Homewood Museum

Homewood Museum Part of the Johns Hopkins University Museums, Homewood Museum is a National Historic Landmark built in 1801 by Charles Carroll Jr. and one of the nation's best surviving examples of Federal period architecture.
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Operating as usual

Need a break from election coverage? Sign up for Homewood's Antiques Forum. Video talks by all five speakers will become...
11/05/2020

Need a break from election coverage? Sign up for Homewood's Antiques Forum. Video talks by all five speakers will become available on YouTube starting at noon tomorrow. You can watch the talks (each is between 20-40 minutes long) at your leisure before next Friday. Then, on Friday, November 13, 3-4 p.m., join a Zoom call with speakers for a live Q&A.

Topics include Joshua Johnson (the earliest documented professional African-American painter), Francis Guy (early America's preeminent landscape artist), early American portrait painter Chester Harding, and prints and maps in Federal-era Chesapeake homes!

Tickets are $20/members, $25/general public. More details and registration at https://homewoodmuseum.eventbrite.com

11/03/2020
Hopkins Volunteers Take Action on Election Day

Today's the day! In this short video, members of the Hopkins community share why they are voting. Why are you voting? Visit https://hopkinsvotes.jhu.edu/ to find resources and information and make sure your voice is heard! #election2020 #vote

Hopkins alumni, volunteers, and staff share why voting is important to them. To learn more and watch more videos related to election day, visit jhu.edu/hopki...

Homewood Museum's Antiques Forum returns in November for an exploration of painting and printmaking in Federal period Ba...
10/22/2020

Homewood Museum's Antiques Forum returns in November for an exploration of painting and printmaking in Federal period Baltimore.

Join a panel of distinguished scholars from Colonial Williamsburg, American Folk Art Museum, Winterthur Program in American Material Culture, and Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences as they discuss painters such as Joshua Johnson (the earliest documented professional African-American painter) and Francis Guy (early America's preeminent landscape artist).

This year's flexible, all-virtual format allows participants to absorb content on their own timetable in early November and then join the speakers for a live Q&A on Friday, November 13, 3-4 p.m. Click the link for more information and to register! https://rb.gy/p4mrua

Thank you to everyone who joined today's Doors Open Baltimore talk about Homewood's architecture with assistant curator ...
10/21/2020

Thank you to everyone who joined today's Doors Open Baltimore talk about Homewood's architecture with assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald. If you've got any questions that you'd still like answered, please feel free to reach out to us here or at [email protected].

This Wednesday at noon, get a virtual architecture tour of Homewood with assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald as part o...
10/19/2020

This Wednesday at noon, get a virtual architecture tour of Homewood with assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald as part of Doors Open Baltimore. Tickets are FREE but registration is required. Register at doorsopenbaltimore.org/events.

Week 3: Design Excellence is in full swing! Who are some of your favorite Baltimore designers/artists/architects? Let us know who inspires you in the comments!

Here are all the fun events you can look forward to this week!

Virtual Tour of the Garrett Jacobs Mansion
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 1:00 pm

Architect's Insights on the Design of the Marbury Building
Tuesday, October 20, 2020 5:00 pm

Virtual Architectural Tour of the Homewood Museum
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 12:00 pm

Transforming One West Mount Vernon Place with Moseley Architects
Wednesday, October 21, 2020 5:00 pm
The National Aquarium Animal Rescue Center Exhibit Fabrication Studio Tour
Thursday, October 22, 2020 12:00 pm

Adapting Baltimore's Historic Markets with PI.KL Studio
Thursday, October 22, 2020 5:00 pm

Hoen & Co. Lithograph Building: Transforming an East Baltimore Landmark
Friday, October 23, 2020 1:00 pm

2020 AIA Baltimore and The Baltimore Architecture Foundation Excellence in Design Awards Celebration
Friday, October 23, 2020 4:00 pm

Designing for Community: Eager Park
Friday, October 23, 2020 4:00 pm

Doors Open Architecture Trivia Night
Saturday, October 24, 2020 4:00 pm

Register for these events and more at doorsopenbaltimore.org/events

Class time looks a little different these days, but learning continues apace at the JHU Museums! This semester, Lori Bet...
09/30/2020

Class time looks a little different these days, but learning continues apace at the JHU Museums! This semester, Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., interim director of the JHU Museums, is teaching the course “Tigers to Teapots: Collecting, Cataloging, and Hoarding in America,” for the JHU Program in Museums and Society. The course investigates the history, psychology, and politics of collecting in America. For today’s class, Lori and her 10 students welcomed guest lecturer Michelle Fitzgerald, assistant curator of the JHU Museums, to discuss an 1895 geological expedition through the American West taken by the Garrett boys of Evergreen.

