Augusta Historical Society and Museum

Augusta Historical Society and Museum We cannot improve our tomorrows without first understanding our yesterdays.
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Peter Settergren was born on February 25, 1830 in Sweden.  Peter was one of 7 children born to Gustaf and Kristena Gusta...
04/19/2021

Peter Settergren was born on February 25, 1830 in Sweden. Peter was one of 7 children born to Gustaf and Kristena Gustafson. (It is not unusual that children had different last names. The name chosen was oftentimes based on employment of the father.) At the age of 25, Peter married Anna Mary Settergren in 1855. Peter and Anna had 7 children, 4 of whom were born in Sweden. They arrived in America in 1866 when Peter was 36.

The family history in America started in the spring of 1868 when Peter and Anna and their 4 children landed in New York. They settled first at Rockford, Illinois where they remained for one year. They moved next to Topeka, Kansas in 1869, then left there to go to Emporia in 1870. From Emporia, Peter walked to Augusta where he gave a man the only $5 he had to stake a claim 6 miles to the northwest of Augusta. The abstract was signed by President Ulysses S. Grant in 1871.

Peter worked 6 miles northwest of ElDorado building a small rock school house. Each Saturday, he walked to his claim to sleep and then walked back to his job on Sunday. In order to hold the claim, he was required to spend part of the time on it. Peter built a 12x12 foot house cutting logs and boring holes in them. The logs were then placed in an upright position. He made hay ropes and wove them into the holes in the logs. Then he built a loft. It was plastered inside and outside, first with clay and then with plaster. Anna and the children came from Emporia in the fall of 1871. Other farm buildings were built later. Through the years there were fires in the barn and the home, with structures built to replace them.

Peter and Anna went on to have 3 more children and continued to farm their land until his death in 1909 and her death in 1918. Both are buried in Elmwood Cemetery.

Photos: Peter Settergren; 1885 Towanda Township Map showing Settergren’s 160 acres; and, the Settergren’s headstone from Elmwood Cemetery.

04/13/2021

Charles Hazlehurst was born in Oneida County, New York on April 23, 1838 to James and Eunice Hazlehurst. He was educated and reared in New York. For a number of years, he was a resident of Illinois, and enlisted in 1861 in the 36th Illinois Volunteer Infantry, serving until the end of the Civil War. He was at the battles of Pea Ridge, Corinth, Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Mission Ridge, Resaca, Dallas and other noted engagements.

Charles came to Kansas in 1870, locating in Blanton Township and afterwards in Towanda Township. He eventually relocated to Sections 15 and 22 of Augusta Township. He married Miss Katie McIntosh in Louisville, Kentucky. There is only a single record of a child, James, age 13, living with Charles and Katie in 1870 in Illinois. No further information of James could be found.

By the age of 62 in 1900, Charles was widowed and was listed as a boarder at the Palace Hotel when Andy and Mary Ryan owned the Hotel.

Katie died on November 13, 1888 and is buried in Kuster Cemetery east of Augusta. Charles died at the age of 64 in December 1903 in Augusta. We have no information about where he is buried, but it is assumed he is also buried in Kuster Cemetery alongside his wife, Katie.

We have no photos for the Hazelhurst family.

Looking for something fun to do Friday or Saturday evening? Come down to the museum for our Paranormal Event. We have sp...
04/09/2021

Looking for something fun to do Friday or Saturday evening? Come down to the museum for our Paranormal Event. We have spots available and you can join in the fun.

Looking for something fun to do Friday or Saturday evening? Come down to the museum for our Paranormal Event. We have spots available and you can join in the fun.

1975 students of Miss Jeanette McDaniel, Augusta High School (AHS) Methods of Research English class were given the assi...
04/05/2021

1975 students of Miss Jeanette McDaniel, Augusta High School (AHS) Methods of Research English class were given the assignment to collect information relevant to the history of Augusta. Material was secured from newspaper articles, interviews, public records and other limited printed material. Students were to collect information and then put it into chronological order. Over the next few weeks, we’ll share some of these research papers (minimal editing will be done).

