USS Slater

USS Slater As the last Destroyer Escort afloat in America, the USS SLATER offers one hour tours of the ship. Located in downtown Albany, New York on the Hudson River.
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USS Slater DE 766 / HS Aetos D 01

Saturday, 14 December 2019. Sixteen volunteers aboard on a relatively warm, drizzly Saturday. Work continued on  the rep...
12/15/2019

Saturday, 14 December 2019. Sixteen volunteers aboard on a relatively warm, drizzly Saturday. Work continued on the replica radar waveguide fabrication, the CIC, and pilothouse restoration. We also got the circulators placed for the season. Smitty served up roast chicken for chow.We mourned the passing of USS SLATER World War II postal clerk, Marvin Cash.

Seventy-five years ago today, on 13 December 1944, USS DUFFY (DE-27) was escorting a group of LSTs with men, supplies, a...
12/14/2019

Seventy-five years ago today, on 13 December 1944, USS DUFFY (DE-27) was escorting a group of LSTs with men, supplies, and equipment to Leyte for the retaking of the Philippines. Protecting the convoy during unloading, DUFFY scored several hits on an enemy plane which crashed on the beach during an air raid.

Throwback Thursday post, to 27 August, 1993. Another view of SLATER/AETOS arrival at the Intrepid Sea Air Space Museum, ...
12/13/2019

Throwback Thursday post, to 27 August, 1993. Another view of SLATER/AETOS arrival at the Intrepid Sea Air Space Museum, in Manhattan. The stern of the Ukrainian tugboat that towed her over from Greece is in the foreground.

Our Ship's Store is still open! Head over to our Facebook Shop and keep our volunteers warm this winter!!  http://ow.ly/...
12/11/2019

Our Ship's Store is still open! Head over to our Facebook Shop and keep our volunteers warm this winter!! http://ow.ly/2VHo50xxpw5

Scrubbing hammocks aboard USS LIDDLE (DE-206/APD-60), circa 1944. Note the bunk straps hanging from the lifelines. Photo...
12/11/2019

Scrubbing hammocks aboard USS LIDDLE (DE-206/APD-60), circa 1944. Note the bunk straps hanging from the lifelines. Photo taken by Harold Deal, courtesy of Jeffery Deal.

Monday, 9 December 2019. Survived my 68th birthday yesterday.  Fifteen volunteers reported aboard today, to continue our...
12/10/2019

Monday, 9 December 2019. Survived my 68th birthday yesterday. Fifteen volunteers reported aboard today, to continue our winter restoration projects. Smitty's ziti and meatballs for chow.

This “Remember a Ship Sunday,” we look back at the USS LIDDLE, grievously damaged 75 years ago, on 7 December 1944. She ...
12/09/2019

This “Remember a Ship Sunday,” we look back at the USS LIDDLE, grievously damaged 75 years ago, on 7 December 1944. She honored William Porter Liddle, Jr., who was born on 27 January 1919, in Richlands, Virginia. He enlisted in the Navy on 2 July 1937. The invasion of Guadalcanal found Liddle assigned to Company L, 5th Marine Regiment, and 1st Marine Division. Pharmacist’s Mate Third Class Liddle was killed in action on 19 August 1942. He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star Medal. The citation read in part “During vigorous attacks by our force on the Japanese-held village of Matanikao, Liddle, with cool courage and utter disregard for his own personal safety, continuously exposed himself to hostile machine gun and rifle fire, in order to administer to his wounded comrades. He gallantly gave up his life in the service of his country.”

His namesake, USS LIDDLE (DE-206), was laid down by Charleston Navy Yard, on 8 June 1943. She was launched on 9 August 1943, and was sponsored by Mrs. William Porter Liddle, the mother of Pharmacist’s Mate Third Class Liddle, Jr. She was commissioned on 6 December 1943, with Lcdr. Robert M. Hinckley, Jr., in command.

