USS Slater

USS Slater As the last Destroyer Escort afloat in America, the USS SLATER offers hour long tours of the ship. Located in downtown Albany, New York on the Hudson River.

USS Slater DE 766 / HS Aetos D 01

We completed our two-day availability today, with the departure of Ron Prest and Thomas Scian. The crew included the ret...
06/06/2019

We completed our two-day availability today, with the departure of Ron Prest and Thomas Scian. The crew included the retirees and employees from the Exelon Limerick Nuclear Generating Plant, in Pottstown Pa. Also participating were Ed Zajkowski, Rick Espenshade, Joe Zygmont, Bob Lalley, and the father and son team of Ed Schlegle and Cole Schlegle. Others contributing were Tin Can Sailors Steve Whynot and Gene Byers, volunteers Kendrick Giambattista, Ron Prest, Thomas Scian, and Bill Maloney. The cooks were Blair Sandri and Phil Zieglin. Thanks to you all!

Tuesday, 4 June 2019. While Ed Zajkowski and his team continued restoration aboard USS SLATER, let us remember those who...
06/05/2019

Tuesday, 4 June 2019. While Ed Zajkowski and his team continued restoration aboard USS SLATER, let us remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice at the Battle of Midway. On this date in 1942, a small group of courageous airmen, flying off of three carriers, changed the course of the entire Pacific war at the Battle of Midway.

The squadron that sacrificed the most was Torpedo 8, flying off of USS HORNET CV-8. VT-8's first and best-known combat mission came during the Battle of Midway, on 4 June 1942. Flying the obsolete Douglas TBD Devastators, Commander John C. Waldron's 15 planes were all shot down during their unescorted torpedo attack on Japanese aircraft carriers. The squadron did not destroy any enemy aircraft with their defensive rear 30-caliber machine guns, nor did they damage any of the Japanese carriers. But their sacrifice paved the way for the successful dive bomber attacks that were to follow. Torpedo 8 was afterwards awarded the American Presidential Unit Citation.

A separate detachment of Torpedo 8 bombers, flying from Midway, was the first squadron equipped with Grumman's new TBF-1 Avenger. This was a bigger, faster, longer-ranged replacement for the TBD. When Hornet sailed to the Pacific, a detachment of the squadron, under the command of Lt. Harold "Swede" Larson, remained in Norfolk, Virginia, to receive the first shipment of the new aircraft. Larson's detachment arrived at Pearl Harbor the day after Hornet sailed for Midway. Six of the squadron's Avengers were flown to Midway under the command of Lt. Langdon K. Fieberling, to participate in the battle. These planes were the first Navy aircraft to attack the Japanese fleet that day. They attacked without fighter cover, and five of the Avengers were shot down, with only Ensign Albert K. Earnest and CDR (then Radioman 2/c) Harry Ferrier's surviving, on a badly shot-up plane with damaged controls and landing gear, and a dead rear-gunner.

Destroyer Escorts honored the following VT-8 airmen:

A list of the fallen flying from USS HORNET CV-8
Lt.(jg) Jeff D. Woodson
Ens. William W. Abercrombie
Ens. William W. Creamer
Ens. Henry R. Kenyon
Ens. Ulvert M. Moore

Pilots of VT-8's Avenger detachment lost: flying from Midwayi
Lt. Langdon K. Fieberling, Commanding
Ensign O.J. Gaynier
Ensign V.A. Lewis
Ensign C. E. Brannon

Let's not forget their sacrifice today.

Monday, 3 June 2019. For the third year, Ed Zajkowski organized a group of volunteer welders and retirees, built around ...
06/04/2019

Monday, 3 June 2019. For the third year, Ed Zajkowski organized a group of volunteer welders and retirees, built around a core group from the Limerick Nuclear Power Plant in Pennsylvania. They completed the 20mm foot rail project, replaced two sets of wasted 40mm shell chutes on guns 41 and 42, welded up the bullhorn mount as part of our mast prefabrication, and did a dozen smaller jobs. They will be with us through Tuesday.

