Museum of African American History - Boston and Nantucket

Museum of African American History - Boston and Nantucket MAAH is New England’s largest museum dedicated to preserving, conserving and interpreting the contributions of African Americans. Nestled on Boston’s Beacon Hill and at Nantucket’s Five Corners are some of the nation’s most important National Historic Landmarks.
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The Museum’s two campuses feature the earliest churches and schools still standing in the land that were built by and for black communities. Each is beautifully restored and worthy of any journey. Our historic sites, talks, tours, videos, collections, and programs are rooted in the past and connected to the present. From the American Revolution to the Abolitionist and Niagara Movements, experience powerful American stories through a new lens. Come to the Museum, where Frederick Douglass and pioneering activists, entrepreneurs, journalists, educators, artists, and authors organized campaigns that changed the nation.

The Museum’s two campuses feature the earliest churches and schools still standing in the land that were built by and for black communities. Each is beautifully restored and worthy of any journey. Our historic sites, talks, tours, videos, collections, and programs are rooted in the past and connected to the present. From the American Revolution to the Abolitionist and Niagara Movements, experience powerful American stories through a new lens. Come to the Museum, where Frederick Douglass and pioneering activists, entrepreneurs, journalists, educators, artists, and authors organized campaigns that changed the nation.

Operating as usual

The Museum of African American History is proud to participate in Bank of America’s Museums on Us program! Every first F...
05/02/2021
Museum of African American History: Still Making American History

The Museum of African American History is proud to participate in Bank of America’s Museums on Us program! Every first Friday of the month, Bank of America card holders can visit us at our Boston and Nantucket campuses for free. Tickets must be reserved in advance through our ticketing website: https://evergreen.humanitru.com/web/campaigns/museum-of-african-american-history~still-making-american-history?attend=tag:boston+location

Tickets only valid for the time listed on ticket. The next Museums on Us date is Friday, May 7th!

Learn more about the Museums on Us program: https://about.bankofamerica.com/en-us/what-guides-us/arts-and-culture.html#fbid=YrydUTSyWzm

Find and explore more about this partner organization!

The African Meeting House in Boston reopened to the public 10 years ago after 6 years of work (2005-2011) to restore the...
05/01/2021

The African Meeting House in Boston reopened to the public 10 years ago after 6 years of work (2005-2011) to restore the building to its 1855 appearance. The frame on the back wall of the Meeting House highlights different renovations IC: Shawmut Construction & Design #PreservationMonth

The African Meeting House in Boston reopened to the public 10 years ago after 6 years of work (2005-2011) to restore the building to its 1855 appearance. The frame on the back wall of the Meeting House highlights different renovations IC: Shawmut Construction & Design #PreservationMonth

We’re wrapping up #NationalPoetryMonth with this poem, entitled "Misconstrued," originally published in “Freedom’s Journ...
04/30/2021

We’re wrapping up #NationalPoetryMonth with this poem, entitled "Misconstrued," originally published in “Freedom’s Journal” in 1842.

We’re wrapping up #NationalPoetryMonth with this poem, entitled "Misconstrued," originally published in “Freedom’s Journal” in 1842.

#OnThisDay in 2001, the Museum of African American History acquired the Seneca Boston-Florence Higginbotham House on Nan...
04/27/2021

#OnThisDay in 2001, the Museum of African American History acquired the Seneca Boston-Florence Higginbotham House on Nantucket when Angeleen Campra, Trustee of the 27 York Street Nominee Trust, sold the property to us. We're proud to have maintained this property for 20 years! Image Courtesy of Joseph Ferraro, National Trust for Historic Preservation

#OnThisDay in 2001, the Museum of African American History acquired the Seneca Boston-Florence Higginbotham House on Nantucket when Angeleen Campra, Trustee of the 27 York Street Nominee Trust, sold the property to us. We're proud to have maintained this property for 20 years! Image Courtesy of Joseph Ferraro, National Trust for Historic Preservation

May 25 at 6:30pm: Join us in partnership with the Boston Public Library, the State Library of Massachusetts, and America...
04/26/2021
Skip Finley — Whaling Captains of Color: America's First Meritocracy

May 25 at 6:30pm: Join us in partnership with the Boston Public Library, the State Library of Massachusetts, and American Ancestors by New England Historic Genealogical Society (AA/NEHGS) for an online conversation with Skip Finley, author of Whaling Captains of Color: America's First Meritocracy. This talk is part of the BPL's Repairing America Series.

