Atchison County Historical Society

Atchison County Historical Society The Atchison County Historical Society is dedicated to preserving, promoting, recording and sharing the history of Atchison County, Kansas since 1967.

04/03/2019
Creek Stewart

We hope to incorporate even more outdoor skills into our programs as the weather warms up, and educate in the area of survival skills heavier in the future...Wouldn't it be great to have a pro like Creek Stewart visit?!

Oh man - this is going to be so much fun!

Could you or someone you know benefit from a surprise visit from ME and my BOW DRILL KIT?

I've taught 1000s of people from all over the world how to start a fire with the Bow Drill, but never like this.

If I show up on your front door with my Bow Drill, ANYTHING can happen!

Tag someone who might like this and SHARE!

I'm hitting the open road in JUNE!

Now looking for interested drillers. Click the link below for more information:

http://www.creekstewart.com/bowdrillin

Atchison County's Museum is open for President's Day today - regular winter hours 9 am to 5 pm. If you want to stop in t...
02/18/2019

Atchison County's Museum is open for President's Day today - regular winter hours 9 am to 5 pm. If you want to stop in to visit the David Rice Atchison World's Smallest unofficial Presidential Library.

With heavy snow predicted Tuesday and/or Wednesday will likely be closed early or opening later - and as always stay safe traveling when the streets are slick and snow covered.

Science news... #STEM Education Earth and Space
01/20/2019

Science news... #STEM Education Earth and Space

It's been a big week for small objects in the solar system. A billion miles past Pluto, NASA's New Horizons explored a small Kuiper Belt object for the first time, while closer to Earth, NASA's OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sample Return Mission entered orbit around an asteroid. See details at http://solarsystem.nasa.gov

MERRY CHRISTMAS!Here are an array of images across the years and some current of Christmas in the Museum - more details ...
12/26/2018

MERRY CHRISTMAS!
Here are an array of images across the years and some current of Christmas in the Museum - more details with each picture. Atchison County's Museum will be open Dec. 26-30th with the Bob Staley exhibit & new Walter Yost paintings - free coffee & cookies Thur-Fri-Sat.

12/25/2018
1963 Chrysler Turbine: Ultimate Edition - Jay Leno's Garage

What were men wishing for Santa to bring them in the early 1960s?
a 1963 Chrysler Turbine!
Want to know more about this revolutionary car - that alas was never put into production - Ultimate Car Guy Jay Leno tells the history of it here... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b2A5ijU3Ivs

1963 Chrysler Turbine: Ultimate Edition. It's the amazing car Jay's lusted after since he was 14 years old, and today's episode is packed with all kinds of a...

Merry Christmas from the Atchison County Historical Society! Images from our Cold War era Christmas Tree & Ornament Time...
12/25/2018

Merry Christmas from the Atchison County Historical Society!
Images from our Cold War era Christmas Tree & Ornament Time Capsule in the Museum - will share more Christmas info and photos later - Hope everyone is having a great Christmas.

Santa's still at work!
12/25/2018

Santa's still at work!

Santa last spotted in upstate New York - NORAD is tracking his progress around the world - to see he safely makes his ro...
12/25/2018
Official NORAD Santa Tracker

Santa last spotted in upstate New York - NORAD is tracking his progress around the world - to see he safely makes his rounds again this Christmas!
Follow his progress here
https://www.noradsanta.org/

Follow Santa Claus as he makes his magical journey around the world!

Black woman who helped create the GPS finally gets some recognition | AFROPUNK
12/17/2018
Black woman who helped create the GPS finally gets some recognition | AFROPUNK

Black woman who helped create the GPS finally gets some recognition | AFROPUNK

Inspired by the re-telling of her sorority sister’s engineering success in the now classic film “Hidden Figures”, a Virginia woman named Gladys West is coming forward with her hidden history and involvement in created a technology most of us use everyday—GPS. As it turns out, like her sorori...

