Homewood Museum

Homewood Museum Part of the Johns Hopkins University Museums, Homewood Museum is a National Historic Landmark built in 1801 by Charles Carroll Jr. and one of the nation's best surviving examples of Federal period architecture.
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This #Juneteenth, Homewood remembers the enslaved individuals who lived and labored at the estate before finding their f...
06/19/2021

This #Juneteenth, Homewood remembers the enslaved individuals who lived and labored at the estate before finding their freedom from the inhumane practice of slavery under the Carroll family.

Juneteenth marks the day federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, to enforced emancipation in the state, which had been slow to comply with federal orders of emancipation despite the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863, and the Union’s victory in the Civil War earlier that spring.

Maryland also delayed emancipation. The Emancipation Proclamation applied only to slave states that supported the Confederacy. As Maryland was a slave state that supported the Union, it was exempt from the order. This meant that those who were enslaved in Maryland did not receive their freedom until state emancipation passed on November 1, 1864.

Cis Conner was one of the enslaved individuals at Homewood who we know was enslaved by the Carroll family until state emancipation. After her years at Homewood, Cis, her husband Isadod, and their children were leased out to labor in the Gulf South. Some--but to our knowledge not all--of the Conners returned to Maryland several years later and were enslaved at Doughoregan, the Carroll family manor near Ellicott City. During their time at Doughoregan, the Conner family would have lived in quarters like the ones shown here, photographed in September 1936.

After a lifetime of enslavement, Cis Conner would have been 81 years old when she was finally emancipated by the state of Maryland.

[Doughoregan Enslaved Quarters, Howard County, MD; 1936, HABS Photograph, Library of Congress.]

This #Juneteenth, Homewood remembers the enslaved individuals who lived and labored at the estate before finding their freedom from the inhumane practice of slavery under the Carroll family.

Juneteenth marks the day federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, to enforced emancipation in the state, which had been slow to comply with federal orders of emancipation despite the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863, and the Union’s victory in the Civil War earlier that spring.

Maryland also delayed emancipation. The Emancipation Proclamation applied only to slave states that supported the Confederacy. As Maryland was a slave state that supported the Union, it was exempt from the order. This meant that those who were enslaved in Maryland did not receive their freedom until state emancipation passed on November 1, 1864.

Cis Conner was one of the enslaved individuals at Homewood who we know was enslaved by the Carroll family until state emancipation. After her years at Homewood, Cis, her husband Isadod, and their children were leased out to labor in the Gulf South. Some--but to our knowledge not all--of the Conners returned to Maryland several years later and were enslaved at Doughoregan, the Carroll family manor near Ellicott City. During their time at Doughoregan, the Conner family would have lived in quarters like the ones shown here, photographed in September 1936.

After a lifetime of enslavement, Cis Conner would have been 81 years old when she was finally emancipated by the state of Maryland.

[Doughoregan Enslaved Quarters, Howard County, MD; 1936, HABS Photograph, Library of Congress.]

Starting at noon, tune in to a live webcast from Homewood Museum hosted by the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Art...
06/18/2021

Starting at noon, tune in to a live webcast from Homewood Museum hosted by the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts and the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences showcasing live dramatic performances based on the writings of Black Baltimoreans who were at the forefront of the 19th-century Abolition movement. Click here to register for free: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/juneteenth-at-homewood-freedom-and-the-liberation-arts-tickets-158618346745

#homewoodmuseum #juneteenth #juneteenth2021 #johnshopkinsuniversity

Starting at noon, tune in to a live webcast from Homewood Museum hosted by the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts and the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences showcasing live dramatic performances based on the writings of Black Baltimoreans who were at the forefront of the 19th-century Abolition movement. Click here to register for free: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/juneteenth-at-homewood-freedom-and-the-liberation-arts-tickets-158618346745

#homewoodmuseum #juneteenth #juneteenth2021 #johnshopkinsuniversity

Meet Elizabeth Sheehan, Homewood Museum's 2021 Pinkard-Bolton intern!⁠⁠Each summer, Homewood selects one Johns Hopkins U...
06/17/2021

Meet Elizabeth Sheehan, Homewood Museum's 2021 Pinkard-Bolton intern!⁠

Each summer, Homewood selects one Johns Hopkins University undergrad for a paid research internship at the museum. ⁠

