Cascade Locks Park Association

Cascade Locks Park Association Cascade Locks Park Association operates and maintains the Mustill Store Museum, Mustill Home and Schumacher Mill site. The museum is open from April through October.
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www.cascadelocks.org Our organization promotes Cascade Locks Park, "Akron's Urban Park". A unique partnership with Metro Parks, Serving Summit County and the City of Akron allows us to promote the historical value of the park while also encouraging residents of Summit County and beyond to get out and about and enjoy nature! Here is the BEST MAP-LINK to the Mustill Store: http://tiny.cc/mustill-store-best-map

Mission: CLPA was founded to preserve, protect and promote Cascade Locks Park along locks 10-16 of the Ohio & Erie Canal.

Operating as usual

09/19/2020
Had a fun afternoon with Anthony Boarman and his class from St.Vincent-St.Mary High School. What a great group of young ...
09/18/2020

Had a fun afternoon with Anthony Boarman and his class from St.Vincent-St.Mary High School. What a great group of young adults. We love sharing Akron's
Cultural Heritage! #Akronhistory #mustillstoremuseum

This afternoon, our in-person and e-Learning Local History students had the opportunity to visit the Mustill Store Museum and interact with the Cascade Locks Park Association Executive Director Don Gordon, who provided in-depth histories of the canal era, the Mustill family, the Cascade Valley and so much more. Thank you to Mr. Gordon for taking time out of his day to share his passion and one of the preserved gems of Akron with us! #AkronHistory

Fred and Emma Mustill had 6 children, four of whom lived into adulthood. Two of their sons Edwin and Franklin, filled th...
09/16/2020

Fred and Emma Mustill had 6 children, four of whom lived into adulthood. Two of their sons Edwin and Franklin, filled the Mustill home with music. Edwin played the piccolo and flute and Franklin played the harp. People from all around the Akron area would come to the lock to hear them play.
Ed and Frank would use what they learned playing music on the lock to form Mustill’s Singing Orchestra. Along with their friends Charlie and Seth Johnson who both played the violin, they performed at barn dances, weddings, balls, and other parties all over the Akron area. In a 1928 article Ed said “We played for all of the big dances in most of the surrounding towns and we were always in demand in Akron”. They played in venues like the Sumner Opera House on North Howard , The Empire Hall on East Market and Phoenix Hall on South Howard. The dances would begin at sundown and would often go until sunup.
Frank did have a day job too. He worked at the Allen Planing Mill here in Akron. He was also a designer and held an 1886 patent for a banjo he designed. In the patent description he says,
“The objects of my invention are, generally, to increase the compass and volume of tone of the instrument; to adapt it to produce new effects, both in tone, volume, and variety; to reduce its size for packing and transportation, and specifically to preserve the hoop intact without cut or orifice; to provide new appliances for straining and retaining the skin upon the head, and to provide devices for readily releasing the tailpiece to enable the instrument to be folded. “ Frank’s patent can be viewed here https://patents.google.com/patent/US350693A/en
In today’s photo we see Franklin Mustill and his beloved harp.
(photo courtesy of summitmemory.org/digital/collection/cascade/id/1/rec/1)
#WayBackWednesday

During the late 1800’s the average American worker worked 12 hours days, 7 days a week just to make enough to feed their...
09/02/2020

During the late 1800’s the average American worker worked 12 hours days, 7 days a week just to make enough to feed their families and survive. Children worked right next to adults for a fraction of the pay. Working conditions were unsafe and often unsanitary.
Manufacturing soon overtook agriculture as the primary employment for most Americans. Labor unions grew more prominent and vocal about the poor working conditions. They organized rallies and strikes to compel employers to renegotiate hours and pay rates. Sometimes the events turned violent, like the Haymarket Affair of 1886 and the Pullman Strike of 1894.
Finally after much unrest across the country, Congress passed an act naming Labor Day as a federal holiday. On June 28, 1894 President Grover Cleveland signed it into law.
Labor Day pays tribute to the contribution of workers to the advancement and achievements of the United States. American workers celebrate their day off with parades, picnics, fireworks displays and other public gatherings. For many people, Labor Day represents the unofficial end of summer and the beginning of the back-to-school season.
This week’s Way Back Wednesday is from Labor Day, September 1, 1941. Barberton High School’s Band led over 1,000 local union supporters in a parade to support the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers union (CIO). The union laborers at the Barberton insulator plant of the Ohio Brass Company went on strike after the union charged the company with stalling in negotiations. On September 16th, after a three and a half month long strike, Ohio Brass Company finally agreed to a proposal from the National Defense Mediation board, recognizing the union and giving workers a .10 per hour raise. When the workers returned, they resumed production of insulators used in the construction of Bonneville dam and other national defense projects.
#WayBackWednesday
(Photo courtesy of summitmemory.org/AkronBeaconJournalPhotographs Collection. Information from Wikipedia and https://reference.insulators.info/publications/view/?id=3302 )

