Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University

Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University Part of the Johns Hopkins University Museums, Evergreen Museum & Library houses a prestigious collection of international art and rare books assembled by two generations of Baltimore’s philanthropic Garrett family.
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Architecture, paintings, decorative arts, rare books, philanthropy, Baltimore's railroad history, and more.The Johns Hopkins University's Evergreen Museum & Library, the one-time Italianate country residence of two generations of Baltimore’s Garrett family, is celebrated for its holdings of Asian arts: porcelains, lacquer wares, and netsuke (miniature carved ivories); European paintings—including works by Edgar Degas (1834–1917), Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920), and Ignacio Zuloaga (1870-1945); American art glass — the majority of pieces assigned to Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933); and the John Work Garrett Library of rare books and manuscripts. This eclectic house-museum also features costume designs, drawings, and a mesmerizing private theatre designed by celebrated Russian émigré Léon Bakst (1866-1924), best known for his set designs for the Ballet Russes. Also of note are the career drawings of regional architect Laurence Hall Fowler (1876-1971); murals by Mexican-born artist Miguel Covarrubias (1904-1957); and paintings by Frenchman Raoul Dufy (1877-1953). The collections of Evergreen afford a unique perspective regarding the evolution of American collecting taste and connoisseurship, from the country’s post-Civil War industrial revolution to the modern jet age.

Operating as usual

🍁Some fleeting final glimpses of fall foliage for your Friday 🍂
11/13/2020

🍁Some fleeting final glimpses of fall foliage for your Friday 🍂

On this #womancrushwednesday, we want to take a moment to highlight the extraordinary Mary Elizabeth Garrett, the aunt o...
11/11/2020
Visionary Philanthropy: Mary Elizabeth Garrett, Women's Education, and the 19th Amendment

On this #womancrushwednesday, we want to take a moment to highlight the extraordinary Mary Elizabeth Garrett, the aunt of the Garretts of Evergreen.

Earlier this year, author Kathleen Waters Sander and curator Natalie Elder presented a talk for Johns Hopkins University's Hopkins at Home series that explores Sander’s book "Mary Elizabeth Garrett: Society and Philanthropy in the Gilded Age," and a new online exhibit from the Chesney Medical Archives about Johns Hopkins women who fought for suffrage. Watch the video below! #jhuwomensvote100 #WomensVote100

https://video.ibm.com/recorded/127514746

In this conversation between author Kathleen Waters Sander and curator Natalie Elder, they will explore the role that Baltimore’s Gilded Age philanthropist Mary Elizabeth Garrett played in the fight to pass the 19th amendment. Garrett’s suffrage activism revived the fight in Baltimore in the ear...

For the 10th Garrett Lecture on Urban Issues, Evergreen Museum & Library and its partners at Johns Hopkins University's ...
11/06/2020

For the 10th Garrett Lecture on Urban Issues, Evergreen Museum & Library and its partners at Johns Hopkins University's 21st Century Cities Initiative, the Johns Hopkins University's Women's Suffrage Centennial, and the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing invite you to a virtual discussion of women's health in Baltimore today.

Distinguished experts, including Dr. Letitia Dzirasa, Commissioner of Baltimore City Health Department; Kamila A. Alexander, Ph.D., MPH, RN, assistant professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing; and China Boak Terrell, Esq., CEO of American Communities Trust, will parse the pandemic's impact, reckon with the future of reproductive rights, and examine the effects of environmental racism.

The discussion, moderated by Deborah Gross, the Leonard and Helen Stulman Professor in Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, will be followed by an audience Q&A.

Sign up now at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/living-for-the-city-womens-health-in-21st-century-baltimore-tickets-127043738241.

11/03/2020
Hopkins Volunteers Take Action on Election Day

Today's the day! In this short video, members of the Hopkins community share why they are voting. Why are you voting? Visit https://hopkinsvotes.jhu.edu/ to find resources and information and make sure your voice is heard! #election2020 #vote

Hopkins alumni, volunteers, and staff share why voting is important to them. To learn more and watch more videos related to election day, visit jhu.edu/hopki...

