North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort

North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort The NC Maritime Museum at Beaufort collects, preserves, researches, documents and interprets the maritime history, culture and environment of coastal North Carolina.

The N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort reflects coastal life and interprets lighthouses and lifesaving stations, the seafood industry, motorboats, and more. Studies in marine life, science, and ecology are available for all ages. The Beaufort museum is the repository for artifacts from Blackbeard’s wrecked flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, among them cannons, grenades, belt buckles and beads. The Harv

The N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort reflects coastal life and interprets lighthouses and lifesaving stations, the seafood industry, motorboats, and more. Studies in marine life, science, and ecology are available for all ages. The Beaufort museum is the repository for artifacts from Blackbeard’s wrecked flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, among them cannons, grenades, belt buckles and beads. The Harv

Operating as usual

On this day in 1858 The Weekly Standard of Raleigh published an article about the benefits of the recently completed rai...
10/27/2021

On this day in 1858 The Weekly Standard of Raleigh published an article about the benefits of the recently completed rail line to the coast, which was finished that summer.

The story relays how much of the agricultural produce from the Charlotte area was exported to Norfolk and Charleston to be shipped, instead of from our own ports. With the new rail line to Carolina City (Morehead City), the much more navigable Beaufort Inlet, and the areas close proximity to the ocean, hopes were high that movement of commerce through the region would increase. The author also made claims that an entire rail network would converge at Beaufort.

As evidenced by this 1880 rail map of the state, Beaufort did not become a major destination of commerce carried by trains. Rail lines are highlighted in yellow, green, purple, and orange. By this time, the only railroad coming into the area was the Atlantic & North Carolina. The port at Wilmington was the terminus for five different lines.

On this day in 1858 The Weekly Standard of Raleigh published an article about the benefits of the recently completed rail line to the coast, which was finished that summer.

The story relays how much of the agricultural produce from the Charlotte area was exported to Norfolk and Charleston to be shipped, instead of from our own ports. With the new rail line to Carolina City (Morehead City), the much more navigable Beaufort Inlet, and the areas close proximity to the ocean, hopes were high that movement of commerce through the region would increase. The author also made claims that an entire rail network would converge at Beaufort.

As evidenced by this 1880 rail map of the state, Beaufort did not become a major destination of commerce carried by trains. Rail lines are highlighted in yellow, green, purple, and orange. By this time, the only railroad coming into the area was the Atlantic & North Carolina. The port at Wilmington was the terminus for five different lines.

10/25/2021

Due to an unexpected water outage, the museum will be closed to the public today.

On this day in 1851...Oyster shells for sale! The Tarboro Press out of Edgecombe County ran an advertisement for oyster ...
10/25/2021

On this day in 1851...
Oyster shells for sale! The Tarboro Press out of Edgecombe County ran an advertisement for oyster shells, targeting farmers of the area. The product was shipped from the coast up the Tar River.
Because the shells have a high calcium content they can be used to help balance soil ph. Nitrate uptake can improve, good enzymes can form in the soil, and plant cell walls can become stronger, all from the addition of oyster shells to the land.

On this day in 1851...
Oyster shells for sale! The Tarboro Press out of Edgecombe County ran an advertisement for oyster shells, targeting farmers of the area. The product was shipped from the coast up the Tar River.
Because the shells have a high calcium content they can be used to help balance soil ph. Nitrate uptake can improve, good enzymes can form in the soil, and plant cell walls can become stronger, all from the addition of oyster shells to the land.

On this day in 1908...When you run out of provisions but the U.S.L.S.S. is there to help!
10/24/2021

On this day in 1908...
When you run out of provisions but the U.S.L.S.S. is there to help!

On this day in 1908...
When you run out of provisions but the U.S.L.S.S. is there to help!

Fish Friday!Comparing Mackerels. With our recent posts about some of these species we thought it might be fun to look at...
10/22/2021

Fish Friday!
Comparing Mackerels. With our recent posts about some of these species we thought it might be fun to look at them side by side. The geographic ranges and species lengths are taken from various literature sources. The possibility exists that these fish may be found outside of the listed regions, and you might catch one bigger than the size listed.