Between 11 February and 29 June 1944, LIDDLE escorted convoys on three round trips across the North Atlantic, from New York to Wales, Gibraltar, and Tunisia. Upon returning to New York, she was converted to a high-speed transport and reclassified APD-60 5 July.

Departing New York on 22 September, she arrived in Hollandia, New Guinea on 4 November for duty with the 7th Fleet. She left New Guinea on 17 November to screen a supply convoy bound for Leyte Gulf, Philippine Islands, and arrived off the beaches on 24 November. On the same day, she got underway to escort an LST formation to the Palaus, and returned to Leyte on 29 November.

LIDDLE embarked 141 troops on 6 December for a flanking operation in the Leyte Gulf area. After landing her troops at Ormoc without casualty on 7 December, LIDDLE came under attack from Japanese aircraft. Though splashing five attackers, she was hit on the bridge by a kamikaze and seriously damaged, necessitating her return to San Francisco on 16 January 1945 for repairs. While she was being refitted, a sign on her quarterdeck read: “This Ship Lost 38 Officers and Men. She is Anxious to Get Back Into Action.”

By 22 February, the ship was again underway to rejoin her division in liberating the Philippines. From 29 March to 5 June, LIDDLE escorted convoys and trained for future landings. She then transported Australian troops to the Netherlands East Indies, and supported the landings at Brunei Bay on 10 June, and Balikpapan on 1 July.

The ship next trained forces for the assault on the Japanese homeland, but the news of Japan’s surrender ended this task. LIDDLE transported equipment to Korea through the mine-infested waters of the East China and Yellow Seas in September 1945. Then she evacuated prisoners of war from Dairen, Manchuria, on 5 October, and became the Port Director Ship at Taku, China, on 25 October.

She got underway from Taku for the United States on 23 November, touched New York on New Year’s Day 1946, and 2 days later headed for Green Cove Springs, Fla. Then she decommissioned on 18 June 1946, and entered the Atlantic Reserve Fleet.

LIDDLE recommissioned on 27 October 1950, during the Korean War, with Lt. Comdr. Kenneth W. Miller in command. Departing Green Cove Springs on 25 November, she arrived in Norfolk, Va., 2 days later to join Transport Division 22.

LIDDLE voyaged to the Panama Canal early in January 1952, and spent the spring and summer operating in the Caribbean. Back at Little Creek on 13 November, the fast transport intensified her tight training schedule. The need in Korea for troops with amphibious experience brought the ship to Boston in January 1953, to the Caribbean the next month, and returned her to Little Creek operations for the remainder of the summer.

She sailed for the Mediterranean on 28 September, to take part in Operation “Weldfast,” a landing exercise. Departing Oran, Algeria, on 23 January 1954. LIDDLE returned to Little Creek on 4 February, where she became an ASW school ship, engaged in more amphibious exercises, and conducted midshipman cruises. She became a unit of Reserve Escort Squadron 4, on 15 January 1958, and decommissioned on 2 February 1959.

In August 1961, the Berlin crisis brought LIDDLE to active duty once again. She recommissioned on 29 November, with Lt. Comdr. Royal R. Ross in command. As a unit of the Atlantic Amphibious Force, the ship resumed training, which included a demonstration landing for President Kennedy off of Onslow Beach, N.C., on 14 April 1962.

During the Cuban crisis, from 24 October to 20 November 1962, she patrolled off of the Bahama Islands, to enforce American demands for the removal of Russian offensive weapons from Cuban soil. She then returned to her training exercises, and in February 1963, was underway as a unit of Amphibious Squadron 8, part of the Caribbean Ready Squadron.

Operating between Little Creek and the Caribbean, LIDDLE participated in a mercy mission to Haiti on 13 to 19 October 1963, to deliver food, clothing, and medical supplies to the coastal areas struck by hurricane “Flora.” From 1964 through 1966, she continued service along the Atlantic coast and in the Caribbean.

