Atchison County Historical Society

Atchison County Historical Society The Atchison County Historical Society is dedicated to preserving, promoting, recording and sharing the history of Atchison County, Kansas since 1967.
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Operating as usual

We found a couple photos of the river from near the Benedictine campus.  The valley has really changed in its looks.Last...
06/16/2021

We found a couple photos of the river from near the Benedictine campus. The valley has really changed in its looks.
Last post for the night.

06/16/2021

Atchison County Historical Board Meeting Minutes of June 14, 2021
The meeting was called to order by Steve at 6:30 PM June 14, 2021 at 6:00 PM in the Depot Museum. Members present were: Pat Brox, Jan Falk, Jim Cormode, Dea Yanke, Galen Pruett, Charles Perdue and Steve Caplinger. Allison Balderrama our archivists was present. Those absent were: Julia Clem and Matt Ramsey. Member Paul Dunlap and volunteer Sterling Falk were also in attendance.
The minutes of the May 10, 2021 Board Meeting were approved by a motion of Galen, second by Pat and unanimous vote.
Financial Statements & Reports were presented.
* Jim moved and Pat seconded that the May month end reports be approved as presented. Motion passed unanimously.
* A bill for $130.96 was presented by Pat Brox for the supplies to plant the garden in front of the museum. Charlie moved and Jim seconded that the bill be paid. Motion passed unanimously.
* Steve reported the movement of $15,000 from two of our investment accounts to a new money market account with the same brokerage company. This is a partial preparation for the expected distribution of funds for the Lincoln Statue.
REPORTS:
* Archivist, Allison Balderrama reported on her recent activities. The insurance documentation for the loaned items to the AE Hangar Museum were received and copies sent to the ACHS. She reported that we were all invited to the Open House at the AEHM on July 10th.
* Steve reported on the recent activities of the digitizing project. Great progress is being made by Ree, Peggy and Sterling. Additionally, Sterling has been making great progress on documenting collection items into the inventory system.
* Steve reported a new life membership has been received from Thomas Clagett.
The following old business was discussed:
* Pat reported on the flower bed and what steps need to be taken next.
* Jan said the planning process for the booth at the fair.
New Business:
* An updated corporate resolution was presented to comply with a request from Capital Group for the endowment fund account. Jim moved and Pat seconded the resolution be adopted. Passed unanimously.
* The KDOR has requested an updated POA be filed to designate a person to act on behalf of the ACHS for all tax related activities. A motion was made by Galen and seconded by Dea that Steve Caplinger being designated as person responsible to act on behalf of the organization for such matters. Motion passed unanimously.
* The prospect of a grant to help with the digitizing project was reported. Steve, Allison and Sterling will investigate and see if this will be advantageous to the ACHS.
Correspondence: A note was received thanking the ACHS for such a nice note written by Jan to them for their gift to the Charlie Wagner memorial.
Collection Committee:
* Steve reported the Whittemore block prints will be sold in four different batches by the Red Barn Studio and Raymer Society in Lindsborg, KS.
* Steve reported an item was discovered during the inventory process that was from Augusta, KS. The Augusta museum was contacted and requested the item be sent to them. It has been.
* A group of items, found during inventory, were assembled on the tables for the board to review and determine if they belonged in the collection or should be disposed of in a suitable manner to receive value. The attached list of items were officially deaccessed by motion of Galen and second from Dea. Motion passed unanimously.
Advance Agenda-Items for the next meeting will be:
• Review Collection items for deaccession
• Review items for accession
• Review Fair Exhibit Plans
The meeting was adjourned by motion of Galen, second of Charlie and unanimous vote.

This photo has the ladder truck that sits in the museum in the foreground.  This is the Lukens Mill on fire in 1937.
06/16/2021

This photo has the ladder truck that sits in the museum in the foreground. This is the Lukens Mill on fire in 1937.

This photo has the ladder truck that sits in the museum in the foreground. This is the Lukens Mill on fire in 1937.

You get one guess.
06/16/2021

You get one guess.

You get one guess.

I wish this photo would have been in better shape but it is from 1927.  A school opera performance of The Torreadors.  D...
06/16/2021

I wish this photo would have been in better shape but it is from 1927. A school opera performance of The Torreadors. Does anyone know for sure the building in the background?

I wish this photo would have been in better shape but it is from 1927. A school opera performance of The Torreadors. Does anyone know for sure the building in the background?

This is a pic in our collection of the Higby House in Troy KS where Abraham Lincoln stayed when he visited Kansas.
06/16/2021

This is a pic in our collection of the Higby House in Troy KS where Abraham Lincoln stayed when he visited Kansas.

This is a pic in our collection of the Higby House in Troy KS where Abraham Lincoln stayed when he visited Kansas.

