Homewood Museum

Homewood Museum Part of the Johns Hopkins University Museums, Homewood Museum is a National Historic Landmark built in 1801 by Charles Carroll Jr. and one of the nation's best surviving examples of Federal period architecture.
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While several items in Homewood's collection can be traced back to Carroll family ownership, none are known to have been...
02/16/2021

While several items in Homewood's collection can be traced back to Carroll family ownership, none are known to have been the personal property of the more than two dozen enslaved individuals who lived and labored at Homewood while it was owned by the Carrolls (1800-1838).

Through material culture research, however, we can gain a fuller picture of the forms and styles that may have been found in an enslaved individual’s living quarters. Mocha-decorated pottery, like the mug pictured here, was designed to resemble the semi-precious gemstone moss agate or “mocha stone.” One of the cheapest decorated wares available, mocha-decorated ceramics were produced throughout England, France, and the United States. They were ubiquitous in public spaces like taverns, while also being found in living spaces of enslaved individuals and families. Their survival in museum collections is a small but significant visual reminder of objects that could have been used, loved, broken, and repaired by families living through the inhumane practices of slavery at Homewood.

Mug, England; Nineteenth century, pearlware with mocha decoration, Homewood Museum HH88.10.2.

#BlackHistoryMonth #ObjectOfTheMonth #OOM

Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University
02/11/2021

Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University

Last summer, Evergreen Museum & Library and our sister site, Homewood Museum, each hosted two Baltimore City high school students as part of the Bloomberg Arts Internship.

The program, supported by Bloomberg Philanthropies and administered locally by Young Audiences/Arts for Learning of Maryland, matches high school seniors in Baltimore, Boston, New York City, and Philadelphia with select cultural institutions for paid summer internships.

This was the third consecutive year the museums participated in the program. Due to the pandemic, the internships were conducted virtually, but that didn't stop the interns from learning about the histories of the museums and engaging with staff. It also didn't stop the interns from exercising their creativity and intellect, as they pursued their respective research projects.

Over the next several weeks, will be sharing some of the work these students completed, including some fun interactive activities they designed for social media. But first, let's meet the JHU Museums 2020 Bloomberg Arts Interns. Swipe through the pics for information on each student!

02/01/2021

Today marks the beginning of #BlackHistoryMonth. During the first quarter of the 19th century, Homewood was a site of bondage for at lest 26 people of African descent. Charity Castle was among the 26 enslaved people who lived and labored at Homewood during this time. Her story was highlighted earlier this year in an episode of Amended, a new podcast from Humanities New York that traces the long history of the women's suffrage movement. In this episode, Martha S. Jones, Ph.D. of Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences explains how Charity's struggle for autonomy embodied many of the principles codified by the Seneca Falls convention some 35 years later.

Homewood Museum's cover photo
01/22/2021

Homewood Museum's cover photo

It's #FanlightFriday! Which do you prefer? Light or dark? Homewood North Portico fanlight, 2012.
01/22/2021

It's #FanlightFriday! Which do you prefer? Light or dark?

Homewood North Portico fanlight, 2012.

Happy #InaugurationDay!President-themed household items are as old as the country itself. On this Inauguration Day, we’r...
01/20/2021

Happy #InaugurationDay!

President-themed household items are as old as the country itself. On this Inauguration Day, we’re highlighting one of our favorite such objects from our collection: our George Washington mantle clock.

Created in Paris, the clock features Washington in a recognizable pose from John Trumbull’s painting, George Washington before the Battle of Trenton (in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art). Underneath the clock, the craftsman inscribed the words: “Washington the first in war, first in peace, and in his countrymen hearts,” a misquoting of Henry Lee’s eulogy for Washington in which he famously referred to the first president as “first in war, first in peace, and the first in the hearts of his countrymen.”

Mantle Clock, Jean-Baptist Charles Gabriel Dubuc, Paris, France; ca. 1800, bronze, gilt, glass, Homewood Museum HH93.10.1.

#oom #objectofthemonth

🎉🎉Good news alert🎉🎉The Sheridan Libraries & University Museums are part of an interdisciplinary team that received fundi...
01/15/2021
Mellon Foundation awards $4 million grant to Inheritance Baltimore project

🎉🎉Good news alert🎉🎉

The Sheridan Libraries & University Museums are part of an interdisciplinary team that received funding from the Mellon Foundation this week to investigate the history of academic racism in higher education and building a citywide network to preserve Baltimore's Black history, culture, and arts. Read all about it here:
https://hub.jhu.edu/2021/01/14/inheritance-baltimore-project-mellon-foundation-grant/

The project will pioneer new methods of instruction, research, and archival preservation that bring the history of the Black Baltimoreans to the fore

Is it nap time yet? Sofa, attributed to William Worthington, Philadelphia, PA; circa 1800, wood and textile, Homewood Mu...
01/13/2021

Is it nap time yet?

