnamons are usually made in the dye bath of madder reds already used, by boiling them as follows: 4lbs alum from the Levant, 2lbs red tartar. After boiling for two hours, they are washed at the fulling mill, and dyed with weld as for lemons or golden yellow.”

Red Tartar provides some interesting insight into the semi-industrialization of some trades in the 18th century - it’s an impure form of tartaric acid, a food additive you can still buy on Amazon today. It got its red color from the fact that it was made from the grape skin residue left over from winemaking!

Source: The Dyer’s Handbook: Memoirs of an 18th-century master colorist, by Dominique Cardon, p60

05/22/2020
Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

Filmed in 2018 for the 245th Anniversary and Annual Reenactment of The Boston Tea Party, we invite you to take a look back at our “Tempest in a Teapot” video series. We delve into the weeks leading up to the “destruction of the tea”. Enjoy!

You’ll find the remaining videos in the series in the Videos section on our page!

Join us as we countdown to the 245th Anniversary and Annual Reenactment of the Boston Tea Party on Sunday, Dec 16, 2018! #huzzah #tossthattea #december16 #bostonteaparty #bostonhistory #livinghistory

Wardrobe Wednesday takes us back to the beautiful patterning we featured earlier and now we begin to see the pieces taki...
05/20/2020

Wardrobe Wednesday takes us back to the beautiful patterning we featured earlier and now we begin to see the pieces taking shape!

“The results of cutting for the blue waistcoat and breeches provide something of an “exploded view” - there’s a few more pieces to go for the breeches, mainly for finishing work at the knee. These will be cut once we’re able to have a fitting with the partially assembled breeches.” @ Boston, Massachusetts

You may have exhausted your board game collection at this point. Drop by our online store to add some fun to your days! ...
05/18/2020

You may have exhausted your board game collection at this point. Drop by our online store to add some fun to your days!

“Shut the box” has a variety of origins, including the possibility of 12th century Normandy (northern France). Versions of this game is played all over the world. “Liar’s dice” is known by many names, including, but not limited to, “pirate’s dice”, “deception dice”, and “diception”. Though unconfirmed that these exact games were played in colonial Boston, we imagine that the Sons and Daughters of Liberty would’ve had a great time if they had!

https://shop.bostonteapartyship.com/

Josiah Wheeler, a 30 year old housewright, left his home in the afternoon of Dec 16, 1773. Unbeknownst to his wife, Lucy...
05/15/2020

Josiah Wheeler, a 30 year old housewright, left his home in the afternoon of Dec 16, 1773. Unbeknownst to his wife, Lucy, Josiah intended to take part in the “destruction of the tea” at Griffin’s Wharf. Lucy sat up waiting for him with a female neighbor until quite late in the evening. He pulled off his long boots and a small quantity of tea spilled out onto the floor. Mrs. Wheeler’s visitor exclaimed, “Save it; it will make a nice mess”. Being the patriotic woman that she was, Lucy quickly swept the entire pile into the fire saying, “Don’t touch the cursed stuff”.

Photo by @proudnewenglander (of his slightly modernized colonial fireplace)

Wardrobe Wednesday returns! Usually, when you people think of fabric prints in the 18th century flower-and-vine chintzes...
05/13/2020

Wardrobe Wednesday returns!

Usually, when you people think of fabric prints in the 18th century flower-and-vine chintzes on a white background come to mind - but that’s only a very small part of what was out there. Probably one of the more unexpected motifs is the polka dot, which seems very 20th century, but nevertheless shows up in this patchwork quilt from the 3rd quarter of the 18th century, held in the collection of the Victoria and Albert Museum.

Source:
The Victoria and Albert Museum’s Textile Collection: designs for printed textiles in England from 1750 to 1850, by Wendy Hefford

@ Boston, Massachusetts

🗣️Calling all history aficionados! It's #TriviaTuesday! Do you know the answer to today's trivia question?
05/12/2020

🗣️Calling all history aficionados! It's #TriviaTuesday! Do you know the answer to today's trivia question?

05/11/2020

History @ Home, Episode 8: The Tax on Tea vs. the Tea Act. Join us as we explain the difference between these two laws of Parliament and how they affected the sale of tea in the North American colonies.

We hope everyone is staying safe at home!

