America On Wheels

America On Wheels Now on display...The Fabulous Fins of the '50's and 60's - The Jet Age of Automotive Design
The amazing educational museum that opened in Allentown PA in April of 2008. Features 23,000 square feet of exhibit space and includes cars, racing vehicles, trucks, alternate fuel vehicles, motorcycles and bicycles. The museum also hosts the Allentown Visitor Center for Lehigh Valley visitors to pick up literature and ask questions. www.discoverlehighvalley.com

04/07/2019

This Day in Auto History
4.7.1969
Fifty years ago, Rolls Royce recalled at least 5,000 cars for defect checks. (This item is courtesy of 365daysofmotoring.com)

For just a short time at America On Wheels, the 2018 50th Anniversary Hot Wheels Camaro. Come see it this weekend.
04/06/2019

For just a short time at America On Wheels, the 2018 50th Anniversary Hot Wheels Camaro. Come see it this weekend.

04/06/2019

This Day in Auto History
4.6.1909
Racer Hermann Lang was born in Bad Canstatt, Germany. Hermann Lang had a fabulous career from mechanic with the Mercedes-Benz works team to one of the great drivers of the 1930s. On his debut on the 16th of June 1935 at the Nurbrugring he finished 5th right away. He went on to win several Grands Prix and to become the 1939 European hillclimb Champion, at the time quite a desirable title. WW2 robbed him of his best years, but he emerged as a Formula 1 driver in 1951 with an now outdated Mercedes-Benz W 154. With the Mercedes 300 SL sports car he won the 1952 Eifelrennen, the Prix de Berne and together with Fritz Riess the 24 hours of Le Mans. The following year he showed up at the Swiss GP with a Maserati, finishing fifth. Mercedes entered Formula 1 officially in 1954 but the now 45-years-old misses out on a podium finish at his home GP by going off. He had to accept that his racing days were over, he retired from the sport but remained with his employer. Hermann Lang visited numerous historic festivals up until his death in 1987.

04/05/2019

This Day in Auto History
4.5.1869
One hundred fifty years ago, racer Frank Alderman Garbutt was born in Mason City, IL. He was an oil magnate and industrialist whose zeal for amateur sports provided the inspiration for the modern Los Angeles Athletic Club, and was involved in early auto racing in the Los Angeles area. In 1910, the Los Angeles Motordrome became a reality through the joint efforts of three larger than life characters, Frederick E. Moskovics, Jack Prince, and Garbutt. Garbutt, son of Los Angeles pioneer, Frank C. Garbutt, was the deep pockets behind the operation with his Los Angeles-Pacific Railway cronies assuming one-half of the initial stock in the enterprise and a syndicate headed by Moskovics the other half. This wood board race track was located in Playa del Rey, California. In addition to automobile racing, it was used for motorcycle competition and aviation activities.

04/04/2019

This Day in Auto History
4.4.1959
George Amick died at age 34. George Amick was best known for his midget successes, but also won 3 ChampCar races on dirt ovals. In a time when the Indianapolis 500 counted for the World Championship, ‘Little George’ Amick survived the multi-car crash on the first lap of the 1958 Indy 500 to bring his Demler Special home in 2nd place, earning him Rookie of the Year honors. The United States Auto Club (USAC) inaugurated the Daytona International Speedway with a 100 mile race. Amick started from pole position, but on the final race lap he lost control of his roadster in turn 3, his car flipped violently came to rest up side down. After Marshall Teague had lost his life during preparations for this race, George Amick became the second driver to die at Daytona.

04/03/2019

This Day in Auto History
4.3.1969
Fifty years ago, Bobby Isaac piloted his Nord Krauskopf-owned No. 71 Dodge to victory at Columbia (South Carolina, US) Speedway’s half-mile dirt track. Isaac started from the pole and led 96 of the 200 laps to top David Pearson by 12 seconds at the finish. Richard Petty took third, one lap back. (This item is courtesy of 365daysofmotoring.com)

04/02/2019

This Day in Auto History
4.2.1919
One hundred years ago, the 3,000,000th Ford Model T was produced. The Ford Model T (often known as the Tin Lizzie, Leaping Lena, jitney or flivver) was an automobile produced by Ford Motor Company from October 1, 1908, to May 26, 1927. It is generally credited as the first affordable automobile and the car that opened travel to the common middle-class American. Some of this can be attributed to Ford's efficient fabrication, including assembly line production instead of individual hand crafting.