Sofa, attributed to William Worthington, Philadelphia, PA; circa 1800, wood and textile, Homewood Museum, The Johns Hopkins University; Gift of Mr. and Mrs. J.R. Herbert Boone, HH85.11.255.

Who needs more coffee this Monday?Coffeepot, Robert Hennell I & David Hennell II, London, England; 1804, silver and wood...
01/11/2021

Who needs more coffee this Monday?

Coffeepot, Robert Hennell I & David Hennell II, London, England; 1804, silver and wood, Homewood Museum, The Johns Hopkins University; Gift of Mrs. Mary E. Rollins, HH87.43.1a-b.

For the residents of Homewood, music was a feature of entertainments, both for family and larger gatherings. All of the ...
12/21/2020

For the residents of Homewood, music was a feature of entertainments, both for family and larger gatherings. All of the Carroll children were trained on various instruments, including the harp and the pianoforte, as part of their education. This training marked them as part of a small group of wealthy elite in the Baltimore area, who could participate in certain society circles. Such formal music training was not available as an opportunity to the enslaved children at Homewood. #objectofthemonth #oom

Pianoforte, London, England; 1804, mahogany, satinwood, ivory, Homewood Museum HH87.8.1.

Homewood Museum's cover photo
12/20/2020

Homewood Museum's cover photo

12/19/2020
JHU Museums Holiday Membership Drive

Need a last-minute gift for the culture vulture in your life? Membership to the JHU Museums provides access to everything that Homewood Museum and Evergreen Museum & Library have to offer: art, architecture, music, history, and much more. Memberships start at $50/year. Visit https://museums.jhu.edu/membership/ to enroll now!

Because Homewood and our sister museum, Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University, are closed right now, we h...
12/04/2020

Because Homewood and our sister museum, Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University, are closed right now, we have partnered with our friends at Baltimore National Heritage Area to sell a few items from our gift shops for the holidays.

Click through to BNHA's 2020 Online Holiday Bazaar to grab a copy of "Sheer Brilliance: The Art Glass of Evergreen Museum & Library" or a print of this Warner & Hanna map of Baltimore circa 1801.

Both are perfect for the history nut, culture vulture, or Baltimore enthusiast in your life! Sale ends December 12, so grab em while they last! https://www.explorebaltimore.org/page/bnha-2020-holiday-online-bazaar

This #GivingTuesday, please consider supporting the JHU Museums!Every little bit helps us to provide unique cultural exp...
12/01/2020

This #GivingTuesday, please consider supporting the JHU Museums!

Every little bit helps us to provide unique cultural experiences, collections care, and specialized academic research that brings history to light. Make a gift of any size or become a member (memberships start at $50/year and come with a host of benefits). Just click here: https://secure.jhu.edu/form/WMUSE #GIVETUEHOPKINS

Homewood Museum's cover photo
12/01/2020

Homewood Museum's cover photo

Homewood's late-breaking #ObjectOfTheMonth is this painting by Francis Guy that hangs in the Back Parlor, which provides...
11/30/2020

Homewood's late-breaking #ObjectOfTheMonth is this painting by Francis Guy that hangs in the Back Parlor, which provides the perfect transition from the fall harvest season to the icy beauty of winter.

Initially trained as a silk dyer in London, the English-born Guy relocated to Baltimore where he intended to continue his trade until his shop burned down in 1799. With no formal education in art, he decided that he would regardless try his hand and soon became known for his landscape scenes and views of Baltimore City. Along with painting on canvas, he also used furniture as a medium, working with the famed Finlay brothers.

Winter Scene, Francis Guy; 1810, oil on panel, Homewood Museum HH2013.9.1. Gift of Stiles Colwill.

Whether you're breaking out the good china or enjoying takeout, we at Homewood wish you a very safe, healthy, and happy ...
11/26/2020

Whether you're breaking out the good china or enjoying takeout, we at Homewood wish you a very safe, healthy, and happy Thanksgiving!

