The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington

The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington Nonprofit museum that focuses on African American history in Arlington Virginia
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The Passing of Honourable Frank Wilson comes as a shock. For almost a quarter of a century – from 1984 – 2009, Frank  Wi...
03/13/2020

The Passing of Honourable Frank Wilson comes as a shock.

For almost a quarter of a century – from 1984 – 2009, Frank Wilson became a tireless fighter for an environment in which all students would achieve.

An independent thinker, he was willing to cast his vote against the majority when necessary to support principles he believed in, bringing fundamental diversity of viewpoint to School Board deliberations and decisions.

The results were instrumental in creating Arlington's first all-day kindergarten, fostering achievement-oriented minority assistance programs, and helping establish the Claremont Early Childhood Center and Science Focus alternative schools.

Mr Wilson was not only the longest-serving member of the Arlington School Board, but a huge contributor to the community, which include volunteering in the PTAs of Glebe Elementary School, Williamsburg Middle School, and Washington-Lee High School; as president of the John M. Langston Citizens Association; and as a member of the Board of Directors of Arlington Hospital, and the Northern Virginia Hospice and a founding member of the Arlington African American Leadership Coalition .

Wilson’s contributions went outside Arlington. They extended to the Virginia School Boards Association, the National School Boards Associations and service on the governors commission on youth violence.

He was a husband and father of three. A leader in his church his community and a friend to many.
May he rest in peace

Black Heritage Museum of Arlington Virginia

We really enjoyed our visitors from The Arlington Career Center yesterday!!! Keep coming back!
03/03/2020

We really enjoyed our visitors from The Arlington Career Center yesterday!!! Keep coming back!

Dear Friends, Do you know about the Black Heritage Museum of Arlington located on Columbia Pike not far from the Freedma...
02/28/2020
Census 2020 - Topics

Dear Friends,

Do you know about the Black Heritage Museum of Arlington located on Columbia Pike not far from the Freedman’s Village Bridge? Do you know about Freedman’s Village?

Today at 3:30pm in honor of Black History Month, I am excited to have as my guest on the Philanthropy Matters radio show Scott Taylor, Executive Director of the Black Heritage Museum of Arlington! Scott will tell us about how the museum came about and some of the terrific exhibits of Africans Americans in the museum. The nonprofit Black Heritage Museum of Arlington was founded by the late Evelyn Syphax and provides a focal point exhibit on Arlington’s Freedman’s Village and contributions made by its residents and their descendants to local and national history. We will also talk about the historically black communities in Arlington.

The Philanthropy Matters radio show airs every Friday 3:30pm-4:00pm
Listen live on the radio at WERA 96.7FM or live online at www.wera.fm
Listen to our past podcasts anytime on www.mixcloud.com Search: Philanthropy Matters

Individuals, organizations and companies are all contributors to philanthropy! Thank you for listening and for your guest recommendations!

All the best,

Wanda

Wanda Pierce
Producer & Host of Philanthropy Matters on
Arlington Independent Media /WERA.fm 96.7fm

Information about the 2020 Census and why it's important to be counted.

Joan Mulholland, an American civil rights activist and a Freedom Rider from Arlington, Virginia was recognized yesterday...
01/21/2020

Joan Mulholland, an American civil rights activist and a Freedom Rider from Arlington, Virginia was recognized yesterday By NAN for her involvement with civil rights. She was once held on death row in #ParchmanPenitentiary for her involvement. She also marched with Dr. Martin Luther King.

Congrats to Joan Mulholand!!
01/21/2020

Congrats to Joan Mulholand!!

It is an honor to recognize Joan Mulholland, an American civil rights activist and a Freedom Rider from Arlington, Virginia. She was the first white to integrate Tougaloo College in Jackson Mississippi, and to be a part of the Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. She was once held on death row in #ParchmanPenitentiary for her involvement with the Civil Rights Movement. #NANMLK2020

Remembering the dream!
01/20/2020

Remembering the dream!

12/21/2019
Reverend Richard Oscar Green , Sr.  Native Arlingtonian , Reverend Richard O. Green attended Northern Virginia and Distr...
10/22/2019

Reverend Richard Oscar Green , Sr.

