National Motorcycle Museum

National Motorcycle Museum The National Motorcycle Museum (located in Anamosa, Iowa) was founded in 1989 to preserve, document, and educate the public on the rich history of motorcycling - from the evolution of motorcycles to key personalities http://www.nationalmcmuseum.org/
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Rat Fink Friday!! Nice helmet!
12/21/2018

Rat Fink Friday!! Nice helmet!

TBT!!Harley Race Team.
12/20/2018

TBT!!
Harley Race Team.

12/19/2018

1998 Buell S1 White Lightning
This 1998 Buell S1 White Lightning is in the rare and dramatic orange body/blue frame color combination. One of the coolest Buells made, this bike was originally a promotional bike loaned to Country Music singer Alan Jackson. With a total of three years of production, about 2200 S1 White Lightnings were built in 1998. They used the Thunderstorm cylinder heads delivering about 10 extra horsepower.

While Buell motorcycles themselves are interesting, motorcycle entrepreneur Erik Buell’s personal story is truly captivating. In an era when the Japanese makers had massive sales, and their design and engineering teams had the ability to invent about anything motorcycle inexpensively and rapidly, Erik Buell chose to go his own way and ultimately invent his own motorcycle brand around his designs. Buell was born in 1950 and by 1979 had earned a degree in Engineering. His favorite form of motorcycling was road racing, which he pursued in his twenties while in school. While not studying or racing, like many of us, he worked at a bike shop. But his degree, and great persistence, landed Buell a job at Harley-Davidson Motor Company right out of school in 1979. There he was part of the Nova V-Four project and worked on the new FX series chassis design. Always the road racer, while not at the Motor Company, he continued racing, then acquired the Barton two-stroke square four 750 road racer from its British maker; drawings, patterns, parts and the rights to build Bartons. He hoped Harley-Davidson would embrace the Barton’s development as well. But when this path was shunned, Buell left the Motor Company in about 1983 to create the RW (Road Warrior) 750 around the Barton design and established Buell Motor Company. AMA rule changes obsoleted the RW750 shortly and his hopes to sell and support a production road racer, along the lines of Yamaha’s late TZ750, were dashed.

Going to Harley-Davidson for a power-plant, Buell next innovated the fully enclosed RR1000 Battle Twin which used Harley’s newly created XR1000 engine. Things began to happen for Buell when he developed the RS1200 using the new Evolution 1200 Sportster engine, but unit sales were still around 100 per year. In the RS design was a rear suspension system he would use for awhile; a coil-over shock mounted under the engine was in pull instead of compression mode to manage movement of the swing-arm. Harley-Davidson needed sportier new designs and around 1990 then CEO Vaughn Beals was convinced to bring Buell Motorcycle Company in house with a 51% purchase of Erik’s company. Over 136,000 Buell’s were produced by late 2009 when Harley-Davidson discontinued the brand. Erik Buell racing continued innovation and production but by 2015 closed its doors and soon went into liquidation; some new Buells are still available.
This Buell is one of several of Erik Buell’s creations currently on display at the National Motorcycle Museum, some stock, some in road race trim.

Specifications:

Engine: 45 Degree V-Twin
Type: OHV Air-cooled, 2 Valves per Cylinder
Bore & Stroke: 89mm x 97mm
Displacement: 73.4 Cu. In / 1203 cc’s
Induction: Two 40mm Keihin Carburetors
Ignition: Electronic
Starting: Electric
Horsepower: 101HP
Transmission: 5-Speed
Final Drive: Kevlar Belt
Suspension: Upside Down Fork/Single Shock
Frame: Tubular Steel
Wheels/Tires: 120/70 ZR17/ 170/60 ZR17
Brakes: 340mm Disk, 6 Piston Caliper / 230mm Disk, 2 piston Caliper
Weight: 441 Pounds

12/18/2018

The 1911 Steco cycle car with Perry Mack motor is progressing in re assembly after painting.

Toy Tuesday! Come by and see all our toys when you are passing this Christmas.
12/18/2018

Toy Tuesday! Come by and see all our toys when you are passing this Christmas.

12/17/2018

The date is closing in! There is still time to get you tickets in!

Plan your Holiday trip now.
12/17/2018

Plan your Holiday trip now.