Apropos of nothing, we thought you might need a little #MuseumsMomentOfZen today. 😉Nature Morte, by Raoul Dufy (French, ...
11/02/2020

Apropos of nothing, we thought you might need a little #MuseumsMomentOfZen today. 😉

Nature Morte, by Raoul Dufy (French, 1877-1953), undated, watercolor on pape. Evergreen House Foundation; Bequest of Alice Warder Garrett, EH1952.1.184. ©️ 2020 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

The stage is set for Victorian Wonders w/ Magician David London. The wonder starts on Zoom at 7 p.m. A few tickets remai...
10/29/2020

The stage is set for Victorian Wonders w/ Magician David London. The wonder starts on Zoom at 7 p.m. A few tickets remain. Grab em here: https://rb.gy/oxs1ut

🎃👻 #SpookySeason🔮🧿 is here!   Join us Thursday, October 29, at 7 p.m., for Victorian Wonders w/ David London Magic. The ...
10/21/2020
Victorian Wonders with Magician David London

🎃👻 #SpookySeason🔮🧿 is here!

Join us Thursday, October 29, at 7 p.m., for Victorian Wonders w/ David London Magic. The virtual program explores the various personalities, technologies, and mysteries that captured the public's imagination during the Victorian era--and even shows you how to perform your own at-home magic using common household items.

Tickets start at $5. Register now! https://www.eventbrite.com/e/victorian-wonders-with-magician-david-london-tickets-123506552423

Evergreen Museum & Library hosts storyteller and magician David London for an interactive exploration of 19th-century magic and technology.

Thanks to everyone who attended today's virtual Doors Open Baltimore talk on Evergreen's architecture with the museum's ...
10/15/2020

Thanks to everyone who attended today's virtual Doors Open Baltimore talk on Evergreen's architecture with the museum's director/curator Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D. We hope you enjoyed hearing a little bit about the development of the house and grounds in the 19th and 20th centuries.

Our sister museum, Homewood Museum, will host a similar talk next Wednesday, October 21, at noon. Click here to register for that free talk: https://www.doorsopenbaltimore.org/events/virtual-architectural-tour-of-the-homewood-museum/

Class time looks a little different these days, but learning continues apace at the JHU Museums! This semester, Lori Bet...
09/30/2020

Class time looks a little different these days, but learning continues apace at the JHU Museums! This semester, Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., interim director of the JHU Museums, is teaching the course “Tigers to Teapots: Collecting, Cataloging, and Hoarding in America,” for the JHU Program in Museums and Society. The course investigates the history, psychology, and politics of collecting in America. For today’s class, Lori and her 10 students welcomed guest lecturer Michelle Fitzgerald, assistant curator of the JHU Museums, to discuss an 1895 geological expedition through the American West taken by the Garrett boys of Evergreen.

In recognition of #NationalHispanicHeritageMonth, which runs to October 15, we are highlighting some the many contributi...
09/21/2020

In recognition of #NationalHispanicHeritageMonth, which runs to October 15, we are highlighting some the many contributions to Evergreen made by Hispanic artists.

We start with #MiguelCovarrubias (1904-57), a versatile Mexican artist, who produced several works for the Garretts of Evergreen in a variety of media. From the book "Evergreen: The Garrett Family, Collectors and Connoisseurs":

"In or soon after 1924, Frank Crowninshield [the editor of Vanity Fair] introduced the Garretts to the Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias, who, at nineteen years of age, had only recently arrived in New York City. Unable to speak English well but blessed with charisma and engaging manners, Covarrubias soon made connections with people who appreciated his unique talent for caricature drawings, including Crowninshield himself, who hired the artist to create amusing drawings of American celebrities for Vanity Fair [. . . .]

Besides his extraordinary talent for caricature, Covarrubias was a painter, a connoisseur of music, and a habi​tué of theater and dance performances, just as the Harlem Renaissance was reaching its height. Totally taken with the talent he encountered, the artist made numerous drawings of the many artists, performers, and patrons he came to know [. . . . ] The Harlem drawings led to commissions for stage sets and costume designs, including for the famous "Revue Nègre," which regularly featured Josephine Baker and proved a thundering success in Paris, both for the performers and for Covarrubias himself.

