The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House

The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House Welcome to the Flag House, home of Mary Young Pickersgill craftswoman of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag. The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House is a historic home and museum located at 844 E. Pratt St. in Baltimore Maryland.
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Mrs. Pickersgill was an American patriot and a Baltimore citizen. She sewed the Star-Spangled Banner, the flag that flew over Baltimore harbor after the Battle of Baltimore and inspired a young man named Francis Scott Key to write the American national anthem in honor of her flag. Now, her home is a National Historic Landmark, open to the public five days a week.

In 2020 and 2021, we're working to create a new vision for the Flag House. We have a dream to be more inclusive, equitab...
05/17/2020

In 2020 and 2021, we're working to create a new vision for the Flag House. We have a dream to be more inclusive, equitable, and diverse. We are dreaming big for our small museum as we work to overhaul our interpretive plan in the new decade, making the Flag House a more socially conscious museum. What dreams do you have for a better world?

#DreamsMW #Hope #OurFuture #Tomorrow #MuseumWeek #MuseumWeek2020 #MuseumsforCulture #MuseumfromHome #COVID19 #StayHome

The Flag House is using technology to reach broader and more diverse audiences than ever before. Whether it's through ou...
05/16/2020

The Flag House is using technology to reach broader and more diverse audiences than ever before. Whether it's through our virtual tour, digital collection, or social media, technology allows small museums like the Flag House to execute its mission worldwide. Stay connected with us by following us on all social platforms, signing up for our monthly newsletter, or exploring our educational resources page at www.flaghouse.org.

#TechnologyMW #MuseumTechnology #MuseumWeek2020

Climate change impacts the short-term, and long-term planning museums have to do to ensure the safety of their greatest ...
05/15/2020

Climate change impacts the short-term, and long-term planning museums have to do to ensure the safety of their greatest assets, the buildings, and cultural objects held within their walls.

Will climate change have a long-term effect on the preservation of the historic Flag House? Yes, increasingly severe weather events and warming of the climate directly affect how the museum developed its Disaster Relief Plan. At the Flag House, one of the greatest threats is the change in the 100-year floodplain that could bring water from the Inner Harbor directly to the front door of the historic house.

What can we do to combat climate change? Reduce emissions, consider making your garden or yard a native plant and wildlife habitat, recycle or reduce your consumption of single-use packaging, reduce energy use, use green and earth-friendly sustainable products at home and work.

#ClimateMW #MuseumWeek2020 #weather #climatecrisis #climateemergency #fridayforfuture #climatechange #climateactionnow #museumsarenotneutral #viewfrommywindow

How are museums going green? Whether it's transitioning to LED lighting in exhibits, recycling, using sustainable office...
05/15/2020

How are museums going green? Whether it's transitioning to LED lighting in exhibits, recycling, using sustainable office and janitorial products, or reducing single-use plastics in cafes, museums across the globe are committing to ethical, environmentally-conscious practices.

The Flag House has committed to using janitorial services that use environmentally friendly cleaning products, has LED lighting in our permanent exhibit, and maintains its courtyard as a National Wildlife Federation certified wildlife habitat.

#ClimateMW #MuseumWeek2020 #weather #climatecrisis #climateemergency #fridayforfuture #climatechange #climateactionnow #museumsarenotneutral #viewfrommywindow

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020.Each year, the Flag House...
05/14/2020

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020.

Each year, the Flag House reaches more than 8,000 students and educators during field trips, early childhood educational programs, and classroom visits. We treasure every moment and can't wait to welcome you back to the museum. Thank you for following along today. Share your Flag House field trip memories with us in the comments!

#Throwback #ThrowbackThursday

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020. Share your memories of t...
05/14/2020

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020. Share your memories of the Flag House with us in the comments!

The Oriole Bird visits the Flag House in support of Nicole Sherry, Baltimore Orioles head groundskeeper and winner of the 2016 Mary Pickersgill Award for Women's Leadership in Business.

#Throwback #ThrowbackThursday

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020. Share your memories of t...
05/14/2020

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020. Share your memories of the Flag House with us in the comments!

The Flag House celebrates its 92nd Flag Day with the unfurling of a replica 30' x 42' Star-Spangled Banner replica graciously loaned from our friends Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine.

#Throwback #ThrowbackThursday

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020. Share your memories of t...
05/14/2020

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020. Share your memories of the Flag House with us in the comments!

