Addison Gallery of American Art

Addison Gallery of American Art The Addison Gallery is home to a world-class collection of American art, along with a vital and adventurous exhibitions program.
(20)

#blackouttuesday
06/02/2020

#blackouttuesday

Happy Senior Sunrise to the @phillipsacademy Class of 2020! 💙⁣⁣Carroll Dunham (born 1949) (PA 1967). The Sun, 2000-2001....
06/01/2020

Happy Senior Sunrise to the @phillipsacademy Class of 2020! 💙⁣

Carroll Dunham (born 1949) (PA 1967). The Sun, 2000-2001. Digital pigmented inkjet graphic with intaglio on Concorde paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, gift of the artist (PA 1967), 2007.42.26⁣

#carrolldunham #seniorsunrise #seniorweek #AndoverMMXX #addisonfromhome

We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Christo today at the age of 84. Born Christo Vladimirov Javacheff in Bu...
05/31/2020

We are deeply saddened to hear of the passing of Christo today at the age of 84. Born Christo Vladimirov Javacheff in Bulgaria, the artist is best known for his monumental yet ephemeral collaborations with his late wife Jeanne-Claude (who happened to have been born on the same day)—including Running Fence (1976), Wrapped Reichstag (1997), and The Gates (2005).⁣

“A work of art is a scream of freedom.” Christo⁣

Christo (1935-2020) and Jeanne-Claude (1935-2009). Wrapped Armchair Project, 1990. Mixed media. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, gift of James R. Fuller (PA 1956) in memory of James R. Fuller (PA 1867), 1992.29⁣

#christo #christoandjeanneclaude

We Mourn Our Loss.⁣⁣Kerry James Marshall (born 1955). Souvenir II, 1997. Acrylic, collage, and glitter on unstretched ca...
05/30/2020

We Mourn Our Loss.⁣

Kerry James Marshall (born 1955). Souvenir II, 1997. Acrylic, collage, and glitter on unstretched canvas banner. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, purchased as the gift of the Addison Advisory Council in honor of John ("Jock") M. Reynolds's directorship of the Addison Gallery of American Art, 1989-1998, 1998.160⁣

#kerryjamesmarshall

Let’s end this dumpster fire of a week on a high note with one of the true masterpieces of the Addison’s collection—Geor...
05/29/2020

Let’s end this dumpster fire of a week on a high note with one of the true masterpieces of the Addison’s collection—George Bellows’ The Circus, 1912!

In his masterful 1912 painting The Circus, Bellows used a brisk, dynamic brushstroke, to create a sense of swirling, excited motion within the circus ring. The fast-paced energy this work exudes suggests that Bellows stood in the crowd to spontaneously capture a passing moment on canvas. However, The Circus was in fact painted from memory in the artists’ studio, and a second look reveals a grid of pin holes across the canvas. This careful geometric planning underlying the structure of the work suggests that Bellows was influenced by and followed the color and compositional mathematics of the theorist Hardesty Maratta. The balance is focused around the colorful figure of a girl standing on a white horse. She remains grounded in the center of the canvas with the enthusiastic crowd framing her. The viewer’s eye is drawn into a calculated triangle, from the central performer down to the prominent corner figures in the foreground. Finally, the vertical lines of the receding tent poles and the horizontal bands of the crowd create an organizational grid over the canvas, balancing the painting’s lively activity with a sense of calming control. The year after its completion, this painting was exhibited in the Armory Show of 1913 that introduced European modernism to America. ⁣

George Bellows (1882-1925). The Circus, 1912. Oil on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, gift of Elizabeth Paine Metcalf, 1947.8⁣

#georgebellows #ashcanschool #circus #america #americanart #addisonfromhome #armoryshow

Today is #NationalWorkFromHomeDay! I’ve been celebrating this holiday privately (butchered an Office joke there) for the...
05/28/2020

Today is #NationalWorkFromHomeDay! I’ve been celebrating this holiday privately (butchered an Office joke there) for the past 11 weeks and thought I’d give you a glimpse into how my colleagues and I are planning exhibitions drawn from our permanent collection from home. ⁣

We’re incredibly lucky to have nearly our entire collection of 23,000 works of art digitized and available for browsing via the collection portal on our website. It’s a great resource and I highly recommend checking it out (see the link in our bio). What you see online is the public interface of our collection management system (the cool kids say “CMS”) and provides interested viewers with all the relevant information they’d likely need about any given object (think artist names, titles, dates of creation, media and credit lines, exhibition histories, and even wall text in some cases). ⁣

