Keats-Shelley Memorial House

Keats-Shelley Memorial House Discover Rome's hidden secret.
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#KeatsShelley200 #KS200 #OnThisDay In the preface to the first edition of ‘Adonais’, Shelley records the death of Keats ...
27/12/2020

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200 #OnThisDay

In the preface to the first edition of ‘Adonais’, Shelley records the death of Keats as occurring on ‘the----of----1821” because he didn’t know the exact day when Keats died. However, in later editions, it is (incorrectly) stated that “John Keats died of a consumption, in his twenty-fourth year on the 27th December 1820.”

The Keats-Shelley House would like to wish everybody a Merry Christmas.
25/12/2020

The Keats-Shelley House would like to wish everybody a Merry Christmas.

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200#OnThisDay in 1820, 200 years ago, Joseph Severn wrote a letter, probably addressed to John Taylo...
24/12/2020

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200

#OnThisDay in 1820, 200 years ago, Joseph Severn wrote a letter, probably addressed to John Taylor, John Keats’s publisher, although it remained unfinished, to inform him of Keats’s worsening health in Rome:

"My dear Sir, Keats has changed somewhat for the worse—at least his mind has much, very much—and this leaves his state much the same and quite as hopeless. Yet the blood has ceased to come; his digestion is better, and but for a cough he must be improving, that is, as respects his body. But the fatal prospect of consumption hangs before his mind's eye, and turns everything to despair and wretchedness. He will not hear a word about living—nay, I seem to lose his confidence by trying to give him this hope [for his knowledge of internal anatomy enables him to judge of every change accurately, and adds largely to his torture]. He will not think his future prospects favourable. He says the continued stretch of his imagination has already killed him. He will not hear of his good friends in England, except for what they have done—and this is another load ; but of their high hopes of him, his certain success, his experience, he will not hear a word. Then the want of some kind hope to feed his voracious imagination."

23/12/2020
'BRIGHT STAR' KEATS-SHELLEY 200 CONCERT

Tonight's concert is brought to you from the Keats-Shelley House by operatic tenor Christian Collia and pianist Giacomo Refolo, and attended by Jill Morri, CMG, Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Italy and San Marino, and Keats-Shelley200 Ambassador. The concert marks the bicentenary of John Keats's stay in Piazza di Spagna and is part of our Keats-Shelley200 programme of virtual events.

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Il concerto di stasera è stato organizzato dalla Keats-Shelley House, eseguito dal tenore Christian Collia e dal pianista Giacomo Refolo, e durante l'esecuzione era presente l'Ambasciatrice britannica in Italia Jill Morris, CMG. Il concerto segna il bicentenario del soggiorno di John Keats a Piazza di Spagna ed è parte di Keats-Shelley200, il nostro programma di eventi virtuali.

23/12/2020
'BRIGHT STAR' KEATS-SHELLEY 200 CONCERT

Tonight's concert is brought to you from the Keats-Shelley House by operatic tenor Christian Collia and pianist Giacomo Refolo, and attended by Jill Morri, CMG, Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Italy and San Marino, and Keats-Shelley200 Ambassador. The concert marks the bicentenary of John Keats's stay in Piazza di Spagna and is part of our Keats-Shelley200 programme of virtual events.

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Il concerto di stasera è stato organizzato dalla Keats-Shelley House, eseguito dal tenore Christian Collia e dal pianista Giacomo Refolo, e durante l'esecuzione era presente l'Ambasciatrice britannica in Italia Jill Morris, CMG. Il concerto segna il bicentenario del soggiorno di John Keats a Piazza di Spagna ed è parte di Keats-Shelley200, il nostro programma di eventi virtuali.