Following is the research paper written by Marsha Dryden on Clare Patterson:

The purpose of this paper is to present the life history of Clare Patterson. Clare Patterson was born in Augusta, Kansas, on a small farm one mile south of Santa Fe Lake on December 18, 1914. Albert Mansfield Patterson, his father, was born in De Busch, Iowa, in 1866. Clare’s mother, Lillie Martha Harris Patterson was born in Little Blue, Missouri, in 1881.

Clare was the 7th son in a family of 13. He stated, “Times were rough when I was growing up. My father worked like a dog just to make ends meet. We never had anything extra, just the basic necessities. But, one thing we had was love, just by being in the same room with my ma and pa you could just feel the love they had for us. Like I said my childhood was rough but with all that love we shared, it wasn’t bad.” Mr. Patterson had 6 brothers and 4 sisters. One sister started him out in the boxing direction. Clare began fighting at the age of 6 on the farm and all of the rest of his brothers and sisters sparred also. His sister, Eleanor, the one mentioned above, outweighed him by 60 pounds and was strong, muscular, and built like a man. She whipped the socks off of Clare in the ring continuously until he reached the age of 12. After that he got the best of those matches.

Mr. Patterson attended the Augusta Junior and Senior High Schools. His boxing career started when he was 15. Clare was dismayed about his first match. “Shoot, it was my first fight in the ring and I’m matched up against a 27 year old professional, but I don’t plan on letting him get the best of me. Not while I’m alive and kicking anyway.” He really had nothing to worry about because from the very first round it was Clare’s all the way. Clare proved himself by knocking his opponent out in the 2nd round. This beginning moment in his life took place at Dennett’s Corner on 54 highway west of Augusta.

He was an outstanding athlete all the way through his schooling. Some of his highlights in junior high were lettering in basketball, in which he played the center. Clare also lettered in track and played tackle in football. His father, Albert, however discouraged his being active in football because of the injury it could cause him in his fighting career.

He participated in high school basketball acting as the post for the team and lettered all 3 years. During his senior year he ran the quarter mile on the mile relay, and that team held the school record for 17 years. His split on the relay was 50 seconds flat, which is considered excellent even today. All through these activities in junior high and senior high he continued to box, winning the welterweight championship as a freshman. Also, during the first week in high school he knocked out the Kansas Middleweight Champion at Hutchinson. The same week, he whipped the Oklahoma Lightweight Champion at Blackwell. Clare then took off and found himself in Manhattan, Kansas faced up against the Kansas Heavyweight Champion. He won that easily by knocking out his opponent.

In 1934, he fought a tough, bloody battle at Worl football field, located at the junior high. All the money he raised went to the football team for equipment. Clare Patterson graduated from the high school in 1935 still winning title after title. He held the Missouri Valley Middleweight title his graduating year. On his 4th big fight, he fought a National champ and after the fight, the blood-drenched man told Faye, Clare’s oldest brother, that Clare had given him the worst beating he had ever received in the ring. Clare credited his schooling and teachers as helping him throughout school. He particularly mentioned Mr. Hayes, whom he admired ‘to no end’.

Clare married Jessie Beatrice Malcom on November 20, 1936. Three sons were born in the following 5 years and the boys were raised on a 160-acre farm 4 miles east and 2 miles south of Augusta. Clare resumed fighting in 1941. He was never knocked out in his ring career, but he admits being knocked down once in the 2nd round of 2 different fights against the same man. Many people nicknamed Clare ‘Shoulderblade’ for no apparent reason. Clare came back the following year to fight and in the same tournament he acquired the Missouri Valley District Championship and the Oklahoma Middleweight Champion.

