Cascade Locks Park Association

Cascade Locks Park Association Cascade Locks Park Association operates and maintains the Mustill Store Museum, Mustill Home and Schumacher Mill site. The museum is open from April through October. www.cascadelocks.org
Our organization promotes Cascade Locks Park, "Akron's Urban Park". A unique partnership with Metro Parks, Serving Summit County and the City of Akron allows us to promote the historical value of the park while also encouraging residents of Summit County and beyond to get out and about and enjoy nature! Here is the BEST MAP-LINK to the Mustill Store: http://tiny.cc/mustill-store-best-map
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Here is the BEST MAP-LINK to the Mustill Store: http://tiny.cc/mustill-store-best-map

Mission: CLPA was founded to preserve, protect and promote Cascade Locks Park along locks 10-16 of the Ohio & Erie Canal.

Cascade Locks Park Association
04/22/2020

Cascade Locks Park Association

Happy Earth Day! Today is the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day celebrated in the United States.
1969 was a rough year environmentally speaking. There was a large oil spill in Santa Barbara that killed thousands of seabirds and other wildlife. And I don’t have to mention the fire on the Cuyahoga River that made international headlines that same year. Reports were also coming out about the decline in the population of our national symbol, the bald eagle.
Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson realized that environmental issues needed to be addressed politically. He organized a national “teach-in” about environmental issues to take place on April 22, 1970. More than 2,000 colleges and 10,000 public schools participated. An estimated 20 million people nationwide attended festivities that day! Today, Earth Day is celebrated in more than 193 countries.
Arbor Day is also this week (on Friday April 24th). So if you are able to, get outside and plant something!
This photo from 1965 shows Tony Weeks, Quinn Simpson and Paul Scarlet planting a hawthorn tree at Crouse Elementary School. The students raised the money to buy the tree themselves through Project Playground.
#EarthDay
#WayBackWednesday

Happy Earth Day! Today is the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day celebrated in the United States.1969 was a rough y...
04/22/2020

Happy Earth Day! Today is the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day celebrated in the United States.
1969 was a rough year environmentally speaking. There was a large oil spill in Santa Barbara that killed thousands of seabirds and other wildlife. And I don’t have to mention the fire on the Cuyahoga River that made international headlines that same year. Reports were also coming out about the decline in the population of our national symbol, the bald eagle.
Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson realized that environmental issues needed to be addressed politically. He organized a national “teach-in” about environmental issues to take place on April 22, 1970. More than 2,000 colleges and 10,000 public schools participated. An estimated 20 million people nationwide attended festivities that day! Today, Earth Day is celebrated in more than 193 countries.
Arbor Day is also this week (on Friday April 24th). So if you are able to, get outside and plant something!
This photo from 1965 shows Tony Weeks, Quinn Simpson and Paul Scarlet planting a hawthorn tree at Crouse Elementary School. The students raised the money to buy the tree themselves through Project Playground.
#EarthDay
#WayBackWednesday

Fishing was a vital part of life for the indigenous people and the settlers in early Ohio history. Muskie, walleye and p...
04/15/2020

Fishing was a vital part of life for the indigenous people and the settlers in early Ohio history. Muskie, walleye and perch were abundant in Ohio’s waterways. By the late 1800’s Lake Erie was home to a booming commercial fishing industry. Unfortunately, overfishing, pollution and other factors led to a decline in the native fish populations. However, there are still many desirable food and sport fish to be had.
Today we have more than 65 species of fish living in the lakes, ponds and waterways of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Catch and release fishing is encouraged to help maintain fish populations. If you decide to go fishing, make sure to follow all laws and guidelines for your area. And don’t forget to practice social “fishtancing”!
Here we see some men fishing at an unidentified lock on the Ohio and Erie Canal in Akron c. 1890.
(Photo courtesy of summitmemory.org General Photograph Collection)
#WayBackWednesday

For today’s Way Back Wednesday we’re going all the way back to ….2011!Yesterday, I shared a post from the Summit Metro P...
04/08/2020

For today’s Way Back Wednesday we’re going all the way back to ….2011!

