The Walters Art Museum

The Walters Art Museum Artworks from around the world and across the centuries. Reopen as of March 17, 2021. Explore the collection at art.thewalters.org. The Walters Art Museum brings art and people together for enjoyment, discovery and learning.
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We strive to create a place where people of every background can be touched by art. General Admission is always FREE! Special Exhibitions and programs may require the purchase of tickets.

Operating as usual

05/01/2021

Next Tuesday, we'll go live with the members of strikeWare, a Baltimore-based collective. The trio will discuss the collaborative process, the importance of creating art experiences in museums and other historic spaces, and using historic institutions as a catalyst for their work. RSVP for the talk below. https://bit.ly/3xEpTur

The Walters Art Museum is closed today, April 30.
04/30/2021

The Walters Art Museum is closed today, April 30.

The Walters Art Museum is closed today, April 30.

04/30/2021

Join the Walters Art Museum and the Dallas Museum of Art for two panels of scholars and artists that deconstruct the power of monuments—both traditional and impermanent—using examples from contemporary art and both museums’ collections.

Contemporary artists offer a unique perspective on how monuments play a role in current dialogue. Join multimedia artist Rayyane Tabet, performance artist lauren woods, and muralist LaToya Peoples in conversation with Katherine Brodbeck, the Hoffman Family Senior Curator of Contemporary Art at the Dallas Museum of Art, as they explore the shifting role of permanent and impermanent art in communities. Additional topics of discussion include how communities are involved in the dialogue about monuments and how we have the power to dismantle and reframe them.

This program is one of two lectures that are generously funded each year by the Boshell Foundation.

Thursday Nights at the Walters are supported by BGE.

Image: Relief With Winged Genius (Apkallu), Assyrian, 883-859 BCE.

04/30/2021

Baltimore-based collective strikeWare, a finalist for the 2020 Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize, is driven to rethink and breakdown tangible and intangible hierarchies. In conversation with Joy Davis, Manager of Adult and Community Program, its members discuss the collaborative process, the importance of creating art experiences in museums and other historic spaces, and using historic institutions as a catalyst for their work.

04/29/2021
LIVE Monuments and Memory: Deconstructing Power in Antiquity and the Contemporary

Join the Walters Art Museum and the Dallas Museum of Art for two panels of scholars and artists that deconstruct the power of monuments—both traditional and impermanent—using examples from contemporary art and both museums’ collections.

Monuments are present in many public spheres we encounter, but do they actively shape our lives? This question and others involving the use of monumental architecture, how monuments and sculpture asserted power in ancient times, and monuments as a device to extend power are the focus of this fascinating discussion. Join Lisa Anderson-Zhu, Associate Curator of Ancient Mediterranean Art at the Walters Art Museum; Michelle Rich, The Ellen and Harry S. Parker III Assistant Curator of the Arts of the Americas at the Dallas Museum of Art; Erika Doss, Professor of American Studies at the University of Notre Dame; and Tsione Wolde-Michael, Curator of African American Social Justice History at the National Museum of American History as they explore these topics.

This program is one of two lectures that are generously funded each year by the Boshell Foundation.

Thursday Nights at the Walters are supported by BGE.

Welcome back to #WaltersBeforeandAfter, a series where we share how we care for art objects in our conservation lab.#Fun...
04/28/2021

Welcome back to #WaltersBeforeandAfter, a series where we share how we care for art objects in our conservation lab.

#FunFact: During a previous restoration of St. Jerome by Giovanni d'Alemagna before the work came into our collection, the green architecture surrounding the bottom half of St. Jerome—yes, including the beautiful, intricate scroll work—was painted over brown 😲

"I had a clue that there was something underneath the brown before I started, and I was really excited to see it,” conservator Pam Betts says. During treatment, Pam examined the painting with infrared reflectography imaging, which revealed what was hidden beneath the brown (image 2). The work used to be gilded with gold leaf using a brown oil-based adhesive (learn more about this technique here: https://youtu.be/1jsDgcO_DHY), so the infrared image (image 3) also showed scattered areas of gold remaining in the design. Pam believes that early cleanings caused most of the gold to be rubbed away. See leftover gold flecks in image 4.

“The biggest challenge in conserving this piece was carefully removing the brown restoration paint from the green architecture and from the brown scroll work within it. If I wasn't careful, I could start to undermine the design and lose it,” Pam says. Next week, Pam shares why she chose not to fill in the scroll work with gold leaf.

