America On Wheels

America On Wheels Now on display...Nicola Bulgari: A Lifetime Devotion to the American Automobile
The amazing educational museum that opened in Allentown PA in April of 2008. Features 23,000 square feet of exhibit space and includes cars, racing vehicles, trucks, alternate fuel vehicles, motorcycles and bicycles. The museum also hosts the Allentown Visitor Center for Lehigh Valley visitors to pick up literature and ask questions. www.discoverlehighvalley.com
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This beautiful 1951 Allard K2 spent some time in our first floor hallway.  Do you remember the local significance of thi...
05/12/2020

This beautiful 1951 Allard K2 spent some time in our first floor hallway. Do you remember the local significance of this Anglo-American hybrid?

05/12/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.12.1970
Fifty years ago, Denny Hulme sustained second and third degree burns to his hands and feet during a cockpit fire in his McLaren during practice for the Indy 500 when the fuel breather cap popped open and methanol, which burns invisibly, spilled out on to the red-hot turbo charger. The McLaren was engulfed in flames and Hulme with it. His visor welded to his helmet and his gloves started to melt in the inferno. Hulme bailed out at over 70mph but the rescue truck sped past him, chasing after the burning car without stopping to tend to the driver lying on the track still on fire. Born Denis Clive Hulme June 18,1936, he was a New Zealand racing driver who won the 1967 Formula One World Drivers' Championship for the Brabham team. Between his debut at Monaco in 1965 and his final race in the 1974 US Grand Prix, he started 112 Grand Prix, resulting eight victories and 33 trips to the podium. He also finished third in the overall standing in 1968 and 1972. Hulme showed versatility by dominating the Canadian-American Challenge Cup (Can-Am) for Group 7 sports cars. As a member of the McLaren team that won five straight titles between 1967 and 1971, he won the individual Drivers' Championship twice and runner-up on four other occasions. Following his Formula One tenure with Brabham, Hulme raced for McLaren in multiple formats—Formula One, Can-Am, and at the Indianapolis 500. Hulme retired from Formula One at the end of the 1974 season but continued to race Australian Touring Cars. Hulme became known as 'The Bear', not only for his rugged appearance but also for his gruff nature. During the early part of his career, Denny preferred to race bare foot as he believed that it gave him a better feel of the throttle. This changed in 1960 when he started competing in the more highly regulated European championships. Having survived F1's most dangerous period and the perils of Indianapolis and the Can-Am, The Bear had succumbed on October 4, 1992 to a massive heart attack at the age of 56, becoming the first world champion to die of natural causes.

This 1987 Buick GNX came to America On Wheels with only 26 miles on the odometer.
05/11/2020

This 1987 Buick GNX came to America On Wheels with only 26 miles on the odometer.

05/11/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.11.1920
One hundred years ago, the 4,000,000th Ford Model T was produced.

From the Century of Performance exhibit, this is an angle of the 1912 National race car that the public was unable to en...
05/10/2020

From the Century of Performance exhibit, this is an angle of the 1912 National race car that the public was unable to enjoy.

05/10/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.10.1980
The United States Secretary of the Treasury G. William Miller announced the approval of nearly $1.5 billion dollars in federal loan guarantees for the nearly bankrupt Chrysler Corporation. At the time, it was the largest rescue package ever granted by the U.S. government to an American corporation.

This 1963 Mustang Concept II prototype has visited America On Wheels twice.  This photo is from the first visit, in 2009...
05/09/2020

This 1963 Mustang Concept II prototype has visited America On Wheels twice. This photo is from the first visit, in 2009.

05/09/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.9.1970
Fifty years ago, Walter Reuther, president of the UAW since 1946, died in an airplane crash at age 62. Born in Wheeling, West Virginia, to German immigrants, Reuther's socialist leanings were fostered by his father, Valentine. A master brewer, Valentine had left Germany to escape the repressive Lutheran authorities there, and to avoid what he viewed as the increasing militarization of his homeland. He imbued his three sons, Walter, Victor, and Roy, with the values of labor organization and social equality. Walter dropped out of high school to become an apprentice die maker at the Wheeling Steel Company. Before he could finish his training, he moved to Detroit during the heavy production years of the Model T, and talked his way into a job as a die maker in a Ford factory. Reuther returned to high school while working at the Ford plant, and he maintained his interest in Socialism and organized labor. During the Depression, he and his brothers traveled to Germany to visit their relatives. The trip proved formative as the totalitarian conditions in Germany, and the bitter split between the National Socialists and the Left, disappointed the brothers terribly. They even briefly ran pamphlets for the Socialist underground there. They continued on to Russia, where Walter employed his skill as a die maker in Russian auto plants that had purchased Ford machinery. They remained in Gorki from 1933 to 1935. Reuther was greatly moved by the camaraderie of the autoworkers there. "To a Ford employee especially," he said, "[the social and cultural life] was absorbing." Reuther returned to Detroit, and began his career as an activist and labor organizer. At first considered a radical and a Communist, Reuther worked his way up the ranks of the UAW as the union became a more and more legitimate force. President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal reached out to the leftist elements of the labor movement, and in response Reuther's left moved center to meet the Democratic Party. Reuther played vital roles in the formation of the UAW and in the merger of the AFL-CIO. He championed integrationist policies when few other labor organizers cared, "The UAW-CIO will tell any worker that refused to work with a colored worker that he could leave the plant because he did not belong there." During Reuther's benevolent reign atop the ranks of the UAW, autoworkers became members of the middle class, as measured by earnings, employment security, medical care, and retirement pensions.