The history of whaling as an industry on this continent has been well-told in books, including some that have been bestsellers, but what hasn’t been told is the story of whaling’s leaders of color in an era when the only other option was slavery. Whaling was one of the first American industries to exhibit diversity. A man became a captain not because he was white or well connected, but because he knew how to kill a whale. Along the way, he could learn navigation and reading and writing. Whaling presented a tantalizing alternative to mainland life.

“The story of people of color in the whaling industry is a fascinating and hitherto unexplored subject enough, but Skip Finley’s brilliant survey of the black captains and crew of the New England whale fisheries takes it one step further. His swift and sure narrative is excitingly told, bringing a fresh and vibrant focus to a vital part of American, and indeed global, history.” — Philip H***e, author of The Whale


Register and more: https://bpl.bibliocommons.com/events/6053bc5d90c24e2400f93b84

Join the Boston Public Library in partnership with the Museum of African American History (MAAH), the State Library of Massachusetts, and American Ancestors by New England Historic Genealogical Society (AA/NEHGS) for an online conversation with Skip Finley, author of Whaling Captains of Color: Ameri...

See this photo of Terry Lynn Carrington & Dizzy Gillespie among others from the Carrington Family Archives in our “Jazz ...
04/24/2021

See this photo of Terry Lynn Carrington & Dizzy Gillespie among others from the Carrington Family Archives in our “Jazz Scene in Boston: Telling the Local Story” exhibit on display now! #JazzAppreciationMonth

See this photo of Terry Lynn Carrington & Dizzy Gillespie among others from the Carrington Family Archives in our “Jazz Scene in Boston: Telling the Local Story” exhibit on display now! #JazzAppreciationMonth

#OnThisDay in 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. led thousands of Civil Rights marchers from Roxbury to the Boston Common. Th...
04/23/2021

#OnThisDay in 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. led thousands of Civil Rights marchers from Roxbury to the Boston Common. The day before, he gave an address to a joint session of the Massachusetts Legislature. On the 23rd, he spoke in the Common for 25 minutes to more than 20,000 people. "Now is the time," he said "to make real the promise of democracy. Now is the time to make brotherhood a reality. Now is the time." This photograph was taken at the Massachusetts State House during this visit.

Pictured here, from left to right, are Attorney Harold Vaughan, Rev. Virgil A. Wood, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Hasan A. Sharif (formerly Arnold M. Walker), and Rev. Dr. Michael Haynes.

Harold Vaughan was a member of the NAACP and a campaign advisor to John F. Kennedy. Virgil Wood was the President of the Massachusetts Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and a close collaborator with Dr. King. Hasan Sharif was assigned to be Dr. King's driver during his visit. Rev. Michael Haynes was the minister at Twelfth Baptist Church, a congregation with historic roots in the Beacon Hill black community of the 19th century.

Quotation Courtesy of The Boston Globe

#OnThisDay in 1965, Martin Luther King, Jr. led thousands of Civil Rights marchers from Roxbury to the Boston Common. The day before, he gave an address to a joint session of the Massachusetts Legislature. On the 23rd, he spoke in the Common for 25 minutes to more than 20,000 people. "Now is the time," he said "to make real the promise of democracy. Now is the time to make brotherhood a reality. Now is the time." This photograph was taken at the Massachusetts State House during this visit.

Pictured here, from left to right, are Attorney Harold Vaughan, Rev. Virgil A. Wood, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Hasan A. Sharif (formerly Arnold M. Walker), and Rev. Dr. Michael Haynes.