Happy Friday! Did you see that Homewood will be participating in this year's all-virtual Doors Open Baltimore? Join Home...
09/18/2020

Happy Friday! Did you see that Homewood will be participating in this year's all-virtual Doors Open Baltimore? Join Homewood's assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald on October 21 from 12-12:30 p.m. for a Zoom stroll around Homewood's exterior. She will point out the features that make Homewood one of the best examples of early 19th-century Chesapeake architecture in Baltimore. Click the link to register https://www.doorsopenbaltimore.org/events/virtual-architectural-tour-of-the-homewood-museum/

Back in February, the team from Amended, a new podcast by Humanities New York exploring the history of the women's suffr...
09/02/2020

Back in February, the team from Amended, a new podcast by Humanities New York exploring the history of the women's suffrage movement, visited Homewood to interview Martha S. Jones, the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor of History at the Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. Now you can hear that conversation! Listen here: shorturl.at/RTV25

In episode 2, "Any Woman," Dr. Jones guides the listener through Homewood and introduces the story of Charity Castle, and enslaved women who advocated for her bodily autonomy and self-emancipation decades before the Seneca Falls convention would enshrine those ideals in the Declaration of Sentiments.

With a new month comes a new #ObjectoftheMonth! Happy September! The impulse to decorate our spaces with images we love ...
09/01/2020

With a new month comes a new #ObjectoftheMonth! Happy September!

The impulse to decorate our spaces with images we love is as old as the concept of home. Early nineteenth-century Americans often opted to decorate their homes with prints of popular paintings. One print in the Homewood Museum collection that the Carrolls may have used is of John Trumbull’s famous painting that depicts the death of Patriot General Richard Montgomery, who died in a failed attempt at a Canadian invasion in the early stages of the American Revolutionary War.

Receiving commissions to create engravings of popular paintings could often be a huge career opportunity for printers. This print’s engraver, Johan Frederick Clemens, was a Pomeranian/Danish printmaker who had to receive royal permission from the English Crown to make this copy. The effort paid off for Clemens, and the print later earned him commissions to engrave other works by famous American artists like Benjamin West.

The Death of General Montgomery at the Battle of Quebec, Johann Frederick Clemens (engraver) after John Trumbull (artist), London; c.1792, engraving, Homewood Museum HH46.31.27.

Today marks a century since Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment, making women's suffrage the la...
08/18/2020

Today marks a century since Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment, making women's suffrage the law of the land.

Johns Hopkins University is celebrating this milestone with a slate of varied programming this summer and fall. Head to https://www.womensvote100.jhu.edu to learn more, register for events, browse images from JHU collections, and more.

And stay tuned for more Homewood-related suffrage content! #jhuwomensvote100

Interesting article in The Baltimore Sun today about the 1877 B&O Railroad strike and its galvanizing effect on the nati...
07/30/2020
Retro Baltimore: The great railroad strike of 1877 stoked the labor movement nationwide

Interesting article in The Baltimore Sun today about the 1877 B&O Railroad strike and its galvanizing effect on the national labor movement. Scholars of Evergreen and Homewood also will recognize some familiar names among the key players.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/features/retro-baltimore/bs-fe-retro-great-railroad-strike-20200730-asop3uys3jbotpscvah26hqe3i-story.html

It’s worth taking a look at the causes and consequences of that long-ago clash between citizens and Guardsmen in the streets of downtown Baltimore, a melee that set off a chain reaction of strikes along the railroad line.

Homewood's assistant curator, Michelle Fitzgerald, will be participating in this panel discussion tomorrow evening, from...
07/13/2020

Homewood's assistant curator, Michelle Fitzgerald, will be participating in this panel discussion tomorrow evening, from 7-8 p.m. Tune in to hear about the rise, fall, and possible resurrection of the American chestnut. 🌳💪🌳💪🌳💪

The chestnut blight that nearly killed off 4 billion American chestnut trees has been called “the greatest ecological disaster to strike the world’s forests in all of history.”*

Join our Panorama series program “To Blight and Back” tomorrow evening, July 14 at 7PM, to hear the story of how the American chestnut went from one of the most ubiquitous trees in the U.S. to an endangered species. Through genetic engineering, a promising future for the American chestnut has been made possible after nearly 30 years of research. Our panel features experts from the American Chestnut Foundation, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Homewood Museum and Johns Hopkins University.
*Source: The American Chestnut Foundation

Ticket: FREE
Reserve your spot on our website Happenings page or in our FB events page.
Your Zoom access link will be included in your event confirmation email.
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#panorama #loveplantingfields
#americanchestnut #preservation #forestry #environmentalscience #plantingfieldsarboretum #plantingfields
@homewoodmuseum @americanchestnutfoundation

Thank you to everyone who joined us this afternoon for our first Wednesday Webinar Curator's Talk. Today's session with ...
05/27/2020

Thank you to everyone who joined us this afternoon for our first Wednesday Webinar Curator's Talk. Today's session with Homewood's assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald focused on Baltimore Federal-era furniture styles and makers. The Wednesday Webinars series continues next week with a discussion of prints. All webinars are free but registration is required. Reserve your spot today at https://homewoodmuseum.eventbrite,com.