I don't suppose anyone can identify the young ladies in these photos?  Pics are probably 50 plus years old based upon th...
06/16/2021

I don't suppose anyone can identify the young ladies in these photos? Pics are probably 50 plus years old based upon the print paper. There are first names written on them.

I don't suppose anyone can identify the young ladies in these photos? Pics are probably 50 plus years old based upon the print paper. There are first names written on them.

Could be a better picture.  It's the Kaff Drug Store, NW corner of 5th and Commercial.
06/16/2021

Could be a better picture. It's the Kaff Drug Store, NW corner of 5th and Commercial.

Could be a better picture. It's the Kaff Drug Store, NW corner of 5th and Commercial.

Found some more construction/destruction photos in the mall area.
06/16/2021

Found some more construction/destruction photos in the mall area.

I do not remember this location for KP & L
06/16/2021

I do not remember this location for KP & L

I do not remember this location for KP & L

Check out the three stories on the building on SE corner of 6th and Commercial.
06/16/2021

Check out the three stories on the building on SE corner of 6th and Commercial.

Check out the three stories on the building on SE corner of 6th and Commercial.

This photo was a new exciting find. It appears to be taken at the corner of 10th and Commercial.  The uniforms suggest W...
06/03/2021

This photo was a new exciting find. It appears to be taken at the corner of 10th and Commercial. The uniforms suggest WW I. There are many ribbons and medals on the uniforms which might mean this was a coming home photo.
SURE would like to have some help determining who these soldiers are. Maybe someone has seen a photo similar in grandpa's stuff.

This photo was a new exciting find. It appears to be taken at the corner of 10th and Commercial. The uniforms suggest WW I. There are many ribbons and medals on the uniforms which might mean this was a coming home photo.
SURE would like to have some help determining who these soldiers are. Maybe someone has seen a photo similar in grandpa's stuff.

05/31/2021

Harriet Tubman was around twelve years old, enslaved, when a fellow enslaved man attempted to run away. After being found and brought back, Harriet and a few others were instructed to help tie him up to be whipped. She refused, and when the man attempted to run again, she blocked the doorway to help him escape. An overseer threw a two-pound weight at the man but hit Harriet instead, fracturing her skull. Throughout her life, she suffered from severe headaches and narcolepsy from this incident.

A petite woman of only about five feet, Harriet was strong-willed and courageous, and as she grew older, she became determined to escape to the North. Upon learning in 1849 that she would be sold, Harriet, now in her mid-20s, decided the time was right. One night, she, along with two of her brothers, ran away. Her brothers soon turned back, and for the rest of her journey, Harriet was alone without friends. She walked at night, hid during the day, didn't know who to trust, where to eat, at times she had shelter, often she slept outside on the ground overlooked by the stars. After about ninety miles of travel, she crossed into the North to freedom.

Reflecting about making it into the North, she said, "I looked at my hands, to see if I was de same person now I was free. Dere was such a glory over everything, de sun came like gold trou de trees, and over de fields, and I felt like I was in heaven."

Soon after her escape, Harriet went back into the South to help some family members to escape. After getting them North, she went back to the South to help more family members. Then she went to help others. Harriet would make many trips over the years, rescuing approximately seventy people. Of the experience, she would say, "I was the conductor of the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say what most conductors can't say — I never ran my train off the track and I never lost a passenger."


Note: If you enjoyed this post, please consider supporting Historical Snapshots with a contribution. To contribute, please visit our Patreon page at https://www.patreon.com/historicalsnapshots or, for one-time contributions, our Ko-fi page at https://ko-fi.com/historicalsnapshots. Your support is much appreciated ❤

Sources: http://www.harriet-tubman.org / Women of Achievement by Benjamin Brawley, 1919, Woman's American Baptist Home Mission Society / Portrait of Harriet taken circa 1868 by Benjamin F. Powelson / Wikimedia Commons / https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Harriet_Tubman / Women's Words : The Columbia Book of Quotations by Women (1996) by Mary Biggs, p. 2

Original post: https://historicalsnaps.com/2021/05/28/a-snapshot-biography-of-harriet-tubman/

Everyone has been so busy scanning and catching up on the backlog of work, the postings have dropped off.  Here is a bat...
05/31/2021

Everyone has been so busy scanning and catching up on the backlog of work, the postings have dropped off. Here is a batch for your entertainment.

I'd like to know the story behind this one.
05/11/2021

I'd like to know the story behind this one.

I'd like to know the story behind this one.

Scanned a few glass negatives yesterday.  They are from the 1910 to 1913 era.  This is going to be hard to recognize any...
05/11/2021

Scanned a few glass negatives yesterday. They are from the 1910 to 1913 era. This is going to be hard to recognize any of these personalities.

