Maryland Center for History and Culture

Maryland Center for History and Culture The Maryland Center for History and Culture collects, preserves, and interprets the history, art, and culture of Maryland. Founded in 1844, originally as the Maryland Historical Society, the Maryland Center for History and Culture is the state’s oldest continuously operating cultural institution.

We serve upwards of 100,000 people through our museum, library, press, and education programs. The MCHC is located in the Mount Vernon neighborhood of Baltimore, Maryland.

Operating as usual

From dance halls to bordellos of his native Baltimore, Eubie Blake rose as a gifted musician. Playing on his folding pum...
05/04/2021

From dance halls to bordellos of his native Baltimore, Eubie Blake rose as a gifted musician. Playing on his folding pump organ at a young age, Eubie knew how his Baltimore roots shaped his identity.

This Thursday, May 6, at noon, we welcome music historian Richard Carlin and music artist Ken Bloom to the next MCHC virtual event. Together, Richard and Ken will share how Eubie’s phenomenal memory and packrat tendencies helped them paint a picture of James Herbert “Eubie” Blake's life.

Together this dynamic, Grammy Award winning duo drew from Blake’s personal collections—left to the Maryland Center for History and Culture—to help write the biography, "Eubie Blake: Rags, Rhythm, and Race."

Join the conversation on Thursday! The program is free but registration is required: https://bit.ly/3nNymGZ

And pick up Richard and Ken’s book now on sale at the MCHC Museum Store: https://shop.mdhistory.org/eubie-blake-rags-rhythm-and-race.html

From dance halls to bordellos of his native Baltimore, Eubie Blake rose as a gifted musician. Playing on his folding pump organ at a young age, Eubie knew how his Baltimore roots shaped his identity.

This Thursday, May 6, at noon, we welcome music historian Richard Carlin and music artist Ken Bloom to the next MCHC virtual event. Together, Richard and Ken will share how Eubie’s phenomenal memory and packrat tendencies helped them paint a picture of James Herbert “Eubie” Blake's life.

Together this dynamic, Grammy Award winning duo drew from Blake’s personal collections—left to the Maryland Center for History and Culture—to help write the biography, "Eubie Blake: Rags, Rhythm, and Race."

Join the conversation on Thursday! The program is free but registration is required: https://bit.ly/3nNymGZ

And pick up Richard and Ken’s book now on sale at the MCHC Museum Store: https://shop.mdhistory.org/eubie-blake-rags-rhythm-and-race.html

One of the goals of our Shaping the Future of History fundraising campaign is to enhance our educational and visitor exp...
05/04/2021

One of the goals of our Shaping the Future of History fundraising campaign is to enhance our educational and visitor experience.

The rendering here illustrates this goal: an intentionally designed educational space called the "Learning Lab" that will offer state-of-the-art learning resources for all our K-12 student programs. In addition to offering educational space, the Learning Lab will hold vibrant, responsive, and inclusive programs that engage and profoundly connect with new and diverse audiences.

Learn more: https://bit.ly/3vBVtXD

One of the goals of our Shaping the Future of History fundraising campaign is to enhance our educational and visitor experience.

The rendering here illustrates this goal: an intentionally designed educational space called the "Learning Lab" that will offer state-of-the-art learning resources for all our K-12 student programs. In addition to offering educational space, the Learning Lab will hold vibrant, responsive, and inclusive programs that engage and profoundly connect with new and diverse audiences.

Learn more: https://bit.ly/3vBVtXD

We are thrilled to announce that our supporters have helped us raise over $10,000,000 towards our $12,000,000 goal for o...
05/03/2021

We are thrilled to announce that our supporters have helped us raise over $10,000,000 towards our $12,000,000 goal for our Shaping the Future of History campaign! What’s the Shaping the Future of History campaign? The campaign's three key tenets aim to:

1- Enhance our educational and visitor experience
2- Advance our collections stewardship and access
3- Achieve financial and long-term sustainability

Tune in this week to all our social media channels to learn more about our campaign goals - https://bit.ly/3e6G9fX

We are thrilled to announce that our supporters have helped us raise over $10,000,000 towards our $12,000,000 goal for our Shaping the Future of History campaign! What’s the Shaping the Future of History campaign? The campaign's three key tenets aim to:

1- Enhance our educational and visitor experience
2- Advance our collections stewardship and access
3- Achieve financial and long-term sustainability

Tune in this week to all our social media channels to learn more about our campaign goals - https://bit.ly/3e6G9fX

Learn about the City of Baltimore’s long history of housing discrimination and its enduring legacy in the latest post to...
05/03/2021
Baltimore’s Pursuit of Fair Housing: A Brief History – Maryland Center for History and Culture

Learn about the City of Baltimore’s long history of housing discrimination and its enduring legacy in the latest post to the H. Furlong Baldwin Library’s "underbelly" blog. David Armenti, MCHC Director of Education, and Alex Lothstein, MCHC Museum Learning Manager, draw on the library’s collections as well as other primary and secondary resources to trace the pursuit of fair housing in Baltimore and across the country.

