Langlade County Historical Society

Langlade County Historical Society The Langlade County Historical Society (LCHS) preserves, advances, and disseminates knowledge in the history of Langlade County, Wisconsin.
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The mission of the Langlade County Historical Society (LCHS) is to preserve, advance, and disseminate knowledge in the history of Langlade County. This is done by the maintenance of a museum, local historical artifacts and archives, and historic sites on the museum campus. In addition, the LCHS prepares programs and publications dealing with local history. The LCHS is affiliated with the Wisconsin Historical Society. The museum is managed by a curator and governed by a nine member board.

It's Nurses Week: Here are some pictures from the staff at Antigo Hospital (at Fifth & Elm) in the 1920s and the staff a...
05/06/2020

It's Nurses Week: Here are some pictures from the staff at Antigo Hospital (at Fifth & Elm) in the 1920s and the staff at Veterans Memorial (now Aspirus) in the 1960s &1970s. Thank you nurses.

Making History: After much planning, we have begun the Let's Make History remodeling project at the museum. Joshua Stump...
05/04/2020

Making History: After much planning, we have begun the Let's Make History remodeling project at the museum. Joshua Stumpner of JAS Construction and our masked curator Mary Kay Wolf went over plans to make sure everything was in order for exterior work to begin. The priority is to make the museum handicap accessible. Further plans involve redesign of the lighting, ceilings, and heating and cooling duct work.The extent of interior redesign will depend on further fundraising, which continues.

For the start of fishing season: here is a link to WI101 Our History in Objects story about MEPPS Fishing Lures https://...
05/02/2020
Mepps Fishing Lure

For the start of fishing season: here is a link to WI101 Our History in Objects story about MEPPS Fishing Lures https://wi101.wisc.edu/mepps-fishing-lure/

The classic Mepps fishing lure the Aglia, was invented in France in the 1930s and patented in 1938. (Mepps is a French acronym for Manufacturier d’ Engins de Precision pour Peches Sportives, translated as “Manufacture of Precision Equipment for Sport Fishing”.) It was introduced to northern Wi...

Why do people love to fish.... Is it to get outside and enjoy nature? To be on or near the water?To dream.......what wil...
05/01/2020

Why do people love to fish....
Is it to get outside and enjoy nature?
To be on or near the water?
To dream.......
what will you catch that day, will it be your new record catch, will you catch a trophy fish, will you catch anything at all?
So to all the people going out fishing this weekend be safe, and enjoy the adventure!

Wisconsin Historical Society
04/30/2020

Wisconsin Historical Society

#BIGHistoryIsHappening

Do you have questions about the Wisconsin Historical Society's COVID-19 Journal Project? Check out our new Frequently Asked Questions section on our website. If you haven't signed up yet to participate, there is still time.

Thank you for being a part of history. It is your documentation of your experience living during the COVID-19 pandemic and quarantine that will allow the Society to share history with people living 100 years from now.

Learn more: https://wihist.org/2JAatPS

04/27/2020
Wisconsin 101: About the Project

There are 3 objects at this site that relate to Langlade County: a pillow sham commemorating CCC Camp 657 in Elcho, a bowling pin made at the Vulcan factory in Antigo, and a MEPPS fishing lure from Antigo. Also lots of other cool stuff.

This video explores the Wisconsin 101 project, examining both it's origins and the current iteration of the website. Learn about how to participate in this d...

Wed. April 22 is the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day. WI Senator Gaylord Nelson was instrumental in establishing...
04/21/2020
The Wolf River

Wed. April 22 is the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day. WI Senator Gaylord Nelson was instrumental in establishing Earth Day. You can read about the efforts of Gaylord Nelson and many others in cleaning up the Wolf River and making it one of two National Scenic Rivers in Wisconsin at https://wi101.wisc.edu/2018/05/24/wolf-river/

Todd Sheldon first discovered the virtues of the Mepps Aglia spinner and later realized improvements afforded by a tuft of squirrel tail while fishing at one of his favorite spots: the Wolf River. Today the Wolf continues …

Wisconsin Historical Society
04/21/2020

Wisconsin Historical Society

You can be part of history! Sign up for the Wisconsin Historical Society's COVID-19 Journal Project. We're asking you to keep a 30, 60 or 90-day journal in whatever format works best for you. It could be written, recorded on audio or video, photographed or expressed through artwork. How you document our journal is up to you.