👉👉👉 DON'T MISS OUR 'BRIGHT STAR' KEATS-SHELLEY 200 CONCERT, TODAY 23rd DECEMBER at 18:30 CET 👈👈👈Don't forget to enjoy ou...
23/12/2020

👉👉👉 DON'T MISS OUR 'BRIGHT STAR' KEATS-SHELLEY 200 CONCERT, TODAY 23rd DECEMBER at 18:30 CET 👈👈👈

Don't forget to enjoy our 'Bright Star' concert of songs inspired by the verse of Keats and Shelley, which have been put to music by late nineteenth/early twentieth-century composers. The concert will be available for streaming on YouTube (via this link https://bit.ly/37GlcoK) from today, Wednesday 23rd December, at 6:30 pm CET. You can also watch it as a live stream here on our page, although the concert is best enjoyed on YouTube for ultra HD quality.

We also remind our visitors and followers that the Keats-Shelley House gift shop is open until 6 p.m. today. If you cannot reach us at 26, Piazza di Spagna, please take a look at our online shop (https://ksh.roma.it/shop), whose books, jewellery and bespoke merchandise are inspired by the Romantic poets who lived in Italy.

The Keats-Shelley House gift shop will reopen regularly on Thursday 7th January 2021. At the moment we still don't know whether we will be in a position to reopen the museum as well, but we will let you know promptly once the situation is clarified.

We would like to take this opportunity to wish everybody a merry Christmas and a happy new year.

🎄🎁🎆🎊🥂

22/12/2020
Keats-Shelley200: Rosie Cavaliero reads an extract from 'Endymion' by John Keats

Keats-Shelley200 Ambassador Rosie Cavaliero was asked to read some of her favourites from the Essential Poems of John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley at the launch party of Keats-Shelley200 on 6 February 2020. Rosie chose to read Lines 6-24 of Book I of Keats's 'Endymion':

Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
Of all the unhealthy and o’er-darkened ways
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon,
Trees old and young, sprouting a shady boon
For simple sheep; and such are daffodils
With the green world they live in; and clear rills
That for themselves a cooling covert make
’Gainst the hot season; the mid forest brake,
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms:
And such too is the grandeur of the dooms
We have imagined for the mighty dead;
All lovely tales that we have heard or read:
An endless fountain of immortal drink,
Pouring unto us from the heaven’s brink.

22/12/2020
Keats-Shelley200: Rosie Cavaliero reads an extract from 'Endymion' by John Keats

Keats-Shelley200 Ambassador Rosie Cavaliero was asked to read some of her favourites from the Essential Poems of John Keats and Percy Bysshe Shelley at the launch party of Keats-Shelley200 on 6 February 2020. Rosie chose to read Lines 6-24 of Book I of Keats's 'Endymion':

Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
Of all the unhealthy and o’er-darkened ways
Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,
Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon,
Trees old and young, sprouting a shady boon
For simple sheep; and such are daffodils
With the green world they live in; and clear rills
That for themselves a cooling covert make
’Gainst the hot season; the mid forest brake,
Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms:
And such too is the grandeur of the dooms
We have imagined for the mighty dead;
All lovely tales that we have heard or read:
An endless fountain of immortal drink,
Pouring unto us from the heaven’s brink.

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200What is the anagram of John Keats? Read below what Charles Brown made up in a letter he wrote to ...
21/12/2020

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200

What is the anagram of John Keats?
Read below what Charles Brown made up in a letter he wrote to Keats #onthisday in 1820, 200 years ago. In this letter, Brown's tone was very cheerful as he was responding to Keats's hopeful letter dated 30 November, and thus he was still unaware of his friend's relapse only ten days earlier.

