Reginald F. Lewis Museum

Reginald F. Lewis Museum The state’s premier institution highlighting the history and accomplishments of African Americans, with a special focus on Maryland.
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The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is the state’s premier institution highlighting the history and accomplishments of African Americans, with a special focus on Maryland. A Smithsonian affiliate, the museum engages visitors through its permanent and special exhibitions, resource center, as well as programs such as its film series, live music performances, and family programming.

Operating as usual

As a child, Reginald F. Lewis overheard his grandparents discussing employment discrimination against African Americans ...
09/12/2020

As a child, Reginald F. Lewis overheard his grandparents discussing employment discrimination against African Americans and asked, "Why should white guys have all the fun?" The museum's namesake, this self-assured child would grow up to become the CEO of Beatrice International and the first Black man to run a billion-dollar company.

Hear how he did it in his book "Why Should White Guys Have All The Fun?" - now available on Audible!

Click here: https://www.audible.com/pd/B08HNJNPD3?qid=1599913972&sr=1-1&ref=a_search_c3_lProduct_1_1&pf_rd_p=e81b7c27-6880-467a-b5a7-13cef5d729fe&pf_rd_r=R7TT5TZ5XH8WW35J1EBV

It's official... we're open! We are so happy to welcome you back to #TheLewis. Timed passes are recommended but not requ...
09/10/2020

It's official... we're open! We are so happy to welcome you back to #TheLewis.

Timed passes are recommended but not required. The museum’s hours have been updated to Thursday to Saturdays 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Sundays 12 – 5 p.m.

Click here to purchase a timed pass: http://bit.ly/TimedPass

As a reminder, all visitors are required to wear a mask while in the building and asked to please adhere to the posted signage.

We can't wait to see you!

#WelcomeBack #MeetMeAtTheLewis

Calling all youth photographers! Young photographers in training are invited to learn the tricks of the trade with Balti...
09/09/2020

Calling all youth photographers! Young photographers in training are invited to learn the tricks of the trade with Baltimore photojournalist, Kyle Pompey, over this two-session course starting this Saturday, September 12.

Kyle will share his experiences and work while teaching youth how to create their own photographic works of art. Student photographers will showcase their work online following the workshop.

Click here to sign up: https://17527.blackbaudhosting.com/17527/Virtual-Youth-Photography-Workshop-How-I-See-My-Community

This is a virtual event. Appropriate for ages 9-16.

#MeetMeAtTheLewisOnlne #YouthPhotographers #BaltimorePhotographers

When #TheLewis reopens this Thursday, September 10, we will have two new exhibitions on view. Freedom Bound: Runaways of...
09/08/2020

When #TheLewis reopens this Thursday, September 10, we will have two new exhibitions on view.

Freedom Bound: Runaways of the Chesapeake tells a story of resistance to bondage and servitude in the Chesapeake Region from the Colonial Period to the American Civil War (1728-1864). In this exhibition, visitors will learn the personal stories of nine people stripped of their human rights and treated as property. Each of these individuals resisted these abuses and asserted some degree of control over their own lives by running away. Freedom Bound will be on view until March 28, 2021.

Also on display is Robert Houston: The 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Photographs. There you'll see the work of Baltimore-based photographer Robert Houston, 84, reveals the human condition in his photographs of Resurrection City, the encampment protesters constructed in 1968 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The Poor People’s Campaign, as it was known, brought 3,000 people from all over the country to a slice of land that would soon be drenched by rain and filled with wooden shanties. Visitors to this exhibition will see a selection of photographs by Houston as curated by photographer Devin Allen, a 2017 Gordon Parks Foundation Fellow.

#MeetMeAtTheLewis #ComingSoon #Reopening #Countdown #SpecialExhibitions

Did you hear the news?! The Reginald F. Lewis Museum will re-open to the public on Thursday, September 10. 🎉For the safe...
09/06/2020

Did you hear the news?! The Reginald F. Lewis Museum will re-open to the public on Thursday, September 10. 🎉

For the safety of our visitors and to protect against the spread of COVID-19, all staff and visitors are required to wear face masks while in the museum. We have also adjusted our hours of operation and signage will direct visitor traffic flow.