The Flag House is adorned in bunting for the 1914 Star-Spangled Centennial Celebrations.

#Throwback #ThrowbackThursday

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020. Share your memories of t...
05/14/2020

We're celebrating some of our favorite Flag House #MuseumMomentsMW all day for #MuseumWeek2020. Share your memories of the Flag House with us in the comments!

The Flag House opened to the public on Sunday, November 11, 1928. Founding members of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House Association, Dr. Arthur and Ruthella Bibbins, host board members and visitors in the dining room of the historic Flag House.

#Throwback #ThrowbackThursday

The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House exists today because of the effort of its community and the idea that together, we g...
05/13/2020

The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House exists today because of the effort of its community and the idea that together, we go further. After a fundraising shortfall, the fate of the historic house was uncertain. Because of community efforts to save the Flag House, Baltimore City stepped in to buy the property to be run as a historic house by the Flag House Association. Today, the community is even more critical to the Museum’s success than in 1927. We rely on community volunteers, donors, partnerships, and feedback so that we may better serve the public at large. #TogetherMW is about celebrating the museum-community relationship. Today, we thank our Baltimore community for their support. It has never meant more to us than during this time of uncertainty. To learn more about a joint vision for our immediate community, Jonestown, visit http://www.flaghouse.org/jonestown-master-plan.

#TogetheratHome #Group #Collectively #Community #MuseumWeek2020 #TogetherMW

We're working to develop new educational resources and online collections to engage our audience during #LifeinQuarantin...
05/12/2020
Educational Resources

We're working to develop new educational resources and online collections to engage our audience during #LifeinQuarantine.

To access educational resources or request information about student virtual tours visit, flaghouse.org/educational-resources. To view our digitized collection visit, flaghouse.org/our-collection.

#CultureinQuarentine #MuseumWeek2020
#StayHome #QuarantineLife

#MuseumFromHome with us! While the Flag House is closed, we want to stay engaged and enrich your learning from home. The below FREE educational activities include something for all ages. We will co…

Help us replace the missing star on the Star-Spangled Banner by crafting your own! Don't forget to share your finished p...
05/12/2020

Help us replace the missing star on the Star-Spangled Banner by crafting your own! Don't forget to share your finished product by tagging the Flag House.

#StayHome #QuarantineLife #CultureinQuarentine #MuseumWeek2020

We want to hear from you! As we all adapt to life during the COVID-19 crisis, the Flag House wants to stay connected wit...
05/12/2020

We want to hear from you! As we all adapt to life during the COVID-19 crisis, the Flag House wants to stay connected with our community. Tell us the type of content you'd like to see, ask a question, or tell us what kind of programs and educational resources would be most helpful.
https://forms.gle/DrgK1qYSuk8zXEjY6

#CultureinQuarentine
#StayHome #QuarantineLife

This post is adapted from a runner up essay in the 2020 Flag House Scholar Award and Essay Contest written by high schoo...
05/11/2020

This post is adapted from a runner up essay in the 2020 Flag House Scholar Award and Essay Contest written by high school senior Helen Qian from Richard Montgomery High School.

Curled against half-chewed watercolor leaves, caterpillars, spiders, and moths come to life in brilliant color. But a struggle accompanies this beauty—painted tarantulas feed on birds, ants race toward morsels of fruit—making nature's fight for survival evident. For the first time, the reality of an ecosystem is visualized on paper.

German illustrator and entomologist Maria Sibylla Merian's work fostered new ideas in the study of biology during the 17th-century. Merian was born in 1647 and grew up in a household of artists. Artwork quickly became her medium for viewing the world, paving the way for a legacy that incorporated both her creative skill and work as a naturalist.

Enduring long nights solely to sketch butterflies emerging from pupa, Merian was intent on capturing every stage of an organism's life. From the silkworms that fascinated her as a teenager to the jars of insects that later littered her kitchen, she became the first naturalist to not only record insect life stages but also incorporate their habitats and food webs into her observations. Her art helped dispel prevailing theories that insects spontaneously generated from mud and reshaped Europe's understanding of ecological relationships. Moreover, she set the standards for today's most renowned artist-naturalists, including John James Audubon and William Bartram.