In 1942 Clare retired from the ring. He maintained a position as a Kansas Boxing Judge and judged Golden Gloves and Professional Boxing in Kansas. When asked what he got out of his boxing career, Clare replied, “I guess the most important thing was pride. When you’re an athlete and you know you’re a good one, you can hold your head high. You’ve really got something to be proud of. I’ve enjoyed my life and I’ve got a lot to show for it. Another thing I’m real proud of is my family. I think I’ve got the best in the world and you can believe that’s the thing I’m living for. I love them all.” Clare said he thought he had the finest sons and wives anyone could ever have, with his grandchildren being the best in the world.

Clare and Jessie resided on the same farm east of Augusta. Besides farming and working at Lear Jet, he maintained a dairy business, selling milk and cream beginning in 1936. Clare passed away on October 5, 1999 and is buried in Elmwood Cemetery. Jessie died November 7, 2004 and is buried alongside her husband.

Photos: Drawing from May 2001 Augusta Gazette article; Patterson headstone

We have a few openings left...come join in the fun!  Call us this week to reserve your spot!
04/04/2021

We have a few openings left...come join in the fun! Call us this week to reserve your spot!

We have a few openings left...come join in the fun! Call us this week to reserve your spot!

1973-79 students of Miss Jeanette McDaniel, Augusta High School (AHS) Methods of Research English class were given the a...
03/29/2021

1973-79 students of Miss Jeanette McDaniel, Augusta High School (AHS) Methods of Research English class were given the assignment to collect information relevant to the history of Augusta. Material was secured from newspaper articles, interviews, public records and other limited printed material. Students were to collect information and then put it into chronological order. Over the next few weeks, we’ll share some of these research papers (minimal editing will be done).

Following are excerpts from the research paper written by Deb Hizey on the early newspapers of Augusta:

Augusta Newspapers

The first newspaper printed in Augusta was “The Augusta Crescent”. It was established in September of 1870, by A. A. Putnam and L. J. Perry. The subscription price was set at $2 a year, because the paper on which the newspaper was printed cost the editors, in 1870, approximately .07 a pound.

“The Augusta Crescent” was bought from A. A. Putnam and L. J. Perry by J. B. Davis. Mr. Davis then proceeded in changing the name to “The Republican”. J. B. Davis was succeeded as editor by W. A. Albin. In 1874, Mr. Albin discontinued publication. He based his decision on the following statements: “Patronage we have received will not justify us in risking a continuance. Since self-preservation is the first law of nature, we will endeavor to locate where we can do best.” This, however, did not end the publications of newspapers in Augusta. On July 4, 1874, C. H. and J. A. Kurtz issued a newspaper entitled the “Southern Kansas Gazette” to take its place. This partnership continued until 1879. After that date, C. H. Kurtz became the sole owner of the “Southern Kansas Gazette”.

C. H. Kurtz was a strong Republican. The press of his newspaper and much of the type of historic interests had been owned by John Brown of Osawatomie, Kansas. The information for the paper came down from Osawatomie to Paola, then to Florence, and next to Augusta. W. A. Albin did not like this type of paper, so in 1879 he repented and returned to establish the newspaper “The Republican” again. The newspaper had a circulation of 675 papers (papers printed). It was not determined by subscribers as is determined today. Mr. Albin printed “The Republican” in the basement of George Brown’s bank building, which was located in the Opera Block, where the Augusta Post Office is located now.

“The Republican” was next owned and edited by Will Cady, and became known as the “Augusta Journal” in 1892. It was published in a building which was located on the southwest corner of 6th and State Streets. Mr. Cady had 2-3 employees and the newspaper consisted of local and farm news. Mr. Cady was one of Augusta’s pioneer school teacher. He was the superintendent of the Lincoln School which was located where the current Middle School is located. Mr. Cady lived on Broadway until 1940 when he died as a result of a home fire.
The “Augusta Gazette” was the next newspaper to come into existence. It was published by Timothy Sexton and O. J. Bradfield. The next editor to take over was Bern Hagler. Chester and Bertha Shore, brother and sister, purchased the newspaper in 1945. Chester joined the military during WWII and Bertha continued to work for the newspaper until 1963.

In 1963 Daniel Zerbe purchased “The Augusta Gazette” and on February 1, 1974 it celebrated its 81st birthday. At that time, the newspaper employed 17 people.