LIDDLE decommissioned on 18 March 1967, at Norfolk. VA. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 5 April; and she was put up for disposal. On the day she decommissioned, her former crew immediately manned BEVERLY W. REID (APD-119), which recommissioned that day. LIDDLE was sold on 25 June 1967, to the North American Smelting Company.

Let us not forget those USS LIDDLE Shipmates lost in action.

7 December 1944
Chester A. Bassett Lt.(jg)
Henry J. Beeftink S 1/C
Lloyd C. Brogger LCDR
Frank J. Caramanica F 2/C
Sylvester Cunningham LCDR
Thomas Gaylord Daine S 1/C
James D. Deane SM 3/C
Frederick M. Denning S 1/C
Theodore J. Dumas S 1/C
Glenn V. Eagon S 1/C
Wynn Epler SK 2/C
William H. Freeman, Jr. S 1/C
Albert P. Gabler S 1/C
Joseph E. Gilbert Lt.(jg)
William B. Graddy, Jr. RM 1/C
Jerome W. Greenbaum LT
Thomas E. Gurski S 2/C
Melvin H. Hitchner RdM 2/C
Clarence W. LaFollette CX(AA)
Morris Smead Lowman RdM 2/C
Thomas E. McAlpine, Jr. LT
Edward A. Matyas RdM 2/C
James A. Murphy, Jr. Lt.(jg)
Donald R. Neff FC 3/C
Kenneth L. Olson F 1/C
Joseph A. Paradis, Jr. SM 1/C
Joseph M. Perez Y 2/C
Nathan F. Piccirilli ENS
Donald A. Russell RM 3/C
Thomas A. Simcox SoM 2/C
Angelo A. Solano SM 2/C
Robert Clair Teague RdM 3/C
Sidney F. Thompson SK 1/C
John A. Vasquez S 1/C
Raymond H. Zeck EM 2/C

8 December 1944
Stewart C. MacLean S 1/C

10 December 1944
Gerald J. Leshok Lt.(jg)

14 December 1944
Philip E. Walker S 1/C

Saturday, 7 December 1941. Twenty volunteers worked aboard the ship today. It was time to dig out, and we remembered Pea...
12/08/2019

Saturday, 7 December 1941. Twenty volunteers worked aboard the ship today. It was time to dig out, and we remembered Pearl Harbor. Thanks to Barry Witte for chow.

Friday evening and it's Liberty Call, Wellington, New Zealand, circa 1942. How many of you have been to New Zealand? Hav...
12/06/2019

Friday evening and it's Liberty Call, Wellington, New Zealand, circa 1942. How many of you have been to New Zealand? Have a great weekend! Photo by E.M. Alderdice from NZ History.

USS JOHN C. BUTLER (DE-339), transferring personnel from SARGENT BAY (CVE-83), on 1 March 1945. NARA photo 80-G-321517 c...
12/06/2019

USS JOHN C. BUTLER (DE-339), transferring personnel from SARGENT BAY (CVE-83), on 1 March 1945. NARA photo 80-G-321517 courtesy of Roger Torgeson.

USS Slater
12/04/2019

USS Slater

This photograph is one of over 400 images taken by radioman, Lyman Peterson, aboard SLATER in 1944 and 45.  Unfortunatel...
12/04/2019

This photograph is one of over 400 images taken by radioman, Lyman Peterson, aboard SLATER in 1944 and 45. Unfortunately, the identity of this Sailor has been lost to history. But for us, he has come to represent all of the maintenance volunteers who will continue working aboard USS SLATER all winter long, and all of our contributors who send money to, “Help keep a volunteer warm this winter.“

Sunday was our last tour day of the season. That fact means that our stream of operating income comes to an end until next spring. If you enjoy the content of this site, and the continuing saga of USS SLATER’s restoration, please consider making a contribution to our Winter Fund Drive. Not counting the money we will spend at the shipyard in the spring, it takes $400,000 annually to operate USS SLATER. The project gets no governmental operating support. Half of our income comes through ticket and souvenir sales. The other half comes from our nationwide network of 3,000 generous supporters.

