Yiddish Book Center

Yiddish Book Center The Yiddish Book Center is a nonprofit organization working to recover, celebrate, and regenerate Yiddish and modern Jewish literature and culture.
Saving a million Yiddish books was just the beginning. Our priority now is to advance knowledge of the content and literary and cultural progeny of the books we’ve saved. We offer fellowships and courses for high school students, college students and adults. We translate Yiddish literature into English. We record oral histories and contemporary stories. After three decades, we’ve emerged as one of the world’s largest, liveliest and most original Jewish organizations.
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The Yiddish Book Center is a nonprofit organization working to tell the whole Jewish story by rescuing, translating, and disseminating Yiddish books and presenting innovative educational programs that broaden understanding of modern Jewish identity. The Yiddish Book Center is home to permanent and visiting exhibits; two performance halls with a year-round schedule of educational programs, concerts (including the annual Yidstock: The Festival of New Yiddish Music), films, and events; an English-language bookstore; and a million Yiddish books. The Center is open Sunday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Public tours are offered Tuesdays at 2 p.m. and Sundays 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

"Rather than merely transliterate the name of the small flying 'golden snitch,' whose capture ends a Quidditch match, Vi...
02/07/2020
The Inside Story of How Harry Potter Was Translated Into Yiddish

"Rather than merely transliterate the name of the small flying 'golden snitch,' whose capture ends a Quidditch match, Viswanath dubbed it the 'goldene flaterl,' or 'golden butterfly,' as butterflies are a common motif in Jewish and Yiddish folklore. By riffing off Yiddish sayings and symbols in this way, Viswanath hopes 'people will feel the Yiddishe taam [taste].'"

Harry Potter is coming to Yiddish, and we can't wait!
tabletmag.com/jewish-arts-and-culture/culture-news/298268/harry-potter-translated-yiddish

J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series is one of the most translated works of fiction in human history. Over the last two decades, it has appeared in over 80 languages, ranging from well-trodden tongues like French and German to more exotic idioms like Gaelic and Latin. Today, that collection expands ...

A photo from the early days of the Yiddish Book Center, back when it was located in a warehouse in Holyoke, MA, likely t...
02/06/2020

A photo from the early days of the Yiddish Book Center, back when it was located in a warehouse in Holyoke, MA, likely taken between 1986-1988. Do you have memories from the Center—photos, stories, other ephemera—from any of its previous locations or the current one? As part of our Fortieth Anniversary this year, we're hoping to collect memories from members and friends–that means you!—of experiences of the Yiddish Book Center over the years. Share your memories in the comments and/or through the link below, which also takes you to a few slideshows of memories from the Center, including some images from its construction!
yiddishbookcenter.org/language-literature-culture/yiddish-book-centers-decade-discovery/yiddish-book-centers-memories

"Every two years, the town of Kutno hosts the Sholem Asch Festival, which organizers describe as an 'event connecting th...
02/05/2020
Asch’s Kutno: Celebrating An Author’s Life and Culture in His Hometown | In geveb

"Every two years, the town of Kutno hosts the Sholem Asch Festival, which organizers describe as an 'event connecting the past with the present of Kutno, once a Polish-Jewish town in which Jews constituted over 70% of the population in the 19th century.' This fall’s weeklong festival, the eleventh since the festival started in 1993, featured musical and theatrical performances, educational programs, and a photography exhibition of Kutno from the 19th and 20th centuries entitled 'That World' ('Tamten świat')."

Gabe Miner gives us a look inside the biannual Sholem Asch Festival held in Kutno, Poland, featuring the Yiddish Book Center's editorial director, David Mazower, great-grandson of Sholem Asch.
https://ingeveb.org/blog/aschs-kutno-celebrating-an-authors-life-and-culture-in-his-hometown

Every two years, the town of Kutno, Poland hosts the Sholem Asch Festival, which organizers describe as an “event connecting the past with the present of Kutno,

New translation on our website: "On Pride," a critique of nationalism in a new modernist allegory by Melech Ravitch, tra...
02/05/2020

New translation on our website: "On Pride," a critique of nationalism in a new modernist allegory by Melech Ravitch, translated by Ladislav Charouz. Part of Ravitch's 1921 collection of poetry, "Nakete lider" (Naked Poems), which represented an important achievement for modernist poetry in the Yiddish language.
yiddishbookcenter.org/language-literature-culture/yiddish-translation/pride