Missed a post? Tap the hashtag to catch up: #WaltersBeforeandAfter

The Walters Art Museum has been nominated as one of USA Today's 10 Best Free Museums! Your vote can take us to the top s...
04/27/2021

The Walters Art Museum has been nominated as one of USA Today's 10 Best Free Museums! Your vote can take us to the top spot. Vote here: https://bit.ly/3x37GGC

Photo by Jill Fannon

The Walters Art Museum has been nominated as one of USA Today's 10 Best Free Museums! Your vote can take us to the top spot. Vote here: https://bit.ly/3x37GGC

Photo by Jill Fannon

LIVE Monuments and Memory: Deconstructing Power in Antiquity and the ContemporaryThursday, April 29 at 6:30 p.m.Monument...
04/26/2021

LIVE Monuments and Memory: Deconstructing Power in Antiquity and the Contemporary
Thursday, April 29 at 6:30 p.m.

Monuments are present in many public spheres we encounter, but do they actively shape our lives? This question and others involving the use of monumental architecture, how monuments and sculpture asserted power in ancient times, and monuments as a device to extend power are the focus of this fascinating discussion.

RSVP: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1XQp20_YCA

LIVE Monuments and Memory: Deconstructing Power in Antiquity and the Contemporary
Thursday, April 29 at 6:30 p.m.

Monuments are present in many public spheres we encounter, but do they actively shape our lives? This question and others involving the use of monumental architecture, how monuments and sculpture asserted power in ancient times, and monuments as a device to extend power are the focus of this fascinating discussion.

RSVP: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h1XQp20_YCA

04/25/2021
Classroom Connect resources from the Walters Art Museum

Have you explored Classroom Connect yet? Classroom Connect is a collection of new multimedia resources from the Walters designed with K-8 curriculums in mind. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3mKcxaH

Comprising videos, activity sheets, and a graphic novel, Classroom Connect uses themes to explore the Walters Art Museum’s collection and build visual literacy, creativity and historical and critical thinking skills. The resources available here can be used online or in print to support learning for students with little to no internet access, at home or in their classrooms.

04/24/2021
Art Kits by the Walters Art Museum

A big THANK YOU to our Art Kit partners! Recently, with the help of Enoch Pratt Free Library and Baltimore County Public Library, the Walters distributed 2,000 Art Kits filled with educational art activities and supplies to kids and families across Baltimore.

Before they hit homes, our team worked hard putting the kits together. Here, museum educator Niki assembles marker sets for kits.

Our two-part lecture series about monuments kicks off next Thursday, April 29. The talk, generously funded by the Boshel...
04/23/2021

Our two-part lecture series about monuments kicks off next Thursday, April 29. The talk, generously funded by the Boshell Foundation and presented alongside the Dallas Museum of Art, centers around the ways in which monuments may shape our lives. RSVP: https://youtu.be/h1XQp20_YCA

Shown: Close up of Wall Panel Depicting Ix K’an Bolon (“Lady Yellow Nine”) In Ritual Dress, Maya, 790 CE.

Our two-part lecture series about monuments kicks off next Thursday, April 29. The talk, generously funded by the Boshell Foundation and presented alongside the Dallas Museum of Art, centers around the ways in which monuments may shape our lives. RSVP: https://youtu.be/h1XQp20_YCA

Shown: Close up of Wall Panel Depicting Ix K’an Bolon (“Lady Yellow Nine”) In Ritual Dress, Maya, 790 CE.

April is #VolunteerAppreciationMonth! Last year, we made the decision to put our volunteer and docent programs on pause ...
04/23/2021

April is #VolunteerAppreciationMonth! Last year, we made the decision to put our volunteer and docent programs on pause due to the Covid-19 pandemic. During this time, our volunteers and docents have continued to serve the Walters virtually. Last week, we directed the spotlight at a handful of Walters Art Museum volunteers and the work they're doing in their communities outside of the museum. This week, we're showcasing a handful of our docents.

1. Nancy Snyder (image 1) began volunteering with the Walters as a docent in 2013 after retiring from 32 years of teaching. “I volunteer for a number of reasons,” Nancy says, “one of which is purely selfish—I like the way it makes me feel: useful. And kids are just so much darn fun!” Nancy volunteers with AOK, an organization that matches volunteers with school kids referred by their guidance counselors. “Before COVID changed all our lives, I was going into public schools to co-teach and work with small groups and individuals.”

Photo caption: One day a fifth grader I mentor (now through Zoom) asked me if she could play with my hair. This was the happy result!

