Holland Land Office Museum

Holland Land Office Museum The Holland Land Office Museum is the Genesee County Museum located in Batavia, New York and have been serving the community since we opened in 1894.
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As a not-for-profit business, the continued operation of the Holland Land Office Museum would not be possible without the generosity of the community. If you or your business would like to contribute to the museum, call (585) 343-4727 or email [email protected] for more information. To all of our generous sponsors and members, we thank you. Stephen M. Hawley 50 Main Street Batavia, NY 14020 585-356-2394 Genesee Patrons Cooperative Insurance Company 218 East Main Street Batavia, NY 14020 585-343-7307 Liberty Pumps 7000 Apple Tree Avenue Bergen, NY 14416 585-494-1817 Freed Maxick CPAs, P.C. 1 Evans Street Batavia, NY 14020 585-344-1967 Call Lands/My-T Acres, Inc. 8127 Lewiston Road Batavia, NY 14020 585-343-1026 Oakfield Family Medical Care 41 Main Street Oakfield, NY 14125 585-948-8077 R. A. Haitz Co., Inc. 128 Cedar Street Batavia, NY 14020 585-343-2400

Mission: The Holland Purchase Historical Society (Society) is a not-for-profit corporation committed to expanding the public’s knowledge in understanding and appreciation of the unique history of Genesee County and its people, a living history that grows with each generation. The Society owns all the artifacts housed at the Holland Land Office Museum (Museum) and shall be responsible for the management and operation of the Museum and for the management of the assets, if any, of the former Holland Land Office Foundation (Foundation).

06/12/2020
Holland Land Office Museum Artifact Series- Ralph Chandler

Be sure to also check out this week's new Artifact Series video. The topic this week is the life and career of Rear Admiral Ralph Chandler. Chandler was a veteran of the the Mexican-American War and Civil War, and commander of the Asiatic Squadron.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9z_BpBud0s

HLOM Director Ryan Duffy shares the life and career of Batavia’s foremost naval hero, Rear Admiral Ralph Chandler. Chandler fought in both the Mexican-Americ...

In case you haven't seen it yet, here is the article in yesterday's Daily News about our painted changing screen from C....
06/07/2020
HLOM: Museum seeks help identifying those pictured on unique canvas

In case you haven't seen it yet, here is the article in yesterday's Daily News about our painted changing screen from C.L. Carr's with employee's portraits from 1963.

The staff of the Holland Land Office Museum has recently come across a very interesting piece of local history. A hand-painted changing screen was found in the collection that came

We have another entry to our Exhibit Me program from our good friend David Reilly. Thank you again for your submission D...
05/26/2020

We have another entry to our Exhibit Me program from our good friend David Reilly. Thank you again for your submission Dave.
In 1856 my great grandfather, George Nussbaumer, emigrated to the United States. Previously he had been a baker in Germany. The following 3 photos show a passbook he needed to have stamped by the police when he traveled from city to city. What the book was called and a description of him are listed in the 3rd photo. Be thankful they don’t put all that information on your driver’s license!
The next 3 photos are of letters George received from his family in Germany in 1863, 1881, and finally in 1894. He died in Mendon, NY in 1908. It was very difficult to get these letters translated to English because they are in a script which has not been used in Germany in many years. I ended up having to pay an elderly woman in Germany ( in Euros)to translate them.
The final photo is of a letter that was sent to my great grandmother, Bridget O’Reilly, from her brother in 1872. At first I thought it was sent from Ireland, but was actually mailed from Australia. Many Irish emigrated there just like others did to America.A funny part of the letter is that twice he says he ,
“Needs to hunt up an old woman”and wonders if his sister knows any. By this he meant in his crude way that he needed a wife. America was a melting pot for sure.

Wishing everyone a safe and fun Memorial Day from the Holland Land Office Museum as we show our gratitude to those who h...
05/25/2020

Wishing everyone a safe and fun Memorial Day from the Holland Land Office Museum as we show our gratitude to those who have made the ultimate sacrifice in service of our country.

05/22/2020
Holland Land Office Museum Artifact Series- Genesee County Gibbet

Be sure to check out the first episode in the Holland Land Office Artifact Video Series presented by Director Ryan Duffy. Follow the link below to watch the video. In this video we look at the history of the Genesee County Gibbet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pCcsrYU21ik&t=31s

HLOM Director Ryan Duffy shares the interesting history of one of the museum’s most famous, or infamous, artifacts- the Genesee County gibbet. The gibbet was...