Harold Vaughan was a member of the NAACP and a campaign advisor to John F. Kennedy. Virgil Wood was the President of the Massachusetts Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and a close collaborator with Dr. King. Hasan Sharif was assigned to be Dr. King's driver during his visit. Rev. Michael Haynes was the minister at Twelfth Baptist Church, a congregation with historic roots in the Beacon Hill black community of the 19th century.

Quotation Courtesy of The Boston Globe

"The call still stands, with renewed focus to end police brutality and relieve other pains inflicted throughout many sys...
04/22/2021

"The call still stands, with renewed focus to end police brutality and relieve other pains inflicted throughout many systems."

"The call still stands, with renewed focus to end police brutality and relieve other pains inflicted throughout many systems."

#ThrowbackThursday to 2011 when Governor Deval Patrick visited the African Meeting House with our former Executive Direc...
04/22/2021

#ThrowbackThursday to 2011 when Governor Deval Patrick visited the African Meeting House with our former Executive Director, Beverly Morgan-Welch. Image Courtesy of Matt Bennett

#ThrowbackThursday to 2011 when Governor Deval Patrick visited the African Meeting House with our former Executive Director, Beverly Morgan-Welch. Image Courtesy of Matt Bennett

#OnThisDay in 1838, William Lloyd Garrison published a list of Anti-Slavery societies and their membership. “The followi...
04/20/2021

#OnThisDay in 1838, William Lloyd Garrison published a list of Anti-Slavery societies and their membership. “The following list, with all its imperfections, is submitted as better than none.”

#OnThisDay in 1838, William Lloyd Garrison published a list of Anti-Slavery societies and their membership. “The following list, with all its imperfections, is submitted as better than none.”

Happy Patriots’ Day! Check out William Cooper Nell’s “Colored Patriots of the American Revolution” published in 1855. We...
04/19/2021

Happy Patriots’ Day! Check out William Cooper Nell’s “Colored Patriots of the American Revolution” published in 1855. We have a copy of Nell’s famous book on display in our current exhibit “Selections From the Collection!” You can also read the whole book online thanks to UNC Chapel Hill https://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/nell/nell.html

Happy Patriots’ Day! Check out William Cooper Nell’s “Colored Patriots of the American Revolution” published in 1855. We have a copy of Nell’s famous book on display in our current exhibit “Selections From the Collection!” You can also read the whole book online thanks to UNC Chapel Hill https://docsouth.unc.edu/neh/nell/nell.html

From 2012 “The Color of Baseball in Boston” exhibit: In 1932, the Boston Giants team was one of the city’s top three bla...
04/18/2021

From 2012 “The Color of Baseball in Boston” exhibit: In 1932, the Boston Giants team was one of the city’s top three black teams. Oliver Marcelle served as the team’s first manager. The Boston Giants were soon replaced by Burlin White’s Greater Boston Royal Giants. White booked games as far away as Ohio and according to one report, “the Royal Giants have their own bus, and attired in neat blue-grey uniforms with dark caps and red, white, and blue stockings, they make a very attractive appearance on the field.”

During the late 1930s, the press referred to the team by a few different names. Some reports listed the team as the Boston Giants, others called them the Royal Giants, and still others termed them the Royal Colored Giants. Regardless of the name, the team became the only black club to represent the city by the early 1940s.

In 1942, team manager Burlin White enlisted the services of his famous battery mate, “Cannonball” Jackman, who left the Philadelphia Giants to play for the Boston Royal Giants. Jackman’s reunion with White ushered in a resurgence of professional black baseball in Boston.

Boston Royal Giants Envelope
Image Courtesy of Layton Revel, Private Collection

From 2012 “The Color of Baseball in Boston” exhibit: In 1932, the Boston Giants team was one of the city’s top three black teams. Oliver Marcelle served as the team’s first manager. The Boston Giants were soon replaced by Burlin White’s Greater Boston Royal Giants. White booked games as far away as Ohio and according to one report, “the Royal Giants have their own bus, and attired in neat blue-grey uniforms with dark caps and red, white, and blue stockings, they make a very attractive appearance on the field.”

During the late 1930s, the press referred to the team by a few different names. Some reports listed the team as the Boston Giants, others called them the Royal Giants, and still others termed them the Royal Colored Giants. Regardless of the name, the team became the only black club to represent the city by the early 1940s.

