New Mexico Museum of Space History

New Mexico Museum of Space History If you are looking for more information about the New Mexico Museum of Space History, please visit www.nmspacemuseum.org.
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Five floors of interior exhibits focused on man's quest for space, International Space Hall of Fame, John P. Stapp Air & Space Park, Daisy Track Exhibit, New Horizons Dome Theater & Planetarium, and the Hubbard Space Archive, Library and Research Center.

The little spacecraft that could and is! You go Voyager!
02/07/2020
Voyager 2 Engineers Working to Restore Normal Operations

The little spacecraft that could and is! You go Voyager!

The spacecraft's science instruments were turned off by a fault protection routine, which allows the spacecraft to automatically take actions to protect itself.

02/06/2020

Did you know...that glaciers are made of solid nitrogen....on Pluto! Find out more about Pluto and beyond tomorrow morning at 9:00 am. Free Launch Pad Lecture, museum first floor. See you then!

“You have to imagine something the size of Texas emerging from below the surface, burning out and sinking, all in the sp...
02/06/2020
What would the Sun sound like?

“You have to imagine something the size of Texas emerging from below the surface, burning out and sinking, all in the space of five minutes,” DeForest says. “That’s an extraordinarily violent process — it would create a tremendous amount of sound.”

We can't hear the Sun here on Earth ... but what if we could? It turns out, our star would drown out all other earthly sounds.

02/06/2020

Did you know... that last year the New Horizons spacecraft photographed one of the original building blocks of the solar system, a billion miles beyond Pluto? Find out more tomorrow morning (Friday, Feb. 6) at 9:00 am when Dr. John Spencer presents our Launch Pad Lecture!

We had a chilly start this morning but we are ready for you to come visit!
02/05/2020

We had a chilly start this morning but we are ready for you to come visit!

Hello neighbor! We look forward to seeing more of you!
02/05/2020

Hello neighbor! We look forward to seeing more of you!

This month marks the third anniversary of the discovery of a remarkable system of seven planets known as TRAPPIST-1. These seven rocky, Earth-size worlds orbit an ultra-cool star 39 light-years from Earth. Three of those planets are in the habitable zone, meaning they are at the right orbital distance to be warm enough for liquid water to exist on their surfaces. After its 2021 launch, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will observe those worlds with the goal of making the first detailed near-infrared study of the atmosphere of a habitable-zone planet.

Read more: https://go.nasa.gov/2UDFvNN

Image: This artist’s concept portrays the seven rocky exoplanets within the TRAPPIST-1 system, located 40 light-years from Earth. Astronomers will observe these worlds with Webb in an effort to detect the first atmosphere of an Earth-sized planet beyond our solar system. Credits: NASA and JPL/Caltech

02/05/2020
NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

There's plenty to see in our night sky this month!

There's a full moon this weekend!

That's not the only skywatching highlight this month, though — the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory has all the info you need to keep your eyes on the sky in February >> go.nasa.gov/34hp376

02/05/2020

Did you know... that Pluto has FIVE moons? Learn all about them on Friday, Feb 7th, when Dr. John Spencer delivers our Launch Pad Lecture. 9:00 am, first floor, FREE!

Good morning Alamogordo!
02/05/2020

Good morning Alamogordo!

02/05/2020

The New Mexico Museum of Space History is on a two hour delay for staff today because of road conditions. We expect to open at 10:00 to the public. Be safe out there folks!

We're proud to be part of this year's Las Cruces Space Festival.
02/04/2020

We're proud to be part of this year's Las Cruces Space Festival.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History is a great resource for our state. We're pleased that they will be joining us for the Festival this year
#newmexicomuseumofspacehistory #partners #lcspacefestival #sidtheastrognome #lascruces #NewMexico #makingspaceforeveryone

02/04/2020

Did you know….you would have to fly around the Earth 120,000 times to travel the same distance as the New Horizons spacecraft travelled on its way to Pluto? Learn what happened when New Horizons arrived…and what happened next this Friday, Feb. 7. Free Launch Pad Lecture starts at 9:00 am on the Museum's first floor. Our guest speaker is Dr. John Spencer, Deputy Project Scientist on the New Horizons mission to Pluto.

Thanks Desert Exposure ! Its going to be a great talk!
02/04/2020

Thanks Desert Exposure ! Its going to be a great talk!

Road Trip to the Edge of the Solar System
Discovering Pluto Again

Feb. 18 celebrates the 90th Anniversary of the discovery of Pluto by New Mexico’s most famous adopted astronomer, Clyde W. Tombaugh who made the discovery at just 24 years old. Tombaugh would have been 114 this February 4. On Friday, Feb. 7, join Dr. John Spencer, Deputy Project Scientist on the New Horizons mission to Pluto, as he shares his personal experiences exploring this distant world during the February Launch Pad Lecture.

