Keats-Shelley Memorial House

Keats-Shelley Memorial House Discover Rome's hidden secret.
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#OnThisDay, 200 years ago, after a long journey of four weeks and three days, aboard The Maria Crowther, John Keats and ...
21/10/2020

#OnThisDay, 200 years ago, after a long journey of four weeks and three days, aboard The Maria Crowther, John Keats and Joseph Severn finally reached the bay of Naples.
Unfortunately, news of a typhus outbreak in London had reached the Neapolitan shores prior to their arrival, and Keats and Severn were forced to quarantine inside the ship for another ten days before disembarking on 31 October, Keats's twenty-fifth, and final, birthday.

Severn later recalled the vivid details of that day in his memoirs:

"At last, at the end of six weeks, we entered the beautiful Bay of Naples. It would be difficult to depict in words the first sight of this Paradise as it appears from the sea. The white houses were lit up with the rising sun, which had just begun to touch them, and being tier above tier upon the hill-slopes, they had a lovely appearance, with so much green verdure and the many vineyards and olive grounds about them. Vesuvius had an immense line of smoke-clouds built up, which every now and then opened and changed with the sun's golden light, edging and composing all kinds of groups and shapes in lengths and masses for miles. Then the mountains of Sorrento to the right seemed like lapis lazuli and gold ; the sea between being of a very deep blue such as we had not seen elsewhere, and so rich and beautiful that it gave great splendour to all the objects on shore. So lovely was the ever-changing scene that we were not so bitterly chagrined as we would otherwise have been when we were informed that we were placed in quarantine for ten days, owing to the fact that there was then an epidemic of typhus in London, and it was feared that we might have brought the contagion. Keats was simply entranced with the unsurpassable beauty of the panorama, and looked longingly at the splendid city of Naples and her terraced gardens and vineyards, upon the long range of the Apennines, with majestic Vesuvius emitting strange writhing columns of smoke, golden at their sunlit fringes, and upon the azure foreground covered with ships and all manner of white-sailed small craft. It was a relief to me that he was so taken out of himself, for he was often so distraught, with so sad a look in his eyes, with, moreover, sometimes, a starved, haunting expression that bewildered me. Yet at that time I never fully understood how terrible were his mental sufferings, for so excruciating was the grief that was eating away his life that he could speak of it to no one. He was profoundly depressed the day we went ashore at Naples, though he had been so eager to leave the ship and explore the beautiful city; indeed, I was more alarmed on his behalf that night than even during that wretched three days' storm in the Bay of Biscay."

#RomanticFacts #KeatsShelley200 #Shelley200Everyone knows 'To Autumn' by John Keats, but did you know that Percy Bysshe ...
20/10/2020

#RomanticFacts #KeatsShelley200 #Shelley200

Everyone knows 'To Autumn' by John Keats, but did you know that Percy Bysshe Shelley also penned a poem inspired by the 'Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness?'

In fact, 200 years ago Shelley composed 'Autumn: A Dirge', which was later published posthumously.

You can read Shelley's poem below. Let us know which one is your favorite.

Autumn: A Dirge

The warm sun is falling, the bleak wind is wailing,
The bare boughs are sighing, the pale flowers are dying,
And the Year
On the earth is her death-bed, in a shroud of leaves dead,
Is lying.
Come, Months, come away,
From November to May,
In your saddest array;
Follow the bier
Of the dead cold Year,
And like dim shadows watch by her sepulchre.

The chill rain is falling, the nipped worm is crawling,
The rivers are swelling, the thunder is knelling
For the Year;
The blithe swallows are flown, and the lizards each gone
To his dwelling.
Come, Months, come away;
Put on white, black and gray;
Let your light sisters play--
Ye, follow the bier
Of the dead cold Year,
And make her grave green with tear on tear.

Leigh Hunt, English critic, essayist, and poet, was born #OnThisDay in 1784.Editor of The Examiner, a newspaper founded ...
19/10/2020

Leigh Hunt, English critic, essayist, and poet, was born #OnThisDay in 1784.