Here is another Exhibit Me entry from Gary Harkness, a long-time friend and supporter of the museum. As you can see, Gar...
05/19/2020

Here is another Exhibit Me entry from Gary Harkness, a long-time friend and supporter of the museum. As you can see, Gary could probably make his own museum from all of his antique collecting. He's also a pretty good appraiser as well. Thank you Gary for sharing.

My wife thinks I'm a hoarder? #musuemfromhomehlom #museumathomehlom #nysmuseums #exhibitmehlom

In case you missed it in this past Saturday's edition of the Batavia Daily News, here is the article written by Director...
05/11/2020
Glimpse of the past: 1837 showdown at the Holland Land Office

In case you missed it in this past Saturday's edition of the Batavia Daily News, here is the article written by Director Ryan Duffy about the incident in 1837 when armed settlers attempted to storm the Holland Land Office.

In 1833, a law was passed in Albany to tax the debts due to foreign land owners. This forced the Holland Land Company to step up its collections policies, which

The William G. Pomeroy foundation has announced a "Snap That Sign" Photo Campaign. The Pomeroy Foundation assists in the...
05/04/2020
Snap That Sign Photo Campaign | William G. Pomeroy Foundation

The William G. Pomeroy foundation has announced a "Snap That Sign" Photo Campaign. The Pomeroy Foundation assists in the funding of the blue and yellow historic markers that we see around our communities, including one in front of the museum. They are asking everyone to take photos of any of those signs they find and they could be uploaded onto their interactive map. Follow this link for more informaiton. https://www.wgpfoundation.org/snap-that-sign-photo-campaign/

The William G. Pomeroy Foundation is hosting its inaugural Snap That Sign photo campaign which asks participants to submit pictures of historical markers.

The Holland Purchase Historical Society is now a participant in the AmzonSmile program. This is another opportunity for ...
05/02/2020
Support Holland Purchase Historic Society by shopping at AmazonSmile.

The Holland Purchase Historical Society is now a participant in the AmzonSmile program. This is another opportunity for everyone to support the museum through your everyday shopping. Instead of shopping through the regular Amazon site, visit AmazonSmile and for eligible purchases the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the purchase price to the HPHS to go towards the funding of the Holland Land Office Museum. All of that Amazon shopping in quarantine can also go towards a good cause and support our local museum. You can follow the link below or visit smile.amazon.com to get started and make sure to choose the Holland Purchase Historical Society. Everyone involved with the museum thanks you for your support, especially during these trying times.

When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon will donate to Holland Purchase Historic Society. Support us every time you shop.

We have received another submission to our  #exhibitmehlom by our good friend Anthony Terrell. Anthony is a Batavia nati...
04/23/2020

We have received another submission to our #exhibitmehlom by our good friend Anthony Terrell. Anthony is a Batavia native who is now an artist in New York City. In fact, two of Mr. Terrell's paintings are on display at the museum. He has sent us pictures of sculptures that he is currently working on. These very large works are made primarily out of twine and other materials, entitled, "“Waving Goodbye To Everything On the Good Ship Lady Gwendolyn In the Ocean of Life” & “GwenSunRam-Waking Up During Sunrise” & “ ManonMoonRam-Falling Asleep At Nightfall”. Check out http://www.hollandlandoffice.com/…/Exhi…/AtHomeExhibits.aspx for more information on Anthony's sculptures and to see what we have! And please help us by submitting your own At Home Exhibits!

Thursday (4/23) we are running our Short Film Quarantine Program. To participate take a short video about your experienc...
04/21/2020

Thursday (4/23) we are running our Short Film Quarantine Program. To participate take a short video about your experience in quarantine, thing you missed most while during quarantine, or favorite tidbit of local history and share with us on social media using #shortfilmhlom

This weeks Thursday Quarantine Program Blog we are hoping to have a little fun with.  Join us in our Quarantine Meme Pro...
04/14/2020

This weeks Thursday Quarantine Program Blog we are hoping to have a little fun with. Join us in our Quarantine Meme Program. Memes have become a major part of online experience and expression, especially for the younger populations. Make sure you use #quarantinememehlom

Hope everyone is staying safe and enjoys a beautiful Easter!
04/12/2020

Hope everyone is staying safe and enjoys a beautiful Easter!

