The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House

The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House Welcome to the Flag House, home of Mary Young Pickersgill craftswoman of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag. The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House is a historic home and museum located at 844 E.

Pratt St. in Baltimore Maryland.

Operating as usual

Happy 105th Birthday to the National Park Service especially our friends and colleagues at Fort McHenry National Monumen...
08/25/2021

Happy 105th Birthday to the National Park Service especially our friends and colleagues at Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine and Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail!

08/21/2021

#onthisday August 21, 1814: The town of Nottingham, Maryland--the Chesapeake Flotilla’s base in July and early August 1814--was hastily abandoned as British troops moved in. An enemy rear guard protected this landing while the main British force invaded Washington.

"Came...to the town of Nottingham...Not an individual was to be seen in the streets, or remained in the house; while the appearance of the furniture, &c., in some places the very bread left in the ovens, showed that it had been evacuated in great haste.” British Lt. George Robert Gleig

[image: 1814 map of the British encampment at Nottingham; Robert Smith, 1814; courtesy Beinecke Library, Yale University]

#StarSpangledTrail #Warof1812 #britishinvasion1814

August 19, 1813, the 30'x42' Star-Spangled Banner and smaller 17'x25' storm flag for @fortmchenrynps  are collected from...
08/19/2021

August 19, 1813, the 30'x42' Star-Spangled Banner and smaller 17'x25' storm flag for @fortmchenrynps are collected from the household of flagmaker Mary Young Pickersgill. She is given this receipt signed by Deputy Commissary James Calhoun, Jr. Mary is to be paid $405.90 for the garrison flag and $168.54 for the storm flag.

The receipt for the Star-Spangled Banner is part of the Flag House's collection and is one of the only primary documents remaining from the Young-Pickersgill flagmaking business. The receipt is currently on view in our permanent exhibit.

Receipt for the Star-Spangled Banner
August 19, 1813
Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Bibbins
Star-Spangled Banner Flag House Collection, FH1938.12.1
_____________________________________
#starspangledbanner #warof1812 #historicpreservation #thisoldhouse #baltimoremuseum #baltimoremuseums #baltimorehistory #ushistory #charmcity #discovercharmcity #discoverbaltimore #bmorehistoric #bmorehistory #historicsites #mdhistory #visitbaltimore #mybmore #baltimorecityoffirsts

🚚 *BEEP BEEP* the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail is going mobile!
08/10/2021

🚚 *BEEP BEEP* the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail is going mobile!

We are jumping for joy for the future Trail mobile visitor center!

The #StarSpangledBannerTrail is developing a mobile visitor center to travel to various Trail locations and public events related to the natural and cultural heritage of the Chesapeake Bay.

Modeled after the #ChesapeakeRovingRanger, the vehicle will be a place for people to interact with an NPS ranger, pick up brochures about the Trail and other local heritage sites, and participate in education and interpretive programs.

The mobile visitor center is made up of a step van (similar in size and style to a delivery truck) which was delivered last week!

With grant funding from the Maryland Historical Trust, Trail staff will be working on the next step of the project which involves transforming the vehicle from the manufacturer’s standard baseline into an eye-catching and welcoming space.

Stay tuned for updates!

National Park Service Chesapeake Bay, Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail, Chesapeake Conservancy

Baltimore National Heritage Area, Maryland Milestones (Anacostia Trails Heritage Area), Destination Southern Maryland, Lower Susquehanna Heritage Greenway Stories of the Chesapeake Heritage Area

#Warof1812

[image: photograph of two rangers jumping in front of a white delivery van.]

Good luck to our friends at Pride of Baltimore II as they race down the bay in the SMCM Governor's Cup Yacht Race!
07/30/2021

Good luck to our friends at Pride of Baltimore II as they race down the bay in the SMCM Governor's Cup Yacht Race!

It’s race day!

PRIDE II is underway & headed for the start line of the SMCM Governor's Cup Yacht Race. Our start time is 2:45 PM.

Track PRIDE as she races down the bay by going to pride2.org/pride-of-baltimore-ii/pride-ii-is-underway/. There is also an official race tracker, we will post the link in the comments shortly.

#AllWoodAllGood

07/26/2021

It's only Day 4 of the Tokyo #Olympics and the U.S. national anthem has already played 7 times at the medal ceremonies (7 gold medals!). Way to go, #TeamUSA!