In this blog post Maryland Center for History and Culture staff examine Baltimore’s history of housing discrimination.

Dr. William Rush Dunton Jr. is known for pioneering the field of occupational therapy while treating patients at Sheppar...
05/01/2021

Dr. William Rush Dunton Jr. is known for pioneering the field of occupational therapy while treating patients at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital in the 1940s. Though he is best known for implementing quilting in his treatments, other types of occupational therapy available to patients included gardening, woodwork, and weaving. Pictured here is a loom that was used by Sheppard Pratt patients in the early 20th century.

Learn more about Dr. William Rush Dunton Jr.’s groundbreaking work in occupational therapy through the exhibition, “Wild and Untamed: Dunton’s Discovery of the Baltimore Album Quilts.” The museum has extended its hours and is now open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday - Saturday.

Image: Loom with woven fabric, early 20th century. Courtesy of the Sheppard Pratt Health System Archives.

The British are coming, and it’s time to grab your haversack and join the Continental Army! During our Virtual Field Tri...
04/30/2021

The British are coming, and it’s time to grab your haversack and join the Continental Army!

During our Virtual Field Trip - "Grab Your Haversack" - students examine Revolutionary War-era objects to learn more about what a soldier would pack with them.

This Virtual Field Trip is currently being offered free during the 2020-21 school year thanks to generous funding from the Society of Cincinnati. Teachers, book your program now as spaces are limited. Programs are booked on a first come, first serve basis: www.mdhistory.org/learn/virtual-field-trips/virtual-field-trips-k-12/#vft-booking-form

Image Citation: George Washington and His Generals at Yorktown, attributed to Charles Willson Peale, c 1784. Maryland Center for History and Culture, Gift of Robert Gilmor Jr., 1845.3.1

#VirtualFieldTrip

The British are coming, and it’s time to grab your haversack and join the Continental Army!

During our Virtual Field Trip - "Grab Your Haversack" - students examine Revolutionary War-era objects to learn more about what a soldier would pack with them.

This Virtual Field Trip is currently being offered free during the 2020-21 school year thanks to generous funding from the Society of Cincinnati. Teachers, book your program now as spaces are limited. Programs are booked on a first come, first serve basis: www.mdhistory.org/learn/virtual-field-trips/virtual-field-trips-k-12/#vft-booking-form

Image Citation: George Washington and His Generals at Yorktown, attributed to Charles Willson Peale, c 1784. Maryland Center for History and Culture, Gift of Robert Gilmor Jr., 1845.3.1

#VirtualFieldTrip

Alex Lothstein, Museum Learning Manager at the Maryland Center for History and Culture, will participate in an online hi...
04/28/2021
Industrial Archaeology: Revisiting the Founding Era | Carroll County Public Library

Alex Lothstein, Museum Learning Manager at the Maryland Center for History and Culture, will participate in an online history panel discussion about industrial archaeology hosted by @CarrollCountyPublicLibrary tomorrow, April 29, at 7:30 p.m.

More information about how to attend the event can be found here: https://ccpl.librarymarket.com/events/industrial-archaeology-revisiting-founding-era

We connect our community with welcoming spaces, innovative resources and services, and educational experiences for lifetime enrichment.

Western High School - Baltimore is celebrating 175 years as America's oldest all-girls public high school and is hosting...
04/28/2021

Western High School - Baltimore is celebrating 175 years as America's oldest all-girls public high school and is hosting a Shine the Light Celebration tomorrow, April 29 at 7 p.m. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3ucMPyR

Western High School began as an all-white institution within the segregated Baltimore City Public School system. In June 1953, 24 black students from Frederick Douglass High School petitioned the School Board for the right to attend Western. They were represented by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and attorney Juanita Jackson Mitchell, the first African American woman to practice law in Maryland. This case followed the successful effort to integrate all-male Baltimore Polytechnic Institute (Poly) the year before. Board members rejected the petition 6-1.

Following this denial, the NAACP filed a federal lawsuit against the School Board. However, all were aware that school desegregation cases were being deliberated in the U.S. Supreme Court. When the Brown vs. Board of Education decision came down in May 1954, city schools such as Western were prepared to desegregate.