Upon opening, the exhibitions on display will be Robert Houston: The 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Photographs and Freedom Bound: Runaways of the Chesapeake.

The Lewis Museum will continue to provide virtual programs and online resources.

To read our full visitor guidelines, please click here: HTTP://www.lewismuseum.org/visitors-guide

It is with great sadness we share news of the passing of Ms. Esther McCready. She was 89.From a young age, Esther McCrea...
09/04/2020

It is with great sadness we share news of the passing of Ms. Esther McCready. She was 89.

From a young age, Esther McCready knew what she was destined to be. After graduating from Dunbar High School and working as a nurse’s aid at Sinai Hospital, in 1950, she applied to the University of Maryland School of Nursing and was rejected due to her race. With the help of NAACP civil rights giants including Thurgood Marshall, Esther sued and won a court case that desegregated the School of Nursing and paved the way for similar desegregation cases. She graduated in 1953.

McCready dedicated much of her life to nursing, working at the Druid Health Center, Morgan State University as Head Nurse, Cornell Medical Center, and Harlem Hospital. In addition to nursing, McCready attended the Manhattan School of Music where she earned a master's degree. She participated in traveling opera groups who toured around the county and in Europe.

In 2004, McCready was inducted into the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame.

A supporter of the Lewis Museum's mission, Esther donated her nurse’s cap and nurse's notebook to the museum. It can be found in our third floor Permanent Exhibition.

#InMemoriam

"My free life began on the third of September, 1838. On the morning of the fourth of that month, after an anxious and mo...
09/03/2020
How Frederick Douglass Escaped Slavery

"My free life began on the third of September, 1838. On the morning of the fourth of that month, after an anxious and most perilous but safe journey, I found myself in the big city of New York, a free man - one more added to the mighty throng which, like the confused waves of the troubled sea...”- Frederick Douglass, 1881

#OTD, 182 years ago, Frederick Douglass, then known as Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, successfully escaped slavery when he boarded a train to Philadelphia from #Baltimore's President Street Station. Disguised as a sailor, he used papers from a freed Black sailor to help in the journey.

For the rest of his life, Douglass celebrated this date in place of his unknown birthday.

Read more about the harrowing journey, including some close calls, here: https://www.history.com/news/frederick-douglass-escapes-slavery

#OnThisDay #FrederickDouglass #ShareBlackStories #BlackHistoryMatters #InternationalUndergroundRailroadMonth

Douglass looked back on September 3, 1838 as the day when his “free life began,” but he encountered several close calls during his journey to freedom.

In honor of September being declared International Underground Railroad Month, yesterday marked the official opening of ...
09/02/2020
Frederick Douglass Park On The Tuckahoe Opens To Begin International Underground Railroad Month In Maryland

In honor of September being declared International Underground Railroad Month, yesterday marked the official opening of the new Frederick Douglass Park on the Tuckahoe in Queen Anne, Maryland.

As a child, Frederick Douglass lived with his family in a cabin close to this park site. Even 200 years later, the surrounding landscape and Tuckahoe Creek are very similar to what Douglass would have known in the early 1800s. With the opening of this park, visitors can now explore outdoor exhibits that describe Douglass’s humble beginnings here and nearby while enslaved.

Find out more here: https://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2020/09/01/frederick-douglass-park-on-the-tuckahoe-opens-in-marylands-eastern-shore/

#ShareBlackStories #FrederickDouglass #InternationalUndergroundRailroadMonth #BlackLivesMatter #BlackHistoryMatter

For the second year in a row, Gov. Larry Hogan announced September as International Underground Railroad Month.

Photographers serve as witnesses, capturing humanity during a moment in time. On September 16 at 6 pm, Baltimore photogr...
09/01/2020

Photographers serve as witnesses, capturing humanity during a moment in time.

On September 16 at 6 pm, Baltimore photographer Joe Giordano will moderate a discussion with fellow photographers from around the country about the history of photographing protest, the importance of being witness to the Black Lives Matter movement, and more.

https://17527.blackbaudhosting.com/17527/Capturing-a-Movement-Photography-as-Activism

#BlackLivesMatter #PowerofProtest #ProtestPhotography #Photography #Activism

#OnThisDay in 1967, #Baltimore's Thurgood Marshall was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Nominated by President Lyndo...
08/30/2020

#OnThisDay in 1967, #Baltimore's Thurgood Marshall was appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Nominated by President Lyndon Johnson, Marshall was the first Black justice in the Court's history.