As the Sons of Liberty and others were destroying the East India Company tea at Griffin’s Wharf on December 16, 1773, ma...
05/08/2020

As the Sons of Liberty and others were destroying the East India Company tea at Griffin’s Wharf on December 16, 1773, many of them had anxious families awaiting their return.

As a young, recently married woman, Elizabeth “Betsy” Palmer was concerned about her husband’s whereabouts on that fateful evening. She was awake rather late, tending to her newborn baby when she noticed strange shadowy figures outside of her home. She was so frightened and believed that she was being robbed so she began to scream! One of the figures reached forward to settle her and began speaking in an oddly familiar voice. The figure said, “Betsy, it is I, your husband! My friends and I were just out making a little salt water tea.” As it turned out, Betsy’s husband, Joseph, had been down at the wharf taking part in what would become known as “The Boston Tea Party”.

Today on “Wardrobe Wednesday” we’re taking a look at the beginnings of some new garments! A note from our Wardrobe Manag...
05/06/2020

Today on “Wardrobe Wednesday” we’re taking a look at the beginnings of some new garments!

A note from our Wardrobe Manager, Ash: “Cutting day - we’re starting work on another three pairs of breeches and a couple of waistcoats. Cutting is pretty satisfying - I like to take a step back after drawing out all the pieces with their seam allowances and before I pick up the shears. It’s a cool technical drawing that generally we’re the only ones to ever see. It might seem nitpicky to want to be precise at every step of the process of building a garment, but in the end the effort all adds up to something better overall.” @ Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

05/04/2020
Robinson Tea Chest lineage

History @ Home Episode 7: The lineage of The Robinson Tea Chest.
Found the morning after the Boston Tea Party in December of 1773, the Robinson Tea Chest was preserved and passed from generation to generation. Please enjoy the story and history of our main artifact.

We're back with more #HuzzahTrivia! What is the answer to today's question:a. Consigneesb. Tea appointeesc. Tea dealers
05/03/2020

We're back with more #HuzzahTrivia! What is the answer to today's question:
a. Consignees
b. Tea appointees
c. Tea dealers

https://soundcloud.com/the-lonely-palette/episode-3-copleys-portraitWe are pleased to share an early episode of the insi...
05/01/2020
Ep. 3 - John Singleton Copley's "Portrait of Samuel Adams" (1772)

https://soundcloud.com/the-lonely-palette/episode-3-copleys-portrait

We are pleased to share an early episode of the insightful and witty art history podcast, The Lonely Palettefocusing on Boston’s own John Singleton Copley’s “Portrait of Samuel Adams” from 1772. Featured in The New York Times, New York Magazine, The Boston Globe, The Washington Post, NPR’s The Big Listen, and many, many other notable sources, The Lonely Palette also recently served as the very first “podcast in residence” at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston for their “Women Take the Floor” exhibit.

We at the BTPSM may be a bit biased, but this is one of our favorite portraits in the MFA Boston’s Art of the Americas wing. Not only does our museum experience include an exhibit inspired by this powerful propagandist image of the leader of the Sons of Liberty, but Copley himself played a bit of a role in the lead-up to the Boston Tea Party. John Singleton Copley was married to Susanna Clarke, daughter of Richard Clarke, wealthy merchant and tea consignee of the East India Company in 1773. In the weeks prior to the “destruction of the tea”, Richard Clarke and the other consignees sought refuge from the Sons of Liberty at Castle William, out in Boston Harbor. Copley served as messenger and had hired a small boat to cross the channel from Dorchester Neck with correspondence between the two groups, hoping for a peaceful resolution.

A big thanks to longtime friend of the BTPSM, creator, writer, and host of The Lonely Palette, Tamar Avishai for showing us how to look with our ears as she brings “art history to the masses, one painting at a time”. Please visit ​​ www.thelonelypalette.com for images and more episodes.

While John Singleton Copley is busying himself with past and present art historical styles, Samuel Adams is getting all up in your biz. See the image: http://www.thelonelypalette.com/episodes/2016/6/

Huzzah! Ready for another #Trivia question? Tell us the answer in the comments ⬇️ a. The Incident at Griffin’s Wharfb. T...
04/30/2020

Huzzah! Ready for another #Trivia question? Tell us the answer in the comments ⬇️

a. The Incident at Griffin’s Wharf
b. The Destruction of the Tea
c. The Treason in Boston

Today’s edition of WARDROBE WEDNESDAY brings another interesting lesson in color! “For Pale Orange or Apricot: 5lbs youn...
04/29/2020

Today’s edition of WARDROBE WEDNESDAY brings another interesting lesson in color!