"My dear Keats,
"Not two hours since your letter from Rome, dated 30th Nov., came to me, and as tomorrow is post-night, you shall have the answer in due course. And so you still wish me to follow you to Rome? and truly I wish to go; nothing detains me but prudence. Little could be gained, if anything, by letting my house at this time of the year, and the consequence would be a heavy additional expense which I cannot possibly afford, unless it were a matter of necessity, and I see none while you are in such good hands as Severn's. As for my appropriating any part of remittances from George, that is out of the question, while you continue disabled from writing. Thank God, you are getting better! Your last letter, which I so gravely answered about 4th Dec, showed how much you had suffered by the voyage and the cursed quarantine. Keep your mind easy, my dear fellow, and no fear of your body. Your sister, I hear, is in remarkably good health. The last news from George (already given to you) was so far favourable that there were no complaints. Everybody next door is quite well. Taylor has just returned to town. I saw him for a few minutes the other day, and had not time to put some questions which I wished, but I understand your poems increase in sale. Hunt has been very ill, but is now recovered. All other friends are well.
[...] What an odd being you are: because you and I were so near meeting twice, yet missed each other both times, you cry out 'there was my star predominant;' why not mine (C. B.'s) as well? But this is the way you argue yourself into fits, of the spleen. If I were in Severn's place, and you insisted on ever gnawing a bone, I'd lead you the life of a dog. What the devil should you grumble for? Do you recollect my anagram on your name? How pat it comes now to Severn! My love to him and the said anagram, 'Thanks Joe!' If I have a right guess, a certain person next door is a little disappointed at not receiving a letter from you, but not a word has dropped. She wrote to you lately, and so did your sister.
"Yours most faithfully,
"Charles Brown"

#TheImmortalDinnerThe results of the Keats-Shelley200 Immortal Dinner competition are in! Oscar Wilde and Samuel Taylor ...
18/12/2020

#TheImmortalDinner

The results of the Keats-Shelley200 Immortal Dinner competition are in! Oscar Wilde and Samuel Taylor Coleridge won joint first place and will each get a seat next to Keats at the famous literary gathering, which was originally hosted by artist Benjamin Robert Haydon.
The event, now known as 'the Immortal Dinner', took place on 28th December 1817 and included not only John Keats, but also William Wordsworth, Charles Lamb and William Hazlitt among their guests. Thanks to later accounts, we know that the mood of the evening was of ‘excitement and tension, conviviality and laughter’ and that the conversation flowed from literature, politics, science to exploration, touching upon contemporary issues like Lord Elgin’s removal of the marble frieze from the Parthenon in Athens.

Follow the link to see all the other nominated guests:
https://bit.ly/3ardJf5

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200#OnThisDay in 1820, 200 years ago, Joseph Severn started to write a letter to Fanny Brawne to tel...
14/12/2020

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200

#OnThisDay in 1820, 200 years ago, Joseph Severn started to write a letter to Fanny Brawne to tell her about John Keats's worsening health. He wouldn't finish the letter till the 17th, as Keats was so seriously ill that Severn couldn't leave him alone even for a moment:

"My dear Madam,
I fear poor Keats is at his worst. A most unlooked-for relapse has confined him to his bed, with every chance against him. It has been so sudden upon what I thought convalescence, and without any seeming cause, that I cannot calculate on the next change. I dread it, for his suffering is so great, so continued, and his fortitude so completely gone, that any further change must make him delirious. This is the fifth day, and I see him get worse.
"Dec. 17th, 4 a.m. — Not a moment can I be from him. I sit by his bed and read all day, and at night I humour him in all his wanderings. He has just fallen asleep, the first sleep for eight nights, and now from mere exhaustion. I hope he will not wake till I have written, for I am anxious that you should know the truth; yet I dare not let him see I think his state dangerous. On the morning of this attack he was going on in good spirits quite merrily, when, in an instant, a cough seized him, and he vomited two cupfuls of blood. In a moment I got Dr. Clark, who took eight ounces of blood from his arm — it was black and thick. Keats was much alarmed and dejected. What a sorrowful day I had with him! He rushed out of bed and said, ' This day shall be my last ; ' and but for me most certainly it would. The blood broke forth in similar quantity the next morning, and he was bled again. I was afterwards so fortunate as to talk him into a little calmness, and he soon became quite patient. Now the blood has come up in coughing five times. Not a single thing will he digest, yet he keeps on craving for food. Every day he raves he will die from hunger, and I've been obliged to give him more than he was allowed. His imagination and memory present every thought to him in horror; the recollection of 'his good friend Brown,' of 'his four happy weeks spent under her care,' of his sister and brother. Oh! he will mourn over all to me whilst I cool his burning forehead, till I tremble for his intellect. How can he be 'Keats' again after all this? Yet I may see it too gloomily, since each coming night I sit up adds its dismal contents to my mind.
"Dr. Clark will not say much; although there are no bounds to his attention, yet he can with little success 'administer to a mind diseased.' All that can be done he does most kindly, while his lady, like himself in refined feeling, prepares all that poor Keats takes, for in this wilderness of a place, for an invalid, there was no alternative. Yesterday Dr. Clark went all over Rome for a certain kind of fish, and just as I received it, carefully dressed, Keats was taken with spitting of blood.
"We have the best opinion of Dr. Clark's skill: he comes over four or five times a day, and he has left word for us to call him up, at any moment, in case of danger. My spirits have been quite pulled down. Those wretched Romans have no idea of comfort. I am obliged to do everything for him. I wish you were here.
"I have just looked at him. This will be good night."