It’s been a rocky road for the little planet at the end of the solar system. If not for the Lowell Observatory’s willingness to try a young self-trained dreamer in 1929, Tombaugh might have never become an astronomer. If not for Tombaugh’s determination to fulfill Percival Lowell’s legacy to find Planet X, Pluto might have never been discovered. And if not for the International Astronomical Union’s drive to define exactly what a planet is, Pluto might still be a full-fledged planet. But on August 24, 2006, Tombaugh’s wobbly discovery was demoted to a dwarf planet.

Despite Pluto’s downgrade, NASA was still on track to explore it and had already launched the New Horizons spacecraft on January 19 of that same year. Nine years later, New Horizons became the first to get up close and personal with Pluto under the direction of a team of scientists and researchers like John Spencer.

Dr. John Spencer is a Staff Scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, where he also holds the title of Deputy Project Scientist on the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. Spencer is the guest speaker for the Museum of Space History’s monthly Launch Pad Lecture on Friday, February 7. He will be talking about his experiences with the New Horizons mission and what we might look forward to as the mission continues.

The Launch Pad Lecture begins at 9:00 am on the museum’s first floor and is free to the public. Coffee and donuts are compliments of the International Space Hall of Fame Foundation.

The Launch Pad Lectures are streamed live on Periscope and are also available after the lecture on the museum’s YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2SirhgX3NsxcREfOVLjHeA.

The New Mexico Museum of Space History, a Smithsonian Affiliate, is a division of the NM Department of Cultural Affairs. For more information, call 575-437-2840 or toll free 1-877-333-6589 or visit the website at www.nmspacemuseum.org. Like us at: www.facebook.com/NMSpaceMuseum/

About Dr. John Spencer

A native of England, Dr. John Spencer obtained a Bachelor's degree in geology at the University of Cambridge in 1978 and a PhD in Planetary Sciences at the University of Arizona in 1987. He worked at the University of Hawaii, and Lowell Observatory in Arizona, before joining the Southwest Research Institute in 2004. He specializes in exploration of the outer solar system, using Earth-based telescopes, the Hubble Space Telescope, and interplanetary robot spacecraft.

He specializes in studies of the moons of the outer planets, particularly the four large "Galilean" satellites of Jupiter, and other small outer solar system bodies, using theoretical models, Earth-based telescopes, close-up spacecraft observations, and the Hubble Space Telescope. He was responsible for temperature mapping of Jupiter’s moons with the Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR) instrument on the Jupiter-orbiting Galileo spacecraft, and worked on the mapping of temperatures on Saturn's moons using the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on the Cassini Saturn orbiter. He is particularly interested in the active volcanos and atmosphere of Jupiter's moon Io, and in the active ice eruptions of Saturn's moon Enceladus. He has also published research on Mars, asteroids, Pluto, and Neptune's moon Triton.

He is a science team member on the New Horizons mission to Pluto, and a deputy project scientist for its extended mission into the Kuiper Belt, for which he coordinated the successful search for Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) flyby targets beyond Pluto. He also led the search by New Horizons, during Pluto approach, for potential debris hazards in the Pluto system, and led the planning of the successful 2019 flyby of the small KBO 2014 MU69. On NASA's Europa Clipper mission, now under development, he is a member of the Ultraviolet Spectrometer team, and deputy PI of the Europa Thermal Emission Imaging System (E-THEMIS). He is also a co-investigator, and instrument scientist for the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), on the Lucy mission to the Trojan asteroids.

He was co-leader of the science team for NASA's 2007 study of a possible Flagship mission to Enceladus, was a member of the science team for the 2008 - 2009 studies of the Jupiter Europa Orbiter mission, and led the Satellites panel of the 2009-2011 Planetary Decadal Survey. In 2016 he won the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Whipple Award for "outstanding contributions in the field of planetary science".

His observational work has included discovery of several major volcanic eruptions on Io, the first observations of Io's volcanic plumes with the Hubble Space Telescope, and discovery of sulfur gas in Io's plumes. He has the honor of several co-discoveries, including that Io's atmosphere is highly asymmetrical; of ice volcanic activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus; of the "Pac Man" thermal anomalies on Mimas and Tethys; of oxygen on Jupiter's moon Ganymede; and of oxygen emissions from Callisto's atmosphere. He also participated in the many discoveries made by New Horizons at Pluto and 2014 MU69. His theoretical work has provided a probable explanation for the extreme albedo dichotomy of Iapetus, and has improved our understanding of nitrogen frost on Pluto and Triton, water frost on Jupiter's moons, and heat radiation from asteroids.