Register now for Homewood's online-only Wednesday Webinars! Learn about antique furniture, prints, and ceramics with Hom...
05/26/2020

Register now for Homewood's online-only Wednesday Webinars! Learn about antique furniture, prints, and ceramics with Homewood's curators, starting tomorrow, May 27, 2-3 p.m. Register at https://homewoodmuseum.eventbrite.com

We love being the backdrop to our Blue Jays' graduation memories. Congratulations to #JHU2020!
05/22/2020

We love being the backdrop to our Blue Jays' graduation memories. Congratulations to #JHU2020!

We are so honored to have shared our libraries with this year's graduating class! Congratulations and best wishes to #JHU2020. For more photographs of our freshly minted alumni, visit hub.jhu.edu/2020/05/21/class-of-2020-in-photos!

Today is #GivingTuesdayNow: a global day of giving and unity in response to COVID-19. Whether you are a long-time suppor...
05/05/2020

Today is #GivingTuesdayNow: a global day of giving and unity in response to COVID-19. Whether you are a long-time supporter or making your first gift to the Johns Hopkins University Museums, now is your opportunity to give, help, and heal where it is needed most. Show your support of our researchers, students, and faculty and #GiveTueHopkinsNow at givingday.jhu.edu.

Aerial view, looking north on Charles Street circa 1924, with Homewood Museum (then Homewood House) and Alumni Residence...
04/30/2020

Aerial view, looking north on Charles Street circa 1924, with Homewood Museum (then Homewood House) and Alumni Residence Halls visible. #TBT #ThrowbackThursday

📸: Special Collections, The Sheridan Libraries, The Johns Hopkins University

Today, we conclude our week-long look at "Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in the Nineteenth Century Home." For th...
04/25/2020

Today, we conclude our week-long look at "Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in the Nineteenth Century Home."

For the final virtual sneak peek, we thought we would reveal a real behind-the-scenes perspective, showing assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald and student worker Ian Waggoner installing the exhibition in early March. Ian is a rising senior majoring in Art History at Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences who has been working closely with staff on this exhibit for the past year. We also would like to take the opportunity to thank the generous donors who made this exhibition possible: Forbes and Sara Maner, Jill E. McGovern, and Eileen K. Perkins. We can’t wait for everyone to see the exhibition in person once the museum reopens!

The picnic being installed here depicts one fashionable way that early 19th-century wealthy Americans enjoyed nature. At Homewood, enslaved workers, like waiting man William Ross, brought fancy painted furniture outside and served light snacks and refreshments to the Carrolls and their company. The Carroll family and their guests enjoyed music and played lawn games while they admired the garden views.

For many wealthy Baltimoreans, a picnic at a garden estate was a safe way to enjoy the natural world without venturing into the so-called “wilderness” of North America. Picnicking became one of the first examples of a national movement toward outdoor recreation.

OBJECTS
Basket, United States, 19th century, oak, HH2019.3.1, Homewood Museum.

Liquor chest, England or United States, late 18th century, wood and glass, HH89.11.1.11a-b, Homewood Museum.

Tumblers, England, late 18th century, glass, HH89.11.1.14, Homewood Museum.

Dinner Plates, Spode Factory, England, c.1820, pearlware, HH85.11.2.101-103, Homewood Museum.

Settee and side chairs, Thomas Renshaw (cabinetmaker) and John Barnhart (ornamenter), Baltimore, MD, c.1810, maple, HH2015.4.1, HH2015.7.1-2, Homewood Museum.

Tray, 19th century, mahogany, HH2019.3.5, Homewood Museum.

Violin, 20th century, possible spruce and maple, JHSC2017.4a-b, Evergreen Museum & Library.

Harlem, the Country House of Dr. Edmondson, Baltimore, Nicolino V. Calyo, Baltimore, Maryland, 1834, Gouache and watercolor on woven paper, 1968.0060 A, B, Museum purchase, Courtesy of Winterthur museum.

On #ArborDay, our week-long virtual exploration of Homewood's current exhibition, Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature...
04/24/2020

On #ArborDay, our week-long virtual exploration of Homewood's current exhibition, Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in the Nineteenth-Century Home continues with a look at the historic lumber trade.