Check out the 360 degree photos of the inside of the building. Now you can tour the Holland Land Office Museum while sta...
04/06/2020

Check out the 360 degree photos of the inside of the building. Now you can tour the Holland Land Office Museum while staying in quarantine!

Here is the first entry for our Thursday Batavia Area's of Interest Photo Program "I find nature and people watching ver...
04/02/2020

Here is the first entry for our Thursday Batavia Area's of Interest Photo Program "I find nature and people watching very interesting and I can do that best sometimes by sitting out on my side porch. I spend a lot of my free time on nice days sitting out on it and watching the birds, squirrels and people as they pass by." Jodi Fisher #bataviaphotohlom
For more information on how you can participate please check out http://www.hollandlandoffice.com/QuarantinePrograms/BataviaAreasofInterestProgram.

03/30/2020

On this day in 1870 Emily Norwood Martin Upton, wife of Gen. Emory Upton passed away from tuberculosis at the age of 23.
She was the daughter of a prominent New York family, and was the sixth of eleven children born to E. T. Throop Martin, a successful attorney and journalist, and the former Cornelia Williams, a mercantile heiress from Utica. A deeply religious young woman, delicate in appearance and in health, Emily had been raised in the stimulating atmosphere of "Willowbrook", the Throop-Martin estate on Auburn's Lake Owasco, where her parents and grand-uncle, former New York Governor Enos Thompson Throop, regularly hosted distinguished visitors. During the 1860's, Union Civil War hero Emory Upton (1839-1881) was among them, and a mutual attraction developed between Emily and the brilliant young general. Following a courtship the couple were married in February 1868 at Sand Beach Church near the lake. Their union was a happy one, but tragically cut short by the bride's tuberculosis. She died in Nassau on March 29, 1870, her spouse's military duties in the US having prevented him from being at her side. Originally buried on the Willowbrook estate, her remains were transferred to Fort Hill Cemetery to join those of her husband Gen. Upton, then 42, had never remarried, and at the time of his death was suffering from excruciatingly painful headaches, possibly caused by brain cancer. In addition to the physical pain which may have prompted him to take his life, historians cite his enduring grief for Emily as a contributing factor in his death.

Every Tuesday from now until the end of the quarantine period we will be hosting our Exhibit Me HLOM Program.  This prog...
03/24/2020

Every Tuesday from now until the end of the quarantine period we will be hosting our Exhibit Me HLOM Program. This program is meant to be an interactive blog in which you as community members can share some at home exhibits with us!
Any content we receive from you during this program as well as our other programs will be added to the Museum’s digital collection.
Check out our website to see some of the exhibits we already recieved and to maybe give yourself an idea of what we are looking for.
http://www.hollandlandoffice.com/QuarantinePrograms/ExhibitMeHLOMProgram.aspx

Rules for the #exhibitmehlomprogram:
Pick 3-5 objects to exhibit!
These objects can say something about you, your family, what you like to collect, what is important to you, or your experience in quarantine

Document!
Take pictures of your pieces (either separate photos, or one photo of all objects together)

Interpret your pieces!
In two to three sentences, tell us what these objects mean to you and identify them or give them a title

Share with us!
Post your images and labels in the comments section of this blog or go on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter, tag the Holland Land Office Museum and add these hashtags to your post: #musuemfromhome2020 #museumathome2020 #nysmuseums #exhibitmehlomprogram

We at the Holland Land Office Museum have been watching the current circumstances regarding the COVID-19 outbreak. Thoug...
03/19/2020

We at the Holland Land Office Museum have been watching the current circumstances regarding the COVID-19 outbreak. Though we had originally planned to stay open, with the recent updates to the situation within our local community, the Board of Directors and the Executive Director Ryan Duffy have decided to close the museum to the public for the recommended two week period until April 1st. This closure is in addition to canceling and rescheduling the remainder of events scheduled for the remainder of March. We will be continually evaluating the situation as April approaches and will keep everyone updated if we decide to cancel or reschedule further events. Any updates to our situation will be communicated through our website, page, and email. Should you have any questions please feel free to contact the museum by phone at 585-343-4727 or by email at [email protected].
Thank you for your support and understanding of this decision. We hope for everyone to stay safe and healthy.Thank you for your support and understanding of this decision. We hope for everyone to stay safe and healthy.