Happy National Dog Day!National Dog Day was founded in 2004 by Colleen Paige, an animal advocate. All breeds of dog, mix...
08/26/2020

Happy National Dog Day!
National Dog Day was founded in 2004 by Colleen Paige, an animal advocate. All breeds of dog, mixes and purebreds alike, are celebrated on this day. The holiday is intended to honor dogs for all they do to enrich our lives and communities, and to shine a spotlight on all of the wonderful dogs who are waiting for their forever homes at your local shelter.
The dog was the first species to be domesticated over 14,000 years ago. They would help to protect human camps from predators, assist with hunting and helped to keep the camps clean by eating food scraps. They even provided warmth for early humans. As the indigenous Australians would say “It’s a three dog night!” (It’s very cold).
Today, dogs still have many important jobs.They can be service dogs, guard dogs, herding dogs, and scent detection dogs among many other jobs. Dogs have up to 300 million olfactory receptors in their noses compared to about 6 million in humans. Scent detection dogs are trained to sniff out drugs, explosives, even cancer in humans. In fact, there is even a study being conducted by the University of Pennsylvania to determine whether dogs can detect Covid- 19 by scent.
So, whether you have a doggo, a mutt, or a pupper, we want to see them! Please leave a picture of your canine bestie in the comments.
Today’s photo is from 1918. It shows an adorable little girl and her furry friend playing under the Wisteria Arbor at the A.B. Hart house on South Rose Boulevard.
(Photo courtesy of https://www.summitmemory.org/digital/collection/building/id/310/rec/1 )

Another busy day in the flower garden! Be sure to stop by and check out all of the blooms! They will be gone before we k...
08/21/2020

Another busy day in the flower garden! Be sure to stop by and check out all of the blooms! They will be gone before we know it!

**On August 18, 1920 The 19th Amendment was finally ratified giving American women the right to vote. This is a rehash o...
08/19/2020

**On August 18, 1920 The 19th Amendment was finally ratified giving American women the right to vote. This is a rehash of an earlier Way Back Wednesday, but I think we can all agree that it is timely and relevant . Also, I thought this post card was really beautiful and I am happy to have another opportunity to share it! **
In a previous Way Back Wednesday post, we learned a little about Sojouner Truth and her speech at the Women’s Rights Convention in Akron. But what other role did Ohio play in the fight for women’s suffrage?
The first women’s rights convention outside of New York state took place in Ohio in 1850. The next year saw Truth’s famous “Ain’t I A Woman?” speech at the second convention, here in Akron. Shortly after the Civil War, Ohio women began forming suffrage and equal rights organizations. Women like Warren, Ohio’s Harriet Taylor Upton worked for decades to enfranchise women at home and at the national level. Upton served as Treasurer of the National Woman's Suffrage Association and later, she was a founding member of the National League of Women Voters.
Congress passed the 19th Amendment, giving women the right to vote, in 1919. On June 16th of that year, Ohians voted to ratify the amendment. Additionally, Ohio’s legislature passed a bill allowing women the right to vote in the upcoming presidential election of 1920, just in case the amendment was not yet in effect nationally. On August 18, 1920, the 19th Amendment was ratified and became part of the U.S. Constitution.
This beautiful image is from a postcard mailed from Columbus to Athens, Ohio in 1915. The postcard shows a woman’s face surrounded by the same iconography of the State Seal of Ohio, including the rising sun and the bundle of arrows and the sheath of wheat.
(Photo courtesy of The Ohio History Connection SC 5690, AL01124 from the Woman's Suffrage Postcard Collection and ohiohistorycentral.org )
#WayBackWednesday

After a snowy January and February, March of 1913 brought warmer weather and heavy rains with it. The rain began Easter ...
08/12/2020

After a snowy January and February, March of 1913 brought warmer weather and heavy rains with it. The rain began Easter Sunday, March 23rd. It rained across the state for 5 long days. Estimates of 8 to 11 inches of rain fell on some parts of Ohio. Much of the ground was still frozen causing the rain water to run directly into streams, rivers and lakes. Every waterway in Ohio was overwhelmed, many of which spilled over into communities built along them. The canals that had once transformed Ohio into a trade capital became jammed with debris and wreckage from the icy waters battering them. Some locks were washed away in the inundation. 7 others were destroyed with dynamite to help bring water levels down.
The flood claimed 467 lives statewide. More than 40,000 homes were flooded leaving thousands of families homeless. The flood also brought an end to the canal era of Ohio’s history. Before the flood, in 1911, there was some momentum to restore the deteriorated canals. Some improvements had even taken place in Akron. Unfortunately, the damage was too great. State officials decided to abandon the canals officially ending their use.
In the photo we can see the Mustill Store and Lock 15 with a massive pile of debris left from the flood. The large fence-like structure is one of the lock’s doors, torn off by the flood water.
( You can find this photo and so much more at summitmemory.org )