In 1928, Covarrubias created a decorative three-panel screen for Evergreen's first floor. Painted in the brilliant, saturated colors for which he was famous, the screen appears to the viewer an impenetrable rainforest brimming with fantastic trees and exotic flowers. Out of this thick tropical foliage emerges a small leopard looking rather surprised, a detail that establishes an amusing confrontation between the wild jungle and the refined Evergreen. The Garretts also acquired an irresistible caricature of the then-president of the United Sates, Calvin Coolidge, which is simultaneously funny and endearing. Covarrubias also designed a series of costumes for Alice [Warder Garrett].

In 1933, Evergreen's reading room was refurbished with fine teak paneling that included lunettes over the room's four doors. Alice wanted each of them painted with scenes from John's most important diplomatic postings: Berlin, Paris, The Hague, and, not least, Rome, where he enjoyed his last and most prominent post as ambassador. It's scene holds pride of place about the enterance to the Main Library. Four smaller, vertical panels framing two southern alcoves represent other diplomatic posts in Venezuela, Argentina, Luxembourg, and Washington. It was during the Garretts' discussion of this decorative plan that Crowninshield suggested that Covarrubias would be a good candidate for that project [. . . .]

By the time of John [Work Garrett's] death in 1942, Covarrubias had returned to Mexico and was absorbed in ethnological studies. At his own early death in 1957, the artist was counted as one of his country's most prominent ethnological and archeological scholars. . . . The Garretts' acquisitions and commissioning of his art added a refreshing and daringly non-European facet that greatly enriches the collection at Evergreen to this day.

Painted Screen with Exotic Flora and Fauna, by Miguel Covarrubias (Mexican, 1904-57), 1928, oil on cavas. Evergreen House Foundation; Bequest of Alice Warder garrett, EH1952.1.910. © Maria Elena Rico Covarrubias.

Caricature of Calvin Coolidge, by Miguel Covarrubias (Mexican, 1904-57), 1931, pencil on paper, Evergreen House Foundation; Bequest of Alice Warder Garrett, EH1952.1.1055

Costume for Alice Warder Garrett, by Miguel Covarrubias (Mexican 1904-57), c. 1920s, cotton and velvet, Evergreen House Foundation; Bequest of Alice Warder Garrett, EH2014.2.2

Reading Room lunette panel, "Rome," by Miguel Covarrubias (Mexican, 1904-57), 1933, oil on teak. Evergreen House Foundation; Bequest of Alice Warder Garrett, EH1952.1.951d. © Maria Elena Rico Covarrubias.

Happy Friday! Did you see that Evergreen will be participating in this year's all-virtual Doors Open Baltimore? Join Eve...
09/18/2020

Happy Friday! Did you see that Evergreen will be participating in this year's all-virtual Doors Open Baltimore? Join Evergreen's director and curator Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D. on October 15 from 12-12:30 p.m. for a Zoom stroll around Evergreen's opulent exterior. She will point out the characteristics of its Gilded Age facade, plus some oddities unique to Evergreen. Click the link to register now! https://www.doorsopenbaltimore.org/events/virtual-architectural-tour-of-the-evergreen-museum/

Happy #TiffanyTuesday from Evergreen! This Favrile freeform vase contains all the colors of September🍃🍂🌾Favrile Freeform...
09/15/2020

Happy #TiffanyTuesday from Evergreen! This Favrile freeform vase contains all the colors of September🍃🍂🌾

Favrile Freeform Vase
early 20th century
Tiffany Glass and Decorating Company (1892-1902) or Tiffany Studios (1902-32)
H 12 1/8 in. (30.8 cm)
Marked LOUIS C. TIFFANY / 09192
Gift of Margaret B. Wilson
JH1940.1.92

As we head into the long Labor Day weekend and toward the unofficial end of summer, we conclude our special summer socia...
09/04/2020

As we head into the long Labor Day weekend and toward the unofficial end of summer, we conclude our special summer social media series #MyFavoriteObject. Thank you to all the Evergreen docents who submitted their favorite objects from the collection and shared a bit about their selections. Fittingly, we give the last word to the docent who suggested the series in the first place, Deborah Saunders, who has been a docent at Evergreen since 2015. Take it away Deborah!