04/01/2019

Starting on April 2, we are finished with our winter hours, and will be open on Tuesdays again. Please remember that the last admissions occur one hour before closing, or at 3pm each day that we are open.

04/01/2019

This Day in Auto History
4.1.1964
The Plymouth Barracuda, a “pony car” fastback version of the Valiant, was introduced to the public, 16 days ahead of the Mustang. Plymouth's executives had wanted to name the car Panda, but that idea was unpopular with the car's designers. In the end, John Samsen's suggestion of Barracuda was selected. Barracuda was the first pony car, but was largely overlooked by buyers in their stampede to purchase the Ford. The Barracuda borrowed the Valiant’s wheelbase, hood, headlight bezels, quarter panels, A-pillar, bumpers, doors, and windshield. This significantly reduced Chrysler’s development costs, allowing the company to get the car to market in record time. The base engine was a 4 litre slant 6 with a 180 hp, 4.5 litre V8 available. With the V8, early Barracudas could accelerate from 0 to 60 in 12.9 sec, with fuel consumption of just 16-19 miles per gallon. Ninety percent of 1964 Barracudas ordered were fitted with the V8. The ’64 Barracuda’s most distinctive characteristic, though, was its massive rear window. Covering a total of 14.4 sq. ft., the huge piece of glass was a joint effort between Chrysler designers and a Pittsburgh Plate Glass company. Towards the end of ’66, Plymouth made an effort to move the Barracuda from the Valiant nameplate. In 1967, the new redesign would prove a serious competitor in the segment.

03/31/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.31.1919
One hundred years ago, Packard completed their government order for 15,000 war trucks. (This item is courtesy of 365daysofmotoring.com)

03/30/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.30.1969
Fifty years ago, Lucien Bianchi died at LeMans France at age 34. Luciano Bianchi was born in Milan and moved with his family to Belgium at young age. He later became a Belgian citizen and gradually was called Lucien Bianchi. A competent allrounder, Bianchi could do it all: single seater racing, sports car racing and rally driving. The winner at Le Mans in 1968 he was killed while testing for the 1969 event.

03/29/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.29.1919
One hundred years ago, the First Tatra vehicle, a TL4 truck, was completed. The truck was Tatra's first offering to the automotive world but it was the Tatra car that had inspired engineer Hans Ledwinka to found Tatra. Just after the war, Hans Ledwinka began construction of a new automobile to be marketed under the marque Tatra, a division of the newly named Koprivnicka Wagenbau of Czechoslovakia. The Tatra High Mountains are among the highest in the Carpathian Mountain Range, the legendary home of Bram Stoker's Dracula. Ledwinka settled on the name Tatra in 1919, when an experimental model of his car with four-wheel brakes passed a sleigh on an icy mountain road, prompting the sleigh riders to exclaim, "This is a car for the Tatras." In 1923, the first official Tatra automobile, the Tatra T11, was completed, and Ledwinka's hope for an affordable "people's car" was realized. The reliable, rugged T11, like Ford's Model T, gave many Czechoslovakians their first opportunity to own an automobile. In 1934, Tatra achieved impressed the automotive world with the introduction of the Tatra 77, the world's first aerodynamically styled automobile powered by a rear-mounted air-cooled engine.

03/28/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.28.1964
Rolla Vollstedt purchased the first Offenhauser engine built for rear-engine application. It was put in the Bryant Heating Special which finished 15th in the Indianapolis 500 with Len Sutton at the wheel. (This item is courtesy of 365daysofmotoring.com)