Memorabilia Monday! Stop in an see what we are displaying of our collection as your Holiday travels pass you by us.
12/17/2018

Memorabilia Monday! Stop in an see what we are displaying of our collection as your Holiday travels pass you by us.

Rat Fink Friday!!
12/14/2018

Rat Fink Friday!!

TBT!! Alan Victor Richardson 1940’s in England outside of North Hampton Hill Climbs. Photo donated to the Museum by hi...
12/13/2018

TBT!! Alan Victor Richardson 1940’s in England outside of North Hampton Hill Climbs. Photo donated to the Museum by his son Wayne Richardson.

12/12/2018

One of our Fundraiser supporters has been very creative with his entry envelopes!! We thought you might also enjoy seeing them.

12/12/2018

1990 Harley-Davidson Sportster Custom- HOT STUFF by Jesse James.

In 1994 Performance Machine was using a flat track-look custom Sportster in their ads to promote their wheels and brakes. Iowa resident Jaey Sedlacek called PM, asking to buy the bike. Responding it was not for sale, PM sent Sedlacek to a relatively unknown “machinist,” Jesse James. This is before James created the custom bike building company West Coast Choppers, when he worked for Boyd Coddington, Hot Rods by Boyd, Inc. There James created several custom and high performance Sportsters, this one commissioned by Iowan, Jaey Sedlacek. By the time James finished the bike for delivery, he was off on his own having started West Coast Choppers.

Harley Sportsters are a great starting point for everything from “replica” XR750 dirt track racers to choppers, and certainly street legal drag bikes. The engines respond to tuning, parts are widely available, basic proportions are good and the result is always a machine that looks and sounds like it means business.

As you can read on the specifications, below, this engine is more than a chromed and polished show piece. James also went the extra mile with a fully polished Super Trapp pipe, and for the suspension, used top rated shocks and a Storz “upside down” fork. Though more than a dirt track racer would use, brakes are PM and rims flangeless alloy, polished but typical of dirt trackers for a few decades.

Jaey Sedlacek is an enthusiastic supporter of the National Motorcycle Museum and has donated outright this custom Sportster and two other customs from his collection. When you visit you can see Hot Stuff and the creations of over 20 other custom builders plus several stock Sportsters, including a pretty rare “Boat-Tail.”

Specifications:
Engine: OHV Sportster, Air-Cooled
Displacement: 1200 Cubic Centimeters
Pistons: C. R. Axtell
Camshaft: Red Shift
Carburetor: Rev Tech
Ignition: Battery, Points, Coil
Heads: Jerry Branch
Ignition: MC Power Arc
Primary: Chain Driven
Transmission: Four-Speed
Clutch: Dry Multi-Plate Barnett
Frame: Steel, Double Down Tube
Suspension: Storz/Ceriani Inverted/Twin Shocks, Swingarm
Wheels/Tires: 2.125 x 19 / 4.50 x 18
Brakes: Performance Machine
Wheelbase: 57 Inches

Toy Tuesday! Come by and see all our toys. This one looks like it didn't get put away for the winter. It was played with...
12/11/2018

Toy Tuesday! Come by and see all our toys. This one looks like it didn't get put away for the winter. It was played with! As it was ment to be.

National Motorcycle Museum
12/10/2018

National Motorcycle Museum

Nice new barn find loan coming in to Mueseum. 1940's Jacobson Bike Kit. Jacobson Mfg R&D department prototyped only 8 to 10 of these before killing project off. This is serial X #7. Thanks for interesting loan and information about it Dan.

Another beautiful loan coming in is this 1947 Indian Chief. Original owner bike. Thanks Max for sharing it with us.
12/10/2018

Another beautiful loan coming in is this 1947 Indian Chief. Original owner bike. Thanks Max for sharing it with us.

Nice new barn find loan coming in to Mueseum. 1940's Jacobson Bike Kit. Jacobson Mfg  R&D department prototyped only 8 t...
12/10/2018

Nice new barn find loan coming in to Mueseum. 1940's Jacobson Bike Kit. Jacobson Mfg R&D department prototyped only 8 to 10 of these before killing project off. This is serial X #7. Thanks for interesting loan and information about it Dan.

Memorabilia Monday! Stop in an see what we are displaying today of our collection.
12/10/2018

Memorabilia Monday! Stop in an see what we are displaying today of our collection.

We left a little room for your ticket. It's time to get it in.
12/07/2018

We left a little room for your ticket. It's time to get it in.