Upcoming expenses are a $14,000 replacement of our 25-year-old fire alarm system. That is a crucial investment that will help us protect all of the progress we have made thus far. We also need to invest in a $5,000 upgrade to our aging computer and information storage systems. Thanks to the Maritime Heritage Grant, we will be going back to the shipyard, to restore the mast and repaint the bottom. Details on that project can be found here on our homepage at www.ussslater.org

We anticipate that project will cost $700,000. With the grant and our match, so far we have raised $400,000. All donors who give $25.00 or more will receive our quarterly print newsletter, TRIM BUT DEADLY, in addition to our online newsletter, SLATER SIGNALS.

So if you’re one of the 16,000 people who enjoy our page and want to be a part of what is happening here, please consider clicking the donate button at the bottom of our homepage. Or, if you are more old-fashioned, like we are, you can download the donation form and send a check here: http://www.ussslater.org/participate/donate.html

You’ll know you’ve helped to keep a volunteer warm this winter.

#GivingTuesday is a perfect opportunity to to give to those organizations close to your heart. Keep a volunteer warm thi...
12/03/2019

#GivingTuesday is a perfect opportunity to to give to those organizations close to your heart.

Keep a volunteer warm this winter by donating to USS SLATER. Donations are accepted by phone, Paypal on our website, as well as good old fashioned snail mail! Thanks for your support!

What a difference a day makes.
12/02/2019

What a difference a day makes.

#CyberMonday #AmazonSmileMake sure you select Destroyer Escort Historical Museum as your Amazon Smile charity! Amazon wi...
12/02/2019

#CyberMonday #AmazonSmile

Make sure you select Destroyer Escort Historical Museum as your Amazon Smile charity! Amazon will donate a portion of your purchase to us at no extra charge to you!

Win a SLATER Treasure Trove today! In honor of our last day of the season we are having a contest. Share your favorite p...
12/01/2019

Win a SLATER Treasure Trove today! In honor of our last day of the season we are having a contest.

Share your favorite photo of SLATER or a photo of you on your visit to SLATER and tag it with #Slater2019. Every post will be entered to win. The winner of the random drawing will be announced tomorrow morning. #MuseumStoreSunday

Saturday, 30 November 2019. The last day of the month, and our last tour day tomorrow. Fifteen volunteers aboard. Snow i...
12/01/2019

Saturday, 30 November 2019. The last day of the month, and our last tour day tomorrow. Fifteen volunteers aboard. Snow is forecast for tomorrow afternoon into Monday. Smitty is on vacation, so no chow today.

Happy #SmallBusinessSaturdayShop small with USS SLATER! If you purchase a gift certificate for 3 admission tickets we'll...
11/30/2019

Happy #SmallBusinessSaturday

Shop small with USS SLATER! If you purchase a gift certificate for 3 admission tickets we'll throw in a 4th for FREE!

This would make a great gift for the history buff in your life!

Friday afternoon and it's Liberty Call! Still time for some Black Friday shopping at the Exchange. Remember, this is the...
11/29/2019

Friday afternoon and it's Liberty Call! Still time for some Black Friday shopping at the Exchange. Remember, this is the last weekend USS Slater will be open until spring. Have a great weekend.

Take advantage of this #BlackFriday deal! When you buy a t-shirt or sweatshirt you'll get a SLATER goody bag free, while...
11/29/2019

Take advantage of this #BlackFriday deal! When you buy a t-shirt or sweatshirt you'll get a SLATER goody bag free, while supplies last!

And stick around for a tour while you're here!

Happy Thanksgiving from the USS SLATER Crew.
11/28/2019

Happy Thanksgiving from the USS SLATER Crew.

Continuing with our Great Lakes boot camp memories, who has rowed around on Lake Michigan? LIFE Archive photo by Bernard...
11/28/2019

Continuing with our Great Lakes boot camp memories, who has rowed around on Lake Michigan? LIFE Archive photo by Bernard Hoffman.

