Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site

Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site Welcome to the official Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site page. Schuyler Mansion was once home to Philip J. Schuyler (1733-1804), renowned Revolutionary War Major-General, State Senator, and business entrepreneur.
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2019 Season: May 15 - Oct 31, Wednesday - Sunday Hours: May & June: 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. July & August: 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. September & October: 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Tour Times: May & June: Tours begin at 11:00 a.m., are offered on the hour, with the last tour beginning at 4:00 p.m. July & Aug: Tours begin at 10:00 a.m., are offered on the hour, with the last tour at 4:00 p.m. Please note: The last tour on SUNDAYS during these two months, will be at 3:00 p.m. Sept & Oct: Tours begin at 11:00 a.m., are offered on the hour, with the last tour at 4:00 p.m. Tour Info: Generally, tours begin at the above listed hours; however, pre-registered groups and special events will alter the tour schedule. Calling prior to your visit to check for schedule changes highly recommended. All tours at Schuyler Mansion are guided tours. Visitors may enter the house only when accompanied by staff. General tours last an hour. General tours are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Schuyler Mansion does not take reservations for general tours (except for large groups, of course). Please call the site at (518) 434 – 0834 if you have further questions about Schuyler Mansion's open hours or tours.

#OTD in 1854, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton died in Washington DC at the age of 97. Over the course of her long life, Eliz...
11/09/2019

#OTD in 1854, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton died in Washington DC at the age of 97. Over the course of her long life, Eliza raised eight children, took in orphaned children, and co-founded the first private orphanage in NYC.

Eliza was a gifted needle-worker and an avid traveler. Starting in her 60s and through her 90s, Eliza traveled from her home in NYC to places like Mount Vernon, Oswego, and Wisconsin. She eventually moved to Washington DC with her daughter, Eliza, where she lived until her death.

Eliza's son, James, who was with her when she died, wrote a letter to his aunt Caty, Eliza's only surviving sibling, with the news that "My dear mother finished her course here this morning at about 4 Oclock." He told Caty that her sister "passed off without a struggle."

Perhaps most importantly to historians, Eliza gathered Hamilton's letters & papers, and worked tirelessly to get a biography on him written. After decades of trying to find a biographer, her son, John Church Hamilton, agreed to write it. Far too close to her subject, Eliza was not a perfect historian. She removed documentation that cast her husband in any sort of negative light, including nearly all mentions of slavery in the Hamilton family from history.

Yet what little she left behind on these subjects allows current historians to now tell the narrative she tried to erase. Without Eliza, Hamilton scholarship would not exist. Her efforts have made possible all Hamilton biographies, many Hamilton-related historical fiction books, the hit Broadway musical, and our own Hamilton tour.

Her children buried Eliza next to her husband in Trinity Church Yard in Manhattan. After fifty long years of working to preserve his legacy, Eliza was finally reunited with her Hamilton. Today we remember Eliza as the keeper of not only Hamilton's legacy, but also her own. Thank you, Eliza, for telling your story.

Happy Halloween! Sadly, it's time to close the lid on another season, but don't be sad! We will be offering special prog...
10/31/2019

Happy Halloween! Sadly, it's time to close the lid on another season, but don't be sad! We will be offering special programming and limited Interpretive Focus tours between November and May. Check back throughout the off-season to see when those will be.

From all of us here at Schuyler Mansion, thank you to all of you for being part of this experience. Whether you visited, explored articles, shared images, attended events, or just wanted to check out our snazzy Eliza photoshops, we look forward to sharing new narratives and creating new experiences with you next year!

End of the 2019 SeasonThank you for a really spectacular 2019 season! Beginning November 1 to mid-May 2020, the mansion ...
10/31/2019

End of the 2019 Season
Thank you for a really spectacular 2019 season!
Beginning November 1 to mid-May 2020, the mansion will be closed for general visitation. Special focus tours will be offered on a very limited schedule during the winter - please see our "Events" for dates offered and how to reserve. Regular guided tours of the mansion may be available by advance appointment ONLY and, in general, will be scheduled on Thursdays and Saturdays. If you have questions, please call the site at (518) 434-0834 or 434-0835.

Congratulations to Schuyler Mansion staff (Heidi Hill, Site Manager and Jess Serfilippi, Site Interpreter) for their tho...
10/22/2019

Congratulations to Schuyler Mansion staff (Heidi Hill, Site Manager and Jess Serfilippi, Site Interpreter) for their thought-provoking contributions to this panel at the Albany Institute of History and Art.

Alexander Hamilton was a _____? Financier. Immigrant. Lover. Lawyer. Political Theorist. Military Man. Which do you think is the most important aspect of Alexander Hamilton today?

