Museum of African American History - Boston and Nantucket

Museum of African American History - Boston and Nantucket MAAH is New England’s largest museum dedicated to preserving, conserving and interpreting the contributions of African Americans. Nestled on Boston’s Beacon Hill and at Nantucket’s Five Corners are some of the nation’s most important National Historic Landmarks.

The Museum’s two campuses feature the earliest churches and schools still standing in the land that were built by and for black communities. Each is beautifully restored and worthy of any journey. Our historic sites, talks, tours, videos, collections, and programs are rooted in the past and connected to the present. From the American Revolution to the Abolitionist and Niagara Movements, experience

The Museum’s two campuses feature the earliest churches and schools still standing in the land that were built by and for black communities. Each is beautifully restored and worthy of any journey. Our historic sites, talks, tours, videos, collections, and programs are rooted in the past and connected to the present. From the American Revolution to the Abolitionist and Niagara Movements, experience

Operating as usual

11/10/2021
The Living Legend Awards Are Back!

The 22nd Annual Living Legend Awards Are Back! With Host Anthony Anderson. Join Us on Sunday, December 5, 2021 at 4:00 PM In-Person / 4:30 PM Virtually

We were excited to host Professor Radhakrishnan's class from Wellesley College  last week! Thank you all for coming. Sch...
11/10/2021

We were excited to host Professor Radhakrishnan's class from Wellesley College last week! Thank you all for coming. Schedule your next class visit via our online portal: https://www.maah.org/education

We were excited to host Professor Radhakrishnan's class from Wellesley College last week! Thank you all for coming. Schedule your next class visit via our online portal: https://www.maah.org/education

Since we rotate exhibits, our exhibit space is always changing. This #TransformationTuesday, check out our transformed g...
11/09/2021

Since we rotate exhibits, our exhibit space is always changing. This #TransformationTuesday, check out our transformed gallery from “Picturing Frederick Douglass” (bottom) to “The Jazz Scene in Boston: Telling the Local Story” (top) on display now!

Since we rotate exhibits, our exhibit space is always changing. This #TransformationTuesday, check out our transformed gallery from “Picturing Frederick Douglass” (bottom) to “The Jazz Scene in Boston: Telling the Local Story” (top) on display now!

The Living Legends Gala is back, with celebrity Host —Anthony Anderson, back by popular demand, at the city's newest hot...
11/07/2021

The Living Legends Gala is back, with celebrity Host —Anthony Anderson, back by popular demand, at the city's newest hot spot, The Newbury Boston. We’re one month away from our annual Living Legends Awards!
Be sure to get your ticket here: https://www.eventcreate.com/e/llg experience the compelling stories of the past and present, inspire pride, and continue the legacy of equality for all.

The Living Legends Gala is back, with celebrity Host —Anthony Anderson, back by popular demand, at the city's newest hot spot, The Newbury Boston. We’re one month away from our annual Living Legends Awards!
Be sure to get your ticket here: https://www.eventcreate.com/e/llg experience the compelling stories of the past and present, inspire pride, and continue the legacy of equality for all.

The abolition of the slave trade in 1808 was an occasion for celebration within Boston's black community and others. Jed...
11/03/2021

The abolition of the slave trade in 1808 was an occasion for celebration within Boston's black community and others. Jedidiah Morse was a white pastor from Charlestown, who was invited by the black community to take part in their celebration, which included a procession of over two hundred people to the African Meeting House, where this sermon was delivered. The African Society, an organization which had been established in 1796, organized a committee to see to the publication of Rev. Morse's sermon following the event.

This object is on display in our current “Selections from the Collection” exhibit.

The abolition of the slave trade in 1808 was an occasion for celebration within Boston's black community and others. Jedidiah Morse was a white pastor from Charlestown, who was invited by the black community to take part in their celebration, which included a procession of over two hundred people to the African Meeting House, where this sermon was delivered. The African Society, an organization which had been established in 1796, organized a committee to see to the publication of Rev. Morse's sermon following the event.

This object is on display in our current “Selections from the Collection” exhibit.

#OnThisDay in 1820, John J. Smith was born free in Richmond, Virginia. At age 28, Smith moved to Boston, where he set up...
11/02/2021

#OnThisDay in 1820, John J. Smith was born free in Richmond, Virginia. At age 28, Smith moved to Boston, where he set up a barber shop on the corner of Howard and Bulfinch Streets. His shop became a gathering place for self-liberated people and abolitionists. During the Civil War, Smith worked in Washington D.C. as a recruitment officer for the all-black 5th Cavalry. After the war, Smith was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives three times.