The ACHS was pleased to host Mrs. Joyce's 5th Grade class from ACES this week.  We took a tour of the Lewis and Clark Hi...
05/06/2021

The ACHS was pleased to host Mrs. Joyce's 5th Grade class from ACES this week. We took a tour of the Lewis and Clark Historic Site, Kanza Lodge and the County Museum at the Santa Fe Depot. They were a very fun group to have as visitors.
We are always glad to host educational events such as this.

The ACHS was pleased to host Mrs. Joyce's 5th Grade class from ACES this week. We took a tour of the Lewis and Clark Historic Site, Kanza Lodge and the County Museum at the Santa Fe Depot. They were a very fun group to have as visitors.
We are always glad to host educational events such as this.

Lots of fun times in 1991
05/05/2021

Lots of fun times in 1991

A great friend has left us.Charles R. Wagner, 91, Atchison, Kansas, died Thursday, April 22, 2021, at Atchison Senior Vi...
04/23/2021

A great friend has left us.

Charles R. Wagner, 91, Atchison, Kansas, died Thursday, April 22, 2021, at Atchison Senior Village.

Mass of Christian burial will be Friday, April 30, 2021 at 10:30 A.M. at St. Joseph’s Church with Rev. Jeremy Heppler, OSB as celebrant. Interment will follow in Mt. Calvary Cemetery. Parish rosary will be on Thursday, at 6:00 P.M. at the Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home with visitation to follow until 7:30 P.M. Memorial contributions are suggested to Atchison County Historical Society or St. Benedict Parish for Mass Intentions for Charlie and may be left in care of the Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home. Online condolences and memories may be shared at www.arensbergpruett.com.

Charlie was born September 8, 1929, in Atchison, Kansas, the son of Mathias and Catherine (Schuele) Wagner. He attended St. Joseph’s Elementary School and graduated from Maur Hill Prep School.

He and Carol Anslinger were united in marriage on February 17, 1955 at St. Benedict’s Church in Atchison. Carol preceded him in death on August 29, 2020.

Charlie was a farmer and stockman his entire life and also worked in several lumberyards as a manager including Easton Lumber, the Lancaster Coop Lumberyard until its closing and Carrigan Lumber. He was a diligent carpenter, building four houses that he lived in throughout his life.

He was a member of St. Benedict Parish in Atchison, he served in the National Guard and was a member of Knights of Columbus Council #818. He volunteered on the Easton City Council, Easton Volunteer Fire Department and as chairman of Atchison County RWD #2. He was a part of the Atchison County Cornshuckers.

Charlie enjoyed the history of his family and Atchison County in his retirement, but was most proud of being a father, grandpa, great grandpa, great-great grandpa and coach.

Survivors include three daughters, Jennifer (Kevin) Gigstad, Nortonville, KS; Stephanie (Tom) Nichols, Shawnee, KS; Angela (Russ) Seybert, Eudora, KS; three sons, Gregory (Robyn) Wagner, Cummings, KS; Richard (Kathy) Wagner, LaMars, IA; Jeffrey (Bev) Wagner, Atchison, KS; two brothers, William “Bill” Wagner, Atchison, KS; Mike Wagner, Atchison, KS; three sisters, Donna Stec, Atchison, KS; Barbara “Bobbie” Miller, Smithville, MO; Sr. Catherine Agnes Wagner, St. Louis, MO; seventeen grandchildren and twelve great grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by an infant daughter, Mary Kathryn Wagner, a brother, Norbert Wagner, three sisters, Beth Miller, Martha Wagner and Clarita Halling.

A great friend has left us.

Charles R. Wagner, 91, Atchison, Kansas, died Thursday, April 22, 2021, at Atchison Senior Village.

Mass of Christian burial will be Friday, April 30, 2021 at 10:30 A.M. at St. Joseph’s Church with Rev. Jeremy Heppler, OSB as celebrant. Interment will follow in Mt. Calvary Cemetery. Parish rosary will be on Thursday, at 6:00 P.M. at the Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home with visitation to follow until 7:30 P.M. Memorial contributions are suggested to Atchison County Historical Society or St. Benedict Parish for Mass Intentions for Charlie and may be left in care of the Arensberg-Pruett Funeral Home. Online condolences and memories may be shared at www.arensbergpruett.com.

Charlie was born September 8, 1929, in Atchison, Kansas, the son of Mathias and Catherine (Schuele) Wagner. He attended St. Joseph’s Elementary School and graduated from Maur Hill Prep School.

He and Carol Anslinger were united in marriage on February 17, 1955 at St. Benedict’s Church in Atchison. Carol preceded him in death on August 29, 2020.