Elizabeth is a rising senior majoring in Archeology with a minor in the Program in Museums & Society. While the museum remains closed in observance of JHU COVID-19 protocols, Elizabeth will conduct her internship through regular virtual check-ins with museum staff, including Curator of Collections Michelle Fitzgerald. ⁠

She will be researching Homewood’s historic privy, which is architecturally significant as a rare surviving example of an early 19th-century outhouse. In addition to its architecture, Elizabeth will look at the privy through a social lens, asking what its construction and use can reveal about race, class, and gender in 19th-century Baltimore.⁠

Meet Elizabeth Sheehan, Homewood Museum's 2021 Pinkard-Bolton intern!⁠

Each summer, Homewood selects one Johns Hopkins University undergrad for a paid research internship at the museum. ⁠

Elizabeth is a rising senior majoring in Archeology with a minor in the Program in Museums & Society. While the museum remains closed in observance of JHU COVID-19 protocols, Elizabeth will conduct her internship through regular virtual check-ins with museum staff, including Curator of Collections Michelle Fitzgerald. ⁠

She will be researching Homewood’s historic privy, which is architecturally significant as a rare surviving example of an early 19th-century outhouse. In addition to its architecture, Elizabeth will look at the privy through a social lens, asking what its construction and use can reveal about race, class, and gender in 19th-century Baltimore.⁠

"Inviting [Charles] Duggar to talk about Black history is like going to a fire hydrant for a glass of water: He's a rese...
06/16/2021
Juneteenth at Homewood: Freedom and the Liberation Arts

"Inviting [Charles] Duggar to talk about Black history is like going to a fire hydrant for a glass of water: He's a reservoir of expertise and thoughtfulness. He's especially insightful when talking about Black history in Baltimore, making him an ideal elder-in-residence to collaborate with the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts' oral history projects about Black Baltimore."

Read this great article in today's Hub about Charles Duggar and the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts at Johns Hopkins, which is co-hosting a live webcast of dramatic performances from Homewood Museum this Friday in honor of Juneteenth. Register for the free webcast here: https://tinyurl.com/2e2zdmcx

https://hub.jhu.edu/2021/06/16/juneteenth-at-homewood/?mc_cid=6678950e03&mc_eid=9e31d55e1a

Live dramatic performances based on the writings of Black Baltimoreans who were at the forefront of the 19th century Abolition movement.

This Friday, our friends from  the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts and the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences ...
06/15/2021

This Friday, our friends from the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts and the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences will host a FREE live webcast from Homewood Museum in commemoration and celebration of #Juneteenth.

Experience dramatic performances based on the writings of Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and other Black Baltimoreans who were at the forefront of the 19th-century Abolition movement. Hear original poetry and storytelling, traditional West African drumming, and a musical blues elegy honoring the "freedom dreams" of the enslaved. Remember the roots of Juneteenth and learn what staff and faculty are doing to advance Black freedom today.

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/juneteenth-at-homewood-freedom-and-the-liberation-arts-tickets-158618346745

This Friday, our friends from the Billie Holiday Project for Liberation Arts and the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences will host a FREE live webcast from Homewood Museum in commemoration and celebration of #Juneteenth.

Experience dramatic performances based on the writings of Frederick Douglass, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and other Black Baltimoreans who were at the forefront of the 19th-century Abolition movement. Hear original poetry and storytelling, traditional West African drumming, and a musical blues elegy honoring the "freedom dreams" of the enslaved. Remember the roots of Juneteenth and learn what staff and faculty are doing to advance Black freedom today.