As a long-time civil rights litigator for the NAACP, Marshall won most of the cases he had previously argued in front of the Supreme Court. One of his most notable wins was Brown v. Board of Education (1954), a landmark case in the Court’s history, which invalidated the concept of segregation at public schools under the Fourteenth Amendment.

During his 24 years on the high court, Associate Justice Marshall consistently challenged discrimination based on race or sex, supported the rights of criminal defendants, defended affirmative action and women’s right to reproductive freedom. He retired in 1991.

#OTD #TodayinBlackHistory #TodayinHistory #ThurgoodMarshall #ShareBlackStories

From Baltimore to Wakanda with love. 👑  #RestInPower #RepresentationMatters
08/29/2020

From Baltimore to Wakanda with love. 👑 #RestInPower #RepresentationMatters

It was 57 years ago today that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. uttered the immortal words, "I have a dream..." during the Ma...
08/28/2020

It was 57 years ago today that Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. uttered the immortal words, "I have a dream..." during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Today - and every day - we stand with the dreamers. We stand with those who honor Dr. King's legacy by continuing to demand change. We stand with those who don't turn away from injustice but face it head-on. We recognize the work of those in the #Baltimore community and Maryland at large who commit themselves to make these dreams a reality. We are dreamers, too.

Although much has changed since 1963, there are more mountains to climb. We invite you to take a moment to reflect on how far we've come - and how much further we need to go - while reading the words of Dr. King, more relevant than ever, even five decades on.

Full speech: https://naacp.org/i-have-a-dream-speech-full-march-on-washington/

#BlackLivesMatter #OnThisDay #OTD #MarchOnWashington #DrKing #IHaveADream #ShareBlackStories

#OnThisDay in 1963, sociologist, historian, writer, civil rights activist and founder of the NAACP, W. E. B. Du Bois die...
08/27/2020

#OnThisDay in 1963, sociologist, historian, writer, civil rights activist and founder of the NAACP, W. E. B. Du Bois died in Ghana.

Nearly 25 years earlier, in 1939, Du Bois moved to #Baltimore with his wife, Nina, purchasing a lot in Morgan Park. They had moved to the city to be near their daughter, Yolande, a city school teacher. The photo below shows Du Bois in front of his home at 2302 Montebello Terrace.

During his years here, Du Bois wrote Dusk at Dawn (1940), Color and Democracy (1945) and The World and Africa (1946). He also was the first Black person to be elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters.

After his wife's death, Du Bois remarried and purchased an apartment in New York City, yet continued to live part-time in Baltimore. Becoming increasingly dissatisfied with life in the United States, he later moved to Ghana in 1962 where he passed a year later at the age of 95.

#OTD #ShareBlackStories #BlackHistory #TodayinBlackHistory #BlackLivesMatter #MarylandHistory #BaltimoreHistoty

TOMORROW AT 6 P.M. Numerous African American women who've lost a child to gun violence or police brutality have gone fro...
08/25/2020

TOMORROW AT 6 P.M. Numerous African American women who've lost a child to gun violence or police brutality have gone from grieving to activism to demanding and making structural change. Join #TheLewis and our partners at Kaiser Permanente Thrive tomorrow for a discussion about how mothers are showing their resiliency through activism. Click here to register: HTTP://bit.ly/PowerofMotherhood

KEY PARTICIPANTS:
Keynote:
Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin

Keynote introduction:
Ruth Williams-Brinkley, Regional President, Kaiser Permanente

Moderator:
Dr. Kaye Whitehead, WEAA Radio Show Host/ Professor of African American Studies, Loyola University

PANELISTS:
Annette March Grier, Executive Director Roberta's House
Dr. Ada Emarievbe (OBGYN), Assistant Physician in Chief
Ruth Williams-Brinkley, Regional President, Kaiser Permanente

Trailblazing artist and #Baltimore resident, Amy Sherald, paid tribute to Breonna Taylor on the cover of September's iss...
08/24/2020

Trailblazing artist and #Baltimore resident, Amy Sherald, paid tribute to Breonna Taylor on the cover of September's issue of Vanity Fair. Sherald calls this portrait a contribution to the “moment and to activism—producing this image keeps Breonna alive forever.”