Who remembers the Great Lakes Sea Bag Inspection? Life Archive photo by Bernard Hoffman, 1940.
11/27/2019

Who remembers the Great Lakes Sea Bag Inspection? Life Archive photo by Bernard Hoffman, 1940.

Monday, 25 November 2019. Fifteen volunteers aboard. The high point of the day was the crew being treated to Danny's gri...
11/26/2019

Monday, 25 November 2019. Fifteen volunteers aboard. The high point of the day was the crew being treated to Danny's grilled salmon and sauce.

Seventy-five years ago today, the destroyer escort USS JOSEPH E. CAMPBELL (DE-70) was reclassified to become a high-spee...
11/25/2019

Seventy-five years ago today, the destroyer escort USS JOSEPH E. CAMPBELL (DE-70) was reclassified to become a high-speed troop transport, and given the new designation and hull number APD-49. Her name honored Joseph Eugene Campbell, who was born on 23 July 1919, in Vigo County, Indiana. He enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve on 29 March 1941, at St. Louis, as an aviation cadet. After preliminary flight training at Robertson, Missouri, he was transferred to Pensacola for further flight training.

Appointed a Naval Aviator on 17 December 1941, he was later commissioned an Ensign on 21 January 1942. Then he was assigned to Cruiser Scouting Squadron 6, aboard USS ASTORIA (CA-34), in the Pacific. Ensign Campbell was killed in action when his ship was destroyed during the first Battle of Savo Island, on 9 August 1942.

His namesake was a BUCKLEY class DE, laid down on 29 March 1943, by Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp., in Hingham, Massachusetts. She was launched on 26 June 1943. Mrs. Marie S. Campbell, the mother of Ens. Campbell, sponsored the ship. She was commissioned on 23 September 1943, with Lcdr. Jack French Bowling, Jr. in command.

After shakedown off of Bermuda, JOSEPH E. CAMPBELL departed Boston on 11 October. After escorting a convoy to Londonderry, Northern Ireland, she returned to New York on 16 December. Between 31 December 1943 and 8 October 1944, the destroyer escort made three convoy escort voyages to French North Africa.

Returning to New York from the last voyage on 8 October, her conversion to a high-speed transport began, and JOSEPH E. CAMPBELL was reclassified APD-49 on 24 November 1944. After exercises and training along the East Coast, the high-speed transport departed Key West on 8 March 1945, arriving in Pearl Harbor on 8 April, via the Panama Canal and San Diego. Departing Pearl Harbor on the 29th, she steamed to Eniwetok, where she rendezvoused with two merchant ships, and escorted them to Leyte. For the next 3 months, JOSEPH E. CAMPBELL served as an antisubmarine screen for LST groups in and out of Okinawa.

On 1 September she departed Cebu, in the Philippine Islands, as part of the screen for occupation forces for Japan, where she arrived 8 days later. JOSEPH E. CAMPBELL continued her escort duties between Japan and the Philippines, until returning to the East Coast in December. After visiting Philadelphia and Norfolk, she steamed to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and San Juan, P.R., where she embarked passengers and returned to More-head City, N.C., on 31 March 1946.
After visits to Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Hampton Roads, JOSEPH E. CAMPBELL arrived in Charleston, S.C., on 22 May, for inactivation.

Secured for preservation, she was towed to Green Cove Springs, Florida, where she decommissioned on 15 November 1946. She was later moved to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet at Orange, Texas. JOSEPH E. CAMPBELL was struck from the Navy List on 1 December 1966, after being sold to Chile on 15 November 1966. Renamed RIQUELME (APD-28), she never saw service in Chile, and was used as a parts hulk and stripped. On 1 December 1966, she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register.

Saturday, 23 November 2019. Twenty-tour volunteers aboard today, working on recognition lights, waveguide, and trailer r...
11/24/2019

Saturday, 23 November 2019. Twenty-tour volunteers aboard today, working on recognition lights, waveguide, and trailer repairs. It was also, finally, a decent day for tours. Smitty outdid himself today, with chicken cordon bleu.

