Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum

Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum The mission of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum is to engage members of the Johns Hopkins University, academic researchers, and both the Baltimore & worldwide public in an interactive, interdisciplinary and collaborative study of the ancient world.
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Operating as usual

Always lovely to see one of our favorite people Professor Emily Anderson (JHU Dept of Classics) and one of our favorite ...
05/27/2021
What's Old is New Again - Arts & Sciences Magazine

Always lovely to see one of our favorite people Professor Emily Anderson (JHU Dept of Classics) and one of our favorite Minoan replicas featured in the Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences magazine. Read about Prof. Anderson's exciting research on the history of ancient replicas and their connection to the university and archaeological museum!

https://magazine.krieger.jhu.edu/2021/05/whats-old-is-new-again/

Emily Anderson, assistant professor of classics, and her team of 11 students are examining how and why the arrival of Ancient Greek and Minoan replicas made a splash in late 19th- and early 20th-century Baltimore, and how it impacted the identity of the ancient cultures.

Great to see a familiar face in the Johns Hopkins University Hub this morning. Congratulations again to museum staff Bia...
05/17/2021
Five from Hopkins join Bouchet Society

Great to see a familiar face in the Johns Hopkins University Hub this morning. Congratulations again to museum staff Bianca Hand for being named to the Edward Alexander Bouchet Graduate Honor Society. As a PhD candidate in the Department of the History of Art focusing on ancient Mesopotamian art, Bianca's research focuses on investigating questions of alterity, materiality, style, and interaction at the royal palace at Khorsabad during the reign of the Neo-Assyrian king Sargon II (721-705 BCE).

In remarks introducing Hand, Professor Marian Feldman, Hand's faculty mentor, commended Hand's commitment to fostering diversity in a field that is overwhelmingly white, male, and colonialist in view. "She brings her own voice to the table and in doing so she stands as a formidable role model for other underrepresented students studying the art and archaeology of the ancient world," Feldman said.

Read more about Bianca and her fellow inductees here:
https://hub.jhu.edu/2021/05/14/bouchet-society-inducts-five/?mc_cid=e63a10aca4&mc_eid=1e0e7ecc03

Society selects students for their outstanding scholarly achievement and commitment to advocacy and to fostering diversity

Want more Athenian ceramics in your life? Hear Sanchita Balachandran talk about ongoing research that started in the Arc...
04/20/2021
Marked in Clay: Interdisciplinary Methods to Re-imagine Ancient Greek Potters at Work

Want more Athenian ceramics in your life? Hear Sanchita Balachandran talk about ongoing research that started in the Archaeological Museum and continues to raise questions about the ancient potters working in Athens in the 6th-4th centuries BCE. This talk looks at how we can search for evidence of the migrants, immigrants, women, freed people, enslaved people and children who were part of the communities of makers producing pots in the ancient world. https://www.bgc.bard.edu/events/1218/27-apr-2021-marked-in

Sanchita Balachandran will deliver The Iris Foundation Awards Lecture on Tuesday, April 27, at 6 pm. Her talk is entitled “Marked in Clay: Interdisciplinary Methods to Re-imagine Ancient Greek Potters at Work.”

Congratulations to our very own Sanchita Balachandran, Associate Director & conservator for being chosen as Hopkins Supe...
04/13/2021
Supervisor of the Year | University Experiential Learning

Congratulations to our very own Sanchita Balachandran, Associate Director & conservator for being chosen as Hopkins Supervisor of the Year! Sanchita strives to create meaningful and educational experiences for students in her employment just as she does for students in her classroom. And many thanks to graduate student Meg Swaney (Near Eastern Studies) for the nomination.

Supervisors provide far more than basic training. They serve as mentors who build skills and advance technical knowledge, they support student career aspirations and foster professionalism, and they serve as positive role models for their student employees. In short, supervisors play a vital role in...