Reading Room lunette panels, "The Hague," "Paris," "Berlin," "Rome," by Miguel Covarrubias (Mexican, 1904-57), 1933, oil on teak. Evergreen House Foundation; Bequest of Alice Warder Garrett, EH1952.1.951d. © Maria Elena Rico Covarrubias.

I’ve always had an interest in historic houses, history in general, and specifically Baltimore history. I’m also really fascinated by the Gilded Age and the Jazz Age, and I enjoy meeting people who come for tours from around the world, so Evergreen is a perfect fit for me. [One set of objects that combines all of those aspects of Evergreen] are the lunettes by Miguel Covarrubias in the Reading Room. Each lunette depicts a scene from a location where Ambassador John Work Garrett served during his diplomatic career. What I love about these objects is their uniqueness. I love that Alice Warder Garrett chose to honor her husband’s diplomatic career by having the different places he served depicted, including Berlin, Paris, the Hague, and Rome, and that she found a way to do this artistically. It tells a story of service and love!

Happy September! 🍂Today we are launching a #ObjectoftheMonth feature in which Evergreen's assistant curator Michelle Fit...
09/01/2020

Happy September! 🍂

Today we are launching a #ObjectoftheMonth feature in which Evergreen's assistant curator Michelle Fitzgerald will highlight an object from the museum's collection. Look for the next object in October!

From desks to sofas to beds, what does your work-from-home office look like? This distinctive hall chair was purchased by T. Harrison Garrett from the historic London department store, Liberty & Company. Founded in 1875, the store specialized in home goods and furnishings with an “exotic” style and partnerships with well-known artists like William Morris and Dante Gabriel Rosetti. This chair, known as the “Thebes” armchair, was based off of an Egyptian stool in the collection of the British Museum. Designed by Liberty’s first in-house furniture production designer, Leonard Francis Wyburd (1865-1958), the chair was intended to capture a rising interest in exoticism among the elite.

Armchair, Leonard Francis Wyburd (att. designer), William Birch (maker) for Liberty and Co., probably High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire; c.1885, mahogany, mahogany veneer, laminated wood, Evergreen Museum & Library JH1942.1.11.

We made it to Friday, y'all! That means it's time for another installment of My Favorite Object, our social media series...
08/21/2020

We made it to Friday, y'all! That means it's time for another installment of My Favorite Object, our social media series in which we ask our docents to pick their favorite object in the museum's collection and explain why they like it so much. Today's entry is from Bernadette Low, who has been a docent at Evergreen since 2015.

"My favorite object at Evergreen is a beautiful 15th-century illuminated Persian manuscript known as The Garret Zafarnama. It is noteworthy because it is such a rare and beautiful manuscript. Only 30 or 40 copies were made. Illuminated by the famous Persian artist Behzad, it tells the story of Timur (aka Tamerlane), the famed Turco-Mongol military leader and founder of the Timurid Empire. It is a magnificent work of art. One day when no one showed up for my tour, I was able to join a visiting class on Persian art from Loyola University and see the magnificent book up close. While I can't see it every time I give a tour, I love knowing it's there among Evergreen's John Work Garrett Library's great collection of incunabula and Shakespeare folios."

Today marks a century since Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment, making women's suffrage the la...
08/18/2020

Today marks a century since Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment, making women's suffrage the law of the land.

Johns Hopkins University is celebrating this milestone with a slate of varied programming this summer and fall. Head to https://www.womensvote100.jhu.edu to learn more, register for events, browse images from JHU collections, and more.

And stay tuned for more Evergreen-related suffrage content! #jhuwomensvote100

After a brief hiatus, we are continuing our My Favorite Object social media series, in which we ask Evergreen docents to...
08/14/2020

After a brief hiatus, we are continuing our My Favorite Object social media series, in which we ask Evergreen docents to pick their favorite object in the museum's collection and tell us why they like it. Today's entry by docent Richard Messick is especially appropriate for the dog days of summer. Take it away, Richard!