By special request, we are returning to 2009 when Herbie joined in on the first birthday celebration of America On Wheel...
05/08/2020

By special request, we are returning to 2009 when Herbie joined in on the first birthday celebration of America On Wheels Museum. The cake was tasty too.

05/08/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.8.2000
Ford introduced the propane-powered, bi-fuel Super Duty F-Series truck. This Bi-Fuel F-250 XLT was powered by a 5.4 liter V8 and held 26.8 gallons of LPG and 30 gallons of gasoline. Based on government fuel economy tests the trucks had a range of 225–300 miles on propane plus 340–490 miles on gasoline.

This car was another feature of 2012's exhibit, "Cars That Were Stars". Do you know why Fozzie Bear's Studebaker no long...
05/07/2020

This car was another feature of 2012's exhibit, "Cars That Were Stars". Do you know why Fozzie Bear's Studebaker no longer as colorful as it was in "The Muppet Movie"? And where was the human driver located during filming?

05/07/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.7.1995
Twenty-five years ago, Dale Earnhardt forged past Mark Martin with two laps to go and recorded his first career win on a road course with a victory at Sears Point International Raceway, California. It was Earnhardt's 36th career start on a road course. (This item is courtesy of 365daysofmotoring.com)

Back in 2009, this car steamed into our parking lot as a part of cruise from the 20th Annual Concours d'Elegance of theE...
05/06/2020

Back in 2009, this car steamed into our parking lot as a part of cruise from the 20th Annual Concours d'Elegance of theEastern United States.

05/06/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.6.1905
René Dreyfus was born in Nice, France. Dreyfus became first noticed when he won the French Riviera championship three consecutive times. He then joined Ecure Friderich and took his first major victory at Dieppe in 1929. That year he entered the inaugural Monaco Grand Prix, finishing first in his class and fifth overall. He was back in 1930 and took a surprise victory. The Ecurie Friderich Bugatti had been fitted with an extra fuel tank with enabled him to complete the race without stopping, thus beating the works Bugatti team, led by Louis Chiron, by 22 seconds. In 1931 he became a works driver for Maserati but without much success he left at the end of 1932 to join Bugatti. In 1933 he finished 3rd in both the Belgian and Monaco Grand Prix and was 3rd again at Monaco in 1934 behind the Alfa Romeos. He finished 3rd behind the Auto Unions in the Swiss Grand Prix and then won the Belgian GP after the German teams withdrew. He joined Scuderia Ferrari in 1935, the year he married, and took wins in the Marne and Dieppe Grand Prix. He also finished 2nd in the Italian GP. In 1937 he raced a Maserati in Voiturette racing, winning at Tripoli and Florence, and signed for Delahaye racing sports cars winning the 'Prix du Million', or the Million Franc Race in Montlhéry for the marque. By beating the legendary Rudolf Caracciola in the Mercedes-Benz teamís all-conquering Silver Arrows in the tight and twisty streets of Pau, Dreyfus become a national hero in France. He was also victorious at the Cork GP that year. René was in the United States to race at Indianapolis when the German Wehrmacht rolled over the border and occupied his home country. He joined the U.S. armed forces and by the end of hostilities, had turned 40 years old. As there was little likelihood of any motor racing activity in war-torn Europe for the foreseeable future, he decided to turn to the other great passion of most Frenchmen; fine cuisine. Finding the post-war economic climate in Europe no more inviting than for motor racing, he decided he would remain in America and open a restaurant.After World War II Dreyfus had continued to race sporadically, and competed in the 1952 24 Le Mans 24 Hour race. His last ever race came at Sebring in the 12 Hour race. In 1953, René and his brother Maurice sold their first New York City restaurant and opened Le Chanteclair at 18 East 49th Street in midtown, a prime location directly between Rockefeller Center and the Waldorf-Astoria. While the main room was decorated in traditional mid-century Continental restaurant style, the bar and cocktail lounge were discretely accented with subtle automobile and racing memorabilia, just enough to remind an alert enthusiast as to where he was imbibing. This soon became the semi-official New York meeting spot for the world's automobile racing community, the rivalries of the past having been overcome by the spirit of fraternity. It continues today as the Madison Avenue Sports Car Driving and Chowder Society, officially founded in March 1957 and which now meets monthly at Sardi's in NYC. René Dreyfus died August 16, 1993 at the age of 88.