On this day in 1788 U.S. Congressman, David Ellicott Evans was born in Ellicotts Upper Mills, Maryland. He moved to New ...
03/19/2020

On this day in 1788 U.S. Congressman, David Ellicott Evans was born in Ellicotts Upper Mills, Maryland. He moved to New York, in 1803 and settled in Batavia. He was employed as a clerk and afterward as an accounting clerk with the Holland Land Company .
Evans was elected as a Jacksonian candidate to the Twentieth Congress and served from March 4, 1827, until his resignation May 2, 1827, before the assembling of Congress. He was appointed resident agent of the Holland Land Company in 1827 and served until his resignation in 1837. Evans also engaged in banking, was a delegate to the convention held at Albany in 1827 to advocate a protective tariff, and retired from active business pursuits in 1837 to devote his attention to his extensive land interests.

He died in Batavia, NY at the age of 62 and was interred in Batavia Cemetery.

Wishing all those Irish or not a Happy, Fun and Safe St. Patrick's Day!!
03/17/2020

Wishing all those Irish or not a Happy, Fun and Safe St. Patrick's Day!!

Don't forget to stop in this Thursday March 19th at 7 pm.  We are welcoming Susan Eck to the museum to talk about Wester...
03/16/2020

Don't forget to stop in this Thursday March 19th at 7 pm. We are welcoming Susan Eck to the museum to talk about Western New York Men who served during WWI. Cost to attend this talk is $3 per person or $2 per museum member. #guestspeakerseries #bataviany #geneseecounty

On this day in 1881 Colonel Emory Upton committed suicide by shooting himself in the head.  He suffered greatly from hea...
03/15/2020

On this day in 1881 Colonel Emory Upton committed suicide by shooting himself in the head. He suffered greatly from headaches, possibly caused by a brain tumor.
Upton is considered one of the most influential young reformers of the United States Army in the 19th century, arguably in U.S. history. His greatest impact was a work he called The Military Policy of the United States from 1775. He worked for years on the paper, but it was incomplete at the time of his death.

Military Policy was a controversial paper where Upton outlined U.S. military history and argued, the armed forces were imprudent and weak and "that all the defects of the American military system rested upon a fundamental, underlying flaw, excessive civilian control of the military." He promoted the idea that all military decisions in the field should be made by professional officers, although the president should retain the role of commander-in-chief. He argued for a strong, standing regular army that would be supplemented by volunteers or conscripts in time of war, a general staff system based on the Prussian model, examinations to determine promotions, compulsory retirement of officers who reach a certain age, advanced military education, and combat maneuvering by groups of four three-battalion infantry regiments. Upton's work had a profound influence on discussions of military and civilian strategy for years.

After Upton's death, Henry A. DuPont, Upton's West Point classmate and a close friend, acquired a copy of the uncompleted manuscript. It circulated widely throughout the Army's officer corps and helped to foment much discussion. After the Spanish–American War, Secretary of War Elihu Root read the manuscript and ordered that the War Department publish it under the title The Military Policy of the United States. Many of the Army's so-called Root Reforms of the early twentieth century were inspired by Upton and his works.

Address

131 W Main St
Batavia, NY
14020

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(585) 343-4727

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As a not-for-profit business, the continued operation of the Holland Land Office Museum would not be possible without the generosity of the community. If you or your business would like to contribute to the museum, call (585) 343-4727 or email [email protected] for more information.

Current Board of Directors:

Don Burkel - President Patrick Weissend - Vice President Patrick Forsyth - Financial Adviser Keith Boeheim - Secretary Anthony Condello Dan Fischer Jeffery Gillard Krysia Mager David Metzler Pamela Meyer Thomas Teifel Board Member Emeritus: Don Read Anne Marie Starowitz

To all of our generous sponsors and members, we thank you.