"From 1881 to 1924, more than two-and-a-half million Eastern European Jews made their way to the United States. But a se...
02/04/2020

"From 1881 to 1924, more than two-and-a-half million Eastern European Jews made their way to the United States. But a series of restrictive laws passed between 1921 and 1924 brought this period of immigration to an abrupt end. Jewish immigration to the United States from Eastern Europe never again reached its pre-1920 height. Ironically, this informative little booklet with the title 'How to Take Out Your First Papers' was translated into Yiddish and then published in the early 1920s, right around the time that these restrictive immigration laws were being passed."

Read more about this booklet and view other selected items from our collections that speak to this year's Decade of Discovery theme, "Yiddish in America: Cultural Encounters." We'll be updating this section periodically to reflect the diversity of voices on this topic from our collections. More to come soon!
https://www.yiddishbookcenter.org/language-literature-culture/yiddish-book-centers-decade-discovery#handpicked

As 2020 gets underway, the Yiddish Book Center is excited to officially announce our Decade of Discovery initiative in c...
02/04/2020

As 2020 gets underway, the Yiddish Book Center is excited to officially announce our Decade of Discovery initiative in celebration of our Fortieth Anniversary this year! This initiative, which we'll be sharing more about in the upcoming weeks, is designed to foster a deeper understanding of Yiddish and modern Jewish culture. Beginning this year and continuing for each of the next ten years, the Center will select an annual theme around which we'll hold special events, courses, conferences, exhibits, performances and other programs, often in partnership with other organizations. This year's theme is "Yiddish in America: Cultural Encounters."

We encourage you to check out our special Decade of Discovery page on our website (link below), which includes information about programs taking place all over the country as part of this initiative, as well as links to our Memories Project (more on that soon) and diverse selections from our collections that speak to this year's Decade of Discovery theme—including a humoresque set in 1930s New York, an article looking at booklets created for Jewish immigrants in the early 20th century, and more!
yiddishbookcenter.org/language-literature-culture/yiddish-book-centers-decade-discovery

"Roughly 2 million Yiddish-speaking Jews migrated from central and eastern Europe to North America between the late 19th...
02/03/2020
'Latkes con mole?' A 'postrom' sandwich? New book explores Yiddish influence on the Americas

"Roughly 2 million Yiddish-speaking Jews migrated from central and eastern Europe to North America between the late 19th and early 20th centuries. But while Americans may be more familiar with the Yiddish influence in the U.S. — we eat bagels and use the word 'klutz' — most people don't know that thousands of Ashkenazi Jews also migrated to Argentina, Brazil and other Latin American countries. There, Yiddish is not only spoken today, but it's also influenced their culture, music and food."

An NBC news review of the new Yiddish anthology that highlights the influence of Yiddish in Latin America.
nbcnews.com/news/latino/latkes-con-mole-postrom-sandwich-new-book-explores-yiddish-influence-n1119431

Many people may not know that thousands of Ashkenazi Jews migrated to Argentina, Brazil and other Latin American countries.

A Yiddish ABC primer donated to the Center in 2003 that carries an interesting story—relayed in a letter found within th...
01/31/2020

A Yiddish ABC primer donated to the Center in 2003 that carries an interesting story—relayed in a letter found within the book recently by our metadata librarian Michelle Sigiel and written by the son of the author, Itzchak Raizman. As the letter writer notes, back in 1943, when his family was living in São Paulo, Brazil, his parents owned a print shop. With WWII happening and the Brazilian Vargas dictatorship forbidding the publication of foreign-language books and newspapers, his father became concerned with the fact that it was impossible to import Yiddish ABC books from Europe or the US—thus there were no books with which Jewish-Brazilian children could learn the Yiddish alphabet. To remedy the situation, his father designed and printed such books in his own printing shop. To avoid problems with the official censorship, he reversed the actual 1943 publication date to read 1934. Thus, if anyone were to raise an issue about the "illegal" book, his father could say that they were "old" books. As the author relays, fortunately no one ever questioned the ABC books. And now they live here at the Center with our other Yiddish primers.