But above all, Merian was a pioneering woman in a field dominated by men. She juggled scientific pursuits with expectations of managing the home and raising children—and emerged with unparalleled vigor. Although her story has historically been overshadowed by her male contemporaries, it's made all the difference for me: a girl who's always been drawn to both art and biology.

The 2020 Scholar Award and Essay Contest prompt asked students to share stories about unsung heroes. From moms to nonprofit founders, teachers, community leaders, medical professionals, and mental health advocates, Maryland high school seniors submitted 350-word essays about the unsung heroes in their communities. We'll be sharing some of those stories with you today for #MuseumWeek #HeroesMW.

#MuseumWeek2020 #MuseumsforCulture #MuseumfromHome #COVID19 #StayHome

Ford Tucker Johnson was the plaintiff in Johnson vs. Virginia, a 1963 Supreme Court case and landmark decision that exte...
05/11/2020

Ford Tucker Johnson was the plaintiff in Johnson vs. Virginia, a 1963 Supreme Court case and landmark decision that extended the ruling of the Brown vs. Board of Education case that desegregated the nation’s schools (1954), to courthouses, libraries, and other publicly funded institutions and facilities.

Two years earlier, he and his sister Elizabeth were among 34 participants arrested during a volatile sit-in at the lunch counter in Thalhimers Department Store in downtown Richmond. The so-called Richmond 34 would also draw the attention of the Supreme Court, which later overturned their convictions, and their protest is remembered for its role in the desegregation of privately owned businesses. Now in his seventies, Ford Tucker Johnson resides in Clarksburg, Maryland.

Ford Tucker Johnson was the subject of a runner up essay in the 2020 Flag House Scholar Award and Essay Contest. For more about the unsung heroes of the Civil Rights Movement visit, https://bit.ly/3dtHs5w

The 2020 Scholar Award and Essay Contest prompt asked students to share stories about unsung heroes. From moms to nonprofit founders, teachers, community leaders, medical professionals, and mental health advocates, Maryland high school seniors submitted 350-word essays about the unsung heroes in their communities. We’ll be sharing some of those stories with you today for #MuseumWeek #HeroesMW.

#MuseumWeek2020 #MuseumsforCulture #MuseumfromHome #COVID19 #StayHome

Wiley H. Bates was born a slave in 1859 in North Carolina, and by age thirteen was working as an oysterman in Annapolis,...
05/11/2020

Wiley H. Bates was born a slave in 1859 in North Carolina, and by age thirteen was working as an oysterman in Annapolis, Maryland. By the age of twenty, Bates owned a grocery store serving the African American residents of Annapolis, becoming a prominent businessman and member of the city council. He was a vocal and influential advocate for the improvement of educational opportunities for African Americans students in Annapolis. As a member of the PTA at Stanton High School, Bates petitioned for the building of a larger school facility. Wiley H. Bates High School opened in 1933. Before desegregation, Wiley H. Bates High School was the only public school in the county that African-American students could attend for a secondary level education. In 1966, Annapolis schools were integrated by court order, and the upper grades moved to Annapolis High School. The site is now known as Wiley H. Bates Heritage Park. The building has been repurposed into 71 senior housing units, a senior center, a boys and girls club, and a museum dedicated to Annapolis merchant and civic leader Wiley H. Bates. Wiley H. Bates High School was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994.

Wiley H. Bates was the subject of a runner up essay in the 2020 Flag House Scholar Award and Essay Contest.

The 2020 Scholar Award and Essay Contest prompt asked students to share stories about unsung heroes. From moms to nonprofit founders, teachers, community leaders, medical professionals, and mental health advocates, Maryland high school seniors submitted 350-word essays about the unsung heroes in their communities. We’ll be sharing some of those stories with you today for #MuseumWeek #HeroesMW.

#MuseumWeek2020 #MuseumsforCulture #MuseumfromHome #COVID19 #StayHome

Best known for his account of his life as a fugitive slave, "The Life and Adventures of Charles Ball" (1837), Charles Ba...
05/11/2020

Best known for his account of his life as a fugitive slave, "The Life and Adventures of Charles Ball" (1837), Charles Ball served in the Chesapeake Bay Flotilla of the United States Navy under the command of Commodore Joshua Barney in the War of 1812. Ball's autobiography was published twice more in 1846 and 1857, as re-edited and abridged versions. The memoir is one of the only pieces of literature that contemporaneously gave a voice to the experience of enslaved persons.