Read more about her process and how she captured Breonna Taylor, a woman she never met yet felt connected to, here: https://www.vanityfair.com/culture/2020/08/amy-sherald-on-making-breonna-taylors-cover-portrait

#BLACKLIVESMATTER #BreonnaTaylor #SayHerName #SupportBlackArtists #baltimoreartist

⏰ TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SPECIAL MEMBERSHIP OFFER: Until August 31, new members get 10% off the co...
08/23/2020

⏰ TIME IS RUNNING OUT TO TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR SPECIAL MEMBERSHIP OFFER: Until August 31, new members get 10% off the cost of membership with the code AUG20.

Members of the Lewis Museum receive special rates on all virtual museum programs and are the first to be notified when new programs are scheduled. When the museum reopens, members receive free general admission, a 15% discount in the Museum Shop, exclusive special exhibition previews and other special perks.

Plus, your membership provides financial support to help #TheLewis further our mission to empower, inspire, and uplift our community. Join us!

Click the here and use code AUG20 for 10% off: https://buff.ly/2L0U5sR

#SupportBlackMuseums #SupportBlackHistory #BlackLivesMatter #JoinUs #MemberPerks #Exclusive

#OTD in 1831, Nat Turner's four-day rebellion of enslaved and free Black people began in Southampton County, Virginia. A...
08/21/2020

#OTD in 1831, Nat Turner's four-day rebellion of enslaved and free Black people began in Southampton County, Virginia. Although it is the most well-known slave revolt, it is far from the only uprising of its time.

In July 1845, another uprising occurred in Maryland that is little remembered and rarely mentioned. Starting in Charles County, runaway slaves gained in strength as they passed through St. Mary’s and Prince George’s into Montgomery County, at one-time numbering approximately 75 armed men. Their destination was the free state of Pennsylvania and they would fight for their freedom if they had to.

They soon encountered Montgomery Volunteers, a local militia, and a posse of citizens called into action by Montgomery County, Sheriff Daniel Hayes Candler. In the ensuing fight, 10 escaped slaves were severely wounded. A large number run away during the chaos and were never recaptured. The rest — 31, according to the Baltimore Sun — were led away in chains to the Rockville jail before being sold by their owners out of state.

In our upcoming exhibition, Freedom Bound: Runaways of the Chesapeake, you'll hear more stories of daring escapes from bondage. #ComingSoon

#TodayinHistory #BlackHistory #SupportBlackMuseums #OnThisDay #NatTurner

TONIGHT AT 6 P.M.: Explore the corrupt world of Baltimore’s Gun Trace Task Force in a conversation with I GOT A MONSTER ...
08/20/2020

TONIGHT AT 6 P.M.: Explore the corrupt world of Baltimore’s Gun Trace Task Force in a conversation with I GOT A MONSTER authors and veteran journalists Baynard Woods and Brandon Soderberg, featuring Ivan J. Bates, the defense attorney who helped take the GTTF down.

The discussion will be moderated by Tia “Mz Konnoisseur” Hamilton, owner of State Vs Us Magazine & co-owner of Urban Reads Bookstore.⠀

Click here to grab your ticket: HTTP://bit.ly/igotamonster

#Tonight #MeetMeAtTheLewisOnline #OnlineProgram #VirtualTalk #AuthorTalk

Numerous African American women who've lost a child to gun violence or police brutality have gone from grieving to activ...
08/19/2020

Numerous African American women who've lost a child to gun violence or police brutality have gone from grieving to activism and from demanding to making structural change.

This discussion on Wednesday, August 26 at 6 p.m. will highlight how mothers show resiliency through relentlessly by using their voices to speak out about police brutality, gun violence, criminal-justice reform or running for political office.

Panelists will also engage in a discussion on the health disparities women of color experience as they navigate the health care system.