Rat Fink Friday!!
12/07/2018

Rat Fink Friday!!

Legends Vintage Motorcycles
12/07/2018

Legends Vintage Motorcycles

A cherished picture of John Parham (L), the founder of the National Motorcycle Museum with #RickSalibury (R) . John's passing feels like only yesterday, his passion for motorcycle collecting has and will continue to be a big inspiration to us all here at Legends Vintage Motorcycles

Stage #08 of this years #motorcyclecannonball finished at John's Motorcycle Museum. A visit to the #National Motorcycle Museum in Anamosa, Iowa is must for any and all motorcycle enthusiast. Please give there page a like and follow...


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#johnparham #J&PCYCLES #nationalmotorcyclemusuem #legendsmotorcycles #legendsvintagemotorcycles #harleydavidson #hendersonmotorcycles #indianmotorcycle #motorcyclecannonball #motorcyclemuseum #ricksalisbury #acemotorcycles #2018motorcyclecannonball #motorcyclecannonball

TBT! Adding wooden fore and aft runners to a motorcycle extends the riding season for these gentlemen. Chains are attach...
12/06/2018

TBT! Adding wooden fore and aft runners to a motorcycle extends the riding season for these gentlemen. Chains are attached to rear wheel for traction, the fork is mounted to sled frame. Records show Morse & Ramsden to be a Salem, Oregon Excelsior and Dayton motorcycle dealership.

Happy 35th birthday of HD Softail!  Not invented in Milwaukee? Take a look at this orange bike. You might say, “Huh. b...
12/05/2018

Happy 35th birthday of HD Softail!
Not invented in Milwaukee? Take a look at this orange bike. You might say, “Huh. big deal, a custom Harley Softail with Pan heads from J&P Cycles or S&S.” But you’d be wrong. This is a production Road Worx frame and the first ones were made about 1979, over four years before Harley made their first Softail in 1984, with the new Evo motor. Harley met with Road Worx, bought the patented design and after a few years of development released the first Harley-Davidson Softails, 1984. The other frame, with no paint and shocks under the seat, is the first version of Road Worx frame, made a bit before the bottom shock design on the orange bike. The next time you visit the National Motorcycle Museum the bike and frame will be on display, eventually with photos and text to explain….where the Harley Softail really came from.

12/05/2018

1982 Honda CBX1000 SuperSport
The 1970’s were years of performance wars in the motorcycle industry. Late in 1978 Honda raised the stakes with the in-line Six-Cylinder DOHC Four Valves per Cylinder CBX1000 SuperSport. Though physically much larger, the engine capitalized on Honda’s Gran Prix winning sixes from the mid-1960’s.

Late in 1978 Honda took the wraps off its legendary six-cylinder street bike, the CBX1000 SuperSport. While not necessarily the fastest, it was certainly a benchmark in design, fit and finish and application of technology. The engine sat boldy in the frame extending from under the fuel tank on both sides. The cylinders sloped to reduce overall height, the generator was up behind the crankshaft to keep the motor as narrow as possible. Gauges were the largest yet, tipped up reminiscent of the Vincent Black Shadow. Wheels were new for 1978; Comstar wheels built up from riveted aluminum extrusions and stampings. Deep candy apple red and silver were first year colors, then black was added. Later on the touring equipped 1981 and 1982 machines, charcoal gray and pearl white were available. All models had highly detailed, attractive striping schemes. This CBX has had a more contoured after-market seat installed.
After 1979 and 1980 model years of the traditional twin shock CBX, some of which were the first off the line in Marysville, Ohio, Honda’s brand new United States-based facility, the bike was reconfigured. For the 1981 model year it became the factory assembled sport tourer you see here with a Hondaline fairing and saddlebags along with the Pro-Link single shock rear suspension and more substantial brakes. After just four model years in production, 1982 was the end for one of Honda’s most sophisticated designs, the CBX. You may recall this was a tough time for the Japanese manufacturers. Sales were soft and many bikes, in spite of their excellence, sat in showrooms. But today any CBX in stock trim and excellent condition is highly desirable, especially those from the first two model years. When you visit the National Motorcycle Museum you can check out a good number of super bikes including the original CB750K0, a 1983 VF750F Interceptor, a 1978 Kawasaki Z1R, KZ1000’s, Norton Commandos and the Grand daddy of performance, the Harley-Davidson Sportster.
Specifications:

Engine: Six Cylinder Double Overhead Cam
Type: Air-Cooled, Four Valves Per Cylinder
Bore & Stroke: 65mm x 54mm
Displacement: 1046 Cubic Centimeters
Compression Ratio: 9.3 : 1
Induction: Six Keihin 28mm Carburetors
Ignition: Electronic
Horsepower: 100 HP
Primary: Chain Driven
Final Drive: Chain Driven
Transmission: 5-Speed
Frame: Tubular Steel, Engine as Stressed Member
Wheelbase: 59 Inches
Fork: Telescopic, Anti-Dive
Rear Suspension: Pro-Link Single Shock
Wheels/Tires: 110/90 X 19 / 130/90 X 18
Brakes: Twin Ventilated Disks/ Disk Rear
Weight: 610 Pounds

Toy Tuesday! Come by and see all our toys. Spark some memories.
12/04/2018

Toy Tuesday! Come by and see all our toys. Spark some memories.

Memorabilia Monday! Stop in an see what we are displaying today of our collection.
12/03/2018

Memorabilia Monday! Stop in an see what we are displaying today of our collection.

It's Rat Fink Friday!!
11/30/2018

It's Rat Fink Friday!!

We are starting to fill the hopper. It's not too late to get your tickets in.
11/29/2018

We are starting to fill the hopper. It's not too late to get your tickets in.

TBT! Do you fell like you are just going around and around today?
11/29/2018

TBT! Do you fell like you are just going around and around today?

11/28/2018

1977 Ducati 900 Super Sport
Riding modified Ducati 750GTs, in 1972 Paul Smart and Bruno Spaggiari finished first and second at the fast, Daytona-like Imola 200 in San Marino, Italy. Putting their 1972 race wins to work, in 1974 the Italian manufacturer released a production desmodromic* valve 750 called the 750 Super Sport. Ducatis of the era used state of the art frames inspired by the Colin Seeley item used on some of Ducati’s GP bikes, large diameter forks and swing arms offering great stability at race track speeds. And their new V-Twin engine with “tower shaft” gear driven cams was highly dependable, greatly overbuilt. The 750 Super Sport was completely uncompromising offering a minimal fairing, solo race seat and clip-on style bars. In 1971, when early production 750GT twins were first available, Ducati was showing the world what would become its supreme, championship winning 750SS designed by the great Fabio Taglioni.

Only a few hundred “green frame” 750SS’s were hand built and are extremely desirable today. Within a few years the silver and blue 860cc version, the 900 Super Sport like this week’s featured bike, came available, essentially identical except for a bump in displacement, square cases and different graphics. With its race wins and the general superbike performance of the 750SS, the 900SS and related yellow 750 Sport, Ducati was firmly set into Superbike territory.

Ducati had not built any motorcycles pre-World War II. Starting with the 50cc Cucciolo in 1946, for about 25 years Ducati focused on sporting and utilitarian single cylinder bikes up to 350 cc’s, then moved up to V-Twins in the early 1970’s. Their focus previously was electrical devises like condensers, radios, shavers, calculators and cameras, even refrigeration equipment. Transforming bicycles into motorcycles, filling the needs of the Italian population, getting them to work is what drove Ducati to its success in motorcycle manufacturing.

When you visit the National Motorcycle Museum you can see this fine 900SS and several other Ducatis including a 1979 Mike Hailwood Replica celebrating Hailwood’s 1978 TT win, and the interesting and more modern 2001 MH900e.

*Desmodromic valve trains use two cam lobes to control opening and closing of each valve; one cam lobe opens the valve, the second cam lobe forces the valve shut. Most engines, like the production 750GT, use one cam lobe to open the valve, but a coil spring to close it.

Engine: 90 Degree V-Twin
Type: Desmodromic SOHC
Bore & Stroke: 86mm x 80mm
Displacement: 864 cc’s
Carburetors: 40mm / Dual Dell’Ortos
Lubrication: Wet Sump
Horsepower: 80 HP
Electrics: 12 Volt / Coil and Points
Primary: Gear Driven
Transmission: 5-Speed
Frame: Steel, Engine as Stressed Member
Suspension: Hydraulic Fork/Twin Shocks
Wheels: 90/100 R18 / 120/90 R 18
Brakes: Dual 280mm Disk / Single 260mm Disk
Wheelbase: 59 Inches
Weight: 495 Pounds

Thank you Linn Area Credit Union for the nice donation and recognizing the National Motorcycle Museum this year.
11/27/2018

Thank you Linn Area Credit Union for the nice donation and recognizing the National Motorcycle Museum this year.