READ ALL ABOUT-WWI Hero Oscar May in our current Newsletter - renew or sign up for Membership in Your Historical Society...
12/13/2018

READ ALL ABOUT-WWI Hero Oscar May in our current Newsletter - renew or sign up for Membership in Your Historical Society - download the Online Version of the Newsletter (you can print it out and mail your membership) or signup and pay online. LINKS BELOW

get the newsletter (pdf format)
http://atchisonhistory.org/assets-homepage/2018 November ACHS Newsletter Membership4Web.pdf

join online
http://atchisonhistory.org/donate.html

If you are watching the 2018 ARMY-NAVY GAME - the Army Uniform is a tribute to the WORLD WAR I First Infantry Division -...
12/08/2018

If you are watching the 2018 ARMY-NAVY GAME - the Army Uniform is a tribute to the WORLD WAR I First Infantry Division - better known as THE BIG RED 1
When the US entered the War, President Woodrow Wilson promised the Allies he would send "a division" to France immediately, but the Army had no such divisions.
The United States quickly ordered four infantry and three artillery regiments from the Mexican border in Texas to Hoboken, N.J., to board transports to France. That group of seven regiments joined together to officially form the "1st Expeditionary Division," later the 1st Infantry Division, under Brigadier General William L. Sibert on June 12, 1917. With more than 28,000 men, the "Big Red One," as the division was later nicknamed from its shoulder sleeve insignia, was twice the size of either the allied or German divisions on the Western Front.
Here is a link to a video promoting the Annual Army Navy Game and the Army Team's uniform tribute.
http://www.military.com/video/off-duty/sports/2018-army-navy-game-uniform-first-infantry-division/5976479661001

Back before the Snow and Blizzard we hosted an opening of a project completed by Trent Lee, a member of Boy Scout Troop ...
11/28/2018

Back before the Snow and Blizzard we hosted an opening of a project completed by Trent Lee, a member of Boy Scout Troop 478 in the Pony Express Council His Eagle Scout project has created an Outdoor Education Station at the Independence Creek: Lewis & Clark Historic Site. The space will give the Historical Society a better educational setting to interpret the Natural History of the area that was originally part of the Tall Grass Prairie that covered the Lands of the Kanza Indians - what became today’s State of Kansas. It was a cold day but a number of people showed including representatives of the DAR - and all expressed their thanks to Trent Lee and his family and volunteer crew for leading this project. Unfortunately the same day was a Scouting day that Trent was attending - so he could not be there in person - but we will host another opening in the spring with an educational program (when the weather is warmer by plan).
The Outdoor Education Station is nestled in the midst of the Big Blue-Stem grasses and the Wild Prairie Flowers, shaded by an ancient Cottonwood Tree where the visitor can see the world as the Kanza lived in it and as Captain William Clark described it on July 4, 1804....
We Camped in the plain, one of the most butifull Plains, I ever Saw, open & butifully diversified with hills
& vallies all presenting themselves to the river covered with grass and a few scattering trees a handsom
Creek meandering thro at this place the Kansaw Inds.... The Plains of this countrey are covered with a
Leek Green Grass—interspersed with Cops [copses] of trees, Spreding their lofty branchs over Pools
Springs or Brooks of fine water. Groops of Shrubs covered with the most delicious froot is to be seen in
every direction, and nature appears to have exerted herself to butify the Senery by the variety of flours
raiseing Delicately and highly flavered raised above the Grass, which Strikes & profumes the Sensation,
and amuses the mind throws it into Conjecterng the cause of So magnificent a Senerey... in a Country
thus Situated far removed from the Sivilised world... Cpt. William Clark - July 4, 1804
For those of you who could not attend on National Take-A-Hike-Day Nov. 17th here are some pictures and we invite you to come out in the spring - or if you have a group, classroom or other and would like to schedule a program - get in touch and we will find a program that will fill your needs.

What would you do if your heritage: family, community, country or religion was in danger of being destroyed and lost for...
11/26/2018
Meet the people racing to save war-torn Syria’s history

What would you do if your heritage: family, community, country or religion was in danger of being destroyed and lost forever? Here is an interesting story/video from Sunday Morning's Today Show looking at the people who are trying to save the treasures of history in their war-torn country, Syria. Putting their Lives on the Line to Save Syrian and World Heritage.