KEY PARTICIPANTS:
*Keynote: Sybrina Fulton, Mother of Trayvon Martin
*Moderator: Dr. Kaye Whitehead, WEAA Radio Show Host/ Professor of African American Studies Loyola University

PANELISTS:
* Annette March Grier, Executive Director Roberta's House
* Dr. Ada Emarievbe (OBGYN), Assistant Physician in Chief, on Quality

In partnership with Kaiser Permanente. FREE to attend; registration required. Click here to sign up: HTTP://bit.ly/PowerofMotherhood

#BlackLivesMatter #SupportBlackWomen #ChangeIsComing #Strength

“With no sacredness of the ballot, there can be no sacredness of human life itself” - Ida B. Wells, suffragette #OTD  10...
08/18/2020

“With no sacredness of the ballot, there can be no sacredness of human life itself” - Ida B. Wells, suffragette

#OTD 100 years ago, the #19thAmendment was ratified, formally granting women the right to vote.

Before the passing of the 19th, Black women often found themselves fighting on two fronts. Black men wanted their support in fighting racial inequality, while white women wanted them to help change the status of women in American society. Neither group recognized the unique challenges that African American women had to face. Black reformers like Maryland's Mary Church Terrell, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, and Harriet Tubman understood that both their race and their sex affected their rights and opportunities.

Despite the successes of the suffrage movement with the passing of the 19th amendment in 1920, obstacles remained for African American women's suffrage. In much of the country, hurdles like poll taxes, literacy tests, and threats of violence kept Black voters disenfranchised. These practices were outlawed only 55 years ago with the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

With another election year upon us, it is time to use your voice by casting your ballot. Vote in honor of those who have paved the way and for those who will follow in your footsteps. To register to vote or get information on absentee ballots, visit www.vote.gov.

#BecauseOfHer #19thAt100 #OnThisDay #TodayInHistory #BecauseOfHerStory #BlackLivesMatter #BlackVotesMatter #BlackHistoryMatters

Address

830 E Pratt St
Baltimore, MD
21202

Parking: Parking for museum visitors is located at the Old Bay Garage, directly across the street on the corner of Pratt and President Streets. Metered parking is also available along Albermarle Street and throughout Harbor East and Little Italy neighborhoods. Bus Lines: Bus #10 and Bus #7 stop within a block of the museum on Pratt St. Bus #11 stops two blocks south of the museum, on President St. Charm City Circulator: Orange Route (stop #201) and Green Route (stop #109) are within a block of the museum. Subway: Take the subway to the Shot Tower Station (East Baltimore). Follow Shot Tower exit area. At street level, walk two blocks south on President St. Museum is located on the left. Water Taxi: Take water taxi to Marriott Waterfront Hotel (Pier 6), walk three blocks north on President Street. Museum will be directly to your right across Pratt Street.

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(443) 263-1800

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The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is the state’s premier institution highlighting the history and accomplishments of African Americans, with a special focus on Maryland. A Smithsonian Affiliate, the museum engages visitors through its permanent and special exhibitions, resource center, as well as programs such as its film series, live music performances, and family programming.


Comments

Thank you for hosting this event. I look forward to checking out more content.
The Reginald F Lewis Museum is looking for your Black Lives Matter Posters
Has the Dream Builder story started? Don't see it live or posted anywhere.
waiting for the movie. Abundance of Caution by Simon&Alvarez
#BHM Did you know that the largest recorded nonviolent escape attempt by slaves in United States history took place in Washington, D.C. in 1848? The song “Troubled Waters” commemorates the daring escape attempt known as the Pearl Incident. Take a listen.
The Charm'tastic Mile of Baltimore on #Google https://local.google.com/place?id=13315758774861807563&use=posts&lpsid=3132669727094217229 The "Charm'tastic Mile" Ceremonial/Honorary Street Sign placed in the heart of the Inner Harbor in front of The Gallery Mall.
Baltimore
Are there new membership packets sent when you get a membership? I sent the money weeks ago and notice yet
Helllo, Will you be hosting the wonderful book fair again this year?
Hey Reginald F. Lewis Museum!! Here's a fun vlog from the GALA last Saturday! Enjoy and PLEASE share with other lovers of the museum!! https://www.facebook.com/aaronhillsworld1/videos/10210431010410743/
This film is special
Remembering Baltimore civil rights activist, William Moore, slain on this day in 1963