Native Arlingtonian , Reverend Richard O. Green attended Northern Virginia and District of Columbia schools.. Green wanted to major in auto mechanics, but the curriculum was not offered at the all black Hoffman Boston High School..

Green's parents along with the NAACP fought vigorously to get him the education he desired. As a result, he was sent to Manassas Regional High School for The Colored that was founded by Jennie Dean. It was a long daily commute and Green never missed a day.

In 1950, after the continuation of a court fight, Green was enrolled in the all-white Washington -Lee high school of Arlington. A teacher was bought in from New York to instruct him only. Years later, Reverend Green became a teacher at Washington-Lee instructing Auto Mechanics.

08/28/2019
CBN News

Remembering Doc Muse

Virginia Pharmacist makes history! During the Jim Crow era, African Americans in Arlington weren't allowed to go inside the drug store to get their prescriptions. But after seeing how blacks were treated, Muse, nicknamed Doc Muse, and classmate Waverly W. Jones opened Green Valley Pharmacy. http://go.cbn.com/6866 #BlackHistoryMonth

Were down at the Arlington County Fair along with The Arlington Historical Society!! ... Stop by and say hello!!!
08/16/2019

Were down at the Arlington County Fair along with The Arlington Historical Society!! ... Stop by and say hello!!!

07/10/2019

Please visit... Please support!

Arlington Civil Rights and Community Activist: Mrs.Saundra GreenSandra Green, a native of Arlington Virginia, was raised...
06/27/2019

Arlington Civil Rights and Community Activist:
Mrs.Saundra Green

Sandra Green, a native of Arlington Virginia, was raised in the historic Highview Park/ Hall’s Hill neighborhood. She began her community work when the ‘War On Poverty’ programs were initiated by the Johnson administration in the 1960’s. Green witnessed first-hand the need for advocacy for the underprivileged. As a program organizer, she initiated food drives,organized teen clubs, trained individuals to become neighborhood block captains and provided information to residents to receive county services.

In 1973 Green was employed by the Arlington Parks and Recreation Department as Supervisor for Langston Brown Community Center. There, she initiated programs for all ages. One of her missions was to provide African American citizens the same opportunities that were available to other citizens in Arlington. She encouraged citizens to speak up against injustices. She founded The Arlington Youth Street Theatre, a summer program for the performing arts that received national recognition. She organized the first Junior Jamboree Program for teens in Arlington, she developed the first proposal for a skateboard park in Arlington, she organized the first Miss Black Teenage Pageant in Arlington and chaired the Arlington County Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. for many years.

Green has also focused her efforts on preserving African-American history in Arlington. She is instrumental in creating a mural depicting significant events, places and people of the Hall’s Hill / High View Park neighborhood. She is also instrumental in creating a playground as a tribute to Arlington’s historical Fire Station #8. She is critical in the creation of the gateway into the Hall’s Hill /High View park community which features over 800 bricks with engraved names of many families and residents. She is also instrumental in getting the Hall’s Hill infamous“segregation wall” marked as a historical site.
In 2014 Saundra Green received the Willard
Brittain Community Appreciation Award from the NAACP.

06/19/2019
Essence

Juneteenth celebrates 155 years of freedom

Happy Juneteenth! On this day in 1865, over two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued, our enslaved ancestors actually became free. http://ow.ly/oW1J50uHVNM

06/18/2019

Queen City was once a thriving African American neighborhood in Arlington complete with its own fire department.

The original residents of Queen City were descendents of the residents of Freedman’s Village, which had been established by the federal government during the Civil War as a home for displaced/freed slaves. A tightly knit African American community, Queen City was particularly focused on providing education for its children and was described by George Vollin, a former resident, as “a real happy, solid community.”

The neighborhood eventually disappeared when residents were displaced in 1941 as construction on the Pentagon and surrounding roads began:

“Queen City was not razed for the Pentagon building, but the overall Pentagon project. In order to accommodate the large number of individuals who would be commuting to and parking at the Pentagon on a daily basis, extensive accommodations had to be made for the automobile.