Yesterday, I shared a post from the Summit Metro Parks featuring some of the stunning cherry trees blooming along the towpath. I had to go down and see them in person!
In 2011, the city of Akron began planting cherry trees along the Ohio and Erie Canal towpath. At the time, Mayor Don Plusquellic made many trips to Japan as part of his work with the international organization Mayors For Peace. He admired Japan’s famous cherry trees and wanted to bring their symbolism of peace to Akron. The following year, 340 additional trees were planted through a cooperative agreement and donation from the Japanese Association of Northeast Ohio.
Today there are 400 ornamental cherry trees along the towpath including Yoshino, Sargent and Accolade varieties. You’ll find these beauties blooming along the towpath south of the Mustill Store. Enjoy the blooms, they don’t last long! Please remember to practice social distancing while in the parks.
#NotSoWayBackWednesday

Summit Metro Parks
04/08/2020

Summit Metro Parks

Naturalist Becca: "If you park at the Mustill Store Trailhead and walk south on the Towpath Trail toward Summit Lake, beautiful ornamental cherry trees are at peak bloom! Think of it as the Akron Cherry Blossom Walk. A ray of sunshine, beauty and hope during trying times."

(#SocialDistancing note: this section of the Towpath Trail is generally a little bit quieter than some of the more popular areas.)

Summit Metro Parks
04/07/2020

Summit Metro Parks

Naturalist Becca: "If you park at the Mustill Store Trailhead and walk south on the Towpath Trail toward Summit Lake, beautiful ornamental cherry trees are at peak bloom! Think of it as the Akron Cherry Blossom Walk. A ray of sunshine, beauty and hope during trying times."

(#SocialDistancing note: this section of the Towpath Trail is generally a little bit quieter than some of the more popular areas.)

The Tuesday Afternoon Club was founded in November of 1887. A small group of Akron women would meet on Tuesday afternoon...
04/01/2020

The Tuesday Afternoon Club was founded in November of 1887. A small group of Akron women would meet on Tuesday afternoons to perform, listen to and discuss music. That first meeting in 1887 was held in the home of Mrs. George Baker on East Market Street in Akron. Singing societies and instrumental groups were popular at the time. Most of these groups were made up of men, but the Tuesday Afternoon Club was predominantly female for much of its history.
The group was only open to those with proven musical talent. As membership increased, so did the public interest in the talent of the members. They began to perform in churches, homes and other venues around Akron. In 1894, by popular vote, men were admitted into the club. Then , in 1898, the group changed their name to the Tuesday Musical Club.
Today, Tuesday Musical is one of the most respected organizations of its kind in the United States. In addition to musical education and enrichment, they present concerts which bring the world’s best classical musicians to Greater Akron and Northeast Ohio.
Here we see an early Tuesday Musical Club parade float.
(Photo courtesy of summitmemory.org/Early Akron from Stan Hywet Hall and Gardens collection)
#WayBackWednesday

Happy Birthday Ferdinand!
03/31/2020

Happy Birthday Ferdinand!

If March 30th, was your birthday, you share it with Ferdinand Schumacher.

Born in 1822, at Celle, Hanover, Germany, he was known for years as the Cereal King of America. The son of F.C. and Louise Schumacher, Ferdinand attend school until age 15, then clerked in a grocery and later worked in a sugar refinery.

In 1850, Mr. Schumacher came to the United States with his brother, Otto, bought 46 acre of land in Euclid, near Cleveland, and farmed a year and a half. Then leaving the farm in charge of his brother, he came to Akron and started a fancy goods, toy and notion store, soon afterward going into the grocery business.

In 1856 he lease water power rights on the Cascade Mill Race and started an oatmeal manufacturing plant on N. Howard Street, making the meal as he had seen it made in Germany. Up to that time, all the oatmeal used in this country had been imported. . Mr. Schumacher was able to produce it at a lower price and soon developed a large business. Later, he made pearl barley and other cereal products, constantly increasing the number of his mills.