The AHA Society participated on a panel of experts to explore the many facets of Hamilton’s life at the Albany Institute of History & Art on Oct. 19th. Nicole Scholet presented about Hamilton’s extensive military service and his influence on the development of the armed branches. Sergio Villavicencio spoke about Hamilton’s contributions as an immigrant and the unique mindset he brought to the colonies.

The Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site and the St. Andrew's Society of Albany partnered on this event.

HAPPY 102nd BIRTHDAY SCHUYLER MANSION STATE HISTORIC SITE!While the mansion itself it much older, today marks the 102nd ...
10/17/2019

HAPPY 102nd BIRTHDAY SCHUYLER MANSION STATE HISTORIC SITE!

While the mansion itself it much older, today marks the 102nd anniversary of the State Historic Site.On this day in 1917, Schuyler Mansion officially opened to the public as a historic site and museum. From that first day to this, staff and volunteers have worked to preserve and interpret the history of this place and its residents through tours, public programming, events, articles, and more.

Today we are able to delve into more detailed and complex narratives than we were in 1917, but only because we have been able to build on the incredible efforts of 102 year's-worth of dedicated people before us, starting with Georgina and Louisa-Lee Schuyler. From all us to all of them, thank you, and Happy Birthday!

TDIH: 17 October 1777: Schuyler attends Surrender ceremonies in Saratoga242 Years ago today, The army of Sir John Burgoy...
10/17/2019

TDIH: 17 October 1777: Schuyler attends Surrender ceremonies in Saratoga

242 Years ago today, The army of Sir John Burgoyne surrendered to the American army at Saratoga. Under the Articles of Convention signed by the two commanders, the British would be accorded the Honors of War, lay down their arms at their own officers’ commands, and then return to Great Britain on the condition that they not serve in the conflict again (an arrangement which the Continental Congress ultimately reneged upon, with many of Burgoyne's men ended up in prison camps). This captured army was a little over six thousand men, as well as large numbers of military stores and armaments desperately needed by the United States. The surrender also marked a victory after the loss of Philadelphia, which had forecast dark times for the Revolution.

Schuyler attended this ceremony, and concurrently invited Burgoyne to stay at his Albany Mansion as a guest (but still a prisoner, of course!). This gentlemanly act was an important part of the social framework both men lived by, but also afforded Schuyler a chance to emphasize his role in the campaign, to eavesdrop on Burgoyne’s officers during their stay, and established the possibility of English connections after American independence was achieved; connections which would be essential to Philip’s commercial activity.

Artist John Trumbull later depicted the surrender on canvass, and included Philip Schuyler in the image. Schuyler is the third face from the right, in civilian clothing directly behind the cannon.

TDIH 10 October 1777: Schuyler’s Saratoga House burned.242 years ago today, the Schuyler house and estate at Saratoga ...
10/10/2019

TDIH 10 October 1777: Schuyler’s Saratoga House burned.

242 years ago today, the Schuyler house and estate at Saratoga were burned by Lt. General John Burgoyne’s retreating forces after the Second Battle of Saratoga.

The destruction of the estate was in line with the standard practices of 18th century armies in retreat, namely the cutting of bridges and removal or destruction of shelter and food for pursuing armies. This practice slowed forces following the army, frustrating the enemy army’s supply situation and making pursuit more difficult. ability As the Schuyler estate at Saratoga included numerous buildings used to provide supplies for the Continental army, the line between the “civilian” and “military” nature of the property was nebulous at best and its continued existence was too much of a threat for Burgoyne to ignore. The house, its two attached wings, and other structures on the property including seven outbuildings and three mills, were destroyed.

Burgoyne would eventually testify to the House of Commons that the infrastructure of the burned estate and property was worth about 10,000 Pounds itself (roughly $2,500,000 in modern US dollars), independent of the proceeds to be derived from it. This was the approximate cost of 869.5 tons of bread at that time, or enough money for 250 laboring families to live in relative comfort for a year.

Given the magnitude of the loss, it is unsurprising that Schuyler was eager to rebuild. There was still skirmishing between the two armies on the 12th, when Schuyler sent two enslaved servants to search the rubble and bring back a report on the situation:

"I send up Tom and another servant to pick up the Iron work of the Buildings which the Enemy have burnt. If you can possibly procure some hands to assist I wish you to do it as Iron and nails are at present very scarce, and I wish that what can be saved should be carried to the mill house at the upper mill… If I am not too much indisposed I propose riding up to morrow or next day. I wish you would direct Tom to see what Forage there is on Guiles farm either Cut or Standing.
Wether there are any turnips or potatoes remaining. –wether the wood work of the ploughs which was left near the turnip patch is still there. Wether there is any feed in the field upon the hill that was intended to be sowed with wheat this fall… I intend immediately to have my mills rebuilt and some house Erected."