Friday afternoon, and it's Liberty Call, with Bill, Marie, and Groucho, in a "Girl in Every Port." Have a great weekend!
11/22/2019

Friday afternoon, and it's Liberty Call, with Bill, Marie, and Groucho, in a "Girl in Every Port." Have a great weekend!

"You want to know how we load depth charges? This is how we load depth charges." LIFE Archive photo.
11/22/2019

"You want to know how we load depth charges? This is how we load depth charges." LIFE Archive photo.

USS CLARENCE L EVANS (DE-113) plane guarding for USS MISSION BAY (CVE-59) circa 1945. Photo from the DEHM collection.
11/21/2019

USS CLARENCE L EVANS (DE-113) plane guarding for USS MISSION BAY (CVE-59) circa 1945. Photo from the DEHM collection.

Seventy-five years ago today, USS CONKLIN (DE-439) and USS McCOY REYNOLDS engaged Japanese submarine I- 37 off Kossol Ro...
11/20/2019

Seventy-five years ago today, USS CONKLIN (DE-439) and USS McCOY REYNOLDS engaged Japanese submarine I- 37 off Kossol Roads, Palau. Here is the story from the Combined Fleet website.

“At 0858, some twelve hours before I-37 is scheduled to launch her kaiten, she is sighted at the western entrance of the Kossol Roads by USS WINTERBERRY (AN-56), laying a torpedo net across the entrance. Twenty seconds later the submarine surfaces again at a steep angle in approximately the same position and then disappears again. USS WINTERBERRY alerts minesweeper YMS-33 and the Port Director of Kossol Passage. YMS-33 fails to locate the submarine.

At 0915, Lcdr. Edmund L. McGibbon's USS CONKLIN (DE-439) and Lcdr Edwin K. Winn's McCOY REYNOLDS (DE-440) are ordered to find and destroy I-37. Navy planes are also dispatched from Peleliu to assist. The ships begin a sonar search.
Around 1504 both destroyer escorts obtain a sound contact. At 1539, McCOY REYNOLDS commences the first attack, firing two patterns of Mark 10 "Hedgehog" projector charges. I-37 descends to 350 feet and commences evasive maneuvers. After her third Hedgehog attack McCOY REYNOLDS loses contact at a depth of 400 feet or more.

At 1603, CONKLIN relocates I-37 and commences her first Hedgehog attack at 1615. Twenty-five seconds later a single underwater explosion is heard. Ten minutes later CONKLIN fires the second pattern of projector charges. Twenty-eight seconds later another explosion is heard. Nevertheless, I-37 continues to maneuver and manages to turn inside CONKLIN's pattern immediately prior to her third attack, during which no hits are recorded.

Lcdr Winn, Officer in Tactical Command, now orders CONKLIN to stand by, and at 1645 McCOY REYNOLDS drops 12 depth charges set to the depth of 450 feet. An air bubble about 25 feet in diameter arises at least 5 feet above the surface, followed by a heavy underwater explosion. At 1700, just after the contact has been regained, another massive explosion shakes the destroyer escort violently, temporarily disabling her sound gear. A minute later, a huge air bubble appears on the starboard bow at 08-07N, 134-16E.

Several smaller explosions follow and no further contacts can be established. Sudden gushes of debris and oil emerge in a large area around both ships. By sundown a whaleboat from McCOY REYNOLDS retrieves a number of items, including wood stenciled with Japanese characters, polished pieces of instrument cases and deck planking. A piece of human flesh with bits of steel embedded in it is likewise retrieved. By darkness the oil slick expands over several square miles and new debris continue to appear.”

For those not familiar with the Combined Fleet Website, it is a superb resource for information and ship movements of the Japanese Navy in World War II.http://www.combinedfleet.com/

Address

Intersection Of Broadway And Quay Streets
Albany, NY
12202

General information

USS SLATER is the last WWII destroyer escort afloat in America.

Telephone

(518) 431-1943

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