Following the destruction by fire of his eight story Jumbo Mill on March 6, 1886, causing him a reported loss of $600,000 he merged his business with that of the Akron Milling Company under the name of the F. Schumacher Milling Company. This concern was consolidated with the American Cereal Company in 1891, of which Mr. Schumacher was president until 1899. Later the American Cereal was merged with the Quaker Oats Company.

An ardent prohibitionist, Mr. Schumacher built the Windsor Hotel on the northeast corner of Mill and Broadway in 1883 as a temperance hotel. He later spent many thousands of dollars in backing the temperance town of Harriman, Tennessee. He was a generous contributor to all church organizations, the Universalists being particularly indebted to him for their church lot and building.

During the 1890s Mr. Schumacher went heavily into debt to maintain controlling interest in the American Cereal Company and also to finance a water power and paper mill project i Marseilles, Indiana in which he was interested. As a result, he was compelled to sign over all his assets to an executor in 1896. However, it was reported when he died on April 15, 1908, that he had paid all his debts in full.

Mr. Schumacher was married in Cleveland, October 7, 1851, to his cousin, Hermine Schumacher, of Bevern, Brunswick, Germany, who died June 1, 1893. They had seven children. On August 1, 1899, he married again, to Mary Zepperlin, of Cincinnati. He was survived by two sons: F. Adolph, who was then head of the Schumacher Cereal Mills, of Iowa City, Iowa, and Louis, who was on a world trip with his wife at the time of his father's death.

Schumacher made his mark serving his steel cut oats to the Union soldiers during the Civil War. When the soldiers returned home, they continued to buy his product. Other , scoffed at his work suggesting that he was giving people animal food as the oats had previously been feed to cows and horses until Schumacher's invention for cutting them.

- Society permanent collections

This is the last Way Back Wednesday of March, which is Women’s History Month!When we look at history books, there isn’t ...
03/25/2020

This is the last Way Back Wednesday of March, which is Women’s History Month!
When we look at history books, there isn’t much about the daily lives of women on the canals. Life would have been family-oriented with the boat captain, his wife and their children all living and working together on the boat. The whole family would have lived and slept in one small room.
While women were primarily cooks, mothers and wives, they also would have been teachers for their children. Children on canal boats could not attend school most of the year due to working the canals. This would leave the parents to teach the children to read or write, if they themselves could.
The children, boys and girls, would often be tasked with caring for the mules who pulled the boats along the towpath. There are stories of a girl as young as 7 years old driving mules for her father. Many women at the time were registered mule and horse drivers.
In this photo from c 1880-1900, we see an unknown woman leading mules as they pull a canal boat along the Ohio and Erie Canal in Akron.
(Photo courtesy summitmemory.com Cascade Locks Park Association Collection) #WayBackWednesday

The first day of Spring is March 19th! For many of us that means planning a garden. I think it is fun and rewarding to s...
03/18/2020

The first day of Spring is March 19th! For many of us that means planning a garden. I think it is fun and rewarding to start your own plants from seed. With Spring in the air, I have seen many online gardening tips recommending the use of eggshells to start seeds. You put soil into a washed out eggshell and plant the seeds. Keep them watered. When they are ready, you can plant them, eggshell and all, in the garden. Tomato plants especially love the calcium boost!
You know what they say, “Everything old is new again”. In today’s #WayBackWednesday photo from 1962 we have some children planting eggshell gardens in their nursery school in Northfield. Pictured from the left are Dominic Yen, Rodger Shuld, and Linda Koucky. (Photo courtesy of summitmemory.org Akron Beacon Journal Photograph Collection)
** If you want to start your own eggshell garden, follow the link in the comments!**

Timeline Photos
03/12/2020

Timeline Photos

As early as 1820 construction on the canal system in Ohio brought hundreds of Irish laborers to Akron and the surroundin...
03/11/2020