Fish Friday!
Comparing Mackerels. With our recent posts about some of these species we thought it might be fun to look at them side by side. The geographic ranges and species lengths are taken from various literature sources. The possibility exists that these fish may be found outside of the listed regions, and you might catch one bigger than the size listed.

On this day in 1908 the small gas powered yacht Ventura anchored 1 mile NE of the U.S. Life-Saving Station Cape Fear. Th...
10/20/2021

On this day in 1908 the small gas powered yacht Ventura anchored 1 mile NE of the U.S. Life-Saving Station Cape Fear. The Ventura was cruising from New York to Florida but encountered bad weather, causing the captain to lose bearings. Those on the yacht fired signal flares, alarming the surfmen at Station Cape Fear who promptly responded with assistance. There was no damage to the Ventura, and both people on board were not injured.
Portion of a 1909 chart showing vicinity of Smith Island (Bald Head) and the location of Station Cape Fear on the eastern shore of the island.

On this day in 1908 the small gas powered yacht Ventura anchored 1 mile NE of the U.S. Life-Saving Station Cape Fear. The Ventura was cruising from New York to Florida but encountered bad weather, causing the captain to lose bearings. Those on the yacht fired signal flares, alarming the surfmen at Station Cape Fear who promptly responded with assistance. There was no damage to the Ventura, and both people on board were not injured.
Portion of a 1909 chart showing vicinity of Smith Island (Bald Head) and the location of Station Cape Fear on the eastern shore of the island.

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10/19/2021

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Yep.

This article from The Beaufort News dated October 18, 1934 reports that a cero mackerel was caught on a fishing trip out...
10/18/2021

This article from The Beaufort News dated October 18, 1934 reports that a cero mackerel was caught on a fishing trip out of Beaufort. There are several species of mackerel that live off the East Coast, but the most common two off North Carolina are the Spanish and king mackerels. Cero's are usually found off south Florida, but fish being fish, maybe one swam up the coast. Or maybe king mackerels used to be called cero mackerels?

This article from The Beaufort News dated October 18, 1934 reports that a cero mackerel was caught on a fishing trip out of Beaufort. There are several species of mackerel that live off the East Coast, but the most common two off North Carolina are the Spanish and king mackerels. Cero's are usually found off south Florida, but fish being fish, maybe one swam up the coast. Or maybe king mackerels used to be called cero mackerels?

On this day in 1784 the vessel Lively, under Captain John Litchfield, departed port Currituck for Baltimore, Maryland. T...
10/17/2021

On this day in 1784 the vessel Lively, under Captain John Litchfield, departed port Currituck for Baltimore, Maryland. The ship was carrying whale oil to northern markets. It is not known if the oil was obtained from the whale fishery along our coast, or if the Lively had just stopped in port while passing through.
Port Currituck was referring to the safe harbor inside Currituck Inlet. A customs house associated with the court in Currituck would have recorded the cargo before the vessel left.
This map dated 1780 shows the inlet as "New Currituck Inlet" (an earlier Currituck Inlet existed a little farther north along the coast when this one opened in the early 1700s). The words "Court House" appear on the map on the mainland across Currituck Sound from New Currituck Inlet. The inlet closed in some time around 1830.

On this day in 1784 the vessel Lively, under Captain John Litchfield, departed port Currituck for Baltimore, Maryland. The ship was carrying whale oil to northern markets. It is not known if the oil was obtained from the whale fishery along our coast, or if the Lively had just stopped in port while passing through.
Port Currituck was referring to the safe harbor inside Currituck Inlet. A customs house associated with the court in Currituck would have recorded the cargo before the vessel left.
This map dated 1780 shows the inlet as "New Currituck Inlet" (an earlier Currituck Inlet existed a little farther north along the coast when this one opened in the early 1700s). The words "Court House" appear on the map on the mainland across Currituck Sound from New Currituck Inlet. The inlet closed in some time around 1830.