Charlie was a farmer and stockman his entire life and also worked in several lumberyards as a manager including Easton Lumber, the Lancaster Coop Lumberyard until its closing and Carrigan Lumber. He was a diligent carpenter, building four houses that he lived in throughout his life.

He was a member of St. Benedict Parish in Atchison, he served in the National Guard and was a member of Knights of Columbus Council #818. He volunteered on the Easton City Council, Easton Volunteer Fire Department and as chairman of Atchison County RWD #2. He was a part of the Atchison County Cornshuckers.

Charlie enjoyed the history of his family and Atchison County in his retirement, but was most proud of being a father, grandpa, great grandpa, great-great grandpa and coach.

Survivors include three daughters, Jennifer (Kevin) Gigstad, Nortonville, KS; Stephanie (Tom) Nichols, Shawnee, KS; Angela (Russ) Seybert, Eudora, KS; three sons, Gregory (Robyn) Wagner, Cummings, KS; Richard (Kathy) Wagner, LaMars, IA; Jeffrey (Bev) Wagner, Atchison, KS; two brothers, William “Bill” Wagner, Atchison, KS; Mike Wagner, Atchison, KS; three sisters, Donna Stec, Atchison, KS; Barbara “Bobbie” Miller, Smithville, MO; Sr. Catherine Agnes Wagner, St. Louis, MO; seventeen grandchildren and twelve great grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by an infant daughter, Mary Kathryn Wagner, a brother, Norbert Wagner, three sisters, Beth Miller, Martha Wagner and Clarita Halling.

Moving up into 1992
04/19/2021

Moving up into 1992

04/17/2021

On this day in 1942, the renowned aviator Lt. Colonel James “Jimmy” Doolittle prepares for his famous Doolittle Raid. Americans would not let the attack on Pearl Harbor go unanswered! Instead, Doolittle would lead sixteen B-25 bomber crews in a surprise attack on the Japanese homeland.

“The president was insistent that we find ways and means of carrying home to Japan proper, in the form of a bombing raid, the real meaning of war,” Lt. General Henry “Hap” Arnold would later describe.

Military leaders settled on a bold plan: Bombers would be transported across the Pacific by an aircraft carrier, USS Hornet. When they were about 400 miles from Japan, the B-25s would take off, headed for Tokyo and other industrial centers. Bombs would be dropped on military targets, then the planes would head for a Chinese airfield. A return to USS Hornet simply wasn’t feasible.

Doolittle looked to the Seventeenth Bombardment Group for help. The pilots volunteered in the dark, knowing only that the mission was dangerous—and that Doolittle was leading the way. “The name ‘Doolittle’ meant so much to aviators that man, we just volunteered like crazy,” one pilot would say. “He was a real leader. The men loved him and respected him.”

The morning of the raid, April 18, began with rough seas and some bad news: Several Japanese patrol boats had been spotted. The mission had become a race against time. USS Hornet wasn’t quite close enough to Japan, but the B-25s needed to get in the air anyway.

Doolittle was the first to go. “[A] rough sea such as the one in front of us,” he later said, “could ruin a pilot’s day if he ignored the signals of the deck officer and tried a takeoff when the bow of the ship was heading into the waves. It was like riding a seesaw . . . .” One observer described what came next: “First bomber off the Hornet. Miraculous. The carrier is diving, deluging deck with white water. The big plane is just about catapulted as the ship lifts out of the sea.”

No one had ever taken off from an aircraft carrier with such a heavily loaded bomber—but Doolittle had just done it. An hour later, 16 planes were in the sky, headed toward Japan. They were strung out, single file, over the space of about 150 miles.

The bombers arrived at the Japanese mainland by mid-day. They would fly in, bomb their targets, then turn toward China. Japan had put up only a weak defense, but the crews were beginning to run into other problems: Inaccurate maps made targets hard to find. Mechanical problems, fuel shortages, and navigational glitches plagued the pilots. One plane was forced to divert to nearby Russia after its bombing run, but the other 15 crash landed near China’s coast.

Most of the aviators would escape into China and make their way home with the help of locals or missionaries, but three were killed during the crash landings. Eight more were captured by the Japanese. Three were executed, one was starved, and the rest were held as POWs. Meanwhile, the crew that landed in Russia was held for a year.

There had been other problems, too. The raiders had accidentally hit some non-military targets. Moreover, Japan was furious with China and launched a series of horrific raids against the Chinese in the months that followed.

Regardless, Japanese officials had been humiliated. They’d told their citizens that the homeland couldn’t be attacked. The Doolittle raiders had proven them wrong. Japan would retaliate by picking a fight at Midway.

That would prove to be a big mistake! Naturally, the Battle of Midway is a story for another day. 🙂

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Address

200 S. 10th Street, Santa Fe Depot
Atchison, KS
66002

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(913) 367-6238

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