This Day in Auto History3.27.1899Camille Jenatzy completed 'La Jamais Contente' (The Never-Satisfied), the first purpose...
03/27/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.27.1899
Camille Jenatzy completed 'La Jamais Contente' (The Never-Satisfied), the first purpose-built land speed record car. The electric vehicle had a light alloy torpedo shaped bodywork and batteries. The high position of the driver and the exposed chassis underneath spoiled much of the aerodynamics. The light alloy, called partinium, is an alloy of aluminium, tungsten and magnesium. Jenatzy driving La Jamais Contente set a land speed record was established in April 1899 at Achères, Yvelines near Paris, France. Jenatzy died in 1913 in a hunting accident. He went behind a bush and made animal noises as a prank on his friends who were hunting with him. It worked too well. Alfred Madoux, director of the journal L'Etoile Belge, fired, believing it was a wild animal. When they realised it was Jenatzy, they rushed him to hospital by car; he bled to death en route, fulfilling his own prophecy he would die in a Mercedes. He is buried at the Laeken Cemetery in Brussels. (This item is courtesy of 365daysofmotoring.com)

03/26/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.26.1879
Thomas Hancock, the father of the British rubber industry whose efforts paralleled those of Charles Goodyear in the United States, died in Stoke Newington, England at age 78.

03/25/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.25.1954
The experimental turbine-engined Plymouth was announced to the public some six months after George J. Huebner Jr. had taken it for its first test drive. The car, a white-over-beige 1954 Plymouth Belvedere two-door hardtop, was not the first turbine-powered automobile in the world (Rover's Jet 1 held that distinction), but it did carry a distinction no car had to that time—it was the first production automobile in the world to be powered by a gas turbine. Chrysler's turbine program dated back to World War II. In 1945, Chrysler had been issued a contract by the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics to develop a turboprop engine. Work on an automotive version of the engine didn't begin in earnest until 1949 when the Navy contract ran out. Key obstacles were cost and materials availability; completely new tooling and manufacturing methods would have to be developed if a turbine engine was to be mass produced. Turbine engines, by their very nature, required special metal alloy and ceramic parts to withstand the extreme temperatures generated. Chrysler engineers were faced with two engine designs to choose from, either single- or two-shaft, and chose to develop the two-stage turbine (a gas generator stage and a power turbine stage). The public got its first look at the Plymouth Belvedere Turbine when it was displayed at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City from April 7 to 11.

03/24/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.24.1954
Stockholders of the Nash-Kelvinator Corporation and the Hudson Motor Car Company approved the proposed merger of the two firms. The companies would form the American Motors Corporation (AMC). AMC is recognized as the most successful postwar independent manufacturer of cars. It owed its success in large part to its remarkable President George Romney. Born to Mormon missionary parents on a Mormon colony in Chihuahua, Mexico, Romney grew up poor. His grandfather, Miles Romney, who had been born in Nauvoo, Illinois, the original site of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, had four wives and sired 30 children. Unlike most of the great figures of the American automotive industry, Romney had little experience actually building cars. He had made his mark as a spokesman and advocate during stints as a lobbyist. His first car-related job was the director position of the Automobile Manufacturers Association. He joined the Nash-Kelvinator Corporation in 1948 as the special assistant to then company Chairman George Mason. Romney learned the business side of the automobile industry, and his exceptional skills as a negotiator propelled him to the upper echelons of the company. By 1953, he was an executive vice-president and a member of the board of directors. A few months after the merger that formed AMC, George Mason, company president, died and the board elected Mason's protege George Romney, to succeed him. As head of AMC, Romney emphasized the independents' need to avoid direct competition with the Big Three. The company developed the Rambler, and Romney coined the term "compact car" to promote it. Romney is also credited with coining the term "gas-guzzling dinosaur" to describe the Big Three's extravagant 1950s models. AMC recorded profits by 1958, and George Romney was rewarded for his remarkable achievement with name recognition. Still a devout Mormon, Romney used his recognition for social improvement. He led a campaign against the monopoly held by Detroit's Big Three. Romney argued that no car manufacturer should be allowed to maintain more than 35 percent market share. He termed his business philosophy "competitive cooperative consumerism" and argued that monopoly "either by labor or by industry, is bad for America." Romney's views, perhaps ahead of their time, were never fully taken seriously due in part to his tendency to change his stance. His career as a car manufacturer was followed by a political career, during which he served as governor of Michigan and ran for the Republican nomination for president.

03/23/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.23.1909
Wilhelm and Karl Maybach formed Luftfahrzeug-Motoren GmbH in Bissingen, Germany, to produce engines for the Zeppelin airships. The Maybach Motoren-Werke, a subsidiary of the aviation company, would produce the luxurious Maybach automobile between 1921and 1941. Wilhelm Maybach designed the internal expanding brake in 1901. The internal brake operated by pressing shoes against the interior of the wheel or drive shaft. Maybach's design remained the model for most braking systems until the disc brake emerged as an alternative in the 1970s.