Fifty years ago today, USS HAVERFIELD (DER-393) was decommissioned for the last time at Pearl Harbor. She honored James ...
06/03/2019

Fifty years ago today, USS HAVERFIELD (DER-393) was decommissioned for the last time at Pearl Harbor. She honored James Wallace Haverfield, who was born on 11 April 1917, in Urichsville, Ohio. After receiving his B.A. from Ohio State University in 1939, Haverfield accepted an appointment as a midshipman on 16 March 1941, and after completing his training at Northwestern University, was commissioned an Ensign on 12 June 1941.

Ensign Harverfield reported to the battleship ARIZONA at Pearl Harbor on 28 June, and remained there. During the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, Ensign James Haverfield was one of the 46 officers and 1,057 men of ARIZONA lost when the valiant ship was sunk by the enemy.

The Edsall class USS HAVERFIELD was launched on 30 August 1943, by Brown Shipbuilding Co., in Houston. She was sponsored by Mrs. Tracy Haverfield, the mother of Ensign Haverfield. Then she was commissioned on 29 November, with Lt. Comdr. Jerry A. Matthews in command. After shakedown in the Caribbean, HAVERFIELD joined escort carrier Hague's hunter-killer group in patrolling Atlantic convoy lanes, in search enemy U-boats.

Departing Norfolk on 26 February 1944, the hunter-killer group, aided by a Canadian corvette and British aircraft, sank U-575 on the 23rd of March. With some seven survivors of the Nazi submarine aboard, HAVERFIELD continued her patrol to Casablanca, where she reported to Commander of the Moroccan Sea Frontier, and turned over the German prisoners on 18 March.

After returning to Norfolk, HAVERFIELD sailed on her second offensive combat cruise with the Bogue group on 5 May. Operating with another HUK group under Block Island, the Bogue force sank RO-501, exU-1224, at 18-08° N., 33-13° W. on 13 May, as the former German ship was heading for her new home in Japan.

Reaching Casablanca on 29 May, HAVERFIELD was ordered out that same night to render emergency assistance to survivors of carrier BLOCK ISLAND, sunk by a German torpedo off of the Canary Islands. HAVERFIELD rescued one of six Block Island fighter pilots who had been aloft when the carrier sank, but a long search failed to locate the remaining five men.

After this, HAVERFIELD continued to operate, until the European War ended in May 1945, on trans-Atlantic HUK missions-as well as on patrol along the icy Great Barrier. When all German U-boats still at sea had been accounted for, the destroyer escort underwent a Boston overhaul.

After intensive training in Cuban waters, she sailed for the Pacific on 19 July, to be ready for the invasion of Japan. Next, she reached Pearl Harbor via the Panama Canal and San Diego on 1 August. She patrolled the China coast and then streamed her homeward-bound pennant, reaching Boston on 15 February 1946. HAVERFIELD sailed to Green Cove Springs, Fla., on 25 March 1946. She decommissioned and went into reserve on 30 June 1947.

Reclassified DER-393 in September 1954, HAVERFIELD was converted to a radar picket ship at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, and recommissioned there on 4 January 1955. Fitted with the latest electronic detection equipment, and with 50 tons of ballast in her keel to compensate for the topside weight of the new radar antennae, HAVERFIELD trained off of the East Coast. She reported to her new homeport in San Diego on 23 July.