“For Pale Orange or Apricot: 5lbs young fustic in the boiling, 1oz cochineal in the finishing”

REUSE OF THE FINISHING BATH: To draw profit from the already used finishing bath for scarlet, it can be used as the boiling for flame colors, and even for other scarlets or crimsons, after which it can be reused also as a boiling for jujube, spiny lobster, pomegranate flower colors, and for oranges. Instead of using it as the boiling bath for the colors just mentioned, it can also be used as the finishing bath for the winesoups, vetch flower, morello cherry colors, the purples, violets, linen grey, mauves, etc.; after these colors, one can reuse it to make peach flower, rose, flesh color; and eventually, after these, plum colors, pearl greys, and other light colors...”

The above recipe is accompanied by a swatch in the original manuscript, and so we were able to match this specific recipe to the color of the suit pictured on “Thomas Crafts”.

Source: The Dyer’s Handbook: Memoirs of an 18th-century master colorist, by Dominique Cardon, p54-55

~~~~~~~
Though home dyers still existed, in the larger textile production industry of the 18th century cloth dyeing was already highly industrialized. The skill of the master colorists had reached its peak at this time, and not only could nearly any shade be achieved, but their ability to achieve consistent colors between dyelots (or batches) was frankly astounding, even by today’s standards.

Many colors were cleverly achieved using the wastewater from the production of other colors - thus the discussion of the reuse of a finishing bath for scarlets to produce a whole litany of other colors. This not only greatly increased the number of colors that could be produced and the control the dyer had over the shade ultimately produced - it also limited waste of dyestuff and the various chemical amendments used as much as possible.

Fabric originally from @burnleyandtrowbridge, we believe!
@ Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum

Today's Trivia question is here! Comment the correct answer below!a. Rowes Wharf in Boston, MAb. The Brick Kiln Shipyard...
04/28/2020

Today's Trivia question is here! Comment the correct answer below!

a. Rowes Wharf in Boston, MA
b. The Brick Kiln Shipyard in Pembroke, MA
c. London, England

Make it a #SundayFunday with our #HuzzahTrivia! Today's question is a True or False! Tell us the answer below.
04/26/2020

Make it a #SundayFunday with our #HuzzahTrivia! Today's question is a True or False! Tell us the answer below.

04/23/2020

History @ Home
Episode 5: Colonial Cooking at Home!

Looking for another at-home activity? This episode teaches you how to make two fun and easy recipes from the time of the Boston Tea Party.

Join us each week as we discuss Boston Tea Party history from home. Stay safe, and enjoy today’s video!

By the 18th century, both purple and black had come to be accessible colors thanks to the widespread use of a tropical w...
04/22/2020

By the 18th century, both purple and black had come to be accessible colors thanks to the widespread use of a tropical wood with a high pigment content, known as logwood (​Haematoxylum campechianum​ - actually in the same plant family as beans and peas!) Logwood most easily produces a lavender purple color, but with the addition of different amendments can be used to produce blacks, blues, and pinks as well. However, even in the 18th century it was known to produce highly unstable color which would degrade when exposed to air and turn a muddy brown color, so in some regions of Europe its use was heavily restricted to its application as a color intensifying additive for the production of particular colors that couldn’t be achieved without it, and in the production of cheap goods.

Purple or “double purple” prints were, however, commonly worn by the lower classes, due to their accessibility. Most logwood-dyed textiles no longer maintain their original color, but a few samples that were protected from air in books survive, such as this black and purple shell print from 1760, and a floral print from 1752 (which also displays a logwood-produced blue), both held in the collection of the Victorian and Albert Museum.

Sources:
The Victoria and Albert Museum’s Textile Collection: designs for printed textiles in England from 1750 to 1850, by Wendy Hefford p64
The Dyer’s Handbook: memoirs of an 18th-century master colourist, by Dominique Cardon p46-47.

Welcome to #HuzzahTrivia! Three days a week we'll post a new trivia question to our page. Let's see how much you all rea...
04/21/2020

Welcome to #HuzzahTrivia! Three days a week we'll post a new trivia question to our page. Let's see how much you all really know about The Boston Tea Party!

Today's question is....

04/20/2020
Boston Tea Party Museum - Let It Begin Here