As early as 1820 construction on the canal system in Ohio brought hundreds of Irish laborers to Akron and the surrounding area. Many Irish immigrated to America to escape political repression, religious persecution and extreme poverty. The Trans-Atlantic voyage could take up to 3 months to reach American shores!
Many newcomers from Ireland were farmers or peasants and had only a pick and a shovel to work with. Starting wages for laborers were 30 cents a day, a ration of whiskey and board and lodging. Often the Irish laborers (and Germans and other immigrants) worked as many as 12 hours a day in mud up to their waists. The working and living conditions left laborers vulnerable to malaria, typhoid and other illnesses. Hundreds perished due to the conditions while working on “The Big Ditch”. Even today it is said there is an Irishman buried for every mile of the canal.
Although the Irish built communities like “Little Dublin” in the old Furnace district, life was not easy in the early days of Ohio. The Irish were persecuted for their Catholic faith and their language. Without the hard work of the Irish immigrants, the way Ohio was transformed by its canals would never have been possible.

03/10/2020
Fun times are coming soon!
03/06/2020

Fun times are coming soon!

March is Women’s History Month!Prior to World War II, most women did not work outside of the home. Things changed in 194...
03/05/2020

March is Women’s History Month!
Prior to World War II, most women did not work outside of the home. Things changed in 1941 when millions of men enlisted to join the fighting overseas following the attack on Pearl Harbor. The aviation industry saw the greatest increase in female workers. By 1943 “Rosie the Riveters” made up 65% of the industry's workforce! Overall, approximately 6 million women worked in the manufacturing industry supporting the war effort.
Goodyear built 4,000 FG-1D Corsair airplanes for the Navy and Marine Corps between 1942 and 1945. These planes are credited with turning the tide in the air war over the Pacific. With a 2,250 horsepower engine, the Corsair became the first plane to fly at 400 mph!
Here, we can see 4 women assembling one of the huge Corsair engines at The Goodyear Aircraft Corporation.
(Photo courtesy summitmemory.org general photograph collection of the Akron-Summit County Library)
#WaybackWednesday #WomensHistoryMonth

Beaver leave their mark along the Cuyahoga River.
03/04/2020

Beaver leave their mark along the Cuyahoga River.

Join us in celebrating Akron's Irish Heritage!  A family friendly event with live music, Irish dancers, food and beverag...
02/28/2020

Join us in celebrating Akron's Irish Heritage! A family friendly event with live music, Irish dancers, food and beverages. Proceeds support the Mustill Store Museum.

02/26/2020
This week's Wayback Wednesday is a crossover honoring the end of Black History Month and the Beginning of Women's Histor...
02/26/2020

This week's Wayback Wednesday is a crossover honoring the end of Black History Month and the Beginning of Women's History Month!
On May 29th, 1851 Sojourner Truth , a former slave, gave her famous “Ain’t I A Woman?” speech. She was speaking at the second Women’s Rights Convention which took place right here in Akron. People had gathered at the Universalist Old Stone Church on North High Street to collect petitions asking the Ohio Constitutional Convention to give women the right to vote. (Ohio women didn’t win that right until 1919!) Her speech described many of the injustices she had endured not only as a woman, but as a woman of color.
Although there is no single undisputed version of Truth’s speech, it’s impact on both the abolition of slavery and women’s rights is undeniable. This powerful speech continues to inspire social and political movements to this day. (Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress loc.gov/pictures )
#WayBackWednesday

Thank You ACF for your thoughtful stewardship of our community!
02/25/2020

Thank You ACF for your thoughtful stewardship of our community!

Today is the anniversary of the Cascade Locks Park Association Endowment Fund, established in 2005 to help preserve Akron’s connection to a time when canalways played a pivotal role in transportation and commerce. Along with access to numerous bike and hike trails, the park hosts living history showpieces like the 1850s Mustill Store Visitor Center and the Schumacher House. To make a gift to the fund, visit https://bit.ly/2mZ00j9.