Tony Michels, the George L. Mosse professor of American Jewish History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, joins hos...
01/31/2020
Tony Michels: Judaism Unbound Episode 207 - American History of Yiddish — Judaism Unbound

Tony Michels, the George L. Mosse professor of American Jewish History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, joins hosts Dan Libenson and Lex Rofeberg for a conversation about the evolving role of Yiddish in America, from the late-19th century through the present. This episode is the fourth in Judaism Unbound's "Yiddish in America" series produced in collaboration with the Yiddish Book Center's Decade of Discovery initiative, in honor of 40 years since the Yiddish Book Center’s founding.
judaismunbound.com/podcast/episode-207-tony-michels

Tony Michels , the George L. Mosse professor of American Jewish History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, joins Dan Libenson and Lex Rofeberg for a conversation about the evolving role of Yiddish in America, from the late-19th century through the present. [1] This episode is the fifth in a

"Though he was shaped by his Bundism, Weinreich was never driven by politics. After the war, he saw the ways that Jewish...
01/30/2020
An Illuminating Obituary for a Yiddish Giant - Tablet Magazine An Illuminating Obituary for a Yiddish Giant

"Though he was shaped by his Bundism, Weinreich was never driven by politics. After the war, he saw the ways that Jewish life had necessarily changed and he softened his once stark anticlerical and anti-Zionist views. The only thing from which he never wavered was his belief in Yiddish as vital to the continuation of the Jewish people . . . Weinreich’s life was too expansive to be defined by a single ideology, profession, or field of inquiry. He was a journalist as well as a teacher. His teaching spanned the prestigious Vilne Teachers’ Seminar to the first Yiddish professorship in America, at City College. As a scholar he published in German, Yiddish, and English. His six volume History of the Yiddish Language is still authoritative. He translated Freud into Yiddish."

In honor of yesterday's anniversary of YIVO cofounder and research director Max Weinrich's death on January 29, 1969, we're sharing an article from Rokhl Kafrissen about his life and passing.
tabletmag.com/jewish-life-and-religion/290971/obituary-for-a-yiddish-giant

Rokhl’s Golden City: When YIVO cofounder Max Weinreich died 50 years ago, one newspaper’s reminiscence revealed the splits in the Yiddish world

So excited that this beautifully-written and illustrated book about Yiddish Book Center founder and president Aaron Lans...
01/29/2020
Review of The Book Rescuer: How a Mensch from Massachusetts Saved Yiddish Literature for Generations to Come

So excited that this beautifully-written and illustrated book about Yiddish Book Center founder and president Aaron Lansky's commitment to rescuing Yiddish Books and preserving the literature and culture for generations to come has won the 2020 Sydney Taylor Book Award for picture book! Congratulations to author Sue Macy and illustrator Stacy Innerst—thank you for bringing this story to life in such a meaningful and inspiring way!
hbook.com/?detailStory=review-of-the-book-rescuer-how-a-mensch-from-massachusetts-saved-yiddish-literature-for-generations-to-come

“Kum aher. Sit down. I want to tell you a story.” With a storyteller’s cadence, Macy (Miss Mary Reporting, rev. 1/16; Trudy’s Big Swim, rev. 7/17) explains how Aaron Lansky came to collect the thousands of books now housed in the Yiddish Book Center in Amherst, Massachusetts.

"I don’t feel like paying my languishing debts, or the new ones either. And I have no patience for sticking a collar stu...
01/28/2020

"I don’t feel like paying my languishing debts, or the new ones either. And I have no patience for sticking a collar stud into a freshly starched collar, and I hate it when the holes in the saltcellar get stopped up. I hate spreading frozen butter on soft bread, and I hate it when the teapot lid falls off in the middle of pouring tea. And I swear to God I don’t want to buy a boutonniere. And I don’t want to eat vegetarian food, and I hate writing recommendation letters, and I don’t want to read about the crisis of Yiddish literature, and I don’t want to discuss whether Yiddish literature is going uphill or downhill, and I’m too lazy to fill out questionnaires."

From "In Which I Hate It and Can’t Stand It and Don’t Want to and Have No Patience at All," a comic monologue by Der Tunkeler to help ease those Tuesday blues... Translated by Ri Turner. One of Jessica Kirzane's Handpicked recommendations for this month—see more on our homepage.
yiddishbookcenter.org/in-which-i-hate-it-and-cant-stand-it-and-dont-want-and-have-no-patience-all

I have seen the radiant dazzleOf the hour before the stars ascend.I have seen, at the height of day, its end—And thought...
01/27/2020

I have seen the radiant dazzle
Of the hour before the stars ascend.
I have seen, at the height of day, its end—
And thought of beginnings and vanishings.