His home is on the Black Heritage Trail and his portrait is currently hanging in our “Selections from the Collection” exhibit!

#OnThisDay in 1820, John J. Smith was born free in Richmond, Virginia. At age 28, Smith moved to Boston, where he set up a barber shop on the corner of Howard and Bulfinch Streets. His shop became a gathering place for self-liberated people and abolitionists. During the Civil War, Smith worked in Washington D.C. as a recruitment officer for the all-black 5th Cavalry. After the war, Smith was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives three times.

His home is on the Black Heritage Trail and his portrait is currently hanging in our “Selections from the Collection” exhibit!

TOMORROW is the Boston Mayoral Election. Be sure to get out and vote!
11/01/2021

TOMORROW is the Boston Mayoral Election. Be sure to get out and vote!

TOMORROW is the Boston Mayoral Election. Be sure to get out and vote!

This military sleeve button was found in the 44 Joy Street privy. The button features an eagle perched atop and anchor w...
10/28/2021

This military sleeve button was found in the 44 Joy Street privy. The button features an eagle perched atop and anchor with 13 stars surrounding. This matches regulation dress for naval officers in 1813, meaning this button could be associated with the War of 1812. While we cannot identify the owner with certainty, Robert Curry is listed as a tenant at 44 Joy Street from 1826 to 1828, and identified as a mariner, which was one of the most common occupations for African Americans in antebellum Boston.

Thank you for following our posts this #MAArchaeologyMonth! We hope you learned something about the archaeology of our sites on Joy St. Special thanks to @umassboston for their help uncovering these great artifacts!

This military sleeve button was found in the 44 Joy Street privy. The button features an eagle perched atop and anchor with 13 stars surrounding. This matches regulation dress for naval officers in 1813, meaning this button could be associated with the War of 1812. While we cannot identify the owner with certainty, Robert Curry is listed as a tenant at 44 Joy Street from 1826 to 1828, and identified as a mariner, which was one of the most common occupations for African Americans in antebellum Boston.

Thank you for following our posts this #MAArchaeologyMonth! We hope you learned something about the archaeology of our sites on Joy St. Special thanks to @umassboston for their help uncovering these great artifacts!

This advertisement published in “The Liberator” #OnThisDay lets readers know of a lecture on the fallacy of Phrenology a...
10/27/2021

This advertisement published in “The Liberator” #OnThisDay lets readers know of a lecture on the fallacy of Phrenology at the Smith School House. Phrenology is “the study of the conformation of the skull as indicative of mental faculties and traits of character” and was used to justify the enslavement of African Americans.

This advertisement published in “The Liberator” #OnThisDay lets readers know of a lecture on the fallacy of Phrenology at the Smith School House. Phrenology is “the study of the conformation of the skull as indicative of mental faculties and traits of character” and was used to justify the enslavement of African Americans.

Our Collections team is back from working on the storage optimization project on Nantucket! We received a part two to ou...
10/26/2021

Our Collections team is back from working on the storage optimization project on Nantucket! We received a part two to our last grant from Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Thank you IMLS for allowing us to do this necessary project. #ACK

Our Collections team is back from working on the storage optimization project on Nantucket! We received a part two to our last grant from Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). Thank you IMLS for allowing us to do this necessary project. #ACK

We’re learning more and more about Florence Higginbotham as we continue our storage optimization project on Nantucket! I...
10/25/2021

We’re learning more and more about Florence Higginbotham as we continue our storage optimization project on Nantucket! It seems that Ms. Higginbotham read tea leaves. We found this rare 1890s fine bone chine fortune telling cup on Nantucket!

A vulcanized (hardened with sulfur) rubber comb was found in the 44 Joy Street privy (outhouse) during our 2006 archaeol...
10/23/2021

A vulcanized (hardened with sulfur) rubber comb was found in the 44 Joy Street privy (outhouse) during our 2006 archaeology project preparing for the renovation of the African Meeting House. The comb likely dates to the late 1850s or 1860s. #MAArchaeologyMonth

A vulcanized (hardened with sulfur) rubber comb was found in the 44 Joy Street privy (outhouse) during our 2006 archaeology project preparing for the renovation of the African Meeting House. The comb likely dates to the late 1850s or 1860s. #MAArchaeologyMonth

This is a picture of the Abiel Smith School basement in 1990. Though this picture is a little hard to see, you can tell ...
10/22/2021

This is a picture of the Abiel Smith School basement in 1990. Though this picture is a little hard to see, you can tell there have been dramatic changes in the last 30 years.