A special thank you to the local businesses who donated to our prize packs! And a BIG Thank you to all of you who purcha...
08/11/2020

A special thank you to the local businesses who donated to our prize packs! And a BIG Thank you to all of you who purchased Duck Derby 2020 tickets! We wouldn't be here without you!
#JanuaryPaints #Lock15Brewing #Crave #AkronFamilyRestaurant

Thank you to all of our 2020 Event Sponsors! Without you, events like Duck Derby would not be possible!!#WorkhorseIntegr...
08/11/2020

Thank you to all of our 2020 Event Sponsors! Without you, events like Duck Derby would not be possible!!
#WorkhorseIntegrations #AdconEngineering #MissingFallsBrewery #HuntingtonBank #HazelTreeDesignStudio #WilliamsHardwoodFlooring #Thomarios

08/09/2020

Welcome to Duck Derby 2020!

WOW! Our ticket numbers have completely sold out!!! Thank you to everyone that was able to purchase numbers. We value yo...
08/09/2020

WOW! Our ticket numbers have completely sold out!!! Thank you to everyone that was able to purchase numbers. We value your support even more in these trying times. GOOD LUCK!!!!!
All numbers have been emailed out, so check your inbox! Please join us this afternoon at 3pm on Facebook for the drawing!

WOW!!! We've sold a lot of numbers in the last 24 hours! Thank you to all who have purchased tickets! Your support means...
08/08/2020

WOW!!! We've sold a lot of numbers in the last 24 hours! Thank you to all who have purchased tickets! Your support means so much to us here at CLPA and the Mustill Store!
We do have some numbers left. If you are interested in supporting a piece of Akron's rich industrial history (or in winning a great prize!) please go to https://cascade-locks-park-association.square.site and get your numbers now!
Good Luck!!
You can watch the drawing tomorrow on Facebook at 3pm! See you then!!

Hey you, ya you. The God Feather here suggesting to you it might be a good idea for you to buy a rubber duck for this Su...
08/07/2020

Hey you, ya you. The God Feather here suggesting to you it might be a good idea for you to buy a rubber duck for this Sunday's Rubber Duck Derby, if you know what's good for you, ya know? I don't want to send one of the Corleone boys to visit you, ya know what I mean? Ten clams gets you one duck. Fifty clams gets you six ducks. https://cascade-locks-park-association.square.site

Get your numbers before they are gone! Four awesome prizes are up for grabs including a $500 for the first place winner!...
08/07/2020

Get your numbers before they are gone! Four awesome prizes are up for grabs including a $500 for the first place winner! The only place you can buy your numbers is at https://cascade-locks-park-association.square.site/ . Please join us on Facebook on Sunday August 9th to watch the drawing!
Good Luck!!

For this week's Way Back Wednesday, we aren't going very far back (although it sure feels like a long time ago!). We are...
08/05/2020

For this week's Way Back Wednesday, we aren't going very far back (although it sure feels like a long time ago!). We are going back to .....2017!
Duck Derby 2020 is fast approaching! It will be held this year as a virtual event. We miss our visitors so much, we thought it would be fun to see some pictures from previous years and to see what we can look forward to next summer!
Until then, please join us on Sunday August 9th at 3pm for a Facebook Live event and watch as we draw the numbers for this years winners. There are still numbers available! Go to https://cascade-locks-park-association.square.site/ to get your numbers before they are all gone!!
Good Luck!!!
#WayBackWednesday

Duck Derby 2020 is right around the corner! Please join us online Sunday, August 9th at 3pm for this Facebook live strea...
08/04/2020

Duck Derby 2020 is right around the corner! Please join us online Sunday, August 9th at 3pm for this Facebook live stream event. Buy your ducks at cascade-locks-park-association.square.site for a chance to win this year's awesome prizes. Buy them soon though, ticket sales close Saturday, August 8th at noon!