Congratulations to museum staff member and History of Art graduate student Bianca Hand who has been selected as a 2021 i...
04/02/2021

Congratulations to museum staff member and History of Art graduate student Bianca Hand who has been selected as a 2021 inductee to the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society!

Named for the first African American in the United States to receive a PhD, the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society seeks to develop a network of pre-eminent scholars who exemplify academic and personal excellence, foster environments of support, and serve as examples of scholarship, leadership, character, service, and advocacy for students who traditionally have been underrepresented in higher education.

We are thrilled to see Bianca and her work recognized in this way!

Congratulations to museum staff member and History of Art graduate student Bianca Hand who has been selected as a 2021 inductee to the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society!

Named for the first African American in the United States to receive a PhD, the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society seeks to develop a network of pre-eminent scholars who exemplify academic and personal excellence, foster environments of support, and serve as examples of scholarship, leadership, character, service, and advocacy for students who traditionally have been underrepresented in higher education.

We are thrilled to see Bianca and her work recognized in this way!

Congratulations to Professor Jennifer Stager of the Johns Hopkins Department of the History of Art and students Ella Gon...
03/01/2021
Syllabus: Past Meets Present Among the Tiles - Arts & Sciences Magazine

Congratulations to Professor Jennifer Stager of the Johns Hopkins Department of the History of Art and students Ella Gonzalez and Maya Kahane for this wonderful article in the recent Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences Magazine. Read about their innovative research on the mosaics of ancient Antioch here: https://magazine.krieger.jhu.edu/2020/11/syllabus-past-meets-present-among-the-tiles/

The Antioch Recovery Project course, part of the Krieger School’s Classics Research Lab, is an experimental pedagogical model marked by collaboration and the opportunity for students to contribute to a long-term stream of research.

Join our conservator and associate director Sanchita Balachandran who will be in conversation with archivist Dominique L...
02/23/2021
Turning Points: An Inclusive Practice for Cultural Heritage

Join our conservator and associate director Sanchita Balachandran who will be in conversation with archivist Dominique Luster, Charles "Teenie" Harris Archivist at the Carnegie Museum of Art for a conversation on "An Inclusive Practice for Cultural Heritage" happening later this week. This event is open and free to all.
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/turning-points-an-inclusive-practice-for-cultural-heritage-registration-139282887867

A conversation series on museum practice now

Our growing online collection is in the spotlight! Check out today's Sheridan Libraries & University Museums blog post. ...
02/19/2021
JHU Artstor Collections Now Available in JSTOR – The Sheridan Libraries & University Museums Blog

Our growing online collection is in the spotlight! Check out today's Sheridan Libraries & University Museums blog post. Milton S. Eisenhower Library, Johns Hopkins University Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences

Posted on February 19, 2021 by Lael Ensor-Bennett [This blog post was contributed by VRC Staff Alana Barry (International Studies/East Asian Studies, ’22)] Spring 2021 is finally here, and the Visual Resources Collection (VRC) has some news to share about an exciting new endeavor: all JHU image co...

For our last post of 2020, we just wanted to say how much we miss being in the museum, how much we miss interacting with...
12/23/2020

For our last post of 2020, we just wanted to say how much we miss being in the museum, how much we miss interacting with all of the people who come and find something to delight or fascinate them, and how much we miss real conversations with other human beings. As museum staff, we are thinking about and planning for how our museum will continue to pursue its mission when we are able to safely gather again. We look forward to seeing you in 2021, which we hope will be a brighter, healthier and more joyful year. Please take care, stay safe and healthy. And as always, thank you for your support and encouragement.

Happy 10th "birthday" to the Archaeological Museum in its current space! Thinking back to this day TEN YEARS AGO when th...
12/05/2020

Happy 10th "birthday" to the Archaeological Museum in its current space! Thinking back to this day TEN YEARS AGO when the Archaeological Museum reopened its doors after the renovation of Gilman Hall. We couldn't have reached this incredible milestone without all of the hard work of so many people behind the scenes. It was such a hectic time that we did not take nearly enough photographs of all the people who made it possible to re-imagine the museum in its current form, but here are some images of the conservators, mount makers and collections specialists whose care of the museum's objects made it such a wonderful place. We'll have to celebrate properly next year.