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/juneteenth-at-homewood-freedom-and-the-liberation-arts-tickets-158618346745

On this #ThrowbackThursday we're looking back at our 2017 Harvest Ball. We can't wait until we can party like it's 2017 ...
06/10/2021

On this #ThrowbackThursday we're looking back at our 2017 Harvest Ball. We can't wait until we can party like it's 2017 again! 🎉🥂 #TBT #HomewoodMuseum #HarvestBall

The Best Guest Chamber at Homewood is the house's fanciest guest room, likely reserved only for close relatives and este...
06/09/2021

The Best Guest Chamber at Homewood is the house's fanciest guest room, likely reserved only for close relatives and esteemed guests. The chintz bedding and draperies are based on historical patterns and were installed in 1987 when Homewood opened as a museum. Elsewhere in the room is a traveling writing desk used by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, wealthy planter, enslaver, and the father of Charles Carroll of Homewood, for whom Homewood was constructed circa 1800-1806. ⁠

#homewoodmuseum #historichousemuseum #historichouses #historicbaltimore #baltimorehistory #johnshopkinsuniversity #johnshopkins #jhu

The Best Guest Chamber at Homewood is the house's fanciest guest room, likely reserved only for close relatives and esteemed guests. The chintz bedding and draperies are based on historical patterns and were installed in 1987 when Homewood opened as a museum. Elsewhere in the room is a traveling writing desk used by Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, wealthy planter, enslaver, and the father of Charles Carroll of Homewood, for whom Homewood was constructed circa 1800-1806. ⁠

#homewoodmuseum #historichousemuseum #historichouses #historicbaltimore #baltimorehistory #johnshopkinsuniversity #johnshopkins #jhu

It’s #ONEHopkins! Today s JHU's institution-wide day of giving, the day when YOUR gift will make an even greater impact ...
05/11/2021

It’s #ONEHopkins! Today s JHU's institution-wide day of giving, the day when YOUR gift will make an even greater impact through matching and challenge gifts. And when you give $25 or more, you’ll receive a limited-edition JHU beach towel as a special “thank you” from us! To support the JHU Museums:

1. Click on the link below. This will take you to a secure JHU online giving page.
2. On this page, in the "designation" field, find the drop-down menu and select "JHU Museums Annual Giving Fund"
3. Fill in your information and submit.
4. You can expect your beach towel in 8-10 weeks!

https://www.givecampus.com/campaigns/20750/donations/new

It’s #ONEHopkins! Today s JHU's institution-wide day of giving, the day when YOUR gift will make an even greater impact through matching and challenge gifts. And when you give $25 or more, you’ll receive a limited-edition JHU beach towel as a special “thank you” from us! To support the JHU Museums:

1. Click on the link below. This will take you to a secure JHU online giving page.
2. On this page, in the "designation" field, find the drop-down menu and select "JHU Museums Annual Giving Fund"
3. Fill in your information and submit.
4. You can expect your beach towel in 8-10 weeks!

https://www.givecampus.com/campaigns/20750/donations/new

As we celebrate mothers and all who fill that role on this Mother’s Day, we wanted to show off one of our favorite piece...
05/09/2021

As we celebrate mothers and all who fill that role on this Mother’s Day, we wanted to show off one of our favorite pieces of painted furniture at Homewood Museum.

This cradle, on display in our Master Bed Chamber, was made in Baltimore at the turn of the nineteenth century and highlights classic details of neoclassical painted furniture, including a mixture of stenciling and free-hand painting that was particularly popular in Baltimore. The Carrolls may have used a cradle similar to this for their five children born at Homewood over the course of their marriage.

While records indicate that Harriet Carroll was a devoted mother, she, like most women of her class, relied heavily on the assistance of enslaved Africans to rear her children. These women included, but likely were not limited to, Cis Conner, who had 13 children of her own, and Rebecca Ross, who had two children of her own.

Cradle, Baltimore, MD; 1800-1810, painted wood, Homewood Museum HH2004.3.1. #mothersday #ObjectOfTheMonth #OOTM

As we celebrate mothers and all who fill that role on this Mother’s Day, we wanted to show off one of our favorite pieces of painted furniture at Homewood Museum.

This cradle, on display in our Master Bed Chamber, was made in Baltimore at the turn of the nineteenth century and highlights classic details of neoclassical painted furniture, including a mixture of stenciling and free-hand painting that was particularly popular in Baltimore. The Carrolls may have used a cradle similar to this for their five children born at Homewood over the course of their marriage.

While records indicate that Harriet Carroll was a devoted mother, she, like most women of her class, relied heavily on the assistance of enslaved Africans to rear her children. These women included, but likely were not limited to, Cis Conner, who had 13 children of her own, and Rebecca Ross, who had two children of her own.