This is a picture of the Abiel Smith School basement in 1990. Though this picture is a little hard to see, you can tell there have been dramatic changes in the last 30 years.

#ThrowbackThursday to the 30th anniversary celebration of Boston African American National Historic Site (BOAF) back in ...
10/21/2021

#ThrowbackThursday to the 30th anniversary celebration of Boston African American National Historic Site (BOAF) back in 2010. Here, all the presenters including Former MAAH Executive Directors Beverly Morgan-Welch & Byron Rushing, Carmen Fields, Charles Dutton, and others!

Image Courtesy of Craig Bailey

#ThrowbackThursday to the 30th anniversary celebration of Boston African American National Historic Site (BOAF) back in 2010. Here, all the presenters including Former MAAH Executive Directors Beverly Morgan-Welch & Byron Rushing, Carmen Fields, Charles Dutton, and others!

Image Courtesy of Craig Bailey

Join us this Saturday!
10/20/2021

Join us this Saturday!

Join us this Saturday!

Last week the Boston Business Journal announced their “Power 50” list. This year the list is “The Movement Makers” and f...
10/20/2021

Last week the Boston Business Journal announced their “Power 50” list. This year the list is “The Movement Makers” and features MAAH President & CEO Leon Wilson.

Last week the Boston Business Journal announced their “Power 50” list. This year the list is “The Movement Makers” and features MAAH President & CEO Leon Wilson.

Here two members of the archaeological crew measure on site at the Boston African Meeting House excavation in 2005. #Arc...
10/18/2021

Here two members of the archaeological crew measure on site at the Boston African Meeting House excavation in 2005. #ArchaeologyMonth

Here two members of the archaeological crew measure on site at the Boston African Meeting House excavation in 2005. #ArchaeologyMonth

William Wells Brown published a book entitled “The Black Man: His Antecedents, His Genius, and His Achievements” in 1863...
10/16/2021

William Wells Brown published a book entitled “The Black Man: His Antecedents, His Genius, and His Achievements” in 1863. In the preface it states “If this work shall aid in vindicating the Negro’s character, and show that he is endowed with those intellectual and amiable qualities which adorn and dignify human nature, it will meet the most sanguine hopes of the writer.” This except is from the chapter on John S. Rock.

William Wells Brown published a book entitled “The Black Man: His Antecedents, His Genius, and His Achievements” in 1863. In the preface it states “If this work shall aid in vindicating the Negro’s character, and show that he is endowed with those intellectual and amiable qualities which adorn and dignify human nature, it will meet the most sanguine hopes of the writer.” This except is from the chapter on John S. Rock.

TONIGHT: The MAAH Stone Book Award! Join us at our Virtual Award Event @ 6:30pm ET as we celebrate this year's award win...
10/14/2021

TONIGHT: The MAAH Stone Book Award! Join us at our Virtual Award Event @ 6:30pm ET as we celebrate this year's award winner and finalists. Register: http://bit.ly/MAAHStone2021

TONIGHT: The MAAH Stone Book Award! Join us at our Virtual Award Event @ 6:30pm ET as we celebrate this year's award winner and finalists. Register: http://bit.ly/MAAHStone2021

John S. Rock was born free in Elsinboro Township in New Jersey. Rock worked as a teacher, a dentist, a lawyer, and a phy...
10/13/2021

John S. Rock was born free in Elsinboro Township in New Jersey. Rock worked as a teacher, a dentist, a lawyer, and a physician. Throughout his life, Rock was an eloquent supporter of social justice and community building. Rock participated in Boston’s abolitionist endeavors as a physician treating self-liberated newcomers to the city; as an orator presenting keynote addresses at the 1858 and 1860 Crispus Attucks Day celebrations and at Tremont Temple while Bostonians awaited the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863; and as a petitioner for and recruiter of black Civil War regiments. Rock died of tuberculosis in Boston in 1866 leaving behind a young son.

John S. Rock was born free in Elsinboro Township in New Jersey. Rock worked as a teacher, a dentist, a lawyer, and a physician. Throughout his life, Rock was an eloquent supporter of social justice and community building. Rock participated in Boston’s abolitionist endeavors as a physician treating self-liberated newcomers to the city; as an orator presenting keynote addresses at the 1858 and 1860 Crispus Attucks Day celebrations and at Tremont Temple while Bostonians awaited the announcement of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863; and as a petitioner for and recruiter of black Civil War regiments. Rock died of tuberculosis in Boston in 1866 leaving behind a young son.