Sign up TODAY: https://wihist.org/2RNg5L5

Then, SHARE with us why you are participating.

1. Download the sign
2. Answer the question..."I'm participating in the COVID-19 Journal Project because..."
3. Snap a photo of yourself with your sign
4. Post on Facebook or Instagram
5. Tag the Wisconsin Historical Society & use #BIGHistoryIsHappening

We will be sharing some of these photos in on our social media pages and e-newsletter.

04/19/2020
langladehistory.com

The Langlade County Historical Society spring 2020 newsletter is now online at http://langladehistory.com/Newsletters/Spring2020.pdf

“Prom”-when High Schools gyms are converted into a “Deck of a Ship” (1937), port holes on the balcony which is the upper...
04/17/2020

“Prom”-when High Schools gyms are converted into a “Deck of a Ship” (1937), port holes on the balcony which is the upper deck and four life boats are suspended from it, a moon will shine over a blue sky filled with stars, the lower deck is furnished with lawn furniture. “ A Fairytale “(1940), a fairyland scene, a wooden path and castle with a princess, an illuminated star centered the pastel ceiling decorations, lawn and porch furniture are scattered at the edge of the dance floor. Over the Rainbow” (1965), transformed into the Land of Oz- a tattered scarecrow, a tin man, a friendly lion were among the spectators “Beneath the Sea” (1966)- A boat suspended from the ceiling, with blue waves of water, fishes of many shapes and sizes and red seahorses form an arch in the center of the gym. “Through the looking Glass” (1968) the couple walked through a looking glass and over a bridge into the world of Alice of Wonderland- with a white rabbit, Alice, The Queen of Hearts and the Mad Hatter looking on. “ Gone with the Wind -(1969) A white columned- mansion and a southern garden and a gazebo.

With people not being able to go to the theater and see a movie lets learn about the Palace Theater in Antigo... Harvey ...
04/15/2020

With people not being able to go to the theater and see a movie lets learn about the Palace Theater in Antigo... Harvey Hanson prominent theater owner was born in Appleton, WI in 1883, he came to Antigo around 1908 and started in the theater business. In 1909 the Hanson building was built on 5th Ave ( still stands today,the name Hanson is still on the building) and during this time Harvey Hanson showed silent movies to the people of Antigo, thus started the beginning of the Palace Theater. Then in 1915, Harvey leased the building to a well known five and ten cent store F.W. Woolworth, and across the street the “New” Palace Theater was going to be built. In 1916, the new Palace Theater ( capacity 1180 seats and at that time the only fireproof theater in central Wisconsin) opened and it was a successful venture and generations of movie goers attended the show house to be enthralled by Hollywood movies. On the stage were occasional vaudeville and talent shows. In 1928, the Palace was leased to Fox- Midwesco Theaters, Inc. who ran the theater until 1946, when Midwesco went bankrupt Harvey Hanson regained ownership and then in 1947 Harvey leased the Palace to Lucille Fowler of Merrill until 1958. The Palace Theater was one of the largest and best known motion picture house in northern Wisconsin. In 1959, the Palace Theater was purchased by James and John Suick from Agnes Hanson. In 1971, James Suick son Tim purchased the Palace Theater from his dad. Today it is still owned by Tim and Barb Suick.