Fish Friday!If you're going to get some oysters to consume, whether from a licensed dealer or harvested on your own, cli...
10/15/2021
Tips for a healthy oyster eating; Hand harvest from public bottom begins Friday | Island Free Press

Fish Friday!
If you're going to get some oysters to consume, whether from a licensed dealer or harvested on your own, click the link below for some good tips to follow...

https://islandfreepress.org/fishing-report/tips-for-a-healthy-oyster-eating-hand-harvest-from-public-bottom-begins-friday/

Nothing says fall on the coast of North Carolina like the beginning of oyster season, when people pull out the fire grates and steamer pots and get ready to slurp down a salty treat. But those pearls of delight need to be properly stored and chilled to ensure a healthy eating experience. The N.C. Di...

10/14/2021

Part two black powder test.

10/14/2021

Museum staff test black powder recovered from an 1860s black powder pistol.

From the Outer Banks History Center page... First hand accounts from Down East oysterman Allen Taylor of Sealevel! Cover...
10/14/2021

From the Outer Banks History Center page...
First hand accounts from Down East oysterman Allen Taylor of Sealevel! Covering experiences in the oyster fishery from around 1900. They were written in 1956 for author and historian David Stick. A little hard to read but makes for a fun afternoon!

10/14/2021

Do to unexpected circumstances, our Watercraft Center will be closed today, Oct. 14. We expect to reopen on our regular schedule Friday morning.

On this day in 1908 a small gasoline powered launch in the Pamlico Sound lost its rudder when the vessel was about 2 mil...
10/13/2021

On this day in 1908 a small gasoline powered launch in the Pamlico Sound lost its rudder when the vessel was about 2 miles NNW of the U.S. Lifesaving Station Hatteras Inlet. A crew from that station responded and pulled the disabled vessel to safe harbor.
Station Hatteras Inlet was built in 1883, it was originally known as Station Ocracoke until 1904 when a new station was built on Silver Lake at the village of Ocracoke and given that name.
Navigational chart showing Hatteras Inlet, the eastern end of Ocracoke Island and the southern end of Hatteras Island. The location of the Life-Saving Station is marked on the map with the silhouette of a surfboat, and the words 'Hatteras Inlet L.S.S.'

On this day in 1908 a small gasoline powered launch in the Pamlico Sound lost its rudder when the vessel was about 2 miles NNW of the U.S. Lifesaving Station Hatteras Inlet. A crew from that station responded and pulled the disabled vessel to safe harbor.
Station Hatteras Inlet was built in 1883, it was originally known as Station Ocracoke until 1904 when a new station was built on Silver Lake at the village of Ocracoke and given that name.
Navigational chart showing Hatteras Inlet, the eastern end of Ocracoke Island and the southern end of Hatteras Island. The location of the Life-Saving Station is marked on the map with the silhouette of a surfboat, and the words 'Hatteras Inlet L.S.S.'

10/12/2021

UPDATE: We will be open our regular hours-- 10-5--on Thursday

Due to construction updates, we will have to be closed tomorrow, Oct. 13. We do expect to be able to reopen on our regular schedule on Thursday.

10/12/2021

Ready for more treats than tricks?! Join us Oct. 29!

(If you'd like to set up at Trunk or Treat, email [email protected]. Spaces are free; however, you do have to supply your own treats)

From the Cape Lookout National Seashore...These two bring the total to 10 newbies for the year! 😍🐴
10/11/2021

From the Cape Lookout National Seashore...
These two bring the total to 10 newbies for the year! 😍🐴

A large hurricane, which came to be known as Racer's Storm, began its slow departure from our coast on this day in 1837....
10/09/2021

A large hurricane, which came to be known as Racer's Storm, began its slow departure from our coast on this day in 1837. The storm had caused destruction along its circular path, from the Yucatan Peninsula, to Texas, and from Louisiana to the Carolinas. On this day it forced two steamships, the Charleston and the Home, to alter course. Both were carrying passengers and cargo and headed to South Carolina.

