The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington

The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington Nonprofit museum that focuses on African American history in Arlington Virginia
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Please join us as we partner with the Arlington Chorale for a night of beautiful music and singing!From Vivaldi to Nat K...
12/04/2023

Please join us as we partner with the Arlington Chorale for a night of beautiful music and singing!
From Vivaldi to Nat King Cole, and featuring Margaret Bond's rarely performed The Ballad of the Brown King, this concert has something for everyone!
Saturday, December 9, 2023 | 5 PM
Westover Baptist Church
1125 Patrick Henry Dr., Arlington, VA 22205
Tickets start at $20 at arlingtonchorale.org

AARP Magazine was here this morning doing a photo shoot with Civil Rights icon Joan Mulholland . We’ll let you know when...
11/21/2023

AARP Magazine was here this morning doing a photo shoot with Civil Rights icon Joan Mulholland . We’ll let you know when the Article is available.

Howard University traces its roots to the establishment of the Howard Normal and Theological Institute   in history, Nov...
11/21/2023

Howard University traces its roots to the establishment of the Howard Normal and Theological Institute in history, November 20, 1866. The institution was founded in Washington D.C. by General Oliver O. Howard, a Civil War hero and the Commissioner of the Freedmen's Bureau. Originally intended to provide education to newly emancipated Black men and women, the institution aimed to train teachers and ministers. Over time, the institution expanded its curriculum and evolved into Howard University in 1872, incorporating a broader range of academic disciplines.

Howard University holds immense significance in American history as a pioneering institution of higher education for Black Americans. It became a center for intellectual and cultural development, producing a distinguished alumni community that includes prominent figures in various fields. Throughout its history, Howard has played a crucial role in the fight for civil rights, serving as a hub for activism and producing leaders who have made significant contributions to the advancement of Black people in the United States. The university remains a symbol of resilience, scholarship, and advocacy in the ongoing pursuit of equality .

Wonderful News!!
11/18/2023

Wonderful News!!

Historical panels will be placed at administrative HQ of Arlington school system

Rest in peace , Reverend Richard Oscar Green , Sr.  Native Arlingtonian , Reverend Richard O. Green attended Northern Vi...
11/18/2023

Rest in peace , Reverend Richard Oscar Green , Sr.

Native Arlingtonian , Reverend Richard O. Green attended Northern Virginia and District of Columbia schools.. Green wanted to major in auto mechanics, but the curriculum was not offered at the all black Hoffman Boston High School..

Green's parents along with the NAACP fought vigorously to get him the education he desired. As a result, he was sent to Manassas Regional High School for The Colored that was founded by Jennie Dean. It was a long daily commute and Green never missed a day.

In 1950, after the continuation of a court fight, Green was enrolled in the all-white Washington -Lee high school of Arlington. A teacher was bought in from New York to instruct him only. Years later, Reverend Green became a teacher at Washington-Lee instructing Auto Mechanics.

Rest in paradise, Charlie Clark . Arlington's Beloved Historian, Journalist,  Library Advocate ànd friend to The Black H...
11/17/2023

Rest in paradise, Charlie Clark . Arlington's Beloved Historian, Journalist,
Library Advocate ànd friend to The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington
You will be missed …..

We were happy to get a visit from Germany this week !  They all spoke English!Thanks to Judith Davis for setting this up...
11/10/2023

We were happy to get a visit from Germany this week ! They all spoke English!
Thanks to Judith Davis for setting this up!
Thanks also to Joan Mulholland for joining us!

We were happy to get a visit from Germany !  They all spoke English!Thanks to Judith Davis for setting this up!Thanks al...
11/08/2023

We were happy to get a visit from Germany ! They all spoke English!
Thanks to Judith Davis for setting this up!
Thanks also to Joan Mulholland for joining us!

Basil HallBy Charlie Clark Nostalgia fans recently posted memories of passing the home of Basil Hall, one of Arlington’s...
10/31/2023

Basil Hall
By Charlie Clark

Nostalgia fans recently posted memories of passing the home of Basil Hall, one of Arlington’s infamous slaveholders. That’s who attached his name to Hall’s Hill, one of Arlington’s vital African-American neighborhoods.

Hall’s mid-19th-century farmhouse stood on the 1700 block of N. George Mason Dr., before it was torn down in 1999 to make a cul-de-sac of red-brick colonials. The two-story yellow farmhouse with eight columns was visible to patients across the street at Virginia Hospital Center.

It was the scene of much drama.