In 1942, team manager Burlin White enlisted the services of his famous battery mate, “Cannonball” Jackman, who left the Philadelphia Giants to play for the Boston Royal Giants. Jackman’s reunion with White ushered in a resurgence of professional black baseball in Boston.

Boston Royal Giants Envelope
Image Courtesy of Layton Revel, Private Collection

Online submissions for the 2021 MAAH Stone Book Award have CLOSED. Physical copies of books must be received by April 23...
04/16/2021

Online submissions for the 2021 MAAH Stone Book Award have CLOSED. Physical copies of books must be received by April 23rd. Check out the MAAH Stone Book Award social media pages for updates!

Online submissions for the 2021 MAAH Stone Book Award have CLOSED. Physical copies of books must be received by April 23rd. Check out the MAAH Stone Book Award social media pages for updates!

In lieu of Daffodil Weekend on Nantucket, check out “Blooming #ACK Businesses!” A month-long event dedicated to highligh...
04/15/2021

In lieu of Daffodil Weekend on Nantucket, check out “Blooming #ACK Businesses!” A month-long event dedicated to highlighting the businesses on Nantucket as they head into their busy season. Walk the Black Heritage Trail on Nantucket and see what the island has to offer. 4/16-5/16

In lieu of Daffodil Weekend on Nantucket, check out “Blooming #ACK Businesses!” A month-long event dedicated to highlighting the businesses on Nantucket as they head into their busy season. Walk the Black Heritage Trail on Nantucket and see what the island has to offer. 4/16-5/16

This poem was published in the “New Orleans Tribune,” a bilingual newspaper founded by and for African Americans in 1864...
04/14/2021

This poem was published in the “New Orleans Tribune,” a bilingual newspaper founded by and for African Americans in 1864, four months after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. #NationalPoetryMonth

This poem was published in the “New Orleans Tribune,” a bilingual newspaper founded by and for African Americans in 1864, four months after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. #NationalPoetryMonth

May 25 at 6:30pm: Join us in partnership with the Boston Public Library, the State Library of Massachusetts, and America...
04/12/2021

May 25 at 6:30pm: Join us in partnership with the Boston Public Library, the State Library of Massachusetts, and American Ancestors and New England Historic Genealogical Society for an online conversation with Skip Finley, author of Whaling Captains of Color: America's First Meritocracy. This talk is part of the BPL's Repairing America Series.

The history of whaling as an industry on this continent has been well-told in books, including some that have been bestsellers, but what hasn’t been told is the story of whaling’s leaders of color in an era when the only other option was slavery. Whaling was one of the first American industries to exhibit diversity. A man became a captain not because he was white or well connected, but because he knew how to kill a whale. Along the way, he could learn navigation and reading and writing. Whaling presented a tantalizing alternative to mainland life.

“The story of people of color in the whaling industry is a fascinating and hitherto unexplored subject enough, but Skip Finley’s brilliant survey of the black captains and crew of the New England whale fisheries takes it one step further. His swift and sure narrative is excitingly told, bringing a fresh and vibrant focus to a vital part of American, and indeed global, history.” — Philip H***e, author of The Whale


Register and more: https://bpl.bibliocommons.com/events/6053bc5d90c24e2400f93b84

May 25 at 6:30pm: Join us in partnership with the Boston Public Library, the State Library of Massachusetts, and American Ancestors and New England Historic Genealogical Society for an online conversation with Skip Finley, author of Whaling Captains of Color: America's First Meritocracy. This talk is part of the BPL's Repairing America Series.

The history of whaling as an industry on this continent has been well-told in books, including some that have been bestsellers, but what hasn’t been told is the story of whaling’s leaders of color in an era when the only other option was slavery. Whaling was one of the first American industries to exhibit diversity. A man became a captain not because he was white or well connected, but because he knew how to kill a whale. Along the way, he could learn navigation and reading and writing. Whaling presented a tantalizing alternative to mainland life.