The Charleston was able to make it to the lee side of Cape Lookout and spend the night safely sheltered in the calm waters. The Home was not so fortunate: It suffered severe damage as the storm waves beat upon the ship. The captain, knowing he had passed Cape Hatteras point, steered the vessel to the west in order to run aground on the beach and give his passengers a better chance of survival. The steamship's boilers were extinguished by water in the engine room though, causing the vessel to become practically adrift with only the aid of short sail. The Home eventually struck the bar about a 1/4 mile off of Ocracoke Island around 10 p.m.. With only three life boats and two life preservers, the 130 people onboard had little hope. By dawn the next day only 40 survivors made it to safety.

19th century Lithograph drawing by Nathaniel Currier, Springfield Museums / D'Amour Museum of Fine Arts.

A large hurricane, which came to be known as Racer's Storm, began its slow departure from our coast on this day in 1837. The storm had caused destruction along its circular path, from the Yucatan Peninsula, to Texas, and from Louisiana to the Carolinas. On this day it forced two steamships, the Charleston and the Home, to alter course. Both were carrying passengers and cargo and headed to South Carolina.

The Charleston was able to make it to the lee side of Cape Lookout and spend the night safely sheltered in the calm waters. The Home was not so fortunate: It suffered severe damage as the storm waves beat upon the ship. The captain, knowing he had passed Cape Hatteras point, steered the vessel to the west in order to run aground on the beach and give his passengers a better chance of survival. The steamship's boilers were extinguished by water in the engine room though, causing the vessel to become practically adrift with only the aid of short sail. The Home eventually struck the bar about a 1/4 mile off of Ocracoke Island around 10 p.m.. With only three life boats and two life preservers, the 130 people onboard had little hope. By dawn the next day only 40 survivors made it to safety.

19th century Lithograph drawing by Nathaniel Currier, Springfield Museums / D'Amour Museum of Fine Arts.

Fish Friday!Meet the king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla. This fish is considered coastal pelagic, living in the ocean ...
10/08/2021

Fish Friday!
Meet the king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla. This fish is considered coastal pelagic, living in the ocean waters near the coast. They prefer warm waters and usually don't venture into anything below 68 degrees F. During the Summer and Fall months they move in close to our beaches and inlets. King mackerel love to eat mullet, menhaden, herring, sardines, and squid, and can often be seen jumping out of the water as they target their prey. These fast growing fish can reach 5 1/2 ft. in length and weigh up to 100 lbs.
A recreational coastal fishing license from the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries is required to catch king mackerel. The current limit is 3 fish at a minimum of 24 inches from tip to the fork in the tail.
Image of fisherman with freshly caught king mackerel on bow of boat at sea, courtesy of NC Div. of Marine Fisheries, date unknown.

Fish Friday!
Meet the king mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla. This fish is considered coastal pelagic, living in the ocean waters near the coast. They prefer warm waters and usually don't venture into anything below 68 degrees F. During the Summer and Fall months they move in close to our beaches and inlets. King mackerel love to eat mullet, menhaden, herring, sardines, and squid, and can often be seen jumping out of the water as they target their prey. These fast growing fish can reach 5 1/2 ft. in length and weigh up to 100 lbs.
A recreational coastal fishing license from the North Carolina Division of Marine Fisheries is required to catch king mackerel. The current limit is 3 fish at a minimum of 24 inches from tip to the fork in the tail.
Image of fisherman with freshly caught king mackerel on bow of boat at sea, courtesy of NC Div. of Marine Fisheries, date unknown.

On this day in 1863 the Civil War ironclad vessel CSS Albemarle was launched at Edwards Ferry on the Roanoke River. Suff...
10/06/2021

On this day in 1863 the Civil War ironclad vessel CSS Albemarle was launched at Edwards Ferry on the Roanoke River. Suffering damage from the occasion, the Albemarle was taken to Halifax for repairs. It was commissioned on April 17, 1864, and had success attacking Union forces at Plymouth on several occasions, as well as sinking the USS Southfield. The Albemarle was attacked with a spar torpedo in late October of 1864 on the Roanoke River at Plymouth. It sank but was later raised and taken to Norfolk, Virginia.
Image of the Albemarle at the Norfolk Navy Yard, circa 1865.