Photos: 3 pages from the July 27, 1900 Augusta Journal

Just a few more days!!!!
03/25/2021

Just a few more days!!!!

James E. Williams was born on February 17, 1835 in Duncan Falls, Ohio to John and Mary Williams.  As a youngster his fam...
03/23/2021

James E. Williams was born on February 17, 1835 in Duncan Falls, Ohio to John and Mary Williams. As a youngster his family moved to Boone River, Iowa and then in 1857 located in Harrison County, Missouri, where he married Miss Amanda Crisup in 1858. James and Amanda had 6 children, John, James, Julie, Jessie, Lydia and Bertha.

In 1864 they moved west to Kansas locating in Chase County but returned to Missouri in the spring of 1865, staying only a short time and returning to Chase County. In 1867 James, Amanda and the children moved to Augusta where he was licensed to preach in the Baptist Church of Augusta in 1869. The Baptist Church at that time was meeting in the James Cabin. James was ordained in June of 1876 with the Baptist congregation constructing their first church home in 1877 on 7th Street. Rev. Williams was involved in many congregations throughout southeastern Kansas for the next 40 years. He had the honor of preaching the first discourse ever delivered in Sumner County on the first Lord’s day in May 1870. From 1880 onward, the Federal Census listed his work as farmer.

James and Amanda lived 3 miles east of Augusta. James died on October 18, 1913 and is buried in Kuster Cemetery east of Augusta. Amanda died in1919 and is also buried in Kuster Cemetery.

Photos: James; Amanda; 1885 Augusta Township Map showing Williams property; Elder James with corn stalk from his farm; son, John; Williams headstone from Kuster Cemetery.

Timothy Sexton was born on February 6, 1854 in Royalton, Vermont to James and Anne Sexton.  In 1875 at the age of 21 he ...
03/15/2021

Timothy Sexton was born on February 6, 1854 in Royalton, Vermont to James and Anne Sexton. In 1875 at the age of 21 he came to Augusta, shortly after marrying Aura G. Stephens. They had three children, Mabel born in 1875, Adele born in 1884 and Louie born in 1886. While in Vermont Timothy was a coal dealer.

Timothy is mentioned several times In Burl Allison’s History of Augusta. The first story relates to the winter of 1882-3, where Timothy and Henry Moyle had a contract to sell 30 carloads of ice to the St. Louis and San Francisco Railway. The ice was to be shipped to Springfield, Missouri. The Gazette commented, ‘They are getting out 4 carloads a day, and of fine quality-8 inches thick and as clear as crystal. They expect to complete their contract this week.’ The next mention is that on July 15, 1892, Timothy is found to be the editor of the Gazette. On June 7, 1894 Timothy was appointed Postmaster of Augusta. Then on December 9, 1898, ordinance #143 was passed giving Timothy Sexton the franchise for a telephone company. He was authorized ‘to construct and maintain a telephone system, line and exchange in Augusta, Kansas.’ The cost to residences was not to be more than $15 per year. Timothy’s central office was upstairs over 513 State Street. In addition, he agreed to rent the front room of his home as a meeting place for the council for $2 per month.

The Federal Census of 1900 listed Mabel at age 24, Ada 15 and Louie 13, were living at home with Timothy and Aura. Ten years later, only Mabel was living with her parents.

Timothy passed away on January 9, 1918. Aura died in 1926. Both are buried in Elmwood Cemetery.

Photo: Cemetery Headstone

Make your reservation now!
03/12/2021

Make your reservation now!

Edwin Hill was born on March 24, 1830 in St. James Parish, Bristol, Avon, England to Isaac and Eliza (Clement) Hill.  Ed...
03/08/2021

Edwin Hill was born on March 24, 1830 in St. James Parish, Bristol, Avon, England to Isaac and Eliza (Clement) Hill. Edwin’s father passed away in 1851. On October 1, 1854, at the age of 24, he married Miss Theodosia Champ. Theodosia was 21. One year later, Edwin, Theodosia, and Edwin’s brother, William, immigrated to America, settling in Kenosha, Wisconsin. He took up the trade of tailor. His brother, Charles, immigrated to New Zealand. Their mother, immigrated to the U.S. shortly after the two brothers, in 1857.