[image: Flags are raised for the medal ceremony for the men's 400 meter individual medley at the Tokyo Summer Olympics, July 25, 2021; AP Photo/ Martin Meissner]

#StarSpangledBanner

The more you know! Great info. from our friends at the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail on #NationalMoonDay.
07/21/2021

The more you know! Great info. from our friends at the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail on #NationalMoonDay.

07/12/2021

#onthisday July 12, 1814, the British attacked Elkton, MD for the second time. The defenders "gave them in all eleven guns, so well directed, that they hastily...retreated down the river..."

The British first attacked the town in April 1813. Elkton, at the head of Elk River, was expected to be a target because it could be a landing site for an advance on Philadelphia. Citizens of Elkton built three earthen forts and placed a chain across the river for defense and fended off the British assault.

Only one other place in Maryland --St. Michaels--succeeded twice in repulsing British attacks.

"Two small batteries...in the town...opened their fire upon the barges, and...compelled them to retreat with considerable precipitation..."
Report on Elkton Skirmish in Alexandria Gazette, August 18, 1813

[image: color illustration of earthwork and wood fortification with artillery, overlooking a river, (c) Gerry Embleton]

#Warof1812

07/05/2021

On this day in 1776, with the passing of the Lee Resolution, “the Continental Congress declared the United Colonies Free and Independent States.” In a letter to his wife Abigail dated July 3, John Adams declared “The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America…”

The announcement just made it in the July 2 edition of the Pennsylvania Evening Post. Can you find it?

Photos from Visit Baltimore's post
07/04/2021

Photos from Visit Baltimore's post

Timeline Photos
07/04/2021

Timeline Photos

It was a beautiful day for a Flag House field trip to Loudon Park Cemetery to visit the burial site of Mary Young Picker...
06/17/2021

It was a beautiful day for a Flag House field trip to Loudon Park Cemetery to visit the burial site of Mary Young Pickersgill, a first for us! Established in 1853, Loudon Park was the most fashionable place to be interred when Mary died in October of 1857. Loudon boasts other well known figures like Jerome Napoleon Bonaparte and H.L. Mencken to name only a few. Mary is interred in section AA not far from the original gate house on Frederick Road. The Flag House is currently working on a project with the Maryland State Society, United States Daughters of 1812 to rededicate Mary’s gravesite.

This year, the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House is pleased to recognize the runners-up for the 2021 Flag House Scholar Aw...
06/15/2021
Star-Spangled Banner Flag House

This year, the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House is pleased to recognize the runners-up for the 2021 Flag House Scholar Award. This year’s essay contest asked seniors to write a journal entry about their lives during the COVID-19 pandemic, creating a primary source for historians of the future.

The creative, exceptionally written, and sometimes emotionally moving journal entries linked below scored the highest of the 28 competitive essay submissions from 11 of Maryland’s 23 counties. If you haven’t already, also check out the video of 2021 Scholar Award winner, Kaylee Kim.

http://www.flaghouse.org/blog

2021 Flag House Scholar Award and Essay Contest: Runners Up June 14, 2021May 18, 2021audoff Leave a comment This year, the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House is pleased to recognize the runners up in for the 2021 Flag House Scholar Award. This year’s essay contest asked seniors to write a journal ent...

Happy Flag Day and congratulations to our 2021 Flag House Scholar, Kaylee Kim! Due to the cancellation of the Flag Day C...
06/14/2021

Happy Flag Day and congratulations to our 2021 Flag House Scholar, Kaylee Kim! Due to the cancellation of the Flag Day Celebration during the COVID-19 pandemic, Kaylee fulfilled her obligation to read her essay in the recording below. Please join us in congratulating Kaylee! The Flag House Scholar Award and Essay Contest Scholarship is generously sponsored by the Society of the War of 1812 in the State of Maryland and Maryland State Society United States Daughters of 1812.

A bit about our winner:

Kaylee Kim is a senior at Mt. Hebron High School. She is a member of the National Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta, Tri- M, and Spanish Honor Society. She is also secretary of the National English Honor Society, and webmaster for the National Computer Science Honor Society and the Key Club. She participates in many clubs and activities, including Varsity Track and Field and Marching Unit. Kaylee enjoys giving back to her community, volunteering as a teacher aide, as a religious education aide and member of the Contemporary Ensemble for her church, and with programs like WEngineer, Codeucate, and TeCanal, that work to provide students STEM education. In her free time, Kaylee enjoys art and animation, music, and coding. She will be attending the University of Maryland in the fall, planning on majoring in Computer Science.