A familiar face rounds out this season of the Peopling the Past podcast this week. You can hear Sanchita Balachandran ab...
12/01/2020
Podcast #12: Thrown Together: Potters, Painters, and Ceramic Production with Sanchita Balachandran

A familiar face rounds out this season of the Peopling the Past podcast this week. You can hear Sanchita Balachandran about how the Archaeological Museum's collection inspired the undergraduate course "Recreating Ancient Greek Ceramics" that inspired many more years of staring at, studying, smelling and even tasting (sort of) pots. We promise, no ancient archaeological objects were damaged in the making of this podcast or this research! https://peoplingthepast.com/2020/12/01/podcast_12/

On this episode of the Peopling the Past Podcast, we are joined by Sanchita Balachandran, Associate Director of the Johns Hopkins Archaeological Museum. Listen in, as she speaks to us about the sen…

The museum is excited to announce that through a partnership with the Johns Hopkins Department of the History of Art's V...
11/17/2020
library.artstor.org

The museum is excited to announce that through a partnership with the Johns Hopkins Department of the History of Art's Visual Resources Collection in the Johns Hopkins University Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, a selection of ancient objects from the Archaeological Museum collection is accessible online as an Artstor public collection (free access). This online collection is also part of a new initiative by Ithaka to integrate public collections in search results in the JSTOR research database. Currently 180 objects including The Buckler Roman Surgical Kit from Colophon and The Sidney Pointer Coin Collection are available. Be sure to visit often as we will be adding new objects in the near future.

How exciting to see that the Peopling the Past folks have interviewed Johns Hopkins' own Jennifer Stager, assistant prof...
11/16/2020
Podcast #9: Living in a Material World: Jennifer Stager and Technicolour Statues

How exciting to see that the Peopling the Past folks have interviewed Johns Hopkins' own Jennifer Stager, assistant professor in the Johns Hopkins Department of the History of Art! Listen to Professor Stager talk about the complexities of how the ancient Greeks viewed (and thought of) color, and why you should start staring ancient sculpture directly in the eyes the next time you're (safely) visiting museums. https://peoplingthepast.com/2020/11/10/podcast_9/

Dr. Jennifer Stager Dr. Stager’s Academic Pages Personal Website Johns Hopkins Profile Antioch Recovery Project On this episode of the Peopling the Past Podcast, we talk with Dr. Jennifer Sta…

We're enjoying the new podcast "Peopling the Past" featuring specialists who are looking at how we can think about the r...
10/29/2020
Podcast #7: No Bones about it: Climate Change in the Ancient World with Flint Dibble

We're enjoying the new podcast "Peopling the Past" featuring specialists who are looking at how we can think about the real people in the ancient world and how they lived. A recent interview with zooarchaeologist Flint Dibble examined evidence for climate change in ancient Greece, and how animal bones give us insight into how peoples' food systems (and meals!) changed as a result: https://peoplingthepast.com/2020/10/20/podcast_7/

On this week’s episode of the Peopling the Past Podcast, we hear from Dr. Flint Dibble, Lecturer in the Department of Classical Studies at Dartmouth College. Join us, as Dr. Dibble discusses …

Associate Director Sanchita Balachandran is giving a talk at the UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology this Wednesday at ...
10/12/2020

Associate Director Sanchita Balachandran is giving a talk at the UCLA Cotsen Institute of Archaeology this Wednesday at 12pm PST about her research on ancient Athenian ceramics, inspired my the museum's collection. You can sign up to attend here:
https://www.ioa.ucla.edu/content/virtual-pizza-talk-makers%E2%80%99-spacemaking-space-interdisciplinary-imagining-lived-experiences

Her talk is entitled, "Makers' Space/Making Space: An Interdisciplinary Imagining of the Lived Experiences of Ancient Athenian Potters and Painters."