On this day in 1863 the Civil War ironclad vessel CSS Albemarle was launched at Edwards Ferry on the Roanoke River. Suffering damage from the occasion, the Albemarle was taken to Halifax for repairs. It was commissioned on April 17, 1864, and had success attacking Union forces at Plymouth on several occasions, as well as sinking the USS Southfield. The Albemarle was attacked with a spar torpedo in late October of 1864 on the Roanoke River at Plymouth. It sank but was later raised and taken to Norfolk, Virginia.
Image of the Albemarle at the Norfolk Navy Yard, circa 1865.

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315 Front St.
Beaufort, NC
28516

Opening Hours

Monday 10am - 5pm
Tuesday 10am - 5pm
Wednesday 10am - 5pm
Thursday 10am - 5pm
Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Sunday 12pm - 5pm

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The N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort reflects coastal life and interprets lighthouses and lifesaving stations, the seafood industry, motorboats, and more. Studies in marine life, science, and ecology are available for all ages. The Beaufort museum is the repository for artifacts from Blackbeard’s wrecked flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, among them cannons, grenades, belt buckles and beads. The Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center restores historic wooden vessels, builds working replicas of historic vessels and teaches boatbuilding for all ages. The mission of the North Carolina Maritime Museum in Beaufort is to collect, preserve, research, document and interpret the maritime history, culture and environment of coastal North Carolina. For more information, visit www.ncmaritimemuseums.com. Free admission to the public. Donations appreciated. About the North Carolina Maritime Museums The North Carolina Maritime Museums are part of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. The three North Carolina Maritime Museums preserve and interpret North Carolina’s coastal life and history. They paint a picture of the maritime and coastal culture including fishermen, boat builders, decoy carvers and more. They present exhibits of painters and pirates, shipwrecks and sailboats, and about marine life and protection. One historic coast...Three unique museums! In addition to the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort, the other two maritime museums include: North Carolina Maritime Museum at Southport The N.C. Maritime Museum at Southport tells the story of the Cape Fear region and its people. The museum is at the intersection of the mighty Cape Fear River and the vast Atlantic Ocean. It shares tales of pirates and pillage, blockade running and riverfront archaeology, and other nautical adventures. Ongoing educational programs for children and adults about this area that was a haven for blockade runners and also a pirate hideout are available. For more information, visit www.ncmaritimemuseums.com. Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras The Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras is named in honor of the thousands of shipwrecks that litter North Carolina’s coast, and is dedicated to the preservation and presentation of the state’s coastal and shipwreck history, with emphasis on the years 1524 through 1945. Shipwrecks associated with piracy, the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, and World Wars I and II are the subject of changing exhibits. The museum has remnants of the earliest known shipwreck found in North Carolina waters, dating to 1650. www.graveyardoftheatlantic.com About the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources The N.C. Department of Cultural Resources (NCDCR) is the state agency with a vision to be the leader in using the state's cultural resources to build the social, cultural and economic future of North Carolina. Led by Secretary Susan Kluttz, NCDCR's mission is to enrich lives and communities by creating opportunities to experience excellence in the arts, history and libraries in North Carolina that will spark creativity, stimulate learning, preserve the state's history and promote the creative economy. NCDCR was the first state organization in the nation to include all agencies for arts and culture under one umbrella. Through arts efforts led by the N.C. Arts Council, the N.C. Symphony and the N.C. Museum of Art, NCDCR offers the opportunity for enriching arts education for young and old alike and spurring the economic stimulus engine for our state's communities. NCDCR's Divisions of Archives and Records, Historical Resources, State Historic Sites and State History Museums preserve, document and interpret North Carolina's rich cultural heritage to offer experiences of learning and reflection. NCDCR's State Library of North Carolina is the principal library of state government and builds the capacity of all libraries in our state to develop and to offer access to educational resources through traditional and online collections including genealogy and resources for the blind and physically handicapped. NCDCR annually serves more than 19 million people through its 27 historic sites, seven history museums, two art museums, the nation's first state-supported Symphony Orchestra, the State Library, the N.C. Arts Council and the State Archives. NCDCR champions our state's creative industry that accounts for more than 300,000 jobs and generates nearly $18.5 billion in revenues. For more information, please call (919) 807-7300 or visit www.ncdcr.gov.