"I've been a docent since 2016. I enjoy Baltimore history and the Garrett family has touched much of it. Evergreen is a time capsule that gives us a close look at one strata of Baltimore’s many layers.

My favorite object is a water stain in the Main Library that speaks to the way the Garretts lived at Evergreen. The library is my favorite room for its design and rare books collection, including gems like Shakespeare’s Folio, Audubon’s Birds of America, and many other rare books defining the Garretts' interests.

Though it is a library, it feels like a living room with comfortable seating around the fireplace, which is where the Garretts would read and sip cocktails. An indication of the amount of time spent there is the water stain on the floor near one of the windows.This is from the water bowl set out for their Boston terrier, Boston Baked Beans."

Interesting article in The Baltimore Sun today about the 1877 B&O Railroad strike and its galvanizing effect on the nati...
07/30/2020
Retro Baltimore: The great railroad strike of 1877 stoked the labor movement nationwide

Interesting article in The Baltimore Sun today about the 1877 B&O Railroad strike and its galvanizing effect on the national labor movement. Scholars of Evergreen and Homewood also will recognize some familiar names among the key players.

https://www.baltimoresun.com/features/retro-baltimore/bs-fe-retro-great-railroad-strike-20200730-asop3uys3jbotpscvah26hqe3i-story.html

It’s worth taking a look at the causes and consequences of that long-ago clash between citizens and Guardsmen in the streets of downtown Baltimore, a melee that set off a chain reaction of strikes along the railroad line.

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Architecture, paintings, decorative arts, rare books, philanthropy, Baltimore's railroad history, and more. The Johns Hopkins University's Evergreen Museum & Library, the one-time Italianate country residence of two generations of Baltimore’s Garrett family, is celebrated for its holdings of Asian arts: porcelains, lacquer wares, and netsuke (miniature carved ivories); European paintings—including works by Edgar Degas (1834–1917), Amedeo Modigliani (1884-1920), and Ignacio Zuloaga (1870-1945); American art glass — the majority of pieces assigned to Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933); and the John Work Garrett Library of rare books and manuscripts. This eclectic house-museum also features costume designs, drawings, and a mesmerizing private theatre designed by celebrated Russian émigré Léon Bakst (1866-1924), best known for his set designs for the Ballet Russes. Also of note are the career drawings of regional architect Laurence Hall Fowler (1876-1971); murals by Mexican-born artist Miguel Covarrubias (1904-1957); and paintings by Frenchman Raoul Dufy (1877-1953). The collections of Evergreen afford a unique perspective regarding the evolution of American collecting taste and connoisseurship, from the country’s post-Civil War industrial revolution to the modern jet age.


Comments

Well worth a visit and tour!
Good Afternoon! 24 Baltimore is coming to the Homewood Campus of Johns Hopkins University! We want to invite you to join us as Alumni, Faculty or even as a student with our NEW registration type! Details below: Freshman 15? Nah, more like the Student 24. We're pretty thrilled to introduce a back to school student special for the students at Johns Hopkins University to participate in 24 Baltimore! Here's what you need to know: Ride or stride the Loop at the Homewood campus September 23-24 2:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Registration to ride: $45 Registration to walk: $30 Fundraising minimum: $100 Learn more and register:
We’re delighted to inform you that Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University has been selected as one of the best Guided Tours in Maryland by Best of AmericanTowns, a property of AmericanTowns Media! Here is the link to the page: https://bestthingsmd.com/guided-tours/ For over 15 years, AmericanTowns Media has been the leader in highlighting the incredible work of great local organizations and initiatives. Best of AmericanTowns offers the most interesting and unique places in America right to the fingertips of the user with the opportunity to browse the best places to eat, live, and visit. We are happy to spotlight the excellence you’ve achieved in your work and hope you’ll share this with your followers on Facebook and tag us @bestofamericantowns! #travelfreely