HAVERFIELD served as a flagship of the newly created CortRon 5, in addition to regular radar picket patrol off of the Pacific coast. After 5 years of this duty, she reported to Pearl Harbor on 10 April 1959 for similar employment along the Pacific Barrier. Departing Pearl Harbor on 16 May 1960, HAVERFIELD sailed to a new homeport, Guam, to make surveillance of the Trust Territory Islands and to ensure the safety and welfare of the islanders. Following her support of this scientific endeavor,

HAVERFIELD conducted antisubmarine and search and rescue patrols among the Bonins, the Marianas, and the Caroline Islands. For almost 5 years she served primarily in the Trust Territory of the Pacific, although twice she deployed to the Far East. Steaming to Japan in October 1960, she became the first radar picket escort ship to operate with the 7th Fleet in the Western Pacific.

HAVERFIELD returned to Pearl Harbor in March 1965, and, after joining Escort Squadron 5, sailed on 19 June for duty off of South Vietnam. There she participated in "Market Time" patrols, to guard against infiltration of North Vietnamese troops and supplies by sea. She served "Market Time" for 7 months, and then returned to Pearl Harbor on 2 February 1966. Departing for the Far East on 23 May, she resumed "Market Time" operations on 9 June.
HAVERFIELD continued "Market Time" patrols during the next 5 months. In addition, she provided gunfire support on 6 September against an enemy on Phu Quoc Island, South Vietnam.

She returned to Pearl Harbor on 6 December, remained there until late April 1967, and then resumed patrol duty off of South Vietnam. On 2 June 1969 she was decommissioned at the Pearl Harbor Naval Station, after 14 years and 5 months of service. On 15 December 1971, she was sold for scrapping to Chi Shun Hua Steel Co. Ltd, of Kaoshiung, Taiwan for $35,000.00.

Saturday, 1 June, 2019. Moored as before, port side to the Albany Snow Dock. Plant is still cold iron. Nothing changed t...
06/01/2019

Saturday, 1 June, 2019. Moored as before, port side to the Albany Snow Dock. Plant is still cold iron. Nothing changed there. Taking all utilities, fresh water, electricity, and telephone from shore. Twenty-two volunteers aboard. Smitty made a giant burrito for chow.

The weekend is here, and it's Liberty Call, Honolulu style! Too many Mai Tais at the luau. LIFE Archive photo Eliot Elis...
06/01/2019

The weekend is here, and it's Liberty Call, Honolulu style! Too many Mai Tais at the luau. LIFE Archive photo Eliot Elisofon.

"I'm a Boatswain's Mate, so of course I can splice wire."
05/31/2019

"I'm a Boatswain's Mate, so of course I can splice wire."

"What is this processed food you talk about?" Back in the day when cooks started from scratch.
05/30/2019

"What is this processed food you talk about?" Back in the day when cooks started from scratch.

Seventy-five years ago today, USS ENGLAND (DE-635) sank her fifth Japanese submarine, as she continued the destruction o...
05/27/2019

Seventy-five years ago today, USS ENGLAND (DE-635) sank her fifth Japanese submarine, as she continued the destruction of the Japanese scouting line. Operating with USS GEORGE (DE-697) and USS RABY (DE-698), at 2303, RABY reported radar contact at approximately 14,000 yards. At 2304, ENGLAND obtained the radar contact at a range of 12,000 yards. She immediately sounded General Quarters, and made preparations for illumination by star shells, projector Mark 10 attack, torpedo attack, and depth charge attack.

ENGLAND changed course, and headed for the sub, making fifteen knots. The sub submerged at 2314, and ENGLAND headed for the point where radar contact was lost and commenced a sonar search. At 2315, CIC, controlling the attack, advised slowing down to ten knots. At 2318, ENGLAND got a good sound contact at 1,700 yards. At 2323, ENGLAND fired a hedgehog salvo that was followed by underwater explosions.

After the projectiles hit, ENGLAND opened the range, and briefly regained a possible sound contact in explosion area. When she tried to hold the contact, what was believed to be the sub completely disappeared. The area was thoroughly searched, but no further contact was obtained.

The following morning, RABY found an oil slick, wood debris, and a meat-cutting block. In her action report, ENGLAND reported that from the time of the first contact, until sub was sunk, the time was nineteen minutes. All three ships departed area for rearming at Manus, at 0830. Postwar records revealed ENGLAND’s fifth victim to be submarine RO-108.