The cloverleaf highway structure, which the Columbia Pike feeds into and is found to the west of the Pentagon, remains the exact location of Queen City. Therefore, Queen City was destroyed for Pentagon’s needed transportation corridor, which eventually would come to include over thirty miles of highways and ramps, including twenty-one overpasses.”
Come to the Black Heritage Museum to see more historical images of the neighborhood

On June 15, we celebrated Founder’s Day!Our founder, Mrs.Evelyn Reid Syphax, was a former Arlington elementary school te...
06/16/2019

On June 15, we celebrated Founder’s Day!

Our founder, Mrs.Evelyn Reid Syphax, was a former Arlington elementary school teacher who served extensively on a variety of elected and appointed boards for schools and civic and community organizations,.

With a background in education, she devoted much of her time to schools. Chiefly, she served in the early 1980s as chairman of the Arlington School Board and led a successful overhaul of the county's desegregation plan to reduce long bus rides for minority students.

Among the other causes she championed on the board was a program to provide mentoring and counseling to help underachieving children improve their communication skills.

Also in the 1980s, she served on the Virginia Advisory Council on Vocational Education and the Committee to Re-evaluate State Government. She was past president of the Northern Virginia Chapter of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, which she helped organize; past president of the Arlington Historical Society; and past chairman of the Northern Virginia United Negro College Fund.

Mrs. Syphax was known principally for her spirited volunteer work. She raised funds for the Arlington Cultural Arts Center and, in 1994, founded the Black Heritage Museum, which honors the history of African Americans in Arlington.

She also was a businesswoman who owned and served as director of the Early Childhood Development Center, a Montessori school in Arlington, from 1963 to 1987. For shorter periods of time, she ran a private residential center for senior citizens and owned a thrift shop.

She received many honors including 1981 Arlington Woman of the Year from the Interservice Club Council. In 1992, the Arlington County Commission on the Status of Women honored her as a Notable Woman of Arlington.

Mrs. Syphax taught in the Arlington public schools in the 1950s, a decade when racial segregation was still the rule in the state's education system. She recalled that era for a Washington Post reporter in a 1996 story:

"The need to end racial separation was clear to her in many ways, starting with her class size of 39 students. 'All the books were discards from the white schools. All the black teachers were busy taping them up,' she said. 'The schools were practically crumbling around us in the black schools.' "

Arlington tried to integrate its schools quickly, but was ordered by the state to close its schools rather than integrate. A court ruling resulted in a victory for Arlington integration.

On Feb. 2, 1959, four black students entered Arlington's Stratford Junior High School, making it the first integrated public school in Virginia. Mrs. Syphax had taught all four of the students as their third-grade teacher at Langston Elementary School.

Mrs. Syphax, a longtime Arlington resident, was born in Lynchburg, Va., and graduated from Virginia Union University. She received a master's degree in early childhood education from New York University.

Mrs. Syphax died March 21, 2000

We had a great visit from Arlington Tech School’s ACC Sister Circle.  Young ladies encouraging each other in the tech fi...
05/13/2019

We had a great visit from Arlington Tech School’s ACC Sister Circle. Young ladies encouraging each other in the tech field. We enjoyed you!

Back to Green Valley?
05/09/2019
WMAL DC

Back to Green Valley?

Confederate names have been stripped from schools and roads, and now an Arlington County neighborhood gets preliminary approval to get rid of a Confederate name.

Please be sure to join us!!
05/07/2019

Please be sure to join us!!

Thanks to legendary Activist JOAN MULHOLLAND for an intriguing and enlightening speaking event at Marymount University. ...
05/02/2019

Thanks to legendary Activist JOAN MULHOLLAND for an intriguing and enlightening speaking event at Marymount University. She spoke about the sit-ins and other groundbreaking protests she was apart of including Dr. Martin Luther Kings March on Washington.

We had a great round table discussion last night last night with reps from Amazon, Arlington Community Fund , The Arling...
04/26/2019

We had a great round table discussion last night last night with reps from Amazon, Arlington Community Fund , The ArlingtonCommonwealth’s Attorney’s office. and community leaders...Very enlightening and and informative!