In two days, we will be celebrating the winner and finalists of the MAAH Stone Book Award! Join us virtually at 6:30pm o...
10/12/2021
Welcome! You are invited to join a webinar: 2021 MAAH Stone Book Virtual Award Event. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email about joining the webinar.

In two days, we will be celebrating the winner and finalists of the MAAH Stone Book Award! Join us virtually at 6:30pm on October 14. We are so excited to honor our winner Daphne A. Brooks and finalists Dan Royles & Walter Johnson! Register: http://bit.ly/MAAHStone2021

Join the Museum of African American History and the James M. and Cathleen D. Stone Foundation, in partnership with the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate for the 2021 MAAH Stone Book Award Virtual Event. Hosted by Callie Crossley, host of GBH’s Under the Radar, the event will...

The Museum of African American History is CLOSED today. We will be open at 10am tomorrow.
10/11/2021

The Museum of African American History is CLOSED today. We will be open at 10am tomorrow.

The Museum of African American History is CLOSED today. We will be open at 10am tomorrow.

Common early-19th-century wares include pearlware, creamware, stoneware, redware, and porcelain, all of which were found...
10/09/2021

Common early-19th-century wares include pearlware, creamware, stoneware, redware, and porcelain, all of which were found at the Meeting House. Many hand-painted wares and some porcelain indicate that this is a high-end assemblage—perhaps a testimony to the economic position of the Meeting House.

Common early-19th-century wares include pearlware, creamware, stoneware, redware, and porcelain, all of which were found at the Meeting House. Many hand-painted wares and some porcelain indicate that this is a high-end assemblage—perhaps a testimony to the economic position of the Meeting House.

William Still was born free #OnThisDay in 1821. In 1847, Still found a job as a janitor and clerk for the Pennsylvania S...
10/07/2021

William Still was born free #OnThisDay in 1821. In 1847, Still found a job as a janitor and clerk for the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery. Shortly after that, he became an Underground Railroad conductor, assisting self-liberated people to find freedom. William Still is best known for his self-published book The Underground Railroad (1872) where he documented the stories of those who had self-emancipated themselves from the bo***ge of slavery. The Underground Railroad is the only first person account of Black activities on the Underground Railroad written and self-published by an African American. The book is now seen as one of the most important historical records to date and includes the stories of Henry “Box” Brown and Ellen and William Craft.

William Still was born free #OnThisDay in 1821. In 1847, Still found a job as a janitor and clerk for the Pennsylvania Society for the Abolition of Slavery. Shortly after that, he became an Underground Railroad conductor, assisting self-liberated people to find freedom. William Still is best known for his self-published book The Underground Railroad (1872) where he documented the stories of those who had self-emancipated themselves from the bo***ge of slavery. The Underground Railroad is the only first person account of Black activities on the Underground Railroad written and self-published by an African American. The book is now seen as one of the most important historical records to date and includes the stories of Henry “Box” Brown and Ellen and William Craft.

Congrats to our own L’Merchie Frazier, who was selected as one of the sixteen recipients of the Boston Foundation Brothe...
10/06/2021

Congrats to our own L’Merchie Frazier, who was selected as one of the sixteen recipients of the Boston Foundation Brother Thomas Fellowship! The award is given every other year to “support and celebrate a diverse group of Greater Boston artists working at a high level of excellence in a range of disciplines—the visual, performing, literary, media and craft arts—and to enhance their ability to thrive and create new work.”

Congrats to our own L’Merchie Frazier, who was selected as one of the sixteen recipients of the Boston Foundation Brother Thomas Fellowship! The award is given every other year to “support and celebrate a diverse group of Greater Boston artists working at a high level of excellence in a range of disciplines—the visual, performing, literary, media and craft arts—and to enhance their ability to thrive and create new work.”

Timeline Photos
10/05/2021

Timeline Photos

Join us at our Virtual Award Event on October 14th @ 6:30pm ET as we celebrate the 4th Winner of the MAAH Stone Book Award, Dr. Daphne Brooks' 'Liner Notes for the Revolution'. Register now! bit.ly/MAAHStone2021

Address

46 Joy St
Boston, MA
02114

General information

Admission: Adults- $10 Youth (13-17) and Seniors (62+)- $8 Members and Children 12 and under- Free Group rate (20+ people)- $3.50 per person in group Hours: Mondays-Saturdays 10AM-4PM Twitter: https://twitter.com/MAAHMuseum Instagram: https://instagram.com/maahmuseum/

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 4pm
Tuesday 10am - 4pm
Wednesday 10am - 4pm
Thursday 10am - 4pm
Friday 10am - 4pm

Telephone

+16177250022

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The Museum of African American History inspires all generations to embrace and interpret the authentic stories of New Englanders of African descent, and those who found common cause with them, in their quest for freedom and justice. Through its historic buildings, collections, and programs, the Museum expands cultural understanding and promotes dignity and respect for all. .