10/12/2020

On #IndigenousPeoplesDay we acknowledge that our museum rests on the ancestral homeland of the Susquehannock People, and that this land has been a place of gathering and stewardship of many Native Peoples past and present (and future) including the Piscataways, the Accohannocks, the Lumbees, the Cherokees and the Nanticokes. We continue to commit ourselves to learning ways to working more reciprocally and respectfully with Native Peoples.

The fall semester is underway, and while things are rather different this year, the one unchanging fact is that our inst...
09/02/2020

The fall semester is underway, and while things are rather different this year, the one unchanging fact is that our instructors are incredibly dedicated and creative. This week, the museum's own Meg Swaney began teaching her undergraduate course "Egyptomania: A Consumer's Guide to Ancient Egypt," and you can follow along on the class instagram page! https://www.instagram.com/inquiring_egyptologists/

Looking forward to seeing what interesting things these "inquiring Egyptologists" work on in the coming weeks!

If you missed yesterday's conversation "Your Mummies, Their Ancestors" featuring several specialists including associate...
08/19/2020

If you missed yesterday's conversation "Your Mummies, Their Ancestors" featuring several specialists including associate director Sanchita Balachandran's remarks on caring for ancient Egyptian human remains, you can now watch it here on the Everyday Orientalism YouTube channel! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLGUhS2qUi8&app=desktop

Join the Archaeological Institute of America and the museum's own Sanchita Balachandran in a conversation coming up on A...
08/06/2020

Join the Archaeological Institute of America and the museum's own Sanchita Balachandran in a conversation coming up on August 27th: "Becoming Better Accomplices And Instructors: Justice, Activism, And Reflexivity In Teaching Museums And Cultural Heritage" The session is an online panel discussion on best practices, successes, and failures in creating and implementing a more diversified and inclusive teaching strategy.

Registration is free:
https://www.archaeological.org/webinar-3-becoming-better-accomplices-and-instructors-justice-activism-and-reflexivity-in-teaching-museums-and-cultural-heritage/

So exciting to see the work that continues to come out of the innovative courses taught by Jennifer Stager, assistant pr...
07/28/2020

So exciting to see the work that continues to come out of the innovative courses taught by Jennifer Stager, assistant professor in the Johns Hopkins Department of the History of Art. Her course "Classics Research Lab: Antioch Recovery Project" resulted in this ARCGIS map produced by graduate students Ella Gonzalez and Maya Kahane!
https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?webmap=dfb15fa40a4647288b11b1139697903e&extent=-172.2656,-9.1412,172.2656,82.8921

Congratulations to Ella and Maya for their terrific work and to Prof. Stager for this course.

Here's a full course description (don't you wish you could have taken it?):
Antioch Recovery Project investigates mosaics from the ancient city of Antioch (modern Antakya, Turkey, near the border with Syria) now in the collection of the Baltimore Museum of Art. Excavated by an international team of archaeologists in the 1930s, hundreds of ancient mosaics from the cosmopolitan city were subsequently dispersed to museums across the globe, with twenty-four mosaics entering the collection of the BMA. Phase I will focus on the digital documentation and analysis of the mosaic of Narcissus as a prototype for ongoing research bringing together the fragments of ancient Antioch for contemporary beholders. The Greek myth of Narcissus tells the story of a beautiful Theban hunter doomed to love his own reflection and is the origin of the modern psychiatric term “narcissism”. Researching the mythology, materials, conservation history, archival material, historiography, and contemporary reception of the Narcissus mosaic and myth offers extensive opportunities to collaborate with scholars across a range of disciplines at JHU, in the Baltimore museum community, and beyond. Investigators will move between the Baltimore Museum of Art, the CRL processing lab in Gilman Hall, and Special Collections. The course will involve some travel to visit other mosaics from Antioch now in collections at Harvard’s Dumbarton Oaks in Washington D.C., and the Princeton Art Museum in Princeton, New Jersey.