At the age of 30, Edwin enlisted in the First Wisconsin Infantry Union Army. He was commissioned Lieutenant in 44th Wisconsin Infantry and served in that capacity until the close of the War. He and Theodosia continued to reside in Wisconsin until 1879 when they came to Kansas, settling in Butler County about 3 miles north of Augusta. Edwin and Theodosia were among the first in this locality. Edwin became one of the most extensive stockmen in the county, operating a mill on his farm principally for his own use in grinding feed. Edwin was a member of the Masonic Order and the Grand Army of the Republic, where Edwin always carried the Bible at burial ceremonies. They were both active in the Baptist Church. Theodosia was remembered as a red curly haired lady weighing less than 100 pounds.

Edwin and Theodosia had 5 children, Edwin H. (Ted), Willie, Florence, Charlie, and a son, Oscar, who died at the age of 9 from a fall into a well. Edwin retired from farming and he and Theodosia moved into Augusta to 135 Broadway. Edwin took up his old trade of tailor, and Ted took over the running of the farm. Ted married Ina Lydia Sisco, daughter of Rueben Sisco, of Sisco Brothers Dry Goods and Millinery Store, which operated in Augusta for a number of years.

Edwin lived until May 31, 1912 and at the age of 82, he passed away from a bad cold he caught while attending one of the GAR burial ceremonies. Theodosia moved to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma to live with her daughter, Florence. She died at the age of 90 on July 26, 1923, while living in Oklahoma City. Both are buried in Elmwood Cemetery.

Photos: Edwin Hill (Civil War picture); elderly Edwin Hill; Theodosia Hill; daughter, Florence; 1885 and 1905 Augusta Township Maps; Hill family headstone, and Edwin Hill’s stone.

Address

303 State St
Augusta, KS
67010

General information

We always offer FREE admission to those visiting our museum. Come learn about the history of Augusta, while standing in the very first building built in Augusta, Kansas. We are open Monday - Friday from 11a - 3pm. We are open Saturdays from 1p - 4p from April - October. If you are unable to visit during our regular hours, please contact us to schedule a time to visit!

Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 15:00
Tuesday 11:00 - 15:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 15:00
Thursday 11:00 - 15:00
Friday 11:00 - 15:00
Saturday 13:00 - 16:00
Sunday 13:00 - 16:00

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(316) 775-5655

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Comments

Hello, I have come across some 1913 photos of the R. J. Freeman Feed Mill & Store that existed in Augusta, Kansas in the early 1900's. I also have a photo of the General Store that existed during that time. Does anyone have any info on the Feed Mill or the General Store. Thank you.
And another Augusta blog post:
I'm so pleased to have found this page. I write a family history blog, and have several posts relating to Augusta that might be of interest to your followers. Here's the most recent:
My great grandfather, Richard W. Stephenson (1874-1960), started the Stephenson's Men's Store on State Street in about 1909. The store continued under the ownership of my great uncle and aunt, Paul (1902-1972) and Do Stephenson, probably until about the late 1960s. Does the Historical Society have any photographs of the business or information on my family? Thanks!
Keep the interesting stories coming.
BOSTON LINCOLNSHIRE "GRANDFATHER OF BOSTON MASS USA ", ENGLAND UK MUSEUM WALKING TOUR
Hi every one , my name is Ray Freeman ,I live in England ,and together with my cousin Geoff ,we are looking into our family history ,We know that our great uncle had a business in town ,his name was Joshua Duncan Robson , we know that he has a grand daughter still living in the area ,and we are in contact with her , but what I was wondering is ,are there any old photographs of him or his store ,which was we think ,a Racket store situated at 432 State street , any help would be appreciated Thanks Ray