I have stood astonished: around me
Heavenly bodies shimmered and dimmed,
And a wind, with a light touch
Spoke to the world in a gesture of silence.

"I Have Seen" by Yiddish poet Rosa Nevadovska (1890–1971), originally from Białystok, translated by Merle Bachman.
yiddishbookcenter.org/language-literature-culture/yiddish-translation/i-have-seen

In honor of the tenth yortsayt (anniversary of death) of renowned Yiddish poet Avrom Sutzkever this week, we're sharing ...
01/24/2020

In honor of the tenth yortsayt (anniversary of death) of renowned Yiddish poet Avrom Sutzkever this week, we're sharing some images from his collection “Sibir" (Siberia), published in 1953, with illustrations by Marc Chagall. In this collection, Sutzkever recalls, in his sensory, neoclassical style, his childhood years in Siberia. His family came to Siberia as refugees, and Siberia looms in the Jewish imagination as a land of want and hardship—but Sutzkever’s childhood there, as he tells of it in the poems, is one of magic and transcendence. As Yiddish Book Center fellow Abigail Weaver tells us, "That’s what I love about Sutzkever—his poems reveal a constant search for beauty. Although he lived through great hardship, the destruction of his whole world, he refused to write a world without hope. Even his most tragic poems are suffused with beauty, just as his most beautiful poems are touched with sadness."

Images include some of Chagall's illustrations, which capture beautifully the sense of childhood wonder in Sutzkever's poems, as well as an inscription from Sutzkever in the book and a translation of a segment of a longer poem.

Sandy Fox, American Jewish historian and host of Vaybertaytsh, a “feminist podcast for the Yiddish-speaking and the Yidd...
01/24/2020
Sandy Fox: Judaism Unbound Episode 206 - ‘Practical’ Isn’t the Point — Judaism Unbound

Sandy Fox, American Jewish historian and host of Vaybertaytsh, a “feminist podcast for the Yiddish-speaking and the Yiddish-curious,” joins Judaism Unbound hosts Dan Libenson and Lex Rofeberg for a conversation that weaves together the topics of Yiddish, podcasting, summer camp, gender, and much more.

The fourth episode in Judaism Unbound's "Yiddish in America" series, produced in collaboration with the Yiddish Book Center's Decade of Discovery initiative.
https://www.judaismunbound.com/podcast/episode-206-sandy-fox

Sandy Fox , American Jewish historian and host of Vaybertaytsh , a “feminist podcast for the Yiddish-speaking and the Yiddish-curious,” joins Dan Libenson and Lex Rofeberg for a conversation that weaves together the topics of Yiddish, podcasting, summer camp, gender, and much more. [1] (Fox is a...

Co-editors Ilan Stavans and Josh Lambert visit with The Shmooze to talk about the process of editing their newly release...
01/23/2020

Co-editors Ilan Stavans and Josh Lambert visit with The Shmooze to talk about the process of editing their newly released much-buzzed-about anthology "How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish," which celebrates the interplay of Yiddish and American culture.
yiddishbookcenter.org/language-literature-culture/the-shmooze/243-how-yiddish-changed-america-and-how-america-changed

For the first time in the 21st century, a new Yiddish-language television program has been broadcast. “Woodski’s World,”...
01/23/2020
The 21st century’s first Yiddish TV show is here

For the first time in the 21st century, a new Yiddish-language television program has been broadcast. “Woodski’s World,” a four-part travelogue produced by Sweden’s state television network, follows Yiddishist Tomas Woodski as he travels to four cities--Bucharest, Tel Aviv, Paris, and London--and talks to local Yiddish speakers (including Yiddish Book Center Translation Fellow Dr. Vivi Lachs and Dr. Zohar Weiman-Kelman, who was previously interviewed for the Wexler Oral History Project of the Yiddish Book Center).
https://forward.com/yiddish/438011/the-21st-centurys-first-yiddish-tv-show-is-here/

Tomas Woodski travels to four countries to interview Yiddishists about their lives and the language that unites them.