2021 Question:

“Living Through a Historic Moment”
Private letters, diaries, and personal artifacts are used by historians to learn about individuals’ experiences during a historically significant event. Have you been journaling, curating a collection of masks that match your aesthetic, creating online content, or otherwise documenting your life during the COVID-19 pandemic? Create your own primary source written artifact, like a journal entry, letter, or blog post detailing your experience of the pandemic. Include cited facts from news clips, newspapers, or scientific articles that could be used as a primary source for future historians. If you would like to include these as supplements to your essay, please upload them as a PDF file in the appropriate field below. We have provided an example of a primary source in the Flag House’s museum collection and resources for analyzing primary documents that you can access while crafting your response.

Kaylee’s Essay :

To my Quarantine,

My first mistake was wanting you. You were there to help me catch up on schoolwork, do you remember? A nice two-week break, where I could study for upcoming finals. But with barely a taste of freedom, how could that have been enough? So, you stretched yourself into the summer, math tests all but forgotten. I did new things instead. Embroidery, guitar playing, finally reading those untouched books. I decorated my room. I loved you.

But the break extended again and bled into the now. On late nights, I think you may love me more than I love you. I don’t embroider anymore. My guitar lays on my bedroom floor. At least the walls aren’t bare. Samantha texts me that once quarantine is over, we should go on a picnic. Last month it was a hike. The month before that, it was to the river. My hair has grown out. Experts say, “…certain precautions like masks might be our future until at least 2022.” (Joseph), and I hope experts are often wrong. For now, I stare at my reflection, back into eyes that have burned dry from online school and zoom classes.

I think I’ll miss you when you’re gone though, I almost already do. I’ll be forever lamenting lost time, as if only I had loved you harder, I could have spent it better. Yet, I fear my fondness has run dry, darling. “Reports: Georgia official who said spa shooting suspect had a ‘bad day’ appeared to promote racist COVID-19 shirt” (Delony). Sometimes I hate you. “In 2019, there were 49 documented cases of hate crimes with anti-Asian bias in those 16 cities, while in 2020 there were 122 such cases.” (Puckett). Sometimes you scare me. It seems you may never truly leave. You’ll linger as hatred, clinging like tar and bad memories, and I know I will be careful of others long after you are gone.

I miss Samantha. I think she’ll be surprised at how long my hairs gotten.

With Distance,

The Timekeeper

http://www.flaghouse.org/scholarship-legacy/scholar-award/kaylee-kim-2021-flag-house-scholar

Happy Flag Day and congratulations to our 2021 Flag House Scholar, Kaylee Kim! Due to the cancellation of the Flag Day Celebration during the COVID-19 pandemic, Kaylee fulfilled her obligation to read her essay in the recording below. Please join us in congratulating Kaylee! The Flag House Scholar Award and Essay Contest Scholarship is generously sponsored by the Society of the War of 1812 in the State of Maryland and Maryland State Society United States Daughters of 1812.

A bit about our winner:

Kaylee Kim is a senior at Mt. Hebron High School. She is a member of the National Honor Society, Mu Alpha Theta, Tri- M, and Spanish Honor Society. She is also secretary of the National English Honor Society, and webmaster for the National Computer Science Honor Society and the Key Club. She participates in many clubs and activities, including Varsity Track and Field and Marching Unit. Kaylee enjoys giving back to her community, volunteering as a teacher aide, as a religious education aide and member of the Contemporary Ensemble for her church, and with programs like WEngineer, Codeucate, and TeCanal, that work to provide students STEM education. In her free time, Kaylee enjoys art and animation, music, and coding. She will be attending the University of Maryland in the fall, planning on majoring in Computer Science.