The Lumber Industry in Northern Wisconsin
04/10/2020
The Lumber Industry in Northern Wisconsin

The Lumber Industry in Northern Wisconsin

Prior to the Civil War, most of northern Wisconsin was inhabited by the Menominee and Ojibwe Indians, and transient fur traders of European origin. Demand for wood in Chicago and Milwaukee after the Civil War …

Since it’s National Beer Day- let’s celebrate the two breweries that were in Antigo. The Antigo Brewery- was organized i...
04/07/2020

Since it’s National Beer Day- let’s celebrate the two breweries that were in Antigo.
The Antigo Brewery- was organized in 1896, (near beer was manufactured for awhile after the 18th amendment was passed)it’s plant and office were located on south Edison Street( later that building would become Kraft Cheese and today it’s home to Sartori Cheese Company).
The Citizens Brewery- was incorporated in 1899. The plant was located on Superior Street north of the office . The office was at the intersection of Sixth Avenue and Superior Street ( today that is where Anytime Fitness is located).

Wisconsin Historical Society
04/02/2020

Wisconsin Historical Society

Opening day for MLB was supposed to happen on March 26. How much are you missing the baseball season and the Milwaukee Brewers?

On this day in 1998, the Brewers played their first game as a National League team, losing to the Atlanta Braves at Turner Field.

The Brewers' transfer, the first since the American League was formed at the turn on the century, was necessary to create a 16-team National League and a 14-team American League.

Learn more about the rise of professional sports here in Wisconsin: https://wihist.org/2xDXSZ6

📸: Milwaukee County Stadium in 1978
WHI Image 50327

John Ogden House- 502 Virginia Street. John Ogden’s great grandfather from New York State fought in the Revolutionary Wa...
04/01/2020

John Ogden House- 502 Virginia Street.
John Ogden’s great grandfather from New York State fought in the Revolutionary War. His grand- uncle William moved to Chicago and became the founder and first President of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad. John’s grandfather Abraham Ogden Jr. moved to the western part of New York and engaged in lumbering. He later traveled to Niles, Michigan where he bought large tracts of land, he still wanted to go farther west and crossed Lake Michigan and settled in Madison, Wi. John’s father Caleb founded Ogdensburg in Waupaca County in 1854, he built the first sawmill and gristmill, platted the village and started the first store. He was elected district attorney of Waupaca County in 1857. John Ogden was born in 1851, he attended school until he was 15. He began his trade as a printer and also studied law in his fathers office. He was admitted to the bar in 1873. Five years later he launched the Taylor County News at Medford,WI while also practicing law. He sold this paper and in 1886, John bought from C. A. Martin the Antigo Weekly, The Forward and changed the name to The Antigo Republican. He sold the paper in 1889. It was eventually purchased by the Berner Bro’s. Publishing Co. and merge with the Antigo Daily Journal. In the summer of 1910, John Ogden was appointed municipal judge to succeed Judge W.H. White. He was elected to the office in 1911, and served until his death in 1913. He was married to the former Alida Randall.

In normal times today would have been the opening of baseball season. Here are some local teams of the area from the pas...
03/26/2020

In normal times today would have been the opening of baseball season. Here are some local teams of the area from the past.

Alfred P. Church home- 402 Lincoln StreetAlfred was born in 1852 in Germantown, Wisconsin. His father George Church buil...
03/19/2020

Alfred P. Church home- 402 Lincoln Street
Alfred was born in 1852 in Germantown, Wisconsin. His father George Church built the first hotel in Milwaukee, it was a log structure and stood on the site of the later Republican House across from the Milwaukee City Hall.
In the late 1800’s A.P. Church had driven a horse team from Menominee Falls to Antigo. He hired out to haul logs to the Weed Sawmill for Sands & Elliot who had a camp a few miles from Antigo. A.P. Church started the first dray line in the Antigo area. After selling it out he obtained a position as a district oil inspector. He married Adella Costlet in 1890. From 1903-1907 he was Langlade County Treasurer. For 15 years he was in the monument business, Granite & Marble Works which was located at 612 Clermont Street. His territory included 19 Northern Wisconsin Counties and much of Northern Michigan, the stones came from Bafre, Vermont. The first house that stood on this site burned and the one in the pictures was a replacement. Prominent features are the position of the entrance at the corner with its ornate roof and trim and the prominent bay window. A back porch, later removed is visible on the extreme left in the picture. Two small gates opens onto the wooden sidewalk leading to the main entrance at the southeast corner. A walk from another gate led to a veranda that ran along a addition built to the west end that was later removed by a later owner. A two story barn stood at the end of the driveway in from Lincoln Street. A row of large willow trees grew from willow stems Mrs. Church had brought from her home in Pennsylvania. A. P. Church died in 1936 at the age of 83. The children of Mr. & Mrs Church were Eva, Bessie and Ila Church.