Editor of The Examiner, a newspaper founded by his brother John Hunt, he introduced John Keats to the public on 1 December 1816 as one of three ‘Young Poets’ of special promise, the others being Percy Bysshe Shelley and John Hamilton Reynolds. ‘He has not published anything except in a newspaper’, Hunt wrote, ‘but a set of his manuscripts was handed us the other day, and further surprised us with the truth of their ambition, and ardent grappling with Nature.’

Hunt took to Keats immediately, considering him a young writer of great promise, and Keats also became an enthusiastic admirer of Hunt’s own poetry. As Keats’s knowledge and confidence grew he became aware of Hunt’s limitations as a poet and moved away from his influence, although he and Hunt remained friends.

In 1820 shortly before leaving for Italy, Keats wrote to Hunt: ‘I hope to see you whenever you can get time, for I feel really attach’d to you for your many sympathies with me.’

17/10/2020
Reeta Chakrabarti reads 'On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer' by John Keats for Keats-Shelley200

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200

Celebrations for the bicentenaries of John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley's deaths started at the beginning of 2020 and will continue for the next two years. Here's another video from our Launch Party for Keats-Shelley200 in February this year, in which Reeta Chakrabarti reads 'On First Looking into Chapman’s Homer' by John Keats.

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Le celebrazioni per il bicentenario delle morti di John Keats e Percy Bysshe Shelley sono iniziate all'inizio del 2020 e continueranno per i prossimi due anni. Ecco un altro video del nostro party per il lancio di Keats-Shelley200 a febbraio di quest'anno, in cui Reeta Chakrabarti legge "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer" di John Keats.

Happy Birthday to Irish poet and playwright Oscar Wilde, who was born #OnThisDay in 1854.In 1877 while staying in Rome W...
16/10/2020

Happy Birthday to Irish poet and playwright Oscar Wilde, who was born #OnThisDay in 1854.

In 1877 while staying in Rome Wilde visited the grave of John Keats, whom he considered to be one of the greatest poets of the 19th century. Visiting Keats's burial had such a profound emotional impact on him that he said it was 'the holiest place in Rome'. Wilde felt moved to compose a sonnet on the occasion, which was first published in the Irish Monthly in an article titled 'The Tomb of Keats', and later revised and published in 1881 as 'The Grave of Keats'.

Picture right: Autograph letter of Oscar Wilde with the sonnet 'The Grave of Keats' to Emma Speed, John Keats's niece, collection of the Keats-Shelley House.

12/10/2020
La Belle Dame Sans Merci

As we approach the bicenteneries of the deaths of Keats and Shelley in Italy, actor and Keats-Shelley200 Ambassador Julian Sands joined us in Rome to commemorate the bicentenary of Keats's voyage with an intense intimate reading from the Essential Poems of John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley published by the Keats-Shelley House in Rome.

🤚🛑🤚🛑🤚🛑Get ready for Gusto, the new exhibition by British artist #NancyCadogan at the Keats-Shelley House, to open on 31 ...
09/10/2020

🤚🛑🤚🛑🤚🛑

Get ready for Gusto, the new exhibition by British artist #NancyCadogan at the Keats-Shelley House, to open on 31 October 2020! #KeatsShelley200

https://bit.ly/2GJx7aF

🎨🖌🎨🖌🎨

#KeatsShelley200 #Keats200#OnThisDay in 1820, 200 years ago, Fanny Brawne wrote to Fanny Keats, John Keats's sister, to ...
06/10/2020

#KeatsShelley200 #Keats200

#OnThisDay in 1820, 200 years ago, Fanny Brawne wrote to Fanny Keats, John Keats's sister, to let her know she'd heard from her brother, who left Portsmouth on 29 September:

My dear Miss Keats
First I must return you my thanks for your readiness in accepting me as a correspondent, and then hasten to inform you I have heard of your brother. I received yesterday a letter from Mrs Dilke with part of a letter from a relation of hers, copied out for my benefit, as I shall copy it for yours 'I have had some very unexpected visitors, Mr Keats and Mr Severn. They had been beating about with a contrary wind ever since they left London, and at last put into Portsmouth. I think Mr Keats much better than I expected and Mr Severn said he was sure that notwithstanding the hardships they had undergone, he was much better than when he left London.'