The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington  and the Marymount University Department of History & Politics Present:An Evening...
04/12/2019

The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington and the Marymount University Department of History & Politics Present:
An Evening With Civil Rights Activist
Joan Mulholland

Joan Trumpauer Mulholland is an American civil rights activist and a Freedom Rider from Arlington VA. She is known for taking part in sit-ins, being the first white to integrate Tougaloo College in Jackson Mississippi, joining the Delta Sigma Theta, joining Freedom Rides;,and being held on death row in Parchman Penitentiary.


*Come out and here her compelling story live!


PLEASE JOIN US!
Free to the public
Tuesday April 30, 2019 @7pm
Reinsch Library Auditorium, Marymount University
2807 N. Glebe Road , Arlington, Virginia 22207

Free Parking

Arlington County Board Chair Christian Dorsey  Joins Black Heritage Museum of Arlington Board of TrusteesArlington, VA –...
04/05/2019

Arlington County Board Chair Christian Dorsey Joins Black Heritage Museum of Arlington Board of Trustees

Arlington, VA – The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington (BHMA) announced today that Christian Dorsey, Chair of the Arlington County Board, will be joining BHMA’s Board, effective April 15, 2019.

BHMA was founded by the late Evelyn Syphax nearly two decades ago to acknowledge the contributions and history of African Americans in the county from slavery to present times. The museum is organized exclusively for charitable, religious, educational, and scientific purposes, to acquire, preserve, catalogue and display historic items relevant to the black history of Arlington County and Northern Virginia. Formerly a “museum without walls”, BHMA is now located at 3108 Columbia Pike in Arlington.

Statement from Christian Dorsey, Arlington County Board Chair:

“The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington is a critical cornerstone of Arlington’s history. With 2019 being the 400th anniversary of Africans arriving in bondage to Virginia’s shores, I cannot think of a better way to recognize this historic time by working to expand and build upon the work of BHMA”.

“We are pleased and honored to have Chairman Dorsey as a member of the BHMA board, said Scott Taylor, BHMA President. His long record of community service and engagement, not to mention his service on the County Board. He will be great asset to us"
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The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington celebrates the African American Journey to Freedom, providing a focal point exhibit on Arlington’s Freedman’s Village and contributions made by its residents and their descendants to local and national history.

Honoring the 107th U.S. Colored Infantry Regiment Fort Corcoran was a wood-and-earthwork fortification constructed by th...
04/04/2019

Honoring the 107th U.S. Colored Infantry Regiment


Fort Corcoran was a wood-and-earthwork fortification constructed by the Union Army in northern Virginia as part of the defenses of Washington, D.C.. during the American Civil War. Built in 1861, shortly after the occupation of Arlington by Union forces, it protected the southern end of the Aqueduct Bridge and overlooked the Potomac River and Theodore Roosevelt Island known as Mason's Island.

The fort was named after Colonel Michael Corcoran, commander of the U.S. Fighting 69th Infantry, Irish Brigade 69th New York Volunteer Regiment, one of the units that constructed the fort.

Fort Corcoran was home to the Union Army Balloon Corps and the headquarters of the defenses of Washington south of the Potomac River, and served throughout the war before being dismantled in 1866. Today, no trace of the fort remains, although the Arlington County government has erected a historical marker at its site.

This view (pictured above) of the defenses of the Washington, D. C./ Rosslyn VA area shows a group of twenty African American soldiers with musical instruments. Blacks served in various capacities in the Union army. At first Union leaders allowed no black men to be commissioned officers, but eventually they served as noncommissioned officers, doctors, and chaplains. The first African American field officer was Major Martin Delany.

Freed blacks served in various capacities in the Union army, including in various bands. The 107th Regiment Infantry was first organized in Louisville, Kentucky and they participated in the siege of Petersburg, the first and second expeditions to Fort Fisher, the capture of Wilmington, the occupation of Raleigh, the surrender of Johnston, and several other smaller battles and skirmishes.