https://www.arcgis.com/home/webmap/viewer.html?webmap=dfb15fa40a4647288b11b1139697903e&extent=-172.2656,-9.1412,172.2656,82.8921

Excited that the museum's associate director Sanchita Balachandran will be in conversation with other scholars on the to...
07/22/2020
#EOTalks: Your Mummies, Their Ancestors? Caring for and About Ancient Egyptian Human Remains

Excited that the museum's associate director Sanchita Balachandran will be in conversation with other scholars on the topic of ethical care of ancient Egyptian human remains on August 18th, from 10am-12pm EST. You can join the conversation as well by signing up for a zoom link. This event is co-organized by The Egypt Exploration Society , Everyday Orientalism, Egypt's Dispersed Heritage - آثارنا المتغربة, and Charlotte Parent (Samuel H. Kress Fellow, Royal Ontario Museum). For more information:

https://everydayorientalism.wordpress.com/2020/07/22/eotalks-your-mummies-their-ancestors-caring-for-and-about-ancient-egyptian-human-remains/

by Charlotte Parent, Heba Abd El Gawad, and Katherine Blouin Cover picture: Mahmoud Hassan (see below for details) Join us on zoom on August 18th for the fourth of our 2020 #EOTalks series! This di…

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150 Gilman Hall, 3400 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD
21218

General information

Free admission to the museum; see website for group tour fees Open: During the Semester Monday-Friday, from 10:30am to 1:30pm First Saturday of the month, noon to 4:00pm Summer and Winter Breaks Monday-Thursday, from 11:30-1:30

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LAST DAY - proposals ! https://www.e-a-a.org/eaa2019 Theme: Archaeological theory and methods beyond paradigms Title: Unveiling Invisibility: Exploring Knowledge , Interdisciplinarity and Identity through the Histories of Archaeological Collections Abstract: Archaeological collections are invaluable sources for reconstructing different aspects of the histories of archaeology. The study of archival documents, publications and newspaper articles related to the constitution and later evolution of such collections brings us insights into the development of archaeological theory and practice, the emergence of interdisciplinarity, as well as into the production and circulation of scientific knowledge across time. It also reveals the potential and role of archaeological collections in identity construction, and in shaping various types of networks and power relationships within the discipline of archaeology. This session aims to unveil the invisible stories behind both private and public archaeological collections in Europe and beyond, from the nineteenth to the twentieth century. We welcome papers that explore topics such as the agendas and ideologies behind collecting, researching and exhibiting archaeological objects and collections; the scientific narratives built around collections; the contribution of collections to the evolution of archaeological interpretations and to fostering pluri- and interdisciplinary collaborations and investigations; the role(s) of collections in the production, transfer and exchange of knowledge, as well as in building local, regional and national identities. We would also like to encourage discussions about the hierarchies and networks (e.g., social, academic) that were formed around collections between locals, collectors, amateurs, and professionals, in addition to their involvement in the birth and development of archaeological societies and museums. Following the EAA2018 session “Archaeology and interdisciplinarity & interdisciplinarity in archaeology: stories of a long and diversified journey (19th-21st centuries)”, this proposal also aims to get a broader and more detailed picture of some aspects of the research project ‘InterArq-Archaeology and Interdisciplinarity’. Keywords: Archaeological collections, Invisible stories, Interdisciplinarity, Identities, History of archaeology Organisers Martins, Ana Cristina (Portugal) 1,2 Coltofean, Laura (Spain) 3,2 Garcia-Ventura, Agnès (Spain) 4 Díaz-Andreu, Margarita (Spain) 5,2 Affiliations: 1. Instituto de História Contemporânea NOVA FCSH + UÉvora + FCT / Uniarq - ULisboa 2. InterArq Project, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain 3. Universitat de Barcelona, Spain 4. Juan de la Cierva-Incorporación, IPOA-Universitat de Barcelona, Spain 5. ICREA and Universitat de Barcelona, Spain Phone 00351939808860 E-mail address [email protected]