I cannot say this news pleases me much, I was in hopes that by this time he was half-way to Naples. He left Portsmouth on the 29th of September, the wind being favorable, the next day it again changed contrary to their wishes, but they did not return so it is supposed the captain put to Sea. I had a message for you from your brother before he left Hampstead as well as a lock of hair, both of which I forgot. He particularly requests you will avoid colds and coughs, and desires you never to go into the cold air out of the hothouse. The hair I myself cut off for you. It is very short, as he had little at the time. If you wish to use it in a manner that requires more pray mention it, I have some that was cut off two or three years ago I believe, and there is no difference in the color.

{...] I send you my most affectionate love

FRANCES BRAWNE

05/10/2020

We're so looking forward to the release of Human OAK, a short film inspired by Percy Bysshe Shelley's Ode to the West Wind, which this year celebrates the bicentenary of its publication.

The film stars Anna Valle and is an Indian/Italian collaboration conceived, written and directed by filmmaker Ulisse Lendaro, and co-produced with Jitendra Mishra of Cinema4good, a production company based in India.

Human OAK was shot and edited during the Covid-19 lockdown, and is the only Italian-Indian co-production made during that time.

We can't wait to see it soon, but in the meantime here's the trailer and an article (in the comments below) which appeared in Il Giornale di Vicenza this weekend.

#OnThisDayMohandas Karamchand Gandhi, better known as Mahātmā Gandhi, was born on this day in 1869. Mahātmā Gandhi who i...
02/10/2020

#OnThisDay

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, better known as Mahātmā Gandhi, was born on this day in 1869. Mahātmā Gandhi who is one of the most famous icons of peace in world history would often quote Percy Bysshe Shelley's 'The Masque of Anarchy', which is considered by many to be the first modern statement of nonviolent resistance.

In the Young India journal the Mahātmā wrote:

'But I believe non-violence is infinitely superior to violence, forgiveness is more manly than punishment.... strength does not come from physical capacity. It comes from indomitable will... A definite forgiveness would, therefore, mean a definite recognition of our strength.'

This statement of Gandhi echoes Shelley's poweful lines in 'The Masque of Anarchy':

[...] ‘Stand ye calm and resolute,
Like a forest close and mute,
With folded arms and looks which are
Weapons of unvanquished war,

[...] ‘With folded arms and steady eyes,
And little fear, and less surprise,
Look upon them as they slay
Till their rage has died away.’

[...] ‘Then they will return with shame
To the place from which they came,
And the blood thus shed will speak
In hot blushes on their cheek.

[...] ‘Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number.
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you—
Ye are many—they are few.

We are slowly welcoming back class group visits to the museum, with necessary precautions to comply with national and re...
28/09/2020

We are slowly welcoming back class group visits to the museum, with necessary precautions to comply with national and regional guidelines on safeguarding staff and visitors against Covid-19 in place.

We run a carefully planned educational programme, dedicated to informing and inspiring students about the significance of John Keats, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and the English Romantics, so if you're interested in bringing your class or group of students to the museum, visit our website to book: https://bit.ly/2HCXWO2 or email us: [email protected].

We look forward to seeing you soon at the Keats-Shelley House.

24/09/2020

#RomanticFacts #KeatsShelley200

In the several memoirs that Joseph Severn wrote to remember and pay tribute to his late friend John Keats, Severn always maintained that Keats wrote the final version of the sonnet 'Bright Star' in September 1820 on a blank leaf in a folio volume of Shakespeare's 'Poems', aboard the schooner Maria Crowther which would take them to Italy the following month.

It is unclear when Keats actually started working on the poem but in 1917 the English curator and literary critic Sidney Colvin found a copy of the poem transcribed by Charles Brown and dated 1819. After this discovery critics and scholars speculated on the actual date of the composition and on whether the sonnet was initially meant to be for Fanny Brawne, with some even saying that the poem was probably at first inspired by Isabella Jones, a former crush of Keats, and eventually adapted by him for Miss Brawne.

Nevertheless, whether Ms.Jones was the initial muse who inspired the poem or not, 'Bright Star' will forever be associated with Miss Brawne's name, as 'a declaration of Keats's love to her', to use Robert Gittings words. In fact, Keats had already referred to her as 'a Bright Star in a letter dated 25 July 1819.