Hall (1806?-1888) was born in Washington, D.C. Before homesteading in Arlington, he was an adventurer on a Massachusetts whaling ship. That allowed him to tour South America and eventually California where he met and married Elizabeth Winner, according to Arlington Historical Magazine write-ups by Willard Webb, Donald Wise and Ruth Ward.

In 1850, as a “trimmer of wood,” Hall purchased 327 acres around what is now the swath between Lee Highway and N. 16th St.

He would raise six children (from two marriages) in a home on a 400-foot hill valued at $3,000. On the farm worked by enslaved labor, he raised fruit, potatoes, oats, cattle, hogs and clover. His worm fence was made of chestnut rails supported by cedar and locust posts.

Basil Hall worked at his reputation for being hard on slaves. As contemporary Gaillard Hunt recalled, “old Hall, as he is familiarly called in the county, was a character well remembered because of violent temper and bad habits.” He whipped many, and shot one “Negro in bravado.”A tragedy in Hall’s household drew news coverage in the Evening Star. Mrs. Hall clashed with an enslaved woman named Jenny Farr over whether to put more wood on the fire. The angry laborer pushed her mistress in the flames.

Elizabeth Hall died despite ministrations from neighbor physician George Wunder. Jenny was hanged, and her fate entered Halls Hill lore.

When the Civil War hit, Hall’s life was upended. First, his farmhouse was shelled by Rebel forces from Upton Hill. But after the second battle of Bull Run, Union forces cut his trees to better view Upton Hill and Falls Church. They took his hay, corn and mules and burned his house. “My barn and other buildings were also burnt; ….I had not a bed to lie on nor a roof to put it under when I left the place,” he later testified.

Basil moved in with his sister Mary Ann, the downtown brothel keeper whose Arlington land became Marymount University. “I voted against the ordinance of secession at Ball’s Cross Roads,” he told Northern soldiers. “I go in for the Union, but I ain’t no abolitionist, and any man of common sense will say that slavery is the very best thing for the south.”

After the war, he made a $42,450 claim to the Southern Claims Commission set up by Congress. He was granted $10,729.

Hall became a justice of the peace. Beginning in 1866, his land tracts were sold to create what would become the African-American neighborhood.

Hall died in that house in 1888 at age 83. He was buried on his land with his two wives. But in 1930, the graves were moved to Oakwood Cemetery in Falls Church–to make room for Arlington Hospital.

*********

Charlie Clark is recognized as the pre-eminent author and historian on any subject related to the fascinating, limitless history of Arlington County, Virginia.
He has a column ‘Our man In Arlington’ with The Gazette newspaper .

10/30/2023
We are so proud this Mission!!
10/29/2023

We are so proud this Mission!!

Three people, enslaved in the 1800s at the oldest house still standing in Arlington, were honored Saturday with bronze markers dedicated in their memories.

10/24/2023

We got yet another bid from the Arlington Chorale !! Civil Rights activist Joan Mulholland was there too!!

Thanks NAACP!
10/19/2023

Thanks NAACP!

We had great time last night at the NAACP Freedom Fund Banquet Gala. The Black Heritage Museum received the Willard W. ‘...
10/15/2023

We had great time last night at the NAACP Freedom Fund Banquet Gala. The Black Heritage Museum received the Willard W. ‘Woody’ Britain, Jr. Community Appreciation award.Fund

We’re open Thursdays 3-6Sat2-5
10/12/2023

We’re open Thursdays 3-6
Sat2-5

Remembering Virginia NAACP Leader Kent Carter  who was Killed October 2, 2022 During Ambush While Celebrating His Birthd...
10/05/2023

Remembering Virginia NAACP Leader Kent Carter who was Killed October 2, 2022 During Ambush While Celebrating His Birthday. Carter, who served as first vice president of NAACP's Arlington Branch, was in Turks and Caicos when two unknown assailants attacked him.

Thank you Arlington NAACP for Recognizing The Black Heritage Museum!!We are honored and humbled. Thanks to our wonderful...
10/02/2023

Thank you Arlington NAACP for Recognizing The Black Heritage Museum!!
We are honored and humbled. Thanks to our wonderful community for thinking of us!!

10/01/2023

Address

3045B Columbia Pike
Arlington, VA
22204

Opening Hours

Thursday 3pm - 6pm
Saturday 2pm - 5pm

Telephone

(703) 271-8700

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The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington

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The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington was founded to celebrate the African American journey to freedom in Arlington County. At the heart of the BHMA mission is the story of Freedmen’s Village. To date, the museum board has commissioned a model of the village, which is now part of a cosponsored exhibit on slave’s life at Arlington House, the Robert E. Lee Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery.


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