Plate, unknown maker, China; c. 1800, porcelain, Homewood Museum, The Johns Hopkins University; Gift of Mr. & Mrs. John Beckley, HH2009.3.3

Homewood's Antiques Forum: Baltimore Through the Painted Canvas is underway! Sign up now to gain access to five video ta...
11/11/2020

Homewood's Antiques Forum: Baltimore Through the Painted Canvas is underway! Sign up now to gain access to five video talks by scholars from Colonial Williamsburg, American Folk Art Museum, Winterthur Program in American Material Culture, and Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. Then, join us Friday, November 13, 3-4 p.m., for a live Zoom Q&A with the speakers. Tickets are $20/members, $25/general public. Register at https://homewoodmuseum.eventbrite.com.

Need a break from election coverage? Sign up for Homewood's Antiques Forum. Video talks by all five speakers will become...
11/05/2020

Need a break from election coverage? Sign up for Homewood's Antiques Forum. Video talks by all five speakers will become available on YouTube starting at noon tomorrow. You can watch the talks (each is between 20-40 minutes long) at your leisure before next Friday. Then, on Friday, November 13, 3-4 p.m., join a Zoom call with speakers for a live Q&A.

Topics include Joshua Johnson (the earliest documented professional African-American painter), Francis Guy (early America's preeminent landscape artist), early American portrait painter Chester Harding, and prints and maps in Federal-era Chesapeake homes!

Tickets are $20/members, $25/general public. More details and registration at https://homewoodmuseum.eventbrite.com

11/03/2020
Hopkins Volunteers Take Action on Election Day

Today's the day! In this short video, members of the Hopkins community share why they are voting. Why are you voting? Visit https://hopkinsvotes.jhu.edu/ to find resources and information and make sure your voice is heard! #election2020 #vote

Hopkins alumni, volunteers, and staff share why voting is important to them. To learn more and watch more videos related to election day, visit jhu.edu/hopki...

Homewood Museum's Antiques Forum returns in November for an exploration of painting and printmaking in Federal period Ba...
10/22/2020

Homewood Museum's Antiques Forum returns in November for an exploration of painting and printmaking in Federal period Baltimore.

Join a panel of distinguished scholars from Colonial Williamsburg, American Folk Art Museum, Winterthur Program in American Material Culture, and Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences as they discuss painters such as Joshua Johnson (the earliest documented professional African-American painter) and Francis Guy (early America's preeminent landscape artist).

This year's flexible, all-virtual format allows participants to absorb content on their own timetable in early November and then join the speakers for a live Q&A on Friday, November 13, 3-4 p.m. Click the link for more information and to register! https://rb.gy/p4mrua

Thank you to everyone who joined today's Doors Open Baltimore talk about Homewood's architecture with assistant curator ...
10/21/2020

Thank you to everyone who joined today's Doors Open Baltimore talk about Homewood's architecture with assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald. If you've got any questions that you'd still like answered, please feel free to reach out to us here or at [email protected].

This Wednesday at noon, get a virtual architecture tour of Homewood with assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald as part o...
10/19/2020

This Wednesday at noon, get a virtual architecture tour of Homewood with assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald as part of Doors Open Baltimore. Tickets are FREE but registration is required. Register at doorsopenbaltimore.org/events.

Week 3: Design Excellence is in full swing! Who are some of your favorite Baltimore designers/artists/architects? Let us know who inspires you in the comments!

Here are all the fun events you can look forward to this week!

Virtual Tour of the Garrett Jacobs Mansion
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 1:00 pm

Architect's Insights on the Design of the Marbury Building
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 5:00 pm

Virtual Architectural Tour of the Homewood Museum
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 12:00 pm

Transforming One West Mount Vernon Place with Moseley Architects
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 5:00 pm
The National Aquarium Animal Rescue Center Exhibit Fabrication Studio Tour
Thursday, October 22, 2020 12:00 pm

Adapting Baltimore's Historic Markets with PI.KL Studio
Thursday, October 22, 2020 5:00 pm

Hoen & Co. Lithograph Building: Transforming an East Baltimore Landmark
Friday, October 23, 2020 1:00 pm

2020 AIA Baltimore and The Baltimore Architecture Foundation Excellence in Design Awards Celebration
Friday, October 23, 2020 4:00 pm

Designing for Community: Eager Park
Friday, October 23, 2020 4:00 pm

Doors Open Architecture Trivia Night
Saturday, October 24, 2020 4:00 pm

Register for these events and more at doorsopenbaltimore.org/events

Class time looks a little different these days, but learning continues apace at the JHU Museums! This semester, Lori Bet...
09/30/2020

Class time looks a little different these days, but learning continues apace at the JHU Museums! This semester, Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., interim director of the JHU Museums, is teaching the course “Tigers to Teapots: Collecting, Cataloging, and Hoarding in America,” for the JHU Program in Museums and Society. The course investigates the history, psychology, and politics of collecting in America. For today’s class, Lori and her 10 students welcomed guest lecturer Michelle Fitzgerald, assistant curator of the JHU Museums, to discuss an 1895 geological expedition through the American West taken by the Garrett boys of Evergreen.