“The story of people of color in the whaling industry is a fascinating and hitherto unexplored subject enough, but Skip Finley’s brilliant survey of the black captains and crew of the New England whale fisheries takes it one step further. His swift and sure narrative is excitingly told, bringing a fresh and vibrant focus to a vital part of American, and indeed global, history.” — Philip H***e, author of The Whale


Register and more: https://bpl.bibliocommons.com/events/6053bc5d90c24e2400f93b84

#FridayFeeling Lewis Hayden, conductor of the Underground Railroad, abolitionist, and Boston community leader
04/09/2021

#FridayFeeling Lewis Hayden, conductor of the Underground Railroad, abolitionist, and Boston community leader

#FridayFeeling Lewis Hayden, conductor of the Underground Railroad, abolitionist, and Boston community leader

Shout-out to the Boston Cultural Council for supporting MAAH again this year! We really appreciate the contribution for ...
04/08/2021

Shout-out to the Boston Cultural Council for supporting MAAH again this year! We really appreciate the contribution for MAAH programming, whether online or at the museum.

Shout-out to the Boston Cultural Council for supporting MAAH again this year! We really appreciate the contribution for MAAH programming, whether online or at the museum.

Charles Lennox Remond had a prominent career as an orator and advocate for abolition. #WednesdayWisdom
04/07/2021

Charles Lennox Remond had a prominent career as an orator and advocate for abolition. #WednesdayWisdom

Charles Lennox Remond had a prominent career as an orator and advocate for abolition. #WednesdayWisdom

Hubert Collins documented African American community activities and people from the 1890s into the 1920s.  The Museum is...
04/05/2021

Hubert Collins documented African American community activities and people from the 1890s into the 1920s. The Museum is proud to own 103 of his glass plate negatives, including this picture of three young boys. Although Collins is acknowledged as a major turn-of-the-century documentary photographer, little is currently known about his life.

Hubert Collins documented African American community activities and people from the 1890s into the 1920s. The Museum is proud to own 103 of his glass plate negatives, including this picture of three young boys. Although Collins is acknowledged as a major turn-of-the-century documentary photographer, little is currently known about his life.

The African Meeting House on Nantucket functioned much like its predecessor in Boston as the heart of its black communit...
04/04/2021

The African Meeting House on Nantucket functioned much like its predecessor in Boston as the heart of its black community. Not only did the building function as a Baptist church, but also as a school building, lecture hall, and even a vaccination center in 1834. IC: Joseph Ferraro, National Trust for Historic Preservation

The African Meeting House on Nantucket functioned much like its predecessor in Boston as the heart of its black community. Not only did the building function as a Baptist church, but also as a school building, lecture hall, and even a vaccination center in 1834. IC: Joseph Ferraro, National Trust for Historic Preservation

Address

46 Joy St
Boston, MA
02114

General information

Admission: Adults- $10 Youth (13-17) and Seniors (62+)- $8 Members and Children 12 and under- Free Group rate (20+ people)- $3.50 per person in group Hours: Mondays-Saturdays 10AM-4PM Twitter: https://twitter.com/MAAHMuseum Instagram: https://instagram.com/maahmuseum/

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

+16177250022

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The Museum of African American History inspires all generations to embrace and interpret the authentic stories of New Englanders of African descent, and those who found common cause with them, in their quest for freedom and justice. Through its historic buildings, collections, and programs, the Museum expands cultural understanding and promotes dignity and respect for all. .