Recollection Wisconsin
03/18/2020

Recollection Wisconsin

"When we finish our part a new day will dawn" emblemizes the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps and perhaps has special meaning to us all right now.

Enjoy (and learn from, kids) these wonderful images of CCC life from Langlade County Historical Society: http://ow.ly/jyz630qqJMH

Here are some scenes from a past and more lively St. Patrick's Day in Antigo. Wait till next year.
03/17/2020

Here are some scenes from a past and more lively St. Patrick's Day in Antigo. Wait till next year.

03/17/2020

An article from the Antigo Daily Journal Prime Time tells how we have all been in a similar situation before: "In November day in 1918, with so much to celebrate with the end of World War I, residents of Antigo were told by city health officials to avoid crowds. The reason was the influenza pandemic which was near its peak at the time with 600 to 700 confirmed cases in Antigo.
It was called the “Spanish Flu” although there is no evidence that it originated in Spain and it killed between 50-100 million people world-wide. Unlike most flu strains, the 1918 variety killed many young healthy adults in addition to the elderly, children, and those with pre-existing medical conditions.
Initially Wisconsin had poor record keeping but the first flu related death likely occurred in Milwaukee in September, 1918. The first reported person from Langlade County to succumb was William Grimm who died on October 14 while in Pittsburgh. He was the son of Rev. and Mrs. A Grimm and managed the Antigo Publishing Company that specialized in German publications. He was 28 years old and in the army as a bandmaster stationed in Pittsburgh at the time.
It was falsely assumed that small town Antigo would escape the pandemic. Anna Deleglise Morrissey of Antigo received letters from a son in Madison and a daughter in St. Paul. They each describe how wide spread and deadly the outbreaks were in their areas and commented that their family and friends in Antigo should consider themselves fortunate to live in an area that was unlikely to experience such a medical calamity. But, as it turned out, living in Antigo did not provide immunity.
By the final weeks of October there were about 150 confirmed cases in Elton and White Lake and over 400 in Antigo. City Health Commissioner Dr. G. W. Moore recognized the severity of the problem very early as the trickle of cases grew. The first deaths due to influenza in Antigo were those of Lucile Shallow, age 20, and her brother Henry, days apart, in the last week of October.
On October 10 Wisconsin became the first state to mandate state-wide school closings to minimize contacts and Antigo immediately complied. Concerned over what high school boys might do with their free time caused officials to close all pool halls and bowling allies.
Other public places were soon closed as well. These included movie theaters, churches and Sunday schools. Even funeral services were curtailed and services limited to family members only. Hospital procedures were strictly regulated. Hospitals forbade visitors access to hospital rooms with influenza patients. Only medical practitioners were permitted to enter the rooms of these patients.
Homes with a sick resident had a red card placed in the window identifying that a resident was ill. The placard was placed in a conspicuous place on which was written “Influenza” in letters at least two inches high. Even healthy individuals who lived in the home were restricted in their movements. Only medical practitioners were permitted to enter these homes. The quarantine could be lifted only after residents provided proof that no one in the house had had a temperature for at least four days. Once the sick residents recovered their homes continued to be placarded for at least four days and then the houses had to be aired out, the woodwork washed with soap and water or disinfectant and all bed clothing used by the patient boiled or thoroughly cleansed and aired. Only then could the placard be removed.
Often several members of a household were afflicted and no one was healthy enough take care of the family. There were reports that as many as ten members in one household might have been infected. The Red Cross played a major role in helping these families. They raised funds for the preparation of an early version of “meals on wheels’. The Domestic Science classrooms at the high school were used by the teacher and three eighth grade girls to prepare foods including vegetable soups and broths, chocolate and rice puddings, custards, oatmeal, stewed prunes, toast, jelly, baked apples and potatoes. Boy scouts would deliver the food to families too ill to prepare meals for themselves.
. People were urged to receive a serum developed by the Mayo brothers in Minnesota. It had first been made available to all railway workers and seemed effective. Other untested remedies were also suggested. Newspaper ads announced home treatments and certain diets. One article recommended the three Cs: keep a “clean mouth, clean skin and clean bowels. One local clothing store suggested you could avoid influenza by keeping warm in one of their coats.
By mid-November the number of cases seemed to be dropping and the Palace Theater announced it would reopen on November15th but reconsidered on the advice of city health officials and waited another week. Churches, lodges and other public places also opened by late November. But schools decided to wait a little longer and did not reopen until December 2, after being closed for seven weeks.
By mid-December normalcy began to return to Langlade County and people were getting into the spirit of Christmas. But officials were still advising the need for caution. It is impossible to tell how many people in Langlade County caught the flu or died of it. Some cases may not have been reported and some not correctly diagnosed. But from October to December of 1918, when people might have been celebrating the end of World War I along with Thanksgiving and Christmas they lived in semi isolation and fear of a deadly disease that swept the globe."