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Occupation of Dutch Fort Lijdzaamheid (Fort Agility) on Southeast Coast of Africa & Debauchery of the Pirates: 22 April - 30 June, 1722 https://bcbrooks.blogspot.com/2021/07/an-unwelcome-visit-from-pirates.html #twitterstorian #pirates #Africa
Please help ONLY if you are able. She does not want to put anybody in hardship
I did write a comment down below .. hope it got through to you ... maybe I could get some info from you to send to our Grandchildren up in ILLinois?? I heard you on the radio this morning so tryed to see if I could get through.......Gloria Kusy
H2O Captain Eco-Tour Private Boat Excursions an authorized permitee of the National Park Service to take up to 6 passengers to Shackleford Banks and The Cape Lookout National Seashore is proud to be picking up passengers in Beaufort! www.h2ocaptain.com
What were the latest discoveries at the Queen Anne location?
**Help Support the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery Memorial Campaign** @SSHMarinersGenealogy The Descendants of Sailors’ Snug Harbor Mariners have been reaching out to Historical and Genealogical Societies, Museums, Military Veterans Groups, and Concerned Citizens, to invite them to join a Letters of Support Campaign to support their efforts to gain access to the old Sailors’ Snug Harbor Cemetery on Staten Island, in New York City, to honor their Ancestors and all of the 6,500 Merchant and Naval Mariners interred there (1834-1976), by installing a Memorial Monument (Obelisk) and holding an annual Memorial Service. Some of the Mariners were famous Sea Captains and some sailed on famous Merchant and Naval ships dating back to the American Revolution. Many were just average seamen whom sailed and endured for many years on the sea under arduous conditions. The Mariners were from many areas of the United States, Canada, and foreign countries. https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/2244490/sailors-snug-harbor-cemetery Sadly, the Sailors' Snug Harbor Cemetery is devoid of gravestones or markers, except for 15 remaining gravestones. The Cemetery is closed and not open to the public. The Board of Trustees of Sailors' Snug Harbor have rejected the Descendants' requests to access the SSH Cemetery to honor their Ancestors. https://nypost.com/2018/12/29/caretakers-shoot-down-plans-for-monument-for-fallen-sailors/ The Descendants are collecting Letters of Support to persuade the Trustees of Sailors’ Snug Harbor to change their decision. You can help support the Descendants by writing a Letter of Support using the Support Letter Writing Instructions at the following link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1sZv5VFLNWw0HA-pW2i33RhbgVFQ6oExx Sailors’ Snug Harbor has a very interesting history. It was one of the first large scale retirement facilities in the United States and the first established for Merchant Mariners. It was founded by the Randall family whom were New York City Merchant Sea Captains and Privateers during the French Indian War and Patriots during the Revolutionary War. Alexander Hamilton was a friend of the Randall family and their Attorney. He helped draft the Robert Richard Randall Will in 1801 to create the SSH Trust which funded the SSH Retirement Home. During its 140+ years of operation (1833-1976) approximately 16,000 Mariners resided there. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sailors%27_Snug_Harbor
20' Wooden Sailboat For sale
Your Mini Ambassador Miss Onslow County enjoyed meeting y’all at today’s Swansboro Business Expo! Thank you for being so sweet! We look forward to joining an event very soon!
Hoping for the best for Beaufort and the Museum!
Stay safe. In our prayers
The Attack of La Concorde of Nantes, the future Queen Anne's Revenge of Blackbeard! "... but on the 28th of November last being 60 leagues from here by the 14 degrees 27 minutes of north latitude, having been attacked by two English pirate ships, one of 12, the other of 8 cannons, crewed by 250 men, commanded by Edouard Titche..." http://bcbrooks.blogspot.com/2018/08/la-concorde-de-nantes-captured.html baylusbrooks.com Read "Quest for Blackbeard" by Baylus C. Brooks: on sale now at the museum gift shop!