Syria is considered one of the most violent and dangerous countries in the world amid ongoing conflicts in the region. In this week’s Sunday Spotlight, NBC’s Kelly Cobiella meets some of the brave crusaders who are trying to save the antiquities and ancient artifacts that carry country’s histo...

100 Years Ago the World War had Ended - and Celebrations broke out all across the Nation and all across Atchison County ...
11/25/2018

100 Years Ago the World War had Ended - and Celebrations broke out all across the Nation and all across Atchison County - And Good and Bad News continued to arrive from "Over There..." and the Flu Still Took Its Toll...Thanksgiving had not arrived yet...Here is News from local newspapers in the aftermath of The Great War

EVERYBODY CELEBRATED
Parade at 11 o’Clock Was Wonderful
SPONTANEOUS FESTIVITIES
Chaos Suddenly Turned to Order When Mammoth Parade Started At 11 o’Clock
A sudden relaxation of tension over the greatest war in history resulted in the greatest spontaneous demonstration Atchison has ever witnessed today.
Festivities began at 4 o’clock this morning, and the first news of the signing of the armistice was received through the Associated Press.
Whistles were blown, some of them were tied down, and a sleeping town suddenly came to life. From that relaxation, which came to a head in the wonderful parade at 11 o’clock this morning, to which there seemed to be no end.
The parade formed at Third and Commercial Streets, that is, the Atchison band did. The Atchison Band led the parade and did some fine marching and playing, full f the spirit of the occasion. The band also was on the job early this morning, marching from the Court House to the Union Depot with what was probably Atchison’s last draft contingent.
Following the band came the Midland College Students Army Training Corps, a marvelous military organization whipped int snappy shape in a few weeks by Lieutenant Stonewall Jackson Smith. They marched as one man, their guns on their shoulders and rigid attention.
Then came the Atchison National Guard, the State Guard and the Colored State Guard companies, marching remarkable well considering the small amount of training they have had with only weekly and semi-weekly drills.
The fire department’s motor equipment made an excellent showing, decorated with flags, which blended beautifully with the bright red paint of the equipment.
St. Benedict’s College also figured in the parade. The St. Benedict’s section was led by the college band, followed by the big flag carried horizontally by a score of the larger St. Benedict’s students. The student body followed in mighty fine order.
The Red Cross and the United War Drive Campaign units also were extremely attractive.
In addition to the Students Army Training Corps, Midland College was represented in the parade by the student body and faculty, marching.
There was not end to the parade. The head of the procession marched from Third To Thirteenth on Commercial and doubled back; when they had reached Third again, not all the process, headed in the opposite direction had passed. The motor section of the parade alone was several miles long, an the other part extended close to a mile. All kinds of make-ups and hundreds of novel patriotic stunts figured in the parade, too numerous to mention. Industrial employees marched in names of the concerns for which they worked.
Before 11 o’clock chaos and bedlam raged on Commercial Streets; with the formation of the parade came order. The big parade was a wonderful and fitting climax to a celebration of the short-order variety the equal of which Atchison has never seen.

CITY ITEMS – the Boys in France, the Homefront, the Flu and more
That new Service Flag at Sixth and Commercial is a pipple.

Members of the family of L. Kaufman, 404 North Ninth Street, who have the flu, are convalescing.

It is said Mrs. True Snowden and her daughter, Helen Katherine, have influenza in San Francisco, where they went to spend six weeks.

Joe Conner, of Sugar Lake, explains the results of the election by the assertion all the Democrats are over there fighting Huns.

The Globe has received the following postcard from Lieutenant Louis Linley: “Am well. Not dead yet but have been in hospital, but o.k. now. Regards to Globe bunch.

Mr. and Mrs. C.E. Lentz are happier today than they have ever been in their lives. They were in Fort Funston yesterday to visit their son Dowell Lentz, who is already to sail to France, and when they returned to Atchison this morning they found the was was ended. Dowell’s battery of artillery was scheduled to leave Fort Funston Wednesday but the order was held up and Mr. Lentz does not believe it will be sent abroad now that the armistice has been signed.

Confirmation has been received from France of the elevation of Lieutenant Courtney Turner to a captaincy.