What you might not know is that this public interface is connected to our own internal database that is only accessible to Addison staff. We need to have access to information beyond what we share publicly—for example the current location of a work of art in storage, object valuations, conservation records, installation instructions, comments from visiting scholars, and detailed logs that track every time an object is moved (imagine keeping track of 23,000 objects? It’s hard work!) Thanks to the amazing IT staff at @phillipsacademy, we’re able to remotely access our database—this is a huge deal!⁣

Perhaps most importantly, we can gather objects together in portfolios that can be kept private or can be shared with the entire team. What you see here is just a small segment of a portfolio I’ve assembled for my upcoming Currents/Crosscurrents exhibition—it looks a bit like an online shopping cart but with priceless masterpieces instead of socks and toothpaste. The thumbnails are great but don’t convey the scale and power of the real objects—we can do a lot of planning with the great digital resources available to us but nothing can replace the real thing! ⁣

Let’s hope we can see these great works in person, and not just on a screen, again very soon! ⁣#addisonfromhome

Coney Island, 1948 or Gulf Shores, Alabama, Memorial Day Weekend, 2020?⁣⁣Reginald Marsh (1898-1954). Crowded Day at Cone...
05/28/2020

Coney Island, 1948 or Gulf Shores, Alabama, Memorial Day Weekend, 2020?⁣

Reginald Marsh (1898-1954). Crowded Day at Coney, 1948. Chinese ink and wash on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, gift of Louis F. Kemp (PA 1925), 1996.76⁣

#reginaldmarsh #mask #coneyisland #wearamask #beaches #covid19 #cnn

It’s a scorcher out there! Who has a pool that I could visit while maintaining strict social distancing? I’ll bring my r...
05/27/2020

It’s a scorcher out there! Who has a pool that I could visit while maintaining strict social distancing? I’ll bring my ruffled swimming cap!🏊‍♂️ 🩱👙🌞⁣

Jerry Gordon (1949-1997). The Breakers Hotel, Palm Beach, Florida, 1978. Cibachrome print. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, gift of Patricia Gordon, 1991.100⁣

#jerrygordon #palmbeach #breakerspalmbeach #swimmingpool #pool #swimming #underwater #underwaterphotography #1970s #addisonfromhome

The pioneering American photojournalist and documentary photographer Dorothea Lange was born on this day 125 years ago i...
05/26/2020

The pioneering American photojournalist and documentary photographer Dorothea Lange was born on this day 125 years ago in Hoboken, New Jersey. ⁣

In August of 1935, Lange began work for the Resettlement Administration (later renamed Farm Security Administration or FSA). Her photographs document the plight of impoverished farmers, sharecroppers, and homesteaders living in dustbowl conditions. In Three Generations of Texans, three men pose in front of a tent. Unlike the two older men, who appear as if they have spent many long days working in agriculture, the young man is not dressed for farm labor. Like many of Lange’s photographs, this image captures the pervasive shift in American culture in this period from a rural to industrial society.⁣

Dorothea Lange (1895-1965). Three Generations of Texans, neg. 1935, printed c. 1960. Gelatin silver print. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 2018.59⁣

#dorothealange #wpa #fsa #documentaryphotography #photography #addisonfromhome #americanart #addisongalleryofamericanart

#MemorialDay⁣⁣Eugene Richards (born 1944). 18 Year Old Marine Shipping Out for Vietnam, Doe Lake Arkansas, 1971. Gelatin...
05/25/2020

#MemorialDay⁣

Eugene Richards (born 1944). 18 Year Old Marine Shipping Out for Vietnam, Doe Lake Arkansas, 1971. Gelatin silver print. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, 1974.77⁣

#eugenerichards

The American abstract expressionist action painter Franz Kline was born on this day in 1910 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvani...
05/23/2020

The American abstract expressionist action painter Franz Kline was born on this day in 1910 in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. ⁣

“The final test of painting, theirs, mine, any other, is: does the painter’s emotion come across?” Franz Kline ⁣

Franz Kline (1910-1962). Abstract, 1948. Oil on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, gift of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Lane, 1969.10⁣

#franzkline #abstractexpressionism #abex #actionpainting #newyorkschool #1940s #abstractart #addisonfromhome #addisongalleryofamericanart

Happy #NationalRoadTripDay! Today we’d like to look at one of the more notorious road trips in the history of the Addiso...
05/22/2020