Star of stage and screen Julian Sands joined us in Rome this month to celebrate the bicentenary of the romantic poet Joh...
23/09/2020

Star of stage and screen Julian Sands joined us in Rome this month to celebrate the bicentenary of the romantic poet John Keats's voyage from London to Italy in September 1820.

It took Keats more than a month to reach the bay of Naples and almost another month to arrive, finally, in Rome on 15 November 1820, from where he proceeded to Piazza di Spagna to take up lodging in the building known today as the Keats-Shelley House.

As we approach the bicentenaries of the deaths of Keats and Shelley, who died in Italy in 1821 and 1822, the Keats-Shelley House will be posting special virtual events in Rome to commemorate key dates and to raise awareness of our Keats-Shelley200 campaign.

We started the celebration with an intimate and intense reading from the Essential Poems of John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley by actor Julian Sands, a long-time friend of the Keats-Shelley House, who joined us in Rome to commemorate the bicentenary of Keats's voyage.

Julian read nine poems by Keats, seven by Shelley and (ssshhhh....) even squeezed in a poem by Lord Byron.

Which are your favourites?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7BRzMTj3Nrg&t=326s

#OnThisDay On 22 September 1820, a few days after John Keats and Joseph Severn set sail from London, Severn wrote the fi...
22/09/2020

#OnThisDay

On 22 September 1820, a few days after John Keats and Joseph Severn set sail from London, Severn wrote the first entry of his journal charting their voyage to Italy.

This manuscript belongs to the collection at the Keats-Shelley House, and entry for 22 September was written at "Dundee Ness" (Severn got the spelling wrong for Dungeness, a headland on the coast of Kent), after the storms and squalls of the previous night and early morning. Severn records:

'A Flat day ‒ waiting for a wind in the Dundee Ness [Port]. [...] Keats appetite increasing'

After this delayed departure, their journey would be a long and arduous one, and the Maria Crowther would encounter bad weather again, arriving in Naples on the following 21 October.

Follow John Keats's voyage on Google Earth:
https://t.co/nr7Lvimhp6?amp=1

We're pleased to announce that the Keats-Shelley House is now offering a virtual tour of the museum with one of our live...
21/09/2020

We're pleased to announce that the Keats-Shelley House is now offering a virtual tour of the museum with one of our live guides.

This experience has been developed for groups wishing to visit the House and is open to schools as well as to any group of people interested in a virtual tour of the rooms where the romantic poet John Keats spent his last days.

Our guides will take our virtual visitors through each room and recount the lives of John Keats, P. B. Shelley, Mary Shelley and Lord Byron, while offering a closer look at items from our collection. Our guides will also be able to answer your questions live.

The virtual tour may be offered in English or Italian at our standard ticket prices, with the usual reduction for students. It lasts approximately one hour, and must be booked in advance through the usual channels:

(+39) 06 678 42 35/ [email protected]

Would you like to spend a lovely evening at the gorgeous and sumptuous Palazzo Doria-Pamphilj, with a Champagne receptio...
19/09/2020

Would you like to spend a lovely evening at the gorgeous and sumptuous Palazzo Doria-Pamphilj, with a Champagne reception, tour of the galleries, gala supper, and theatre and music performances?‬

Help us raise money for Keats-Shelley200, and have a truly memorable time.


📌Saturday 12th June 2021 at 7 p.m.‬📌

Get your tickets now:
👇👇👇👇👇👇👇👇

https://bit.ly/2FLNwKY

#OnThisDay in 1820, 200 years ago, Fanny Brawne wrote the first of a long series of letters to Fanny Keats, John Keats’s...
18/09/2020

#OnThisDay in 1820, 200 years ago, Fanny Brawne wrote the first of a long series of letters to Fanny Keats, John Keats’s sister, she introduced herself to her and also gave a detailed account of Keats’s departure from London:

My dear Miss Keats

Your brother on leaving England expressed a wish that I should occasionally write to you, a wish with which I feel the greatest pleasure in complying, but I cannot help thinking I require some kind of introduction, instead of which I must inform you of all my claims to your correspondence and I assure you I think them no slight ones, for I have known your brother for two years, am a great friend of Mrs Dilke's who I believe you like, and once sent you a message, which I do not know whether you received by a lady who had then never seen you but who expected to do so, a Mrs Cornish. Besides which I have several times invited you to stay with me during the last time your brother George was in England, an indulgence which was not granted me. You see I have been quite intimate with you, most likely without you ever having heard of my name. Besides all this your brother has been staying with us for the last six weeks of his being in this country and my Mother has nursed him. He left us last Wednesday but as the ship waited a few days longer than we expected, he did not sail from London till 7 o’clock yesterday morning. This afternoon we have received letters from two of his friends who accompanied him as far as Gravesend; they both declare his health and spirits to be better than they could have expected. I do not enclose you the letters or send you all the particulars because Mr Haslam said he should call on you very soon and he may have seen you before you receive this note; if that should not be the case, you will be pleased to hear that he went part of the way with him. His kindness cannot be described. As he was uneasy at your brother's travelling by himself he persuaded a friend to go with him, and in a very few weeks Mr Brown, who you probably know by name will follow him. I cannot tell you how much every one have exerted themselves for him, nor how much he is liked, which is the more wonderful as he is the last person to exert himself to gain people's friendship. I am certain he has some spell that attaches them to him, or else he has fortunately met with a set of friends that I did not believe could be found in the world. May I hope, at some time to receive a letter from you? Perhaps you have an objection to write to a stranger. If so, I will try not to be very much disappointed if your objection is too strong to be overcome. For my own part I have long ceased to consider you a stranger and though this first letter may be a little stiff—because I wish to let you know what a time I have been acquainted with you, it will not be the case again, for at any rate I shall write once more whether you answer or not, as soon as letters are received from your brother, which I hope will not be for some time, for writing agitates him extremely. In Mr Haslam you will see the best person in the world to raise your spirits, he feels so certain your brother will soon recover his health. What an unconscionable first letter. I remain yours, allow me to say, affectionately

FRANCES BRAWNE

Indirizzo

Piazza Di Spagna, 26
Rome
00187

Metro line A to SPAGNA or buses to Via del Tritone or Piazza San Silvestro

Orario di apertura

Lunedì 14:00 - 18:00
Lunedì 10:00 - 13:00
Martedì 14:00 - 18:00
Martedì 10:00 - 13:00
Mercoledì 14:00 - 18:00
Mercoledì 10:00 - 13:00
Giovedì 14:00 - 18:00
Giovedì 10:00 - 13:00
Venerdì 14:00 - 18:00
Venerdì 10:00 - 13:00
Sabato 14:00 - 18:00
Sabato 10:00 - 13:00

Telefono

+39 06 678 4235

Notifiche

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Discover Rome’s hidden Romantic secret

Situated at the right foot of the Spanish Steps, just a few steps away from Spagna metro station, the Keats-Shelley House is a museum dedicated to the English Romantic poets, who were spellbound by the Eternal City.

26 Piazza di Spagna is most famous for being the final dwelling place of John Keats, who died here in 1821, aged just 25, and to this day Keats’s bedroom is preserved as a shrine to his tragic story and extraordinary talent.

Displayed through a chain of beautiful rooms, the collection contains a great many treasures and curiosities associated with the lives and works of the Romantic poets, as well as one of the finest libraries of Romantic literature in the world; now numbering more than 8,000 volumes.

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Commenti

Salve! Avete esposti manoscritti di Shelley? Grazie!
Selected poems by Keats & Shelley now available in my Crane Classics series: hope you might stock these? https://anthonyeyre.com/keats-selected-poems/ https://anthonyeyre.com/shelley-selected-poems/
I went here in Easter week, 1975. It was a very moving experience. Rome remains my favourite city in the world.
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Saw this and thought of you
I would like to share a very compelling presentation on Keats and the development of his creative process during his “Miracle Year” if 1819.
Hi, Would this information be interesting/useful to you guys?
Hi! Am I the only one who can't find the link for submitting work to the 2020 prize?
Questa sera, ore 21:10 su Rai Storia, DT. 54
Dear Keats-Shelley Memorial House, Please feel free to share this new recitation of Ode to a Nightingale in honor of the bicentennial of Keats' Great Odes.