Cradle, Baltimore, MD; 1800-1810, painted wood, Homewood Museum HH2004.3.1. #mothersday #ObjectOfTheMonth #OOTM

Cliveden shares a complicated history with Homewood and the story of Harriet Chew Carroll and Charity Castle is one exam...
04/27/2021

Cliveden shares a complicated history with Homewood and the story of Harriet Chew Carroll and Charity Castle is one example. Their status in 19th-century American society separated them: Harriet was part of the elite class while Charity, an enslaved woman, was not considered a person. However, their lives at Homewood bound them together and raised the question who is free and who determines that answer.

Charity and Harriet, as well as others who labored for the Chews and Carrolls, will be discussed TOMORROW (4/28) at 7 p.m. during A Tale of Two Houses: Cliveden and Homewood. Registration is $5 and open through Eventbrite until noon tomorrow. Click here to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-tale-of-two-houses-cliveden-and-homewood-tickets-149351515403

Cliveden was the summer home and later permanent residence of the Chew family. It was also a site where free, enslaved, ...
04/26/2021

Cliveden was the summer home and later permanent residence of the Chew family. It was also a site where free, enslaved, and indentured servants labored to provide services reflecting the Chews’ upper-class status. Over the last several years, Cliveden staff have worked to uncover the names and stories of these men and women whose work contributed to Cliveden’s history, and have made some interesting discoveries that connect Cliveden to other properties in the Mid-Atlantic region, including Homewood.

To learn more, join curators and staff from Cliveden and Homewood on Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. for a live Zoom talk and Q&A! Registration is $5. See the link below for more information. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-tale-of-two-houses-cliveden-and-homewood-tickets-149351515403

Cliveden was the summer home and later permanent residence of the Chew family. It was also a site where free, enslaved, and indentured servants labored to provide services reflecting the Chews’ upper-class status. Over the last several years, Cliveden staff have worked to uncover the names and stories of these men and women whose work contributed to Cliveden’s history, and have made some interesting discoveries that connect Cliveden to other properties in the Mid-Atlantic region, including Homewood.

To learn more, join curators and staff from Cliveden and Homewood on Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. for a live Zoom talk and Q&A! Registration is $5. See the link below for more information. https://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-tale-of-two-houses-cliveden-and-homewood-tickets-149351515403

Cliveden and Homewood present A Tale of Two Houses: Cliveden and Homewood on April 28th at 7 p.m.! Join us for a virtual...
04/15/2021

Cliveden and Homewood present A Tale of Two Houses: Cliveden and Homewood on April 28th at 7 p.m.! Join us for a virtual presentation about the historic summer homes separated by geography but united by shared histories. The talk will touch on the similarities between the properties, how the interpretation of the sites has changed over time, and the overlapping lives of the free and enslaved residents.

Registration is $5; visit https://a-tale-of-two-houses.eventbrite.com.

Cliveden and Homewood present A Tale of Two Houses: Cliveden and Homewood on April 28th at 7 p.m.! Join us for a virtual presentation about the historic summer homes separated by geography but united by shared histories. The talk will touch on the similarities between the properties, how the interpretation of the sites has changed over time, and the overlapping lives of the free and enslaved residents.

Registration is $5; visit https://a-tale-of-two-houses.eventbrite.com.

Address

3400 N Charles St
Baltimore, MD
21218

Baltimore Collegetown Shuttle http://www.baltimorecollegetown.org/shuttle/ JHMI Shuttle http://www.parking.jhu.edu/shuttles_jhmi_homewood.html

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The Homewood Museum Story

A tour of Homewood is a time-traveling experience, transporting you to the days when members of Maryland’s prominent Carroll family called this elegant Federal-period mansion home. As you move through the home’s spaces, you’ll see exquisitely decorated rooms, appointed in the most fashionable styles available to members of early America’s elite.

But underneath the sheen of privilege, all was not well. Hear about the personal struggles faced by the Carroll family, and meet the Ross and Conner families, who lived alongside, but were enslaved by, the Carroll family. How did these three families coexist in wildly unequal circumstances? What did they share? How were their fates linked? The answers are here. Come discover them for yourself.


Comments

The tour was very good. Debi was wonderful. She is very informative and knowledgable with information. My husband and I learned a lot about Maryland’s history from her today.