Address

3108 Columbia Pike
Arlington, VA
22204

Opening Hours

Tuesday 10:00 - 15:00
Thursday 15:00 - 18:00
Saturday 13:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(703) 271-8700

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The Black Heritage Museum of Arlington was founded to celebrate the African American journey to freedom in Arlington County. At the heart of the BHMA mission is the story of Freedmen’s Village. To date, the museum board has commissioned a model of the village, which is now part of a cosponsored exhibit on slave’s life at Arlington House, the Robert E. Lee Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery.

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Comments

my mother's baby black dolls she grew up in Virginia. 1 is complete the other is missing a leg and two arms they were handed down to her so they must be very old
#TEARDOWNTHISWALL2019!!...... PLEASE ARLINGTON COUNTY, VA!!!.... "NEVER FORGET WHY THIS WALL WAS BUILT IN THE FIRST PLACE!!...TO THE KEEP THE "N*****S...OUT!!... IT DID NOT WORK THEN!!!...AND IT "SURELY WON'T WORK NOW!...... HALL'S HILL/HIGH VIEW PARK ARLINGTON, VA IS OUR....'LEGACY"!!!...... IF THE WALL GOES BACK UP, YOU WILL CONTINUE THE PERPETRATE THE HATE, RACISM, PREJUDICE, AND BIGOTRY, THAT IS IN ALL "OUR" PAST!!!..... THANKS #GOVERNORNORTHAM!!!.....FOR YOUR "NEW LEADERSHIP IN VIRGINIA!!...THE COMMONWEALTH!!!... NATIVE, AFRICAN, LATINO, ASIAN AMERICANS,...AND ALL PEOPLE OF COLOR BUILT THIS COUNTRY.... ON THE 'BACKS OF FREE LABOR!!'' FOR HUNDREDS OF YEARS!!!... THINK ABOUT IT!!..... WE WILL NEVER BE A "FOOTNOTE"...IN HISTORY!!..... #NEVERFORGET!!!.....TODAY THE WALL, NEXT RAMPANT POLICE VIOLENCE, NEXT CONTINUED MASS SHOOTINGS.....ETC., ETC. ETC.!!!!! "TIME TO PUT YOUR MONEY, WHERE OUR "TAXES" ARE!!!..... #VOTE2020!!!..... #FULFILLTHEDREAM!!!!..... #alllivesmatter!!.#itstime!!..#keeptheconversationsgoing!! #lovetrumpshate!! #oneheroatatime! STAY BLESSED, BY THE BEST!!" KEEP US POSTED!!! SMOOCHESS!!! BEST, [email protected],#starrchile33, Empower ME Networking,@starrchile33, Empower ME [email protected]_crook, @DenzelWashingt.....#donthatetalk #lovetrumpshate. #downwithhate #upwithhope @michelleobama @barrackobama #flotus44 #potus44 #whitehouse #fox5news #theview #oprah #tylerperry #peoplemagazine #ellendegeneres #steveharvey @Steve Harvey TV #gabifresh #plmuse #nbc4washingon #yolandaadams #GOTRI #shomaristone @PLMuse,@NBCWashington nbcgive #bethesdacares Montgomery County Police Department https://www.facebook.com/pages/Washington-Metro/116461105035583 CBS DC #joelosteen #hodakotb #nbctodayCBS DC #joelosteen #hodakotb #nbctoday #therocknewmanshow #drboycewatkins #howarduniversity #whut Governor of Virginia Arlington County Virginia – Government https://wjla.com/…/historic-wall-destroyed-by-arlington-flo… About this website WJLA.COM|BY ABC 7 NEWS - WJLA Historic segregation wall destroyed by Arlington flooding divides neighborhood Monday’s flood obliterated the brick wall in Laura Roger’s backyard. “My heart fell to my toes. I really felt sick to my stomach,” Rogers said. Bricks and concrete scattered across her garden, but the water also washed away part of history. During racial segregation in the 19... About this website WJLA.COM|BY ABC 7 NEWS - WJLA Historic segregation wall destroyed by Arlington flooding divides neighborhood Monday’s flood obliterated the brick wall in Laura Roger’s backyard. “My heart fell to my toes. I really felt sick to my stomach,” Rogers said. Bricks and concrete scattered across her garden, but the water also washed away part of history. During racial segregation in the 19...
Hi Scott, I was there last Saturday with Camilla and Mr Vollin