Ball fought at the Battle of Bladensburg on August 14, 1814, a month before the Battle of Baltimore. He writes in his memoir, "I stood at my gun until the Commodore was shot down when he ordered us to retreat, as I was told by the officer who commanded our gun. If the militia regiments, that lay upon our right and left, could have been brought to charge the British, in close fight, as they crossed the bridge, we should have killed or taken the whole of them in a short time; but the militia ran like sheep chased by dogs." After serving the U.S. Navy for two years, Charles Ball was resold into slavery. In 1837, he escaped to Pennsylvania, where he wrote his autobiography.

Charles Ball was the essay subject of the 2020 Flag House Scholar Award-winning essay written by high school senior Reuben Williams.

The 2020 Scholar Award and Essay Contest prompt asked students to share stories about unsung heroes. From moms to nonprofit founders, teachers, community leaders, medical professionals, and mental health advocates, Maryland high school seniors submitted 350-word essays about the unsung heroes in their communities. We’ll be sharing some of those stories with you today for #MuseumWeek #HeroesMW.

#MuseumWeek2020 #MuseumsforCulture #MuseumfromHome #COVID19 #StayHome

The 2020 Scholar Award and Essay Contest prompt asked students to share stories about unsung heroes. From moms to nonpro...
05/11/2020

The 2020 Scholar Award and Essay Contest prompt asked students to share stories about unsung heroes. From moms to nonprofit founders, teachers, community leaders, medical professionals, and mental health advocates, Maryland high school seniors submitted 350-word essays about the unsung heroes in their communities. We’ll be sharing some of those stories with you today for #MuseumWeek #HeroesMW.

#MuseumWeek2020 #MuseumsforCulture #MuseumfromHome #COVID19 #StayHome

Usually, this is the time of year when visitors are treated to Flag House’s rose garden in full bloom. Since we can’t se...
05/06/2020

Usually, this is the time of year when visitors are treated to Flag House’s rose garden in full bloom. Since we can’t see you in person right now, we wanted to share some of the first beautiful roses of 2020 on this rainy afternoon.

From all of us at the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House, thank you for your continued support. We have officially reached ...
05/06/2020

From all of us at the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House, thank you for your continued support. We have officially reached our Giving Tuesday Now $1,000 goal! These emergency funds will allow the museum to continue developing remote learning resources, support our staff, and plan for a phased reopening. Thank you to everyone who donated, shared our campaign, and cheered us on.

We know many worthy nonprofits were participating in Giving Tuesday Now. If you were unable to contribute to the Flag House, we still want to thank you for visiting and engaging with us online, and for supporting the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House in so many other ways. Our hearts are full.

Sincerely,

The Flag House Team

Only a few more hours to help the Flag House close the gap. We’re just $175 short of our #GivingTuesdayNow goal to raise...
05/05/2020
#GivingTuesdayNow Make a Difference at the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House

Only a few more hours to help the Flag House close the gap. We’re just $175 short of our #GivingTuesdayNow goal to raise $1,000 in emergency funds for the museum.

To keep the momentum going, visit the Flag House's #GivingTuesdayNow Campaign by following the link below. GoFundMe Fundraising will make a $1,000 matching grant to qualified nonprofits that raise at least $1,000 through their #GivingTuesdayNow charities platform.

Help support the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House during this time of need. We want to sincerely thank you for your past and continued support of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House. It means so much during these difficult times. The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House stands to ...

Address

844 E. Pratt St.
Baltimore, MD
21202

2 blocks from the Charm City Circulator

General information

The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House is a historic home and museum located at 844 E. Pratt St. in Baltimore Maryland. This 225 year old structure is restored to its 1813 glory. Tour the Flag House, visit the museum and spend a day with Mrs. Pickersgill and her family.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(410) 837-1793

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Our Story

Opened to the public in 1928, the historic Star-Spangled Banner Flag House and Museum preserves the 1793 structure and interprets the life of Mary Young Pickersgill a nineteenth-century female entrepreneur and craftswoman of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag that inspired the National Anthem. In 1927, the historic structure was purchased by Baltimore City with the intent to preserve the house for future generations as the birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner flag and in 1970 it was named a National Historic Landmark. Today, the historic house and museum are open Tuesday through Saturday for public tours. Visit our website (www.flaghouse.org) or Facebook calendar for more information on upcoming programs and events.