Several female Douglass students transferred to Western High School in September 1954, becoming the first African Americans to attend in its 110-year history. Western moved sites at the same time to the southwest corner of North Howard and West Centre Street (pictured here). It remained there until 1967 when the Falls Road campus shared with Baltimore Polytechnic Institute was opened. Both schools still occupy the campus today and educate diverse student bodies from across Baltimore City.

Image: Baltimore City College High School, 540 North Howard Street. Unidentified photographer, circa 1925. Maryland Center for History and Culture, H. Furlong Baldwin Library, Julius Anderson Photograph Collection, BCLM Collection, 1994.42.069

Western High School - Baltimore is celebrating 175 years as America's oldest all-girls public high school and is hosting a Shine the Light Celebration tomorrow, April 29 at 7 p.m. Learn more: https://bit.ly/3ucMPyR

Western High School began as an all-white institution within the segregated Baltimore City Public School system. In June 1953, 24 black students from Frederick Douglass High School petitioned the School Board for the right to attend Western. They were represented by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and attorney Juanita Jackson Mitchell, the first African American woman to practice law in Maryland. This case followed the successful effort to integrate all-male Baltimore Polytechnic Institute (Poly) the year before. Board members rejected the petition 6-1.

Following this denial, the NAACP filed a federal lawsuit against the School Board. However, all were aware that school desegregation cases were being deliberated in the U.S. Supreme Court. When the Brown vs. Board of Education decision came down in May 1954, city schools such as Western were prepared to desegregate.

Several female Douglass students transferred to Western High School in September 1954, becoming the first African Americans to attend in its 110-year history. Western moved sites at the same time to the southwest corner of North Howard and West Centre Street (pictured here). It remained there until 1967 when the Falls Road campus shared with Baltimore Polytechnic Institute was opened. Both schools still occupy the campus today and educate diverse student bodies from across Baltimore City.

Image: Baltimore City College High School, 540 North Howard Street. Unidentified photographer, circa 1925. Maryland Center for History and Culture, H. Furlong Baldwin Library, Julius Anderson Photograph Collection, BCLM Collection, 1994.42.069

Step Into History is back! Featuring images from the museum and library collections, the Maryland Center for History and...
04/27/2021

Step Into History is back! Featuring images from the museum and library collections, the Maryland Center for History and Culture's larger-than-life-size frames allow you to step (literally) into history and engage with the past at local state and regional parks.

Now through the end of July, you can find these photo frames at Patapsco Valley State Park's Avalon Area (at the intersection of Gun Road and Glen Artney Road) and at Watkins Regional Park (at the main parking lot near the Loop Trail).

Insert yourself into these historic images and stand side by side with players from the 1949 Baltimore Elite Giants, one of two professional Negro League Baseball teams in Maryland, or jump on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad with a group of traveling artists in 1859.

Stretch your imagination, take a photo, and tag #StepIntoHistory!

Department of Parks and Recreation Pr. Geo. County Maryland Department of Natural Resources

Dozens of shoppers wait in the snow for the trolley to come in this photograph, which was taken on January 28, 1922 by a...
04/27/2021

Dozens of shoppers wait in the snow for the trolley to come in this photograph, which was taken on January 28, 1922 by an unknown photographer. Commuting in the snow is a challenging yet common part of winter. Have you ever had to go to work or do an important task that required you to go outside during severe winter weather? What was driving on icy roads like? What was it like taking public transport?

We are collecting Marylanders’ memories of winter for "Losing Winter," a new exhibition opening at the Maryland Center for History and Culture in July. Join us virtually on Thursday, April 29 at 6 p.m. to record your memory and learn more about this project. Register to attend: https://bit.ly/3sjyn67.

Image: Blizzard of 1922, Saturday afternoon, photographer unknown, 1922. Maryland Center for History and Culture.

#LosingWinter

Dozens of shoppers wait in the snow for the trolley to come in this photograph, which was taken on January 28, 1922 by an unknown photographer. Commuting in the snow is a challenging yet common part of winter. Have you ever had to go to work or do an important task that required you to go outside during severe winter weather? What was driving on icy roads like? What was it like taking public transport?

We are collecting Marylanders’ memories of winter for "Losing Winter," a new exhibition opening at the Maryland Center for History and Culture in July. Join us virtually on Thursday, April 29 at 6 p.m. to record your memory and learn more about this project. Register to attend: https://bit.ly/3sjyn67.

Image: Blizzard of 1922, Saturday afternoon, photographer unknown, 1922. Maryland Center for History and Culture.