When we take apart antique furniture, we discover it is often made from a variety of woods that tell a global environmental story. This Baltimore desk, for instance, is covered in a mahogany veneer that came from a tree felled in the English Caribbean in the late 18th century. Originally used as ballast on ships, merchants quickly saw the aesthetic value of mahogany's exotic grain and began harvesting the wood commercially. By the 1760s, mature mahogany trees were almost completely harvested in Jamaica for trade.

Homewood, like many Chesapeake houses, also incorporates popular domestic wood species, like the American chestnut, into its structural underpinning. Because of its abundance, grain quality, and resistance to decay, chestnut was a popular material. However, around 1900, the importation of invasive trees for landscaping accidentally introduced a blight that attacked the American chestnut trees. In a matter of years, the trees that once made up approximately 25 percent of the Appalachian forest dwindled from four billion chestnuts to functionally extinct.

In recent decades, institutions like the The American Chestnut Foundation have planted chestnut groves throughout the United States where they are developing blight-resistant hybrids to revive the American chestnut tree. (See map for breeding locations in Maryland.)

We would like to thank the preservation and conservation organizations who endorse "Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in the Nineteenth-Century Home": Sierra Club Maryland Chapter, the American Chestnut Foundation, and Baltimore Heritage. Follow them to find out more about current environmental efforts and Baltimore history!

OBJECTS
Desk, att. to John Bankson and Richard Lawson, Baltimore, Maryland, c.1795, mahogany and tulip poplar, HH2013.8.1, Homewood Museum.

Chestnut sample from architectural beam, Maryland, 2020, reclaimed American chestnut, Homewood Museum.

Chestnut sample cookie from blighted tree, Maryland 2020, American chestnut, Homewood Museum.

Orchards of Maryland Chapter Map, 2020, Courtesy of American Chestnut Foundation Maryland Chapter.

Chestnut tree, published in "American Lumberman & Building Products Merchandiser," 1910.

Today, we continue our virtual exploration of the museum's current exhibition "Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in...
04/23/2020

Today, we continue our virtual exploration of the museum's current exhibition "Naturally Beautiful: Uncovering Nature in the Nineteenth-Century Home," with a look at the degree to which 19th-century decorative arts relied upon animal byproducts.

The argand lamp was one of the most important developments for early 19th-century interiors. The lamp used whale oil to produce a light that was the equivalent of six to eight candles. The brightness of the light quickly made it the lamp of choice for almost a century. This popularity led to the rise of the whaling industry, the dangers of which were covered by Herman Melville in "Moby Dick."

Whales were hunted nearly to extinction in the Atlantic Ocean for their oil, spermaceti, and bone. Many mass-scale animal hunts involved dangerous work conditions for humans and employed unsustainable practices. As a response to rapidly depleting resources, governments passed restrictions on commercial whaling and hunting.

Other animals have received federal protections due in part to their symbolic importance – such as the bald eagle. Proposed as the nation’s seal in 1782, the eagle became prominent in American decorative arts. The species’ symbolic importance and endangerment due to habitat loss led to it becoming one of the first species protected by Congressional Acts. While it was removed from the endangered list in 2007, the eagle’s habitats continue to face risk from the lumber industry and commercial development.

For Americans then and now, the nation’s ties to nature remain a complicated paradox of preservation and destruction.

TOMBSTONE TEXT
Argand lamp, ca. 1810, Sheffield plate, HH88.19.1a-e, Homewood Museum.

Powder box, early 19th century, ivory, tortoiseshell, glass, gold, HH85.11.151a-b, Homewood Museum.

Box, France, 1757, tortoiseshell, bone, metal, HHLEHF.A.39, Evergreen House Foundation.

Stole, 20th century, JHSC2016.3, Evergreen Museum & Library.

Mantle clock, Jean-Baptist Charles Gabriel Dubox, Paris; ca.1800, bronze, gilt, glass, HH93.10.1a-b, Homewood Museum.

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Baltimore, MD
21218

Baltimore Collegetown Shuttle http://www.baltimorecollegetown.org/shuttle/ JHMI Shuttle http://www.parking.jhu.edu/shuttles_jhmi_homewood.html

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The Homewood Museum Story

A tour of Homewood is a time-traveling experience, transporting you to the days when members of Maryland’s prominent Carroll family called this elegant Federal-period mansion home. As you move through the home’s spaces, you’ll see exquisitely decorated rooms, appointed in the most fashionable styles available to members of early America’s elite.

But underneath the sheen of privilege, all was not well. Hear about the personal struggles faced by the Carroll family, and meet the Ross and Conner families, who lived alongside, but were enslaved by, the Carroll family. How did these three families coexist in wildly unequal circumstances? What did they share? How were their fates linked? The answers are here. Come discover them for yourself.

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Comments

The tour was very good. Debi was wonderful. She is very informative and knowledgable with information. My husband and I learned a lot about Maryland’s history from her today.