Saturday, 25 May, 2019. We started this Memorial Day weekend with a busy mix of maintenance and tours. Cathy Wheat and S...
05/26/2019

Saturday, 25 May, 2019. We started this Memorial Day weekend with a busy mix of maintenance and tours. Cathy Wheat and Smitty came up with roast beef, potatoes, and green beans for chow. But the big event of the day was the return of the Captain's palm tree.

The weekend is here and it's Liberty Call! "This must be the club the Chief warned us about. Let's check it out."
05/25/2019

The weekend is here and it's Liberty Call! "This must be the club the Chief warned us about. Let's check it out."

Thursday, 23 May 2019. The last work day for the USS HUSE Association volunteers. The weather cooperated for three and a...
05/24/2019

Thursday, 23 May 2019. The last work day for the USS HUSE Association volunteers. The weather cooperated for three and a half days. We covered all the primer on the fantail with non-skid, painted out three MK-51 director tub and four 20mm tubs, chipped and primed the area around mount 31, and preserved the void under the gun 25 tub amidships. Thanks to everyone who participated!

Twenty-two volunteers from the USS HUSE Association work crew, finally took time out to pose for a picture. It was back ...
05/22/2019

Twenty-two volunteers from the USS HUSE Association work crew, finally took time out to pose for a picture. It was back to work right afterword. Our thanks to George Amandola, for putting it all together.

Tuesday, 21 May 2019. USS HUSE (DE-145) Association work week day two. Lots of progress chipping, painting, and on the M...
05/22/2019

Tuesday, 21 May 2019. USS HUSE (DE-145) Association work week day two. Lots of progress chipping, painting, and on the Mount 33 sight assembly.

Monday, 20 May 2019, USS HUSE Work Week, day 1. Forty volunteers aboard today, as the members of the USS HUSE former cre...
05/21/2019

Monday, 20 May 2019, USS HUSE Work Week, day 1. Forty volunteers aboard today, as the members of the USS HUSE former crew members association joined us for a week of maintenance support.

Seventy-five years ago today, on 19 May 1944, USS ENGLAND (DE-635) sank Japanese submarine I-16, the first of six submar...
05/20/2019

Seventy-five years ago today, on 19 May 1944, USS ENGLAND (DE-635) sank Japanese submarine I-16, the first of six submarines ENGLAND would destroy in May.

She honored John Charles England, born in Harris, Missouri, on 11 December 1920. He enlisted in the Naval Reserve on 6 September 1940, and was commissioned an ensign on 6 June 1941. On 3 September 1941, he reported for duty aboard the Battleship USS OKLAHOMA (BB-37). Ensign England was killed in action during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, when OKLAHOMA was torpedoed and capsized.

His namesake, USS ENGLAND, was launched on 26 September 1943, by Bethlehem Steel Company in San Francisco, California. She was sponsored by Mrs. H. B. England, the mother of Ensign England. The ship was commissioned on 10 December 1943, with Cdr. William B. Pendleton in command.

ENGLAND arrived at Espiritu Santo on 12 March 1944, from San Francisco, Pearl Harbor, Funafuti, and Guadalcanal. She took up escort duty between Espiritu Santo and Guadalcanal, occasionally sailing to Noumea, and once to the Marshalls.

On 18 May 1944, with two other destroyer escorts, RABY and GEORGE, ENGLAND cleared Port Purvis on a hunt for Japanese submarines during a passage to Bougainville. Thanks, in part, to Executive Officer John Williamson’s previous duty teaching ASW tactics at Miami, during the next 8 days, she was to set an impressive record in antisubmarine warfare, unmatched by any other American ship.