Judge and Mrs. W.A. Jackson left this afternoon for Lawrence, in response to a telegram saying their son, Edward, who is in the Kansas University, is leaving there tonight for Camp Grant, Rockford, Ill. About 30 K.U. men are going to Camp Grant, presumably having been chosen to enter an officers’ training camp.

R.H. Nissley, formerly of Atchison who went to Omaha from here some time ago, is now in the army and is stationed at Camp Fremont, California.

The first women to arrive at The Globe office around 4 o’clock this morning were wives and sweethearts of boys over there.

A son was born at 2:40 o’clock this morning to Lieut. and Mrs. James F. Strain at the home of Lieut. Strain’s mother, Mrs. Mary Strain, 721 Parallel Street. The baby’s father is in France, and in a letter received from him yesterday (Nov. 12), and dated Oct. 9 (1918), it stated he had been far away from places where it was possible to mail letters, had been sleeping on the ground, and enduring other hardships, which caused his Atchison relatives to believe he had just returned from the front. The baby has a great grandmother, Mrs. Jennie McKelvy, who lives with her daughter, Mrs. Strain. His mother was is Vena Young, of Houston, Teas, before her marriage to Lieut. Strain.

CELEBRATION NOTES
W.C. Linville, councilman, was one of the first to celebrate the arrival of peace this morning. In a galvanized iron tub, his arms and feet in the air, he rode up and down Commercial Street behind an automobile driven at a snappy rate of speed. Sparks flew from the pavement as the tub and its human cargo skimmed over the brick, and friction finally made the bottom of the tub so hat the alderman had to abandon it.

Dr. H.B. Logan: “A mule attached to a city wagon was the only thing on Commercial Street that looked sad during the parade. But a mule is always excusable.”

WENT WILD AT EFFINGHAM
Effingham went wild over the “peace” news. The Kaiser was burned in effigy in the streets, every bell was run. Boys climbed into the belfry of the old Lutheran Church and the bell long unused, pealed forth the tidings with all the rest. The din was plainly heard at the W.A. Nye farm six miles northwest of town. In the country on the party lines the telephone did its full share in the jollification. Many expressed the wish that the real article in Berlin be given what the substitute was getting.
A cable-gram has been dispatched from Washington in inquire into the face of an Effingham young man, George Gibson. Three boys from this vicinity have mentioned him as being killed in a September battle, but no official notice has ever reached his parents. One of the boys writes of passing the grave of the young soldier. George Gibson is one of the finest young men who ever attended A.C.H.S. here.
Miss Erma Hawk, who teaches at Forest Grove, promised her pupils a wiener roast for Monday. They are going to turn it into a Liberty Roast instead.
The November meeting of the Capper Girls’ Poultry Club and the Capper Boys’ Pig Club was held at the home of Miss Ethel Huff, president of the girls’ club at her home one and one-half miles north of Muscotah. It was properly a carbon party, as each person was asked to bring pets of any kind as well as nut shells. The diner was served cafeteria style.
Prof. Cline, of Midland, spoke in the interest of the United War Work drive at Forest Grove Sunday afternoon. Grasshopper township will have a house to house canvass. The school district plan to be used.

CUMMINGS
At six o’clock Monday morning (Nov 11, 1918) when the news came that the war was over every old fire lock was brought into use. Men ran out in the street half dressed. By nin o’clock flags were flying everywhere, school was dismissed for the day ad the children marched through the streets carrying flags and singing “Aemrica.” Behind them they trailed the Kaiser in effigy, with one boot off and the other looking as through blood was oozing from it. They afterwards hung him head downward. They continued their celebration through the day with bells, horns, flags, etc. Talk about patriotism, they sure had the spirit.

KENNEKUK
Thirty-five young people assembled at the A.C.P.A. Hall Saturday evening to attend a reception given by Mrs. Roy Bechtold, in honor of her brother, Alfred Torkelson, who is home on a 10 day furlough. Alfred Torkelson will return to camp at the Great Lakes this week.

MONROVIA
In the vicinity of Monrovia, when the peace news became circulated yesterday morning, it sounded like a battle. Nearly every farmer shot all his ammunition away.

Address

200 S. 10th Street, Santa Fe Depot
Atchison, KS
66002

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:01 - 17:00

Telephone

(913) 367-6238

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