Toy Tuesday! Great Triumph model with amazing detail. Come see the amazing collection we have.
11/27/2018

Toy Tuesday! Great Triumph model with amazing detail. Come see the amazing collection we have.

Memorabilia Monday!
11/26/2018

Memorabilia Monday!

We are open today 10am till 4pm. If you are out shopping stop in for a visit.
11/23/2018

We are open today 10am till 4pm. If you are out shopping stop in for a visit.

Rat Fink Friday!!
11/23/2018

Rat Fink Friday!!

Look!! If you are Shopping Friday come by and take advantage of our in store Black Friday Sale!! (Friday Nov 23 only)
11/21/2018

Look!! If you are Shopping Friday come by and take advantage of our in store Black Friday Sale!! (Friday Nov 23 only)

11/21/2018

1928 Harley-Davidson Model 28B
From the beginning in 1903, the single cylinder engine was a mainstay for Harley-Davidson and most other motorcycle manufacturers. It was not until 1909 that Harley-Davidson added the V-Twin design. Introduced in 1926, by 1934 these 21.1 and 30.50 cubic inch singles were gone from the lineup. Next up was the Model C as Harley’s lightweight followed by a variety of DKW-based designs. That was until the Aermacchi line up was added in the 1960’s, and much later the Buell Blast.

The Model B featured this week was introduced in 1926 and constantly upgraded and modified to meet demands of export to foreign markets where it was most popular. Wheels, fuel tank and fenders were very similar to the big twins of the time, so the 21 cubic inch vertical single engine looks a bit small in the single down tube cradle frame. The single was even made in some overhead valve versions nearly 10 years before OHV design hit the twins with the introduction of the 1936 EL, now referred to as the Knucklehead. The OHV design was used on the 30.50 “Peashooter” track bike, but most racer components were quite exotic and only looked like production versions.

Though the facts are yet to be determined, it has been stated many times that Harley-Davidson licensed the “squish head” design of Harry Ricardo, even directly consulted with him. Ricardo was a British engineer working on a variety of projects around World War I and was famous for his understanding of combustion chamber and cylinder head design. He determined that swirling the fuel/air mixture in the combustion chamber gave the most efficient combustion, even in Diesel engines. In any case the head design reflects Ricardo’s important work.

Originally offered with a rear band type brake only, over time a front brake was added along with a wider handlebar and fenders. The paint was the handsome olive of the time using orange and red accents. Dual headlights were employed on some export models to meet national regulations, and the box with two knobs behind the handlebar switches them on and off. Though not very powerful, the 28B was a nimble 269 pounds according to Harley literature.

When you visit the National Motorcycle Museum you can take in dozens of single cylinder motorcycles including a very early Curtiss, a “strap tank” Harley from 1908, a Vincent Comet, several BSA Gold Stars and other British singles including Rudges and Velocettes. There are also dozens of off-road machines that are part of DIRT RIDING USA presented by J&P Cycles on display, but only through December 2018.

Specifications:
Engine: Side-Valve Single
Bore & Stroke: 73mm x 82mm
Displacement: 21.1 Cubic Inches / 346 cc’s
Carburetion: Schebler
Ignition: Battery & Coil
Compression Ratio: 4:1
Primary: Single Row Chain
Transmission: 3-Speed, Hand Shift
Starting: Kick Starter
Final Drive: Chain
Fork: Springer
Frame: Single Loop, Forged Bottom Plate
Wheelbase: 56.5 Inches
Brakes: Band Rear / Drum Front
Lighting: Electric
Wheels: 20 Inch, front & Rear
Weight: 269 Pounds

Address

102 Chamber Dr - PO Box 405
Anamosa, IA
52205

General information

Admission Information Admission: $10 Per Person (12 and under FREE when with an adult) $1 discount for Senior Citizens (age 60+)* $1 discount for current Abate, AMCA, AMA, HOG, GWRRA members.** * Limit one discount per person per admission. ** Current proof of membership required. Group Discounts: Available - Please call for more information Closed On the following holidays: New Years Day, Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(319) 462-3925

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