Address

404 Superior St
Antigo, WI
54409

Opening Hours

Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(715) 627-4464

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Comments

I'm currently going through the archives at my company (Maas Brothers Construction in Watertown) in anticipation of our 100th anniversary in 2022. I found this picture and have determined it must be the Antigo Vocational School project we built in 1936. From what I can tell from Google maps, it still stands and is used as part of the middle school. I have the blueprints somewhere as well. I thought it was interesting and wanted to share. Feel free to share it with the schools district or others as well. If anybody has more information on the building or photos of construction (long shot, I'm sure), I'd love to see them! - Anthony Maas
Looking back in time-Clipping from 6-24-98
About a year and half ago, I came across these pictures while cleaning out some paperwork at my parents home. I am interested in getting these pictures back to the family members if possible. My Grampa, (Walter Kamps) was on the Langlade County Board. That's why I believe our family ended up with these pictures. They are from around the 1960's. First picture, I am told that the gentleman on the right is Harold Singer. This is of the old Midland Co-op Gas Station and Hardware Store on 6th Ave. (Now Anytime Fitness Center is what I am told). The second picture is also the Midland Gas Station but I do not know the gentlemen in the picture. The gentleman in the third picture, I believe, is the same gentleman that is in the first picture, on the left, but again, I do not know the name. The third and fourth picture, I am told, are also of the Midland Hardware Store. Any help in finding out more information and the proper home for these pictures would be greatly appreciated.
Y'all wouldn't happen to have more information on this case, would you?
The school house, was erected by the Charles W. Fish Lumber Company. The first teacher was Miss Lola Mills who was my Grandmother.
I recently found out my biological father had a bar in Antigo called Gil’s Blue Flame. Anyone know anything about it or have any pictures? Thanks!
I have not visited the museum since they moved to the old library........we went yesterday, and how wonderful!!! I guess when you get older you really appreciate history! The gentleman who showed us the cabin, is so knowledgeable!! Half the time I can not remember the 2 things I need to get from the store, and this man knows so very much!! Admission is by donation. I would highly recommend for anyone and everyone to go through and see all of the amazing history in this building and on the grounds!! just awesome!
This is my great grandmother and my grandmother...1926..july/aug/...I can see a lake in the background...but not sure where it was taken..I know they spent time on Lac Vieux Desert ...any help would be appreciated
Does anyone know the history of Typner Lake? Where the name came from? I cannot find it in my family's history. Any help or thoughts would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!
Anyone familiar with Langlade County recognize this park? The picture is from the early 70s. It was thought to be Summit Lake Park, but I walked the park today and the topography didn’t seem to match.
1911 INDIAN Motorcycle Langlade Fairgrounds