2. Bonnie Brobst (image 2), a Walters docent since 2015, says she volunteers because she enjoys getting to know new people and sharing skills. “I believe that by giving we receive,” she says. “I train literacy and ESL tutors and lead weekly tutoring sessions with adult learners. I teach my 8-year-old grandson for 5 hours per week in what he calls “BonBon School” as well. I also facilitate a monthly book discussion group via Zoom at my church.”

3. Sharon Edlow (image 3) has been a Walters docent since 2013 and is a self-described people person. “I enjoy talking to, helping, and learning from others. I feel very fortunate to have stayed safe during the pandemic and it is important to me to give something back to those who are not as fortunate,” Sharon explains. In addition to her service to the Walters and getting a pre-school up and running in the face of the pandemic, Sharon also volunteers through her synagogue. “I make friendly calls to elderly people who are more or less housebound to check on them and just have a nice conversation. I also check in with people who are ill or have been hospitalized and see if they would like to have a meal sent to them.”

Once again, please join us in thanking our docent volunteers in the comments. Drop a ❤️ (or other emoji of your choice!) to show your appreciation.

04/22/2021
LIVE Artist Talk: Decolonizing the Constellations

People in cultures throughout history have gazed up at the night sky and seen their own imagined, culturally specific images in the glowing points of stars. Baltimore artist René Treviño explores how many features of our culture, even supposed natural phenomena, are framed in terms of European ideas and concepts. In a recent series of paintings, one of which is included in the Walters exhibition Translations and Transitions / Traducciones y Transiciones, Treviño challenges this Eurocentric view with a creative reimagining of the constellations, pointing out how the web of stars can be configured and reconfigured—as can our cultural canon. Treviño talks with Ellen Hoobler, William B. Ziff, Jr. Associate Curator of the Art of the Americas, about his work and recovering Indigenous traditions.

Image Credit: René Treviño, Reclaiming the Constellations (Jaguar), 2019, acrylic and rhinestones on wood panel. © 2020, René Treviño.

Happy #EarthDay 💚⁠⁠Shown: Yuanqi, Wang, Free Spirits Among Streams and Mountains (detail), 1684. Museum purchase with fu...
04/22/2021

Happy #EarthDay 💚⁠

Shown: Yuanqi, Wang, Free Spirits Among Streams and Mountains (detail), 1684. Museum purchase with funds provided by the W. Alton Jones Foundation Acquisition Fund, 1994.

Happy #EarthDay 💚⁠

Shown: Yuanqi, Wang, Free Spirits Among Streams and Mountains (detail), 1684. Museum purchase with funds provided by the W. Alton Jones Foundation Acquisition Fund, 1994.

Welcome to #WaltersBeforeandAfter! This is a series where we discuss treating art objects in the Walters Art Museum’s Co...
04/21/2021

Welcome to #WaltersBeforeandAfter! This is a series where we discuss treating art objects in the Walters Art Museum’s Conservation Lab. Over the next few weeks we’ll focus on St. Jerome by Giovanni d'Alemagna (now on view on Level 3), a work that Walters conservator Pam Betts treated in 2018. (Learn more about the work here: https://bit.ly/3tDN2e7)

We’re kicking off the series by sharing some downright delicious images taken while the object was being treated in our lab. If you find cleaning even remotely calming, these images will soothe you to your core 💆 Swipe to see! These photos also provide a sneak peek at the intricate, once-gilded scroll work that Pam discovered during treatment (image 3). More on that next week ✨

Questions for our conservation team? Leave yours in the comments and we’ll answer them.

It's Monday. That is all. ☹️🎨: Miller, Alfred Jacob, Never Am Happy, Except When Miserable, 1825-1870. Gift of Mr. and M...
04/19/2021

It's Monday. That is all. ☹️

🎨: Miller, Alfred Jacob, Never Am Happy, Except When Miserable, 1825-1870. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. J. William Middendorf II, 1970.

It's Monday. That is all. ☹️

🎨: Miller, Alfred Jacob, Never Am Happy, Except When Miserable, 1825-1870. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. J. William Middendorf II, 1970.

Have you ever heard of kintsugi, a Japanese repair technique that celebrates the beauty of imperfection? Learn more abou...
04/17/2021

Have you ever heard of kintsugi, a Japanese repair technique that celebrates the beauty of imperfection?

Learn more about it here: https://art.thewalters.org/detail/10841/bowl-28/

Shown: Artist: Chinese, Bowl, 10th century. Bequest of Henry Walters, 1931.

Have you ever heard of kintsugi, a Japanese repair technique that celebrates the beauty of imperfection?

Learn more about it here: https://art.thewalters.org/detail/10841/bowl-28/

Shown: Artist: Chinese, Bowl, 10th century. Bequest of Henry Walters, 1931.