#LosingWinter

You can now rewatch our recent event, "Finding Truth, Healing, & Reconciliation: The History of Lynchings in Maryland," ...
04/26/2021
Finding Truth, Healing, and Reconciliation: The History of Lynchings in Maryland

You can now rewatch our recent event, "Finding Truth, Healing, & Reconciliation: The History of Lynchings in Maryland," to learn about the efforts of the Maryland Lynching Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the Maryland Lynching Memorial Project to research, acknowledge, and commemorate the violent historical events that occurred in our state.

Between 1865 and 1950, more than 4,000 black Americans were lynched in the United States; at least 40 were in Maryland. The Maryland Lynching Truth and Recon...

The Baltimore Sun staff photographer Amy Davis recently spoke with WMAR-2 News Baltimore about her book celebrating the ...
04/26/2021
Flickering Treasures: The culture of Baltimore through its theaters

The Baltimore Sun staff photographer Amy Davis recently spoke with WMAR-2 News Baltimore about her book celebrating the history of Baltimore City movie theaters: https://www.wmar2news.com/news/local-news/flickering-treasures-the-culture-of-baltimore-through-its-theaters

You can see Davis’s photographs coupled with historic photographs from the MCHC collection in the exhibition “Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore’s Forgotten Movie Theaters." Learn more here: https://www.mdhistory.org/exhibitions/flickering-treasures/

A story about Baltimore as seen through the prism of its theaters.

Planning to watch the Oscars tonight? The Academy Awards are a perfect occasion to reflect on the best films of the year...
04/25/2021

Planning to watch the Oscars tonight? The Academy Awards are a perfect occasion to reflect on the best films of the year, and on the fascinating history of cinema leading to this point.

#DidYouKnow that moviegoers initially experienced motion picture films predominantly outdoors at amusement parks and at church? Early indoor movie theaters had an unfortunate reputation for being smelly, dark, and dirty places that appealed more to children than adults.

The first movie projections in Baltimore took place at Electric Park, an outdoor amusement park formerly located southwest of Pimlico Race Course, on June 16, 1896. Four short Vitascope films were screened that evening depicting dancing women, a blacksmith shop, and life on a New York street corner. Electric Park offered many other attractions in addition to movie screenings. Today, not a trace of the venue is left.

Learn more about the history of moviegoing in Baltimore in the exhibition, “Flickering Treasures: Rediscovering Baltimore’s Forgotten Movie Theaters,” brought to you by PNC, and featuring the photographs of Baltimore Sun photographer Amy Davis, from her book Flickering Treasures.

Image: Electric Park, unknown photographer, 1905. Maryland Center for History and Culture, H. Furlong Baldwin Library, Subject Vertical File, Baltimore, Amusement Parks, Electric Park

Image: Former location of Electric Park, Amy Davis, 2013, Courtesy of Amy Davis

Address

610 Park Avenue
Baltimore, MD
21201

Light Rail: Centre Street stop MTA Bus #27: Madison Street stop Charm City Circulator: Purple Route, stop #307, Washington Monument (N. Charles St. & E. Mt. Vernon Pl.).

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 15:00
Thursday 10:00 - 15:00
Friday 10:00 - 15:00
Saturday 10:00 - 15:00

Telephone

(410) 685-3750

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Maryland Center for History and Culture posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Maryland Center for History and Culture:

Videos

Category


Other History Museums in Baltimore

Show All

Comments

For Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, my family read about the life of Black Americans in Maryland from 1634-1868. Feel free to use it as a teaching tool.
listen to this recording that is a piece of Maryland music history.
Happy Repudiation Day!
Maryland based storyteller Peter Brooks recites the Yoruba tale of the "Children of the Sun and Moon"
TEEN SU***DE! We go through many stages in life. During your teen years, it's the "Imaginary Audience" : This makes you think everyone is laughing at you, making fun of you. The BULLIES, especially with the internet, take a long look in the MIRROR. The good news, the next stage of life: "Mate Search & Selection". Please send this to any TEEN's you Know Jonathan HELP IS A PHONE CALL AWAY. 301 475-2000 if the hotline was useless. The average COLLEGE GRAD makes $1,000,000 more in their life, than a HS Degree.
I am interested in learning more about the Baltimore Clipper passenger ships used around the time of the Civil War for folks heading to California either via the isthmus or the horn. Everything from deck and cabin layout to ports of call and encounters with Confederate blockades, cost of passage, and information about the land crossing which took about 2 weeks but apparently saved more than double that time sailing around South America. Do you have any of these documents (original, facsimile, or--ideally, for research purposes--online)? Thank you!