The new house was constructed over the next six weeks in a more up-to-date style, but a bit plainer than the previous structure. The country estate was not furnished to match the high elegance seen at Schuyler’s Albany Mansion, however, it was still considered an elegant setting for the entertainment of high-class guests and family. The estate itself was also rebuilt, complete with mills, storehouses and barns, and extensive cultivation. The 1777 house still stands today under the care of the National Park Service, part of the Saratoga National Historical Park.

09/22/2019

If you need to call us, please call us at 518-434-0835. Our main phone number is not working at the moment.

09/15/2019

Our main phone line is not working, so please call us at 518-434-0835 for questions and focus tour reservations. Thank you!

When it doesn't rain it pours...Or in this case, the water has to be shut off. An issue with the waterlines in the South...
09/11/2019

When it doesn't rain it pours...

Or in this case, the water has to be shut off. An issue with the waterlines in the South End of Albany has interrupted the water supply at the site. A marvelous "portable Necessary House" (will modern marvels never cease?) is en route, but the restrooms and other running water are currently out of commission.

On an unrelated note, line 1 of our phone system is dropping calls. Anyone looking to contact us via telephone should call 518-434-0835.

Happy Grandparents Day! Going through letters earlier, several of our staff ran across a great letter from Philip Schuyl...
09/08/2019
"You must not Insist upon depriving us of them...": Philip and Catharine Schuyler as Protective Grandparents

Happy Grandparents Day! Going through letters earlier, several of our staff ran across a great letter from Philip Schuyler to Alexander and Elizabeth Hamilton that shows just how protective of their grandchildren Philip and Catharine could be. Click the link below to learn more!

by Ian Mumpton and Jessie Serfilippi My Dear Sir, …It is very natural that you and my Dear Eliza Should be anxious to have your child...

TDIH, 7 September 1755: Schuyler Marries Catharine Van Rensselaer. “In the year 1755 on the 7th of September did I Phi...
09/07/2019

TDIH, 7 September 1755: Schuyler Marries Catharine Van Rensselaer.

“In the year 1755 on the 7th of September did I Philip John Schuyler (being 21 years 9 months and 17 days old) enter the holy state of matrimony with Catharine Van Rensselaer (being 20 years 9 months and 27 days old). The Lord Grant this marriage last long and in peace and to his honor.”

264 years ago today, Philip Schuyler and Catharine Van Rensselaer were married in Albany. Even though the marriage might have been a seemingly sudden event, the two had grown up together in Albany high society. Their courtship seems to have begun at least two years prior. In a letter written to friend Abraham Ten Broeck in September 1753, Philip concluded with, “But I must say farewell, with love to Peggy and sweet Kitty V.R. if you see her.”

Two years later, Schuyler was stationed at Fort Edward, about fifty miles north of Albany, in command of a company of New York troops, when he received an express demanding that he return to Albany to marry Miss Catharine Van Rensselaer, daughter of Johannes Van Rensselaer. The express was written in the imperative due to Catharine being four months pregnant at the time, and while pregnant brides were hardly unknown in the 18th century, it was essential that they be married before Philip went into action against the French army at Lake George; a battle, as it turned out, that he would miss.

Schuyler hurried back to Albany and the two acquired a marriage license on September 4th. Three days later they were married by Dominie Theodorus Freylinghuysen, Jr. and the union entered into the marriage book of the Dutch Reformed Church.

The marriage would last almost 50 years, fulfilling the first tenet Schuyler hoped for in writing the event in the family bible. Peace, however, would not be granted to the couple, who would experience two wars, near continuous political upheaval, and many other troubles, both personal and public. Despite this, they raised eight children to adulthood, and enjoyed a healthy marriage built on affection, cooperation, and mutual respect and friendship.

Happy Anniversary to Philip and Catharine!

Tickets still available - get yours today!
09/05/2019
Garden Party at Schuyler Mansion!

Tickets still available - get yours today!

Garden Party hosted by the Friends of Schuyler Mansion on the mansion grounds. Join us an evening of agreeable diversions !

08/29/2019

What's so special about Labor Day? Well, for one thing, Schuyler Mansion is open for guided tours! Tours begin at 11:00 a.m., are offered on the hour, with the last tour at 4:00 p.m.

We were excited to have the folks from the #AngelicaTour of #Hamilton visit the other day!
08/24/2019

We were excited to have the folks from the #AngelicaTour of #Hamilton visit the other day!

Run away with us for the summer, let’s go upstate. While the #AngelicaTour is playing Proctors in Schenectady, cast members were able to check out the nearby Schuyler Mansion. #HistoryIsHappening

We have not been able to get our phone lines working reliably yet. Currently line two is down completely, and the connec...
08/22/2019

We have not been able to get our phone lines working reliably yet. Currently line two is down completely, and the connection coming in on line is unreliable. We are still working to get the situation rectified. Our apologies for the inconvenience, and we thank everyone for their patience.

