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Keats-Shelley Memorial House

Keats-Shelley Memorial House Discover Rome's hidden secret.

Situated at the right foot of the Spanish Steps, just a few steps away from Spagna metro station, the Keats-Shelley House is a museum dedicated to the British Romantic poets, who were spellbound by the Eternal City.

26 Piazza di Spagna is most famous for being the final dwelling place of John Keats, who died here in 1821, aged just 25, and to this day Keats’s bedroom is preserved as a shrine to h

Situated at the right foot of the Spanish Steps, just a few steps away from Spagna metro station, the