She hunted down and sank 1-16 on 19 May, RO-106 on 22 May, RO-104 on 23 May, RO-116 on 24 May, and RO-108 on 26 May. In three of these cases, the other destroyers were in on the beginning of the actions, but the kill in every case was ENGLAND's alone. Quickly replenishing depth charges at Manus, ENGLAND was back in action on 31 May, to join with four other ships in sinking RO-105.

This superlative performance won for ENGLAND a Presidential Unit Citation, and the assurance from the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral E. J. King, "There'll always be an ENGLAND in the United States Navy." His pledge was fulfilled 6 October 1960, when DLG-22 was assigned the name ENGLAND. Sadly, the promise has not been kept today.

Through the summer of 1944, ENGLAND sailed throughout the northern Solomons, providing the escort services necessary for the building up of bases. She also continued to provide escort services that aided the preparations for the renewed assaults on Japanese territories to the north, and the provision of supplies to garrison forces on the islands of the southwest Pacific.

In August, she underwent repairs at Manus, and between 24 September and 15 October, voyaged from the Treasury Islands to Sydney, Australia. From the Treasuries she sailed, guarding a convoy to Hollandia, where she arrived on 18 October. Then, on the 26th, she got underway on the first of two voyages to escort reinforcement convoys to newly invaded Leyte. She returned to Manus and local escort duty on 2 December.

From 2 January 1945, ENGLAND escorted convoys between Manus and Ulithi, the major base for operations of the carrier task forces, and later to be the staging point for the assaults on Iwo Jima and Okinawa. The escort vessel sailed to Kossol Roads in February, bringing in a convoy later routed on to the Philippines, and then resumed her duty on the Manus-Ulithi sea lanes. She sailed from Ulithi on 23 March for the pre-invasion bombardment of Okinawa.

Then she returned to Ulithi to join the screen of two cruisers, guarding them back to Okinawa to join the 5th Fleet just after the initial assault on 1 April. Between 6 and 17 April, she voyaged to Saipan, screening empty transports. Next, she took up a screening and patrol station north of the Kerama Retto.

On 9 May 1945, while on station, ENGLAND was attacked by three Japanese dive-bombers. Gunfire from the ship blew off one wing of the first suicider, but failed to deflect the kamikaze from its one-way mission. The plane crashed into ENGLAND’s starboard side, at the main deck, below the bridge. A heavy explosion soon followed, and a burst of smoke and flame engulfed the destroyer escort's pilothouse and bridge. ENGLAND raced along out of control.

The minesweeper, VIGILANCE (AM-324), rang up full ahead and went to ENGLAND’s assistance. ENGLAND was brought under control and stopped, about four miles east of where she had been kamikazed. At 1920, VIGILANCE pulled alongside the burning destroyer escort. VIGILANCE found heavy fires blazing from the forward mess hall, up through the wardroom, forward 20-millimeter clipping room, radio room, pilothouse, and flying bridge. Afterwards, when ENGLAND’s fires were under control, VIGILANCE took the destroyer escort under tow.

Underway for the northern entrance of Kerama Retto at 2135, the two ships arrived at their destination two hours later. ENGLAND’s total casualties were horrific, with 37 of her men killed or missing, and 25 wounded. When ready for sea, ENGLAND sailed on to Leyte, where she received temporary repairs, putting her in shape for the long voyage home. On 16 July 1945, she arrived in Philadelphia for permanent repairs and conversion to a high-speed transport.

The end of the war, however, halted this work. She was decommissioned on 15 October 1945, and sold for scrap on 26 November 1946. This was the end of one of the great destroyer escorts.

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Intersection Of Broadway And Quay Streets
Albany, NY
12202

General information

USS SLATER is the last WWII destroyer escort afloat in America.

Opening Hours

Wednesday 10:00 - 16:00
Thursday 10:00 - 16:00
Friday 10:00 - 16:00
Saturday 10:00 - 16:00
Sunday 10:00 - 16:00

Telephone

(518) 431-1943

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