Of all the written accounts of pogroms in the Yiddish Book Center's collection, we know of only one authored by a woman....
01/22/2020

Of all the written accounts of pogroms in the Yiddish Book Center's collection, we know of only one authored by a woman. In this "From the Vault" piece by former fellow Sarah Quiat, Quiat explores Rokhl Faygnberg’s "A pinkes fun a toyter shtot (khurbn dubove)" (Chronicle of a Dead City: The Destruction of Dubove)--a book that constructs a collective memory for communities destroyed in the 1919 Ukrainian pogroms, and also carries its own fascinating history.
yiddishbookcenter.org/language-literature-culture/vault/pogrom-literature-and-collective-memory

"In my eyes, 'How Yid­dish Changed Amer­i­ca and How Amer­i­ca Changed Yid­dish' is a the­saurus of per­spec­tives. This...
01/21/2020
The Endurance of Yiddish: A Conversation Between Ilan Stavans and Josh Lambert

"In my eyes, 'How Yid­dish Changed Amer­i­ca and How Amer­i­ca Changed Yid­dish' is a the­saurus of per­spec­tives. This is the way Yid­dish speak­ers have por­trayed who and how they are: full of twists and turns, joy and hope and suf­fer­ing, truths and fic­tion. This is how a lan­guage that is full of ener­gy, a lan­guage that by def­i­n­i­tion is a hybrid of mul­ti­ple tongues and back­grounds, dances around its own fate, puz­zling its ene­mies, mak­ing room for new futures."

To celebrate TODAY'S PUBLICATION (!) of the new anthology "How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish," published by Restless Books in collaboration with the Yiddish Book Center, we're sharing a conversation with co-editors Josh Lambert and Ilan Stavans about the anthology and their own relationships to Yiddish. The anthology is available now from Restless Books (and in our online store), with talks by Ilan and Josh coming up around the country (more details on our website).
https://www.jewishbookcouncil.org/pb-daily/the-endurance-of-yiddish-a-conversation-between-ilan-stavans-and-josh-lambert

Seventy-five years after the Holocaust, Yiddish shows extraordinary resilience.

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1021 West St
Amherst, MA
01002

Pioneer Valley Transit Authority: http://www.PVTA.com Amtrak Peter Pan Bus Lines Megabus

General information

We are closed during shabbos (Saturdays) and Jewish and legal holidays. View our calendar for closings and events: http://www.yiddishbookcenter.org/calendar

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 16:00
Tuesday 10:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 10:00 - 16:00

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(413) 256-4900

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Our Story

Since our founding in 1980, we’ve rescued more than a million Yiddish books. But that was just the beginning: our priority now is to advance knowledge of the content and literary and cultural progeny of the books we’ve saved. We do that in many ways:


  • Our educational programs include graduate fellowships and courses for high school students, college students, teachers, and adult learners.

  • Our translation initiative includes a fellowship to train new Yiddish-to-English translators and publishing projects that bring this great literature to new audiences.

  • Our Wexler Oral History Project is a growing collection of in-depth interviews with people of all ages and backgrounds, whose stories offer a rich, complex chronicle of Jewish identity.

  • The world's first Yiddish museum, we're home to permanent and visiting exhibits.

  • We offer a full calendar of public programs, such as films, talks, family events, and concerts, including the annual Yidstock: The Festival of New Yiddish Music.

  • We publish an English-language magazine, Pakn Treger, with news from the Center and features on Yiddish and Jewish literature and culture. You can also follow the latest news at Heft (Notebook) and on Facebook, Twitter (@YiddishBookCtr), and Instagram (yiddish_book_center). The Center is open Sunday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Public tours are offered Tuesdays at 2 p.m. and Sundays 11 a.m. and 1 p.m.