This Armstrong-Siddley is the one of two that have displayed from this marque in our history.
05/05/2020

This Armstrong-Siddley is the one of two that have displayed from this marque in our history.

05/05/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.5.1995
Twenty-five years ago, the new Ford plant in Valencia (Spain) started producing Zetec-SE 4-cylinder engines. (This item is courtesy of 365daysofmotoring.com)

05/04/2020

In response to COVID-19 and its impact on non-profits, Giving Tuesday has announced a day dedicated to global giving and unity for May 5, 2020. Even as we face much uncertainty these days, every act of kindness will help America On Wheels Museum. As with so many others, America On Wheels has been hard hit because of the state mandated closures. We’re seeing people coming together through kindness, donations and helping hands which is great. Please join the Giving Tuesday Movement on May 5th and help us through difficult times as we shift gears to always move forward. Museums serve as diverse anchors for the community. Thank you for your consideration. Wishing you safety and staying healthy. Visit http://americaonwheels.org/fueling-make-a-donation to donate.

Linda Merkel, Executive Director

Do you remember when this 1934 Chevrolet Master Series Custom was on the cover of the September 1958 issue of Rodding & ...
05/04/2020

Do you remember when this 1934 Chevrolet Master Series Custom was on the cover of the September 1958 issue of Rodding & Restyling magazine? It cruised into the museum twice so far.

05/04/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.4.1880
Harry W. Ford, first President of the Saxon Motor Car Company, was born in Knob Knoster, MO. The Saxon was produced from 1913 to 1923. The company was based in Detroit and then Ypsilanti, Michigan. Saxon was founded by Hugh Chalmers, before being sold to Harry W. Ford in 1914. In 1917 28,000 cars were made making it the seventh or eighth (sources vary) largest car maker in the United States. Harry Ford left the company at the end of the year to join the Transport Corps of the U.S. Army, before dying December 18, 1918 from the pandemic that was sweeping the world.

This lovely machine graced our South Gallery when we first opened.  Do you remember the significance of this Chevrolet?
05/03/2020

This lovely machine graced our South Gallery when we first opened. Do you remember the significance of this Chevrolet?

05/03/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.3.1945
Seventy-five years ago, the 31,000,000th Ford vehicle was produced, a Model 59C half-ton pickup truck.

This is part of the line-up of our Fall 2016 opening of "Fender Skirts & Poodle Skirts - Cruisin' in the Fabulous 50's. ...
05/02/2020

This is part of the line-up of our Fall 2016 opening of "Fender Skirts & Poodle Skirts - Cruisin' in the Fabulous 50's. You should have fun identifying these.

05/02/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.2.1915
Effie Hotchkiss and her mother Avis left Brooklyn, New York on the adventure of a lifetime. The mother and daughter duo were bound for San Francisco, California on a new 1915 Harley-Davidson V-twin with sidecar that Effie had recently purchased. By taking the southern route, they crossed into California enduring temperatures in excess of 120 degrees Fahrenheit, came within feet of a rattlesnake (which Effie handily dispatched with her handgun), and came face-to-face with a coyote which met the same fate as the rattlesnake. The Hotchkisses also recounted that while in New Mexico, they had run out of spare inner tubes. The ingenious duo took a blanket from their supplies, cut it down to inner tube length, rolled it and stuffed it into the tire.When they arrived in the City by the Bay in August, the pair became the first women to ride cross-country on a motorcycle. Taking a northern route, their return journey included crossing the deserts of Nevada and Utah. Effie and Avis Hotchkiss finally returned to their home in Brooklyn in October of 1915, having traveled approximately 9,000 miles, covering more than one-third of the United States, over five months.

Looking to add a little color to this day, here is a Pontiac Firebird we had on display in 2008.
05/01/2020

Looking to add a little color to this day, here is a Pontiac Firebird we had on display in 2008.

05/01/2020

This Day in Auto History
5.1.1955
Mike Nazaruk died while leading an AAA sprint car race at Langhorne. Nicknamed "Iron Mike." Nazaruk was of Ukrainian descent. Before racing, he worked as a florist's delivery driver and as an aircraft welder. Nazaruk served as a U.S. Marine in the Battle of Guam and the Guadalcanal campaign in World War II. He promised himself that if he lived through the war he would become a race driver. He raced after he returned home. He won the track championships at Staten Island, New York, and Rhinebeck, New York in 1947. He scored over twenty feature wins at Middletown, New York en route to winning the 1948 track championship. Nazaruk was the 1949 American Racing Drivers Club (ARDC) midget car champion. He joined the AAA racing circuit in 1950. He won 14 national midget tour events, including the 1950 Night Before the 500, and the first midget car event at Terre Haute Action Track in 1953. He finished fifth in the 1954 National Midget car points. Nazaruk finished second in his first Indianapolis 500 in 1951. He competed in two more Indianapolis 500, including a fifth-place finish in 1954 On the morning of his final race, he had awakened with flu symptoms at his North Bellmore, Long Island home. Mike then struck his head on the car door frame when preparing to drive to Langhorne that morning. Witnesses said that while leading the race, he reached up to wipe his goggles, lost control, hit the fence, and was thrown 150 yards from his car. He was pronounced dead upon his arrival at Lower Bucks Hospital.