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My wife thinks I'm a hoarder? #musuemfromhomehlom #museumathomehlom #nysmuseums #exhibitmehlom
For the "Exhibit Me" Tuesday activity, I am sharing our New Orleans'wall...artwork we have collected on many visits to our favorite city..notice a cat theme? #museumfromhomehlom#museumathomehlom#nysmuseums#exhibitmehlom
Holland Land Office 1942 flood.
The annual HLOM History Bus Tour took us to East Aurora for a fascinating walk through the Roycroft Campus learning about Elbert Hubbard, his life and times a hundred years ago.
In 1893 no one had reached a speed of 100mph. But on April 10th the New York Central "Empire State Express" Engine 999, equipped with large 86 inch drive wheels (70 was normal) went for a new speed record, reaching 112.5 mph in a stretch from Batavia to Buffalo, NY. It took another ten years to break that record. The 999 was displayed at the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, and the 1933 Century of Progress World's Fair in Chicago. The Chicago Museum of Science and Industry acquired the well worn engine in 1962 for an outside display before being totally restored and brought inside to where you can see it today.
Depending on your age words you used when younger are passing out of use. Here's an interesting collection of "historical" words and phrases that would need explanation to a younger generation. Lost Words From Our Childhood; words gone as fast as the buggy whip! Sad really! Mergatroyd! . . . Do you remember that word? Would you believe the email spell checker did not recognize the word Mergatroyd? Heavens to Mergatroyd! The other day a not-so-elderly (65) (I say 75) lady said something to her son about driving a Jalopy and he looked at her quizzically and said, "What the heck is a Jalopy?" OMG (new phrase)! He never heard of the word jalopy!! She knew she was old . . . but not that old. Well, I hope you are Hunky Dory after you read this and chuckle. About a month ago I illuminated some old expressions that have become obsolete because of the inexorable march of technology. These phrases included "Don't touch that dial” "Carbon copy” "You sound like a broken record” and "Hung out to dry”. Back in the olden days we had a lot of 'moxie.’ We'd put on our best 'bib and tucker' to' straighten up and fly right'. Heavens to Betsy! Gee whillikers! Jumping Jehoshaphat! Holy moley! We were 'in like Flynn' and 'living the life of Riley', and even a regular guy couldn't accuse us of being a knucklehead, a nincompoop or a pill. Not for all the tea in China! Back in the olden days, life used to be swell, but when's the last time anything was swell? Swell has gone the way of beehives, pageboys and the D.A.; of spats, knickers, fedoras, poodle skirts, saddle shoes and pedal pushers. Oh, my aching back! Kilroy was here, but he isn't anymore. We wake up from what surely has been just a short nap, and before we can say, "Well, I'll be 'a monkey's uncle!’” or, "This is a 'fine kettle of fish!’" we discover that the words we grew up with, the words that seemed omnipresent, as oxygen, have vanished with scarcely a notice from our tongues and our pens and our keyboards. Poof,image010.gif go the words of our youth, the words we've left behind. We blink, and they're gone. Where have all those great phrases gone? Hey! It's your nickel. Don't forget to pull the chain. Knee-high to a grasshopper. Well, Fiddlesticks! Going like sixty. I'll see you in the funny papers. Don't take any wooden nickels. Wake up and smell the roses. It turns out there are more of these lost words and expressions than Carter has liver pills. This can be disturbing stuff! (Carter's Little Liver Pills are gone too!) We, of a certain age, have been blessed to live in changeable times. For a child, each new word is like a shiny toy; a toy that has no age. We, at the other end of the chronological arc, have the advantage of remembering there are words that once did not exist, and there were words that once strutted their hour upon the earthly stage and now are heard no more, except in our collective memory. It's one of the greatest advantages of aging. Leaves us to wonder where Superman will find a phone booth
The latest issue of The Speculator newsletter is very informative. Looks great too.
A scene from the Museum.
Friday the 17th. The HLOM Wonderland of Trees Kick Off. Which basket will you be going home with?
After the morning at the Wilcox Mansion we enjoyed a great lunch at the Pearl Street Brewery and Grille. Let us know your suggestions for the next trip a year from now.
Today our Annual HLOM Bus Trip took us to the Theodore Roosevelt National Inaugural at the Wilcox Manson in Buffalo. Here you see the room where TR took the Oath of Office following the assassination of William McKinley on September 14, 1901. The small table near the middle is where Roosevelt stood. He was only one of four Presidents sworn into office outside our Nation's Capitol.
Stand in the room where Teddy Roosevelt was sworn in as President of the United States after the assassination of William McKinley at Buffalo's Pan American Exposition in 1901. Learn what Buffalo was like at the beginning of the Twentieth Century and how Roosevelt's presidency changed America. Following the morning tour of the Wilcox Mansion we will be enjoying lunch at the Pearl Street Grill and Brewery.The bus holds forty passengers and these tours usually sell out. So contact the Museum for more information and secure your reservation soon.