Rita Francis Dove was born In Akron on August 28th, 1952. Her father, Ray, was a research chemist at Goodyear. In 1970, ...
02/19/2020

Rita Francis Dove was born In Akron on August 28th, 1952. Her father, Ray, was a research chemist at Goodyear. In 1970, she graduated from Buchtel High School as a Presidential Scholar. She graduated summa cm laude from Miami University in 1973.
Rita Dove won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1987. She served as the United States Poet Laureate from 1993 -1995 and as poet laureate for the state of Virginia from 2004 to 2006. In addition to poetry, Ms. Dove has also published many essays and a book of short stories and also a novel. She has won numerous literary awards and academic honors, including 28 honorary doctorates! Most recently in 2019, she received the Wallace Stevens Award, which was awarded to recognize her outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry.
Rita Dove has been teaching at the University of Virginia, where she is a Commonwealth Professor Of English, since 1989. She is also classically trained as a cellist. (Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)
#WaybackWednesday

Jazz music first emerged from African-American communities in New Orleans around 1910. By 1920 we were in the “Jazz Age”...
02/12/2020

Jazz music first emerged from African-American communities in New Orleans around 1910. By 1920 we were in the “Jazz Age” and this wonderful genre had spread across the country. Chicago and New York were hot spots and all of the biggest performers and their bands traveled between the cities to perform. Akron made a great halfway point between the cities. Howard Street had all of the amenities a traveling musician could want, hotels , barber shops, laundromats, and bars. 72 of them by one count!
Places like the Mathews Hotel played host to the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Charlie Parker, Cab Calloway and Louis Armstrong among many other famous names. These musicians and their bands would collaborate with other traveling musicians as well as locals, making the sound of Howard Street’s jazz unique.
In the photo we can see some of the many businesses on Howard Street, including the The Green Turtle Cafe.
(Photo courtesy of summitmemory.org general photograph collection)
#WayBackWednesday

Address

57 W North St
Akron, OH
44304

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Here is the BEST MAP-LINK to the Mustill Store: http://tiny.cc/mustill-store-best-map

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Comments

hello friends this is one thing i miss not living in AKRON ANYMORE
When is the towpath trail north of Mustill Store supposed to reopen?
Oktoberfest (Locktoberfest) this year?
Sharing a good time with the neighbors is what Locktoberfest is all about. Join us at Lock 15 Brewing.
Check out the varieties offered. "Cascade Locks Pale Ale"
Stop by and see the Monarch Waystation at Schumacher Mill site, Cascade Valley Akron (57 W. North St). In addition to lots of blooming plants (native plants) you can see the latest addition: Pollinator Specialist Denny Reiser has set up a puddling station for butterflies. Who would have thunk? They like mud puddles! Location: Monarch Waystation at Schumacher Mill site, Cascade Valley Akron (57 W. North St). Butterflies will use these shallow puddles as drinking stations. They also like to sip muddy water because it supplies them with minerals they need. Photo credit: Guy Marentette
Check out the latest Jane's Walk at the Cascade Locks Park & Mustill Store Museum
There will be a Jane's Walk at the Cascade Locks Park / Mustill Store Museum on Friday May 4th 2018 starting at 5:30pm. Details will be posted to the Jane's Walk page soon. Come learn about the industrial history of Akron's canal and mill race era.
Congratulations on your recent civic affairs grant and for helping to preserve this important piece of Akron history.
Today is National Museum Day - Come Visit the Mustill Store Museum. We have an Akron2Akron Walk starting at 3pm today.
Life and Death On the Locks: 1800's Murder Mystery Gala was a resounding success. Funds were raised for maintaining the historic locks for future generations to marvel the resourcefulness of their ancestors. Lizzie's descendants did just that last night. Thank you Beth Leipold, Wendy Kertesz and Cascade Locks Park Association for welcoming Lizzie's story into Akron history.
Hi Canal history fans, Stow-Munroe Falls Public Library is hosting a FREE presentation "The Story of Ohio's Canals" Date: Thursday 08/10/2017 at 7:00 PM Join Tom O’Grady, instructor at Ohio University, for his presentation on Ohio canals. Beginning in 1825, Ohio began constructing its canal system that eventually included nearly 1,000 miles of channel and towpaths laced with stone locks and culverts, aqueducts, feeder lakes, and slack water ponds....More at this link http://www.smfpl.org/event/2017_08_10/story_ohios_canals