April is Volunteer Appreciation Month! At the Walters Art Museum, we're honored to work with a host of talented voluntee...
04/16/2021

April is Volunteer Appreciation Month!

At the Walters Art Museum, we're honored to work with a host of talented volunteers and docents. Last year, we made the decision to put our volunteer and docent programs on pause due to the Covid-19 pandemic. During this time, our volunteers and docents have continued to serve the Walters virtually, as well as their communities in many ways. Learn more about just a few of our volunteers below:

1. Tierney Gormley, a Walters volunteer since 2016, also donates her time to the Maryland SPCA (as pictured here). Why does she volunteer? "I want to make sure I am doing my part to make art accessible and provide a high quality of life for animals. Also, selfishly, volunteering at the Walters is a fun excuse to be at the museum and volunteering at the SPCA is a great way to maximize my time with pups!”

2. Barbee Barber (pictured far right volunteering with World Central Kitchen) has been a volunteer at the Walters for just over a year. "Community engagement has always been important to me. Considering the increasing need for support, in March 2021 I retired from my work in order to commit more time to volunteering," says Barbee. Barbee splits her time between the Walters, The American Red Cross, World Central Kitchen, The Y of Central Maryland, and the Baltimore Museum of Art, among other organizations.

3. "My volunteering is totally self-serving," says Shelly Mintz (pictured first row, middle in a photo taken before the pandemic), a Walters volunteer since 2013, who also volunteers for the Maryland Food Bank, Baltimore-based theaters, Friends of the Chapel of Morgan State University, the American Visionary Art Museum and, the Jewish Museum of Maryland. In addition to that, she serves on the board of her synagogue. "Volunteering allows me to learn, experience great art, lectures, music, theater, movies, comedies, and all kinds of community activities. Most importantly, though, it enables me to meet and make friends with the most interesting, kind, fascinating, dedicated people you can imagine. I am never alone in the city. I have dozens of amazing people around me."

A big thank you to every Walters volunteer and docent. Your kindness, dedication, and selflessness mean the world to us. Drop a ❤️ in the comments to show appreciation for our volunteers!

Address

600 N Charles St
Baltimore, MD
21201

Light Rail to Centre Street Subway to Lexington Market Charm City Circulator Purple Route to Washington Monument (Northbound) or Centre Street (Southbound) #3 and #11 MTA Bus Lines to Centre St (Southbound) or Hamilton St (Northbound) Main Entrance: North side of Centre Street between Charles and Cathedral Side Entrance: West side of Charles Street just north of Centre

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 10:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(410) 547-9000

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The Walters Art Museum

The Walters Art Museum is a cultural hub in the heart of Baltimore. Located in the city’s Mount Vernon neighborhood, the Walters is free for all. The museum’s collection spans more than seven millennia, from 5,000 BCE to the 21st century, and encompasses 36,000 objects from around the world. General Admission is always FREE! Special Exhibitions and programs may require the purchase of tickets. Discover the stories behind the collection and use our mobile guide on your next visit. Simply bring your own device and go to mobile.thewalters.org to try it out.


Comments

My Mount Vernon triptych is back in stock this weekend! Click to see details from this whimsical collection of rough drafts for our historic Washington Monument.
My kiddles enjoyed making the masks! They were in a silly mood!
This is a perfect jewel of a museum. It is one of the jewels in Baltimore's crown.
Thought y'all might be interested in this free event from Jewish Museum of Maryland and Jewish Museum Milwaukee about the making of exhibits! https://www.facebook.com/events/703405167118453/
Our Advance students at the Applauso Italian Learning Center are doing a fabulous job in visiting important Italian museums virtually and presenting artworks in Italian in our online Italian 465 course. Does the Walters Art Museum offer virtual tours like the Uffizi museum? Last week we did a virtual tour at the Galleria degli Uffizi di Firenze! Our student Marianna presented Paolo Veronese's portrait of Giuseppe da Porta (circa 1555) and pointed out that the wife Lidia is held at the Walters. Here is the video of her presentation from our Italian online lesson last week:
😠😠 How the hell do I get the Walters to STOP sending me its literature? Several calls to the office number requesting this have proven unfruitful. Also, there is no way to UNSUBSCRIBE on your website. That needs to be fixed.
BlackBook hits the culture highlights in Baltimore...
One of my favorite parts of the Walters
Thank you for the great evening at the Walters last night!! I really enjoyed the taxidermy talk and demo.
Beautiful museum, great staff and a lovely way to spend a Saturday morning!
BlackBook LOVES Baltimore!!!