Photo:

Dr. John Spencer, Deputy Project Scientist on the New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt, is the guest speaker for the Museum of Space History’s monthly Launch Pad Lecture on Friday, February 7. (Photo courtesy Dr. Spencer)

02/04/2020

Don't miss out on our free Launchpad Lecture, Discovering Pluto Again this Friday!

Simply WOW!
02/03/2020

Simply WOW!

Total Solar Eclipse Corona over Chile
Credit: Nicholas Lefaudeux
Date: 2019 July 2
From: Cerro Tololo, Chile
Details: https://hdr-astrophotography.com/

Whoa! 😲Rocket size comparison.
02/03/2020

Whoa! 😲
Rocket size comparison.

Now you have it! We have truly entered the space age!
02/03/2020
New Mexico Chile heads to space

Now you have it! We have truly entered the space age!

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration will be growing New Mexico Chile in the International Space Station in 2020 as part of the effort to develop crops to support deep space exploration.   NASA Science Expert on Space Crop Production Matthew Romeyn explained that in 2017, after...

02/03/2020

Did you know…if you were driving a car 590 miles per hour, it would only take you about 680 years to get to Pluto. Luckily, the New Horizons spacecraft traveled a tad faster and arrived in a mere nine years. Find out what happened along the way on Friday, Feb. 7 when Dr. John Spencer presents the free Launch Pad Lecture beginning at 9:00 am on the Museum's first floor.

This looks like something to mark your calendar for!
02/03/2020

This looks like something to mark your calendar for!

Our neighbors are opening their doors to the public! Bring your friends & family out for a fun, filled event! #rareopportunity #nmnightskies

01/31/2020

Did you know…if you were driving a car 590 miles per hour, it would only take you about 680 years to get to Pluto. Luckily, the New Horizons spacecraft traveled a tad faster and arrived in a mere nine years. Find out what happened along the way on Friday, Feb. 7 when Dr. John Spencer takes us on a trip to outer space! (Free lecture 9:00 am museum first floor)

01/30/2020
Apollo 11: First Steps

We're back up and running with our New Horizons Theater! Come by and check out this wonderful film!

Too funny! You go, Curiosity!
01/24/2020

Too funny! You go, Curiosity!

That’s right. Even the @nasa #curiosityrover is taking part in the #dollypartonchallenge

Things are starting to happen in preparation for the next manned lunar landing mission!
01/24/2020
First Commercial Moon Delivery Assignments to Advance Artemis

Things are starting to happen in preparation for the next manned lunar landing mission!

NASA has finalized the first 16 science experiments and technology demonstrations, ranging from chemistry to communications, to be delivered to the surface of the Moon under the Artemis program.

01/23/2020
DoubleTree by Hilton

Its somehow appropriate that the first food baked fresh in space would be chocolate chip cookies. Did they have to add a tablespoon of flour because of the altitude? :)

Houston, we have cookies! 🍪🚀👩‍🚀👨‍🚀
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Using a new specially designed oven created by @zerogkitchen @nanoracks, astronauts aboard the @ISS successfully baked DoubleTree cookies during the first baking experiment in space. Five cookies were baked at various times and temperatures starting from the standard 300 degrees, and then exploring other combinations for optimal baking in space. The team determined the “most successful baking” occurred at 300 degrees, but for 120 minutes! Totally worth the wait though, because astronauts could smell the sweet scent of fresh baked cookies for the first time in space. #cookiesinspace

Address

3198 State Rd 2001
Alamogordo, NM
88310

Opening Hours

Monday 10:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 10:00 - 17:00
Thursday 10:00 - 17:00
Friday 10:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 12:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(575) 437-2840

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Comments

The Museum looked amazing with the snow covered mountains in the background too.
Awesome
Just a thought...
How about a new addition to the museum? NASA is looking to rehome a rocket, just gotta haul it off!
Just saw the Apollo 17 documentary and it was a good show. Described how much technology advanced in just three years since the first landing.
Very educational. So much to see and you get to try on a space suit.
The Stargazing party May 31- June 2 "Online registration for the event is currently underway on the museum’s website and offers guests the option of picking and choosing their activities." I don't see any where on the website where you can register. ??
Who are you honestly??
When will the rescheduled fireworks show be held?
So many of you inquired about information on the Space History Museum...here it is!
How does one find out what is showing at the imax? And what are the prices?