14/12/2020
KSH Curator, Giuseppe Albano, introduces 2021's Keats-Shelley and Young Romantics Prizes

🇬🇧🇬🇧🇬🇧
Giuseppe Albano, Curator of Keats-Shelley House, launches 2021's Keats-Shelley and Young Romantics Prizes - Poetry and Prose. Visit keats-shelley.org & click Prizes.

To mark 2021's theme - Writ in Water - Giuseppe visits John Keats' grave in Rome's Non-Catholic Cemetery.

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🇮🇹🇮🇹🇮🇹
Giuseppe Albano, Direttore della Keats-Shelley House, introduce il Keats-Shelley Prize e lo Young Romantics Prize, di poesia e prosa, per l'anno 2021.
Per maggiori informazioni visitate il sito http://keats-shelley.org e cliccate sulla sezione Prizes.

In occasione del tema del 2021, "Scritto sull'acqua", Giuseppe ha visitato la tomba di John Keats al Cimitero Acattolico di Roma.

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200Through Joseph Severn’s memoirs and letters, we continue our journey back to the time when he and...
11/12/2020

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200

Through Joseph Severn’s memoirs and letters, we continue our journey back to the time when he and John Keats spent their first weeks in Rome two hundred years ago. In the passage below, Severn recalls Keats's despair for what he felt he was about to lose:

“While in Italy he [Keats] always shrank from speaking in direct terms of the actual things which were killing him. Certainly the 'Blackwood's' attack was one of the least of his miseries, for he never even mentioned it to me. The greater trouble which was engulfing him he signified in a hundred ways. Was it to be wondered at that at the time when the happiest life was presented to his view, when it was arranged that he was to marry a young person of beauty and fortune, when the little knot of friends who valued him and believed in a future for the beloved poet, and he himself, with generous, unselfish feelings, looked forward to it more delighted on their account — was it to be wondered at that, on the appearance of consumption, his ardent mind should have sunk into despair? He seemed struck down from the highest happiness to the lowest misery. He felt crushed at the prospect of being cut off at the early age of twenty-four, when the cup was at his lips, and he was beginning to drink that cup of delight which was to last his mortal life through, which would have insured to him the happiness of home — happiness he had never felt, for he was an orphan, and which would be a barrier for him against a cold and (to him) a malignant world."

[Image: Keats's bedroom, Penny Graham, gouache paint, 2008, Keats-Shelley House collection]

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200#OnThisDay John Keats suffered a serious haemorrhage of the lungs, which caused him devastating p...
10/12/2020

#KeatsShelley200 #KS200

#OnThisDay John Keats suffered a serious haemorrhage of the lungs, which caused him devastating pain and confined him to bed. Severn wrote a letter to Charles Brown to inform of his friend's condition:

"I fear our poor Keats is at his worst – a most unlooked for relapse has confined him to his bed – with every chance against him: it has been so sudden upon what I almost thought convalescence – and without any seeming cause that I cannot calculate on the next change. I dread it, for his suffering is so great, so continued, and his fortitude so completely gone, that any further change must make him delirious."