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Comments

She is a Boston based artist She talks about how free black folks during slavery traveled internationally on business, to attend school, etc. Introducing Strong Inspirations youtube channel "Where black history lives"
This image is from my Walk of Fame Project that has been proposed to the Lowell City Council last year 2020. I found a tad more info on the man and his family that is rather impressive. Harry Haskell Lew-(1884-1963), Born in Lowell, Ma Was the first African American to integrate professional basketball in 1902. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ His great-great-grandfather, Barzillai Lew, was a freeman who served in the American Revolution. And was a fifer and served with Captain John Ford at the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775. Barzillai was immortalized in the Duke Ellington song "Barzillai Lou". His great-great-aunt Lucy Lew and her husband Thomas Dalton were civil rights activists. The home of his grandparents, Adrastus and Elizabeth Lew, was a station on the Underground Railroad. His father, William Lew, was a delegate to the 1891 Equal Rights Convention in Boston, Massachusetts. That's an impressive family. To top things off, Barzillai Lew, is buried at the Clay Pit Cemetary, in Lowell, Ma, where the New Market Basket is located. This man and his family need to be held up and remembered. Especially during these times. Stuff like this is being ignored and it needs to be celebrated and honored for what they have done to help shape this nation, regardless of the past. To make a better future for all. He and his family is what is needed to inspire people of all Races And not ignored or covered in the pavement or hidden by weeds. Sending to you folks to see what can be done. This man and his family are National Heroes within the Black Community and all others. In today's age, it is history like this that needs to be honored and respected. Please pass this along and make it known.
It is time to come together as one to practice cooperative economics in order to achieve financial independence from the system designed to hold us back. "The U.S. government has a long history of facilitating wealth for white Americans. From at least the Land Act of 1785, Congress sought to transfer wealth to citizens on terms that were quite favorable. In some instances, land could be attained by the luck of the draw — but only if you were a white man. It was never the case that a white asset-based middle class simply emerged. Rather, it was government policy, and to some extent literal government giveaways, that provided whites the finance, education, land and infrastructure to accumulate and pass down wealth. While the 1866 Homestead Act sought to include blacks specifically in the transfer of public lands to private farmers, discrimination and poor implementation doomed the policy. Black politicians during Reconstruction attempted to use tax policy to force land on the market, but this was met with violent resistance." Published: March 4, 2019 by Darrick Hamilton and Trevon Logan It's time for us to play catch up. Contact me and I'll tell you how. SERIOUS INQUIRERS ONLY!!!! Contact me at [email protected] to find out how to gain financial independence!!
“Carrying the Colors” is the first ever biography of an illiterate escaped slave turned Civil War hero. Andrew Jackson Smith was a member of the 55th Massachusetts: “This book is one of the best biographies of an individual USCT soldier to reach the market in recent memory…hard to put down” Civil War News review Carrying the Colors chronicles race as a salient and destructive force in American life, but so too the inspiring power of commitment, determination, and pride.”—John David Smith, author of Lincoln and the U.S. Colored Troops Through impressive research and insightful prose, Beckman and MacDonald have crafted a compelling portrait of an American hero.”—Russell S. Bonds, author of Stealing the General: The Great Locomotive Chase and the First Medal of Honor https://www.facebook.com/Carrying-the-Colors-Book-101137168141531/?modal=admin_todo_tour
Archer Alexander the Slave on The statue in the city's Park Square is a replica of the Emancipation Memorial in Washington and depicts Lincoln with one hand raised above a kneeling man with broken shackles on his wrists.
Trying to fashion a more inclusive Revolutionary War history for NH. Meet Jude Hall, black soldier at Bunker Hill.
Caribbean roots? You don’t want to miss this
I am surprised that more information is not mentioned on your page about the 54th Mass. Reenactors, Company A, They are the ones that are sill keeping the true story of the 'Regiment' alive. They have been active since the movie 'Glory' premiered, and are still here in Readville, Mass to 'Represent' .
Coach Paul "Bear" Bryant was an inspiration to many great men including Nantucket's own Legendary Football Coach Vito Capizzo and Football greats from Nathan to Namath. Together with Hank Erwin (who will speak after the film), they change the face of a team, a community, & a nation. FREE
Join I Am Harriet! We Want to Hear From EVERYONE at the Community Listening Session! There are Alternatives! NO More Luxury Condos, called Tubman Place! Did you help build the Harriet Tubman ~ Brick by Brick -- We REALLY want to hear from you! What programs did you take, did you get your GED here, did you go to the daycare that used to be at the Harriet Tubman, what events, art exhibits, political or community meetings did you attend or host at the Harriet Tubman House, What Memories do you HAVE ~ WE WANT TO HEAR IT ALL! We Are All Harriet 💛