A special thank you to all of our 2020 event sponsors! #WorkhorseIntegrations #AdconEngineering #MissingFallsBrewery #Hu...
07/31/2020

A special thank you to all of our 2020 event sponsors!
#WorkhorseIntegrations #AdconEngineering #MissingFallsBrewery #HuntingtonBank #HazelTreeDesignStudio #WilliamsHardwoodFlooring #Thomarios

Did you know the Mustill Store serves as an official visitor center for the OCIT tunnel digging, and the drill was named...
07/31/2020

Did you know the Mustill Store serves as an official visitor center for the OCIT tunnel digging, and the drill was named after Rosie the Riveter? Rosie asks that you buy a rubber duck for the Rubber Duck Derby as a thank you!. https://cascade-locks-park-association.square.site

Congratulations CVNP on removing the station rd. Brecksville dam. So many great organizations helped bring back the natu...
07/30/2020

Congratulations CVNP on removing the station rd. Brecksville dam. So many great organizations helped bring back the natural flow to our river

Pearl R. Nye was born in 1872. He was the 15th child and the 9th son of Mary and William Nye, a canal boat captain. It w...
07/29/2020

Pearl R. Nye was born in 1872. He was the 15th child and the 9th son of Mary and William Nye, a canal boat captain. It was common for canal families to live on their boats. Because the family was so large (18 kids total!) Captain Nye ran two canal boats tied together to accommodate his family, their dog and their mules. As a child, Pearl worked as a mule driver (or muleskinner) on the Ohio & Erie Towpath.
When Pearl was 15, his father died. Pearl and his mother continued to live and work on the canal boat. Pearl is often referred to as “Captain” Nye, but his mother was the official captain of the boat after her husband’s death. By 1907, the railroads had all but taken over the canal’s shipments. Pearl and Mary lived on the family’s boat in Akron until she died.
After his mother’s death he traveled for a while, but returned to Ohio. Pearl dedicated himself to the canal again, this time by writing songs, poems and a memoir of his childhood on the Ohio & Erie Canal. He helped to preserve songs and stories of the canal that he learned in his childhood. The memoir went unpublished, but his songs attracted attention.
In 1937 John and Alan Lomax recorded some of Pearl’s folksongs for the Library Of Congress. Listen here https://www.loc.gov/item/afcnye000025/ Pearl performed at the National Folk Life Festival in 1938 and again in 1942.
Pearl eventually returned to the canal for good. In 1939, he leased property on an abandoned lock and built a home. The home was built with poplar logs that Pearl cut down himself. He enlarged the structure using lumber salvaged from an abandoned canal boat. He named his home “Camp Charming” and he lived there until 1948.
Pearl spent the last two years of his life at Hawthornden State Mental Hospital in Cuyahoga County, where he died in 1950 at the age of 78. He is buried in Akron’s Glendale Cemetery.
(information sourced from an unpublished manuscript by Terry K. Wood and an unpublished manuscript by Pearl R. Nye. Photo courtesy of summitmemory.org General Photograph Collection)

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57 W North St
Akron, OH
44304

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hello friends this is one thing i miss not living in AKRON ANYMORE
When is the towpath trail north of Mustill Store supposed to reopen?
Oktoberfest (Locktoberfest) this year?
Sharing a good time with the neighbors is what Locktoberfest is all about. Join us at Lock 15 Brewing.
Check out the varieties offered. "Cascade Locks Pale Ale"
Stop by and see the Monarch Waystation at Schumacher Mill site, Cascade Valley Akron (57 W. North St). In addition to lots of blooming plants (native plants) you can see the latest addition: Pollinator Specialist Denny Reiser has set up a puddling station for butterflies. Who would have thunk? They like mud puddles! Location: Monarch Waystation at Schumacher Mill site, Cascade Valley Akron (57 W. North St). Butterflies will use these shallow puddles as drinking stations. They also like to sip muddy water because it supplies them with minerals they need. Photo credit: Guy Marentette
Check out the latest Jane's Walk at the Cascade Locks Park & Mustill Store Museum
There will be a Jane's Walk at the Cascade Locks Park / Mustill Store Museum on Friday May 4th 2018 starting at 5:30pm. Details will be posted to the Jane's Walk page soon. Come learn about the industrial history of Akron's canal and mill race era.
Congratulations on your recent civic affairs grant and for helping to preserve this important piece of Akron history.
Today is National Museum Day - Come Visit the Mustill Store Museum. We have an Akron2Akron Walk starting at 3pm today.
Life and Death On the Locks: 1800's Murder Mystery Gala was a resounding success. Funds were raised for maintaining the historic locks for future generations to marvel the resourcefulness of their ancestors. Lizzie's descendants did just that last night. Thank you Beth Leipold, Wendy Kertesz and Cascade Locks Park Association for welcoming Lizzie's story into Akron history.
Hi Canal history fans, Stow-Munroe Falls Public Library is hosting a FREE presentation "The Story of Ohio's Canals" Date: Thursday 08/10/2017 at 7:00 PM Join Tom O’Grady, instructor at Ohio University, for his presentation on Ohio canals. Beginning in 1825, Ohio began constructing its canal system that eventually included nearly 1,000 miles of channel and towpaths laced with stone locks and culverts, aqueducts, feeder lakes, and slack water ponds....More at this link http://www.smfpl.org/event/2017_08_10/story_ohios_canals