Happy #NationalRoadTripDay! Today we’d like to look at one of the more notorious road trips in the history of the Addison and American Art: the conceptual artist Larry Stark’s 1970 Addison-sponsored, 10,000 mile trip across the United States during which the artist ate only @mcdonalds. ⁣

A collaboration between then director Christopher Cook and Stark, the “hamburger project” was crystallized in a 1970 letter from Stark to Cook in which the artist stated “if I could spend one month eating at McDonalds and only at McDonalds, it would be like the Zen artist who draws one twig and only one twig until he knows that twig. In our culture the twig trip could only be a dream or an escape from the reality of America: which is the city, the suburb, and the near country. McDonalds and the other chains of restaurants, stores, gas stations, and such are ‘things in common’ to all of us.” ⁣

With $500 from the Addison in hand, along with the promise of an eventual exhibition and added stipulations from Cook (that he could only eat at McDonald’s, that he had to pick up every hitchhiker he saw, and that he had to give the museum a set of prints from an edition of photo silkscreens that he planned to produce in response to his adventure) Stark left his Michigan home in May 1970. To document his trip, he took photographs, kept a diary, made tape recordings, retained the food containers and utensils he received with his meals, and collected the signs his hitchhikers held up to attract the driver’s attention. ⁣

The resulting exhibition “In the merry month of May/Larry crossed the U.S.A./Ate McDonald’s all the way—/Tells his story day by day” presented what Avis Berman described as “an orgy of facts, statistics, and other pieces of literal information.” Stark had travelled 10,000 miles, taken 852 black and white photographs and 323 color slides, and consumed 43 Big Macs, 16 hamburgers, 4 double cheeseburgers, 19 regular cheeseburgers, 16 fish sandwiches, and 35 packs of fries. ⁣

Swipe through to see some of the screenprints created after his journey along with and exhibition installation view and the cover of the accompanying catalogue! @ Addison Gallery of American Art

Welcome to today’s installment of our ongoing series of #throwbackthursday deep dives into the important, groundbreaking...
05/21/2020

Welcome to today’s installment of our ongoing series of #throwbackthursday deep dives into the important, groundbreaking, unusual, or just plain weird exhibitions that have graced the walls of the Addison Gallery of American Art over the past 89 years! ⁣

Today, we’re featuring “Jim Hodges: colorsound,” an exhibition that ran from April 12-July 31, 2003 at the Addison. During his time as the Edward E. Elson artist-in-residence at the Addison the American installation artist Jim Hodges worked with over a hundred students from @phillipsacademy and neighboring schools to create a visual and musical installation that explored the connections between color, sound, memory, and personal history. The exhibition included a selection of works that represented the artist’s experiments with music in addition to a site-specific wall mural that led visitors down the museum’s main corridor and into a gallery where they could experience and participate in a concert of sound and color created by the artist and his collaborators. ⁣

We can only imagine how many selfies would have been taken in this exhibition had it appeared 15 years later! ⁣

#jimhodges #installation #installationart #sitespecific #mural #americanart #music #addisonfromhome @ Addison Gallery of American Art

The American trompe l’œil master John a Frederick Peto was born on this day in 1854.⁣⁣This is the earliest recorded work...
05/21/2020

The American trompe l’œil master John a Frederick Peto was born on this day in 1854.⁣

This is the earliest recorded work by John Frederick Peto that belongs to a type of still life commonly known as a “rack picture.” Peto, who preferred the term “office board,” has been recognized as the American master of the genre and he executed more examples of it than did any other American artist. Peto painted rack pictures during two distinct phases of his career. The first occurred during the years 1879–85, the period to which the Addison’s example belongs; the second ran from 1894 to 1907. In the earlier period, he created rack pictures which, like the Addison’s, make specific references to places of business. Compositionally, they tend to be more crowded and complicated than those of the later period, and, more often than not, they include objects apparently unrelated to each other—photographs, almanacs, keys, and pieces of string, for instance.⁣

In Office Board for Smith Brothers Coal Company, among the objects tucked into the tapes of the board is the illustrated business card of the Smith Brothers Coal Company from which the painting takes its title, a calling card from one “Dr. H. Jones,” a postcard depicting flowers and a hovering bee, and an envelope with the cryptic phrase: IMPORTANT INFORMATION INSIDE. A number of these elements appear in other rack pictures by Peto. Despite the presence of the card for the Smith Brothers Coal Company, there is no evidence that a company owned by brothers named Smith commissioned or ever owned the Addison’s painting; in fact, attempts to identify the company have been unsuccessful, and it seems likely that it was a product of Peto’s imagination. It seems equally likely that most or all of the objects depicted in this and similar paintings were actually owned by Peto, not by his patrons.⁣