Yesterday, in honor of Patriot’s Day we shared our award winning museum experience film “Let It Begin Here.” Today, please enjoy a behind the scenes look at how it all came together.

"Let it Begin Here" Let it Begin Here is an epic short film projected on an innovative and unique screen system in a specially designed theater equipped with...

On April 18, 1775, 245 years ago, a battalion of British Regulars ferried from (the then shore at) Boston Common over to...
04/19/2020

On April 18, 1775, 245 years ago, a battalion of British Regulars ferried from (the then shore at) Boston Common over to Lechmere Point and marched toward Concord, MA, to seize a collected munitions cache. Earlier that evening, two lanterns had been placed in the steeple of Christ Church (Old North) telling the mode of the dispatching British military unit to the surrounding towns.

Under orders from Patriot leader, Dr. Joseph Warren, Paul Revere was rowed from a North Boston shore under the shadow of the warship Somerset to Charlestown. He and dozens of other riders on horseback, including William Dawes and Dr. Samuel Prescott, sounded an alarm across the countryside, to warn of the advancing troops.

At about 5:00am on April 19, the first leg of the battalion were met on the green in Lexington by a number of militiamen led by Captain John Parker, who instructed his men to stand fast, and if something was to happen it would “begin here.”
When the Lexington militia refused to move, a skirmish took place killing eight of the men outright. Ten more were wounded, a few fatally.

The regulars then marched onto Concord where hundreds of the informed militias and Minutemen were gathered ready for a battle that took place at the North Bridge.

The “shot heard ‘round the world” had been fired and the American Revolution had begun. #huzzah #bostonteaparty #bostonhistory #americanhistory #shotheardroundtheworld #americanrevolution

Address

306 Congress St
Boston, MA
02210

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(617) 338-1773

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Comments

Many people have been citing the current riots and looting as the same acts of the Boston Tea Party. I am just wondering how the museum feels about this analogy?
Release of The Noble Train The story of a twenty five year old Boston bookseller who dragged 60 tons of cannons to George Washington and saved the American Revolution https://www.amazon.com/Henry-Knoxs-Noble-Train-Booksellers/dp/163388614X
The History at Home series is excellent. It makes e want to return to the ship as soon as the cover-19 is over.
Destination Boston: Fascinating History, Interesting Tours On Land and Water https://www.justluxe.com/travel/boston-news__1969813.php
This little building here in Rotherham Yorkshire England is called Boston Castle. It was built to commemorate the Boston Tea Party. The man who paid for it was Rotherham’s solider and politician Thomas Howard Earl of Effingham. Thomas refused to go and fight the colonists. He is remembered today in the names of two cities in the USA and two counties called Effingham. The US Navy has had three ships named Effingham. Another local monument is the Victory Arch built at Parlington Hall near Leeds in 1783 to celebrate American freedom. The Patriot movement started as a branch of the British Whig Party in 1725. They were opposed by the ruling Tory Party. The story of the British Patriots needs to be told, along with that of American Tories.
I keep forgetting to share this photo with you folks, from that very foggy afternoon a couple weeks back. It's like a ghost ship :)
I had to share …..my son Jacob Stearns birthday is Dec 16th and we are direct descendants of Phineas Stearns who participated in the historic event! We were there this summer and had to share this pics....taken Aug 6th 2019
Had so much fun learning about so many important people in our history at the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museums a couple months back while visiting Boston that I could not wait to come back and learn more and experience Tavern Nights. There stories are so important and they are truly inspiring individuals that we can all learn from and look up to. Thank you to the Cast of the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museums. Ms Sally Bass, Mr. Paul Revere, Mrs. Rachel Revere and Ms Dolly. You all are so kind and wonderful. And so extremely talented and phenomenal. I had the most fun and the best time during the Tour and during Tavern Nights and was the happiest because of it all. I greatly appreciate you all so much and for all the hard work that you put into Tavern Nights and these tours for us everyday. So grateful and blessed. Thank you for everything!! Until next time. Godspeed. Huzzah sweet friends!! 🧡💚🍁🍂
Docked in Boston on the Seranade of the Seas this morning. Boarding the tea party tour 11:30.
"Boston Tea Party". ©Peter A Tully Photography.
Great tour 09/22