Happy Friday! Did you see that Homewood will be participating in this year's all-virtual Doors Open Baltimore? Join Home...
09/18/2020

Happy Friday! Did you see that Homewood will be participating in this year's all-virtual Doors Open Baltimore? Join Homewood's assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald on October 21 from 12-12:30 p.m. for a Zoom stroll around Homewood's exterior. She will point out the features that make Homewood one of the best examples of early 19th-century Chesapeake architecture in Baltimore. Click the link to register https://www.doorsopenbaltimore.org/events/virtual-architectural-tour-of-the-homewood-museum/

Back in February, the team from Amended, a new podcast by Humanities New York exploring the history of the women's suffr...
09/02/2020

Back in February, the team from Amended, a new podcast by Humanities New York exploring the history of the women's suffrage movement, visited Homewood to interview Martha S. Jones, the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor of History at the Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. Now you can hear that conversation! Listen here: shorturl.at/RTV25

In episode 2, "Any Woman," Dr. Jones guides the listener through Homewood and introduces the story of Charity Castle, and enslaved women who advocated for her bodily autonomy and self-emancipation decades before the Seneca Falls convention would enshrine those ideals in the Declaration of Sentiments.

With a new month comes a new #ObjectoftheMonth! Happy September! The impulse to decorate our spaces with images we love ...
09/01/2020

With a new month comes a new #ObjectoftheMonth! Happy September!

The impulse to decorate our spaces with images we love is as old as the concept of home. Early nineteenth-century Americans often opted to decorate their homes with prints of popular paintings. One print in the Homewood Museum collection that the Carrolls may have used is of John Trumbull’s famous painting that depicts the death of Patriot General Richard Montgomery, who died in a failed attempt at a Canadian invasion in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War.

Receiving commissions to create engravings of popular paintings could often be a huge career opportunity for printers. This print’s engraver, Johan Frederick Clemens, was a Pomeranian/Danish printmaker who had to receive royal permission from the English Crown to make this copy. The effort paid off for Clemens, and the print later earned him commissions to engrave other works by famous American artists like Benjamin West.

The Death of General Montgomery at the Battle of Quebec, Johann Frederick Clemens (engraver) after John Trumbull (artist), London; c.1792, engraving, Homewood Museum HH46.31.27.

Today marks a century since Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment, making women's suffrage the la...
08/18/2020

Today marks a century since Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment, making women's suffrage the law of the land.

Johns Hopkins University is celebrating this milestone with a slate of varied programming this summer and fall. Head to https://www.womensvote100.jhu.edu to learn more, register for events, browse images from JHU collections, and more.

And stay tuned for more Homewood-related suffrage content! #jhuwomensvote100

Interesting article in The Baltimore Sun today about the 1877 B&O Railroad strike and its galvanizing effect on the nati...
07/30/2020
Retro Baltimore: The great railroad strike of 1877 stoked the labor movement nationwide

Interesting article in The Baltimore Sun today about the 1877 B&O Railroad strike and its galvanizing effect on the national labor movement. Scholars of Evergreen and Homewood also will recognize some familiar names among the key players.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/features/retro-baltimore/bs-fe-retro-great-railroad-strike-20200730-asop3uys3jbotpscvah26hqe3i-story.html

It’s worth taking a look at the causes and consequences of that long-ago clash between citizens and Guardsmen in the streets of downtown Baltimore, a melee that set off a chain reaction of strikes along the railroad line.

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The Homewood Museum Story

A tour of Homewood is a time-traveling experience, transporting you to the days when members of Maryland’s prominent Carroll family called this elegant Federal-period mansion home. As you move through the home’s spaces, you’ll see exquisitely decorated rooms, appointed in the most fashionable styles available to members of early America’s elite.

But underneath the sheen of privilege, all was not well. Hear about the personal struggles faced by the Carroll family, and meet the Ross and Conner families, who lived alongside, but were enslaved by, the Carroll family. How did these three families coexist in wildly unequal circumstances? What did they share? How were their fates linked? The answers are here. Come discover them for yourself.


Comments

The tour was very good. Debi was wonderful. She is very informative and knowledgable with information. My husband and I learned a lot about Maryland’s history from her today.