John Frederick Peto (1854-1907). Office Board for Smith Brothers Coal Company, 1879. Oil on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1956.13⁣

#johnfrederickpeto #johnfpeto #peto #trompeloeil #stilllife #americanart #19thcentury #addisonfromhome #addisongalleryofamericanart #officeboard

🍓Happy #PickStrawberriesDay! 🍓 ⁣⁣Did you know that strawberries are in the rose family? Did you also know that garden st...
05/20/2020

🍓Happy #PickStrawberriesDay! 🍓 ⁣

Did you know that strawberries are in the rose family? Did you also know that garden strawberries are an excellent source of Vitamin C? And did you also know that the garden strawberry (what we think of when we think of strawberries) was first bred in Britany, France in the 1750s by crossbreeding two species of wild strawberries: Fragaria virginiana from North America and Fragaria chiloensis from Chile? We didn’t either until mere moments ago. Thank you Wikipedia! ⁣

Happy picking!⁣

Winslow Homer (1836-1910). Boy Picking Berries, 1873. Graphite and gouache on paper. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 1937.2⁣

#winslowhomer #berrypicking #strawberry #strawberries #americanart #drawing #addisonfromhome

We are very pleased to announce the Addison’s acquisition of Jaune Quick-to-See Smith’s Drive-Thru, 2002! ⁣⁣Appropriatin...
05/19/2020

We are very pleased to announce the Addison’s acquisition of Jaune Quick-to-See Smith’s Drive-Thru, 2002! ⁣

Appropriating the aesthetics of European-American modernism through her references to Abstract Expressionist painting and the work of Robert Rauschenberg, Quick-to-See Smith deploys the language of the dominant culture to shine a critical light on the erasure and marginalization of Indigenous peoples in North America from first contact to the present day. A self-described cultural worker and enrolled member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Jaune Quick-to-See Smith sees her acclaimed work and activism for Indigenous political, cultural, social and environmental rights as fundamentally intertwined. #whatisamerica⁣

(Note: This acquisition was put in motion months before the COVID-19 epidemic and was formally approved by our board of trustees earlier this month.) ⁣

Jaune Quick-to-See Smith (born 1940). Drive-Thru, 2002. Acrylic on canvas. Addison Gallery of American Art, Phillips Academy, Andover, MA, museum purchase, 2020.69⁣

#jaunequicktoseesmith #americanart #addisonfromhome #addisongalleryofamericanart @garthgreenangallery

I imagine no one out there remembers our opening day but I imagine a few of you might remember our epic 50th anniversary...
05/19/2020

I imagine no one out there remembers our opening day but I imagine a few of you might remember our epic 50th anniversary bash.⁣

According to a May 9, 1981 article in the @nytimes “shortly before noon the 1,200 students of the academy will swarm into the lawn in front of the gallery...A huge geometric ‘sculpture’ on the lawn will disintegrate as revelers remove the multicolored box lunches that it is made up of. What is being billed as ‘the 1,200 kazoo chorus’ (instruments come with lunch) will perform ‘Happy Birthday’ to signal the cutting of the birthday cake: a grand three-dimensional version of a prized Addison painting, Patrick Henry Bruce’s ‘Forms on Table.’ [sic] The museum’s Director since 1969, Christopher Cook, would have preferred a baked edition of Josef Albers’s ‘Bent Black (A),’ which he thought would mean more to the grade-conscious students.” ⁣

Luckily, the photographer Roswell Angier was on hand to document some of the May 9th festivities. Scroll through to see a few shots of partiers enjoying a number of exhibitions, including an installation of Sandy Skoglund’s Radioactive Cats! ⁣

#roswellangier #sandyskoglund #birthdayparty #1980s #addisongalleryofamericanart #andover #addisonfromhome @ Addison Gallery of American Art

Address

Addison Gallery Of American Art, Phillips Academy, 3 Chapel Avenue
Andover, MA
01810

The Addison Gallery of American Art is on the campus of Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts.

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Addison Gallery of American Art posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Museum

Send a message to Addison Gallery of American Art:

Videos

Category

Nearby museums


Comments

while reading a book titled Downtown (My Manhattan) written by Pete Hamill and searching work done by John Sloan I came across You...what a Find and so close to where I live!