We apologize for the inconvenience, but our phone line has been dropping calls today. Line one is having the most troubl...
08/16/2019

We apologize for the inconvenience, but our phone line has been dropping calls today. Line one is having the most trouble, so we recommend trying line two (518-434-0835).

We always appreciate letters from folks who visit, but this is one of the best we have ever received!In 1782, Alexander ...
08/14/2019

We always appreciate letters from folks who visit, but this is one of the best we have ever received!

In 1782, Alexander Hamilton's friend, James McHenry, had some less-than-complimentary things to say about Peggy Schuyler, largely stemming from her willingness to share her thoughts on educated subjects. He felt that she alienated women. and attracted men with the wrong attribute- her mind. He wrote that his advice would, "...soon place her in her proper station."

While we do't know Peggy's response (if Hamilton even dared tell her!), but Jenna Newburg envisioned it like this 😂 We love it!

Thanks again Jenna, and thanks for letting us share your picture!

On This Date in 1757, Elizabeth "Eliza" Schuyler was born to Catharine van Rensselaer and Philip Schuyler in Albany. Her...
08/09/2019

On This Date in 1757, Elizabeth "Eliza" Schuyler was born to Catharine van Rensselaer and Philip Schuyler in Albany. Her father recorded in the family Bible "In the year 1757 August the 9th at 5 o’clock in the afternoon was born our second child a daughter named Elizabeth, baptized by... Domine Theodorus Frelinghysen, Witnesses Cortland Schuyler my brother and mother Cornelia Schuyler. Lord do unto her according to Thy will."

When Eliza was about eight years old, she moved into the newly built Schuyler Mansion with her family. About a year or so later, she traveled to Manhattan with her sisters, Angelica & Peggy, and lived with relatives as private tutors educated the three girls in everything from dance and fancy needlework to French, history, and arithmetic. Eliza was especially gifted at needlework.

In 1775, she journeyed with Tench Tilghman & friends to the Cohoes Falls, where he recorded in his journal "I fancy Miss Schuyler had been used to ramble over and climb grounds of this sort for she disdained all assistance and made herself merry at the distress of other Ladies."

In early 1780, she made a perilous trip to the Continental Army Winter Headquarters in Morristown, NJ through bitter temperatures and feet of snow. While there, she met Alexander Hamilton, to whom she was engaged by March after earning both of her parents' approval. Philip Schuyler wrote to Hamilton on the subject: "Yesterday I had the pleasure to receive a line from Mrs Schuyler in answer to mine on the subject of the one you delivered me at Morris town; she consents to Comply with your and her daughters wishes [to wed]." (8 April 1780)

Eliza married Hamilton in the best parlor of the Schuyler Mansion on December 14, 1780. Their first child, Philip Hamilton, was born there on January 22, 1782. She would go on to have a total of eight children and move between Albany, Manhattan, and Philadelphia with her family. After her husband's death in 1804, Eliza co-founded the first private orphanage in New York City in 1806, which is now Graham Windham.

As early as 1807, she began gathering papers and going to different biographers to get the first biography on her husband published. In 1846, she wrote to her youngest sister Caty: "My dear Sister, I am again endeavoring to get the papers of your brother before Congress either to purchase or aid me in having them printed, my success is doubtful but I am doing it that the world may learn what he has done.”
Working nonstop, she traveled to Mount Vernon, Philadelphia, & Boston among other cities to gather her husband's papers & talk to people who'd known him. Her son, John C. Hamilton, would eventually write the first biography on his father, but she did not live to see it completed.

Eliza was often the sole defender of her husband's legacy, but she was not a perfect historian. Too close to her subject, she sought to create a perfect image of her husband, which resulted in erasing her husband's history of enslavement from the historical record. Yet Eliza left behind enough information on Hamilton so that current historians can now fill in these gaps in the narrative--especially in relationship to her husband's history as an enslaver. By doing this, we are able to create a fuller, more truthful depiction of Hamilton.

Without Eliza's efforts, we would not have any of the biographies, historical fiction books, the Hamilton musical, or even our own Hamilton Focus Tour. By continuing to tell Hamilton's story honestly, we further not only his legacy, but Eliza's, because it is as much hers as his. Eliza outlived her husband by 50 years, dying in Washington D.C. at the age of 97. Her children decided there was no better place to bury her than next to their father in Trinity Church Churchyard in Manhattan. After fifty long years, she was finally reunited with her Hamilton.

Address

32 Catherine St
Albany, NY
12202

Albany CDTA routes: #6 Second Ave #7 Glenmont #100 Mid City Belt Disembark on the corner of South Pearl Street and Morton Ave, or, if taking the #100, in front of the Albany Courthouse. Walk up Morton Avenue, turning left on Clinton and right up Catherine to enter through the back gate.

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