In 2015, this Chrysler graced our lobby for a brief time.  This limousine was custom built for Mrs. Chrysler as a gift f...
04/30/2020

In 2015, this Chrysler graced our lobby for a brief time. This limousine was custom built for Mrs. Chrysler as a gift from her husband.

04/30/2020

This Day in Auto History
4.30.1920
One hundred years ago, the first Studebaker Light Six was produced. Born out of great demand for more affordable cars following World War I, the Studebaker Light-Six remains an excellent example of the engineering and design that marked Studebaker as the sensible choice for so many years. In August, 1924, the car was renamed the Studebaker Standard Six. While in production, the Light Six / Standard Six represented Studebaker's least expensive model. The car was available in a full array of body styles throughout its production. In 1927, the car was renamed the Studebaker Standard Six Dictator in preparation for the 1928 model year when the car would be henceforth known as the Studebaker Dictator.

We know that our Mustang fans can tell us a lot about this car that was featured in our Century of Performance exhibit.
04/29/2020

We know that our Mustang fans can tell us a lot about this car that was featured in our Century of Performance exhibit.

04/29/2020

This Day in Auto History
4.29.1915
The $490 Chevrolet Model 490 was introduced. It was an immediate success and established the brand as a big player. The name would not denote the price for long (in 1921, the average price was $820), but it would stay low enough to take a chunk out of the Model T market. The Model T started at $495 at the time. Electric horns were standard And by 1921, standard equipment included a speedometer, and ammeter, dome lights (closed-body cars only), and headlight dimmers. All 490s were only offered with the Overhead Valve 171-cubic-inch four cylinder, producing 24 hp. This would be Chevrolet's main engine until the "Stovebolt" straight six replaced it for 1929. (This item is courtesy of 365daysofmotoring.com)

This was a rather different car on display at the AMC show outside the museum in 2010.  Do you know what this car is?
04/28/2020

This was a rather different car on display at the AMC show outside the museum in 2010. Do you know what this car is?

04/28/2020

This Day in Auto History
4.28.1950
James Douglas Muir 'Jay' Leno, television personality and prominent car collector, was born in New Rochelle, NY.

Address

5 N Front St
Allentown, PA
18102

General information

Last ticket sale is 1 hour before closing. Free parking is available on site in our parking lot. Admission: Adults $10, Seniors (62+) $8, Students (6-16) $6 & Children 5 & under FREE ** Seniors are FREE the first Thursday of EVERY MONTH & Children/ Students 16 & under are FREE EVERY Sunday.

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Comments

https://www.inquirer.com/arts/simeone-foundation-philadelphia-antique-auto-club-hershey-pa-free-library-archive-20191209.html Huge collection of auto manuals and materials being transferred to Hershey and S. Phila.
4th Annual Harrison Career Center FFA Tractor, Truck, Engine, and Car Show May 5, 2019 Cadiz, Ohio www.facebook.com/HCCFFA/photos/a.1555722377998841/2092869487617458/?type=3&theater
You guys are on the map for museums to visit in the USA!
We love what your doing with the city we want to be apart of it I think it's really going to turn that side of town around in a few years! Keep up the good work ;-)
My 1967 Divco Milk Truck
I have to include this picture of my 1956 Chrysler wagon currently on display at America on Wheels. This is what it looks like with the tailgate up
The Firebird III Has Landed...
The Firebird III Concept Car Has Landed!!!
Caty enjoyed visiting America On Wheels this morning to help us measure the slot car table for a new table skirt...
https://www.facebook.com/Jalopnik.JasonDrives/videos/1495957263828214/UzpfSTY1NjE0MTc2MToxMDE1NTYwNDYwMjQ1MTc2Mg/ Entertaining description of the worst car ever made - the Hoffman produced in Germany after WWII.
Hey guys- Check out our all-new MUSTANG COLORING BOOK! #mustang #ford #fordmustang #mustanggt
3rd Annual Harrison Career Center FFA Tractor, Engine, Truck and Car Show May 6, 2018 Cadiz, Ohio https://www.facebook.com/HCCFFA/photos/a.1534068033497609.1073741828.1533418623562550/2006862639551477/?type=3&theater