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    THE BOOK RESCUER by Sue Macy, a picture book biography of The Yiddish Book Center's Aaron Lansky, just won the Sydney Taylor Book Award for the best in Jewish children's literature! Here's the full scoop on all the 2020 winners!
    For Channuka:
    Do you have an transliterated story books available online?
    NOW SHOWING: “Corrie Remembers! The true story of Corrie ten Boom,” a drama starring Susan Sandager. This is from a flyer I got Sept. 6 about an event Sept 6, 7 & 8 at The Cell Theater, 700 First St NW in downtown, Albuquerque, NM…and it will be repeated Oct. 4 & 5! - This powerful one-woman performance brings to life the late Corrie ten Boom, legendary Dutch Holocaust rescuer who, together with her family, was responsible for saving hundreds of persecuted Jews in Holland during World War II. After release from Ravens Bruck Concentration Camp, she spent the rest of her life speaking to the world about faith, hope, love, forgiveness and reconciliation. Friday & Saturday, September 6th & 7th, 7:30 pm Sunday, September 8th, 3 pm Friday, October 4th, 7:30 pm Saturday, October 5th, 2 & 7:30 pm $15 at The Cell Theater, 700 First St NW in downtown Albuquerque... limited seating -- "Corrie Remembers" is the showpiece drama of a series of one-woman presentations entitled "Time With Corrie ten Boom," which are scripted and performed by Susan Sandager. -- Over the past 20 years this powerful dramatization about the devout Christian Ten Boom family, who helped hundreds of Dutch Jews escape the Nazi death machine and was ultimately subjected to a similar fate, has been performed in some 30 states across the Country, as well as in 10 foreign nations. -- Imagine seeing your neighbors torn from their homes and businesses by the police. No crime has been committed. They have been deemed unfit and marked for death. Helping them would be a crime. -- Would you have the courage to intervene? The Ten Boom family did. In 1944 their choice to rescue persecuted Jews meant risking their own lives and sharing the collective fate of the Jewish people in Nazi concentration camps. "Corrie Remembers," the solo drama, tells the true story of the Righteous Gentile and 20th Century Heroine. Corrie Ten Boom.
    The Good news keeps on coming! SHEHITA - our all-Yiddish film won more awards the past week at two of the most important film Festivals in the US that feed into the Oscars. It won "Best Thriller" at the Holly Shorts Film Festival in LA and the "Hearts, Minds, and Soul award" at the Flickers Rhode Island International Film Festival! Add this to the awards it received at the Toronto Short Film Festival for "Best Short Film Audience Choice" and "Best Dramatic Short " at "The Stockholm Independent Film Festival " and we have a winner for Contemporary Yiddish Film. Congratulations to Dean Gold for his brilliant script and direction; to Avi Hoffman and Sam Stein for their stellar acting; to Max Sterling and Nina Jordanova for sounding like native Yiddish speakers and to all who worked on this Yiddish jewel. It was truly an honor for me to translate Dean's brilliant English script into Yiddish and to coach the two non-Yiddish speaking actors. Shehita will soon be screened at the DC Shorts International Film Festival. Kudos to all who worked on this!
    We are excited that our grandchild, Quinn Spence, will be attending session 1 of Great Jewish Books!
    NEW DOCUMENTARY REVEALS A HIDDEN SHOAH STORY Dear friends, It’s an honor for me to be at the forefront of a story tradition that belongs uniquely to children of Holocaust survivors. Thank you for inviting me to tell you more. My new film is quite a departure from my last one, LUNCH, about Jewish comedy legends: The Presence of Their Absence follows a son of survivors on a journey to trace his inherited trauma. Armed with only scant clues from his late parents, Fred Zaidman ventures into the unknown to tell his story for this first time. With helpers in Poland, Israel, Germany, and an unlikely source – a Baptist minister in Atlanta - Fred finds his roots in the ashes of the Shoah. Yad Vashem has called The Presence of Their Absence “a film for the ages”. We are delighted it has just come to Digital HD on iTunes and your other platforms: https://itunes.apple.com/us/movie/the-presence-of-their-absence/id1449946652 https://www.amazon.com/Presence-Their-Absence-Fred-Zaidman/dp/B07P1C57FL. You may also order a DVD on our website: https://thepresenceoftheirabsence.com/ I hope you will view the film, send your thoughts, and share your personal stories on [email protected] With gratitude, Donna Kanter and team
    If you like yiddish expressions, you might like my book that just got published. Its title is "Monticello: A Borscht Belt Catskills Tale. It is a fictionalized memoir of coming of age in the Catskills and there is a lot of yiddish in it, (translated of course ). It is available on Amazon. com. Here is the link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1727126114/ref=cm_sw_em_r_mt_dp_U_hvoMCbXGJB3QB
    We could use a Yiddish club leader in Phoenix area at Temple Solel. Can you recommend anyone?
    Looking for the Book Club. Please help