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"This book is one of the best biographies of an individual USCT soldier to reach the market in recent memory. It is very readable, well documented, and hard to put down. . . . This book is highly recommended for any Civil War enthusiast, especially those with an interest in the contributions of black soldiers to the Union victory."—Civil War News
Bill Costen, first and only African American hot air balloon "Master" in the world to be featured in documentary film "Balloon Man" - https://www.facebook.com/BalloonManMovie
Bill Costen, first and only African American hot air balloon "Master" in the world to be featured in documentary film "Balloon Man" - https://www.facebook.com/BalloonManMovie
She is a Boston based artist She talks about how free black folks during slavery traveled internationally on business, to attend school, etc. Introducing Strong Inspirations youtube channel "Where black history lives"
This image is from my Walk of Fame Project that has been proposed to the Lowell City Council last year 2020. I found a tad more info on the man and his family that is rather impressive. Harry Haskell Lew-(1884-1963), Born in Lowell, Ma Was the first African American to integrate professional basketball in 1902. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ His great-great-grandfather, Barzillai Lew, was a freeman who served in the American Revolution. And was a fifer and served with Captain John Ford at the Battle of Bunker Hill on June 17, 1775. Barzillai was immortalized in the Duke Ellington song "Barzillai Lou". His great-great-aunt Lucy Lew and her husband Thomas Dalton were civil rights activists. The home of his grandparents, Adrastus and Elizabeth Lew, was a station on the Underground Railroad. His father, William Lew, was a delegate to the 1891 Equal Rights Convention in Boston, Massachusetts. That's an impressive family. To top things off, Barzillai Lew, is buried at the Clay Pit Cemetary, in Lowell, Ma, where the New Market Basket is located. This man and his family need to be held up and remembered. Especially during these times. Stuff like this is being ignored and it needs to be celebrated and honored for what they have done to help shape this nation, regardless of the past. To make a better future for all. He and his family is what is needed to inspire people of all Races And not ignored or covered in the pavement or hidden by weeds. Sending to you folks to see what can be done. This man and his family are National Heroes within the Black Community and all others. In today's age, it is history like this that needs to be honored and respected. Please pass this along and make it known.
It is time to come together as one to practice cooperative economics in order to achieve financial independence from the system designed to hold us back. "The U.S. government has a long history of facilitating wealth for white Americans. From at least the Land Act of 1785, Congress sought to transfer wealth to citizens on terms that were quite favorable. In some instances, land could be attained by the luck of the draw — but only if you were a white man. It was never the case that a white asset-based middle class simply emerged. Rather, it was government policy, and to some extent literal government giveaways, that provided whites the finance, education, land and infrastructure to accumulate and pass down wealth. While the 1866 Homestead Act sought to include blacks specifically in the transfer of public lands to private farmers, discrimination and poor implementation doomed the policy. Black politicians during Reconstruction attempted to use tax policy to force land on the market, but this was met with violent resistance." Published: March 4, 2019 by Darrick Hamilton and Trevon Logan It's time for us to play catch up. Contact me and I'll tell you how. SERIOUS INQUIRERS ONLY!!!! Contact me at [email protected] to find out how to gain financial independence!!
“Carrying the Colors” is the first ever biography of an illiterate escaped slave turned Civil War hero. Andrew Jackson Smith was a member of the 55th Massachusetts: “This book is one of the best biographies of an individual USCT soldier to reach the market in recent memory…hard to put down” Civil War News review Carrying the Colors chronicles race as a salient and destructive force in American life, but so too the inspiring power of commitment, determination, and pride.”—John David Smith, author of Lincoln and the U.S. Colored Troops Through impressive research and insightful prose, Beckman and MacDonald have crafted a compelling portrait of an American hero.”—Russell S. Bonds, author of Stealing the General: The Great Locomotive Chase and the First Medal of Honor https://www.facebook.com/Carrying-the-Colors-Book-101137168141531/?modal=admin_todo_tour
Archer Alexander the Slave on The statue in the city's Park Square is a replica of the Emancipation Memorial in Washington and depicts Lincoln with one hand raised above a kneeling man with broken shackles on his wrists.
Trying to fashion a more inclusive Revolutionary War history for NH. Meet Jude Hall, black soldier at Bunker Hill.
Caribbean roots? You don’t want to miss this