03/22/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.22.1974
Racer Peter Revson was killed at age 35 when his Shadow-Cosworth Formula 1 car crashed during a practice run at the Kyalami track in South Africa when the car's front suspension failed.. The nephew of Revlon Cosmetics industry magnate Charles Revson, he was an heir to his father Martin's fortune (reportedly worth over $1 billion). He was a young, handsome bachelor who was described as a "free spirit". Revson began racing while at Cornell University. In 1968 he was part of the new Javelin racing program established by American Motors (AMC). At the first Trans-Am Series attempt, the 12 Hours of Sebring, Revson and Skip Scott drove to a 12th overall and took 5th in their class. In 1970 he teamed with Steve McQueen to place second in the 12 Hours of Sebring. Also in 1970, Revson was teammates with Mark Donohue in the Penske Racing AMC factory-team Javelins in the SCCA Trans Am. Revson joined McLaren in 1971 and became the first American to win the Can-Am Championship. That same season he finished second in the Indianapolis 500 after posting the fastest qualifying time. He competed in the Indy 500 each year from 1969-1973. In 1972, Revson was named to the McLaren Formula One team. He remained with the team for two years, winning the British Grand Prix and Canadian Grand Prix in 1973, before moving to Shadow in 1974. He is the last American born driver to win a Formula One race (Mario Andretti, who won in later years, is a naturalized American).

03/21/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.21.1964
Ferraris swept the podium while winning the 12 Hours of Sebring with Umberto Maglioli and Mike Parkes driving the first place car, a Ferrari 275P. In the same race, the Iso Rivolta Grifo prototype belt by Giotto Bizzarrini made its racing debut, finishing 39th.

America On Wheels
03/21/2019

America On Wheels

A very special car rolled into our lobby today, "Old Blue". This 1940 Ford Deluxe Convertible, a mutliple Senior Grand National Award winner, is on loan from the AACA.

A very special car rolled into our lobby today, "Old Blue".  This 1940 Ford Deluxe Convertible, a mutliple Senior Grand ...
03/20/2019

A very special car rolled into our lobby today, "Old Blue". This 1940 Ford Deluxe Convertible, a mutliple Senior Grand National Award winner, is on loan from the AACA.

03/20/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.20.1994
Michael Andretti won the Australian CART Indy Car race driving a Reynard. This was Andretti's first race after leaving F1 and the first Indy Car race for Reynard.

03/19/2019

This Day in Auto History
3.19.1999
Ford established the Premier Auto Group (PAG) consisting of Aston Martin, Jaguar and Lincoln [Volvo and Land Rover would later be included in this group]. Forbes estimated that, by 2004, Ford had spent $17 billion building on acquisitions to form PAG. Lincoln and Mercury were returned to Ford direct control in 2002. Lincoln's headquarters had been merged into PAG's North American office, where it was run by a German executive who was based in London, England. The four other marques in the PAG, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Land Rover and Volvo, were essentially completely different car companies with their own unique markets and dealer networks, so there were few synergies that could be achieved by combining them under one division. Ford attempted to push these brands to share parts and engineering in order to cut costs. This made some vehicles too similar to mass-market Fords, notably the Jaguar X-Type which was a capable compact executive car yet its reputation suffered mainly because it shared a platform with the Ford Mondeo. The PAG was gradually dismantled from 2006 to 2010 with the divestiture of its constituent brands.

Address

5 N Front St
Allentown, PA
18102

General information

Hours of Operation: Summer (April-December) Tuesday-Saturday 10am to 5pm, Sunday noon to 5pm *Last ticket sales at 4pm Winter (January-March) Wednesday-Saturday 10am-5pm *Last ticket sales at 4pm & Sunday noon to 4pm *Last ticket sales at 3pm Admission: Adults $10, Seniors (62+) $8, Students (6-16) $6 & Children 5 & under FREE ** Seniors are FREE the first Thursday of EVERY MONTH & Children/ Students 16 & under are FREE EVERY Sunday.

Opening Hours

Tuesday 09:00 - 16:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(610) 432-4200

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