In his memoirs, he also recalled the following days:
"Dr. Clark was very kind and considerate, and was most ardent in his attention on Keats, and at times arose in the night to watch him, when any serious change took place or seemed imminent. This bitterly painful position for me (and so it was in a high degree, when nothing seemed to help my unfortunate friend) was not without a redeeming point — I mean that it was not utter misery, for I was at least the nurse of Keats, however unworthy and whatever my deficiencies; and, moreover, I was sustained by the delightful hope of my beloved friend's recovery, if God so willed. This hope reconciled me to every difficulty and supplied the place of sleep at times, and even food, for I was obliged to devote myself wholly to him both day and night, as his nervous state would not admit of his seeing any one but Dr. Clark and myself. And yet, with all his suffering and consciousness of approaching death, he never quite lost the play of his cheerful and elastic mind. Yet these happier moments were but slight snatches from his misery, like the flickering rays of the sun in a smothering storm. Real rays of sunshine they were, all the same, such as would have done honour to the brightest health and happiest mind: yet the storm of sickness and death was always going on, and I have often thought that these bursts of wit and cheerfulness were called up to set purpose — were, in fact, a great effort on my account. I could perceive in many ways that he was always painfully alive to my situation, wholly dependent as I was upon my painting. His wit, I should add, was seldom exercised but upon unpleasant things, for he was essentially chivalrous and tender-hearted; and, too, it never failed to call up something pleasant."

[Image: (clockwise) John Keats, Dr. James Clark, Charles Armitage Brown, Joseph Severn]

Indirizzo

Piazza Di Spagna, 26
Rome
00187

Metro line A to SPAGNA or buses to Via del Tritone or Piazza San Silvestro

Orario di apertura

Lunedì 14:00 - 18:00
Lunedì 10:00 - 13:00
Martedì 14:00 - 18:00
Martedì 10:00 - 13:00
Mercoledì 14:00 - 18:00
Mercoledì 10:00 - 13:00
Giovedì 14:00 - 18:00
Giovedì 10:00 - 13:00
Venerdì 14:00 - 18:00
Venerdì 10:00 - 13:00
Sabato 14:00 - 18:00
Sabato 10:00 - 13:00

Telefono

+39 06 678 4235

Notifiche

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Contatta Il Museo

Invia un messaggio a Keats-Shelley Memorial House:

Video

Discover Rome’s hidden Romantic secret

Situated at the right foot of the Spanish Steps, just a few steps away from Spagna metro station, the Keats-Shelley House is a museum dedicated to the English Romantic poets, who were spellbound by the Eternal City.

26 Piazza di Spagna is most famous for being the final dwelling place of John Keats, who died here in 1821, aged just 25, and to this day Keats’s bedroom is preserved as a shrine to his tragic story and extraordinary talent.

Displayed through a chain of beautiful rooms, the collection contains a great many treasures and curiosities associated with the lives and works of the Romantic poets, as well as one of the finest libraries of Romantic literature in the world; now numbering more than 8,000 volumes.

Musei nelle vicinanze


Commenti

So exciting to hear about the new museum project dedicated to Lord Byron at his former home in Greece.
Spero possiate acquisire almeno la maschera!
I imagine you are already aware but I've just been alerted that Christies are auctioning a Keats death-mask and a Joseph Severn portrait of Keats in their 9th December London sale. More details here:
💜🧡 Happy 225th Birthday, John Keats!! 🧡💜
Salve! Avete esposti manoscritti di Shelley? Grazie!
Selected poems by Keats & Shelley now available in my Crane Classics series: hope you might stock these? https://anthonyeyre.com/keats-selected-poems/ https://anthonyeyre.com/shelley-selected-poems/
I went here in Easter week, 1975. It was a very moving experience. Rome remains my favourite city in the world.
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Saw this and thought of you
I would like to share a very compelling presentation on Keats and the development of his creative process during his “Miracle Year” if 1819.