2021 Question:

“Living Through a Historic Moment”
Private letters, diaries, and personal artifacts are used by historians to learn about individuals’ experiences during a historically significant event. Have you been journaling, curating a collection of masks that match your aesthetic, creating online content, or otherwise documenting your life during the COVID-19 pandemic? Create your own primary source written artifact, like a journal entry, letter, or blog post detailing your experience of the pandemic. Include cited facts from news clips, newspapers, or scientific articles that could be used as a primary source for future historians. If you would like to include these as supplements to your essay, please upload them as a PDF file in the appropriate field below. We have provided an example of a primary source in the Flag House’s museum collection and resources for analyzing primary documents that you can access while crafting your response.

Kaylee’s Essay :

To my Quarantine,

My first mistake was wanting you. You were there to help me catch up on schoolwork, do you remember? A nice two-week break, where I could study for upcoming finals. But with barely a taste of freedom, how could that have been enough? So, you stretched yourself into the summer, math tests all but forgotten. I did new things instead. Embroidery, guitar playing, finally reading those untouched books. I decorated my room. I loved you.

But the break extended again and bled into the now. On late nights, I think you may love me more than I love you. I don’t embroider anymore. My guitar lays on my bedroom floor. At least the walls aren’t bare. Samantha texts me that once quarantine is over, we should go on a picnic. Last month it was a hike. The month before that, it was to the river. My hair has grown out. Experts say, “…certain precautions like masks might be our future until at least 2022.” (Joseph), and I hope experts are often wrong. For now, I stare at my reflection, back into eyes that have burned dry from online school and zoom classes.

I think I’ll miss you when you’re gone though, I almost already do. I’ll be forever lamenting lost time, as if only I had loved you harder, I could have spent it better. Yet, I fear my fondness has run dry, darling. “Reports: Georgia official who said spa shooting suspect had a ‘bad day’ appeared to promote racist COVID-19 shirt” (Delony). Sometimes I hate you. “In 2019, there were 49 documented cases of hate crimes with anti-Asian bias in those 16 cities, while in 2020 there were 122 such cases.” (Puckett). Sometimes you scare me. It seems you may never truly leave. You’ll linger as hatred, clinging like tar and bad memories, and I know I will be careful of others long after you are gone.

I miss Samantha. I think she’ll be surprised at how long my hairs gotten.

With Distance,

The Timekeeper

http://www.flaghouse.org/scholarship-legacy/scholar-award/kaylee-kim-2021-flag-house-scholar

06/14/2021

In honor of #FlagDay, we wanted to post some interesting facts about the 15-star, 15-stripe Star-Spangled Banner flag that inspired the U.S. national anthem!

#DidYouKnow?

*The 30' x 42' Star-Spangled Banner was made to be the garrison flag for Fort McHenry during the #Warof1812. It was created in Baltimore, MD in 1813 by Mary Pickersgill and her household of women, which included an African American indentured servant named Grace Wisher. A second smaller storm flag (17'x 25') was also made by the team of women.

* The flag was made out of English wool bunting.

* Each stripe and each star are 2' wide.

* The stars on the flag are "spangled," meaning the stars are tilted on the blue canton.

Check out this article to learn more about the the Star-Spangled Banner flag--https://s.si.edu/2RR0AVK --or visit The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House, Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine, and National Museum of American History.

[image: a 15-star, 15 stripe American flag waves in the air; photo by Sarah Rogers]

Address

844 E. Pratt St.
Baltimore, MD
21202

2 blocks from the Charm City Circulator

General information

The Star-Spangled Banner Flag House is a historic home and museum located at 844 E. Pratt St. in Baltimore Maryland. This 225 year old structure is restored to its 1813 glory. Tour the Flag House, visit the museum and spend a day with Mrs. Pickersgill and her family.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10am - 4pm
Wednesday 10am - 4pm
Thursday 10am - 4pm
Friday 10am - 4pm
Saturday 10am - 4pm

Telephone

(410) 837-1793

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Our Story

Opened to the public in 1928, the historic Star-Spangled Banner Flag House and Museum preserves the 1793 structure and interprets the life of Mary Young Pickersgill a nineteenth-century female entrepreneur and craftswoman of the Star-Spangled Banner Flag that inspired the National Anthem. In 1927, the historic structure was purchased by Baltimore City with the intent to preserve the house for future generations as the birthplace of the Star-Spangled Banner flag and in 1970 it was named a National Historic Landmark. Today, the historic house and museum are open Tuesday through Saturday for public tours. Visit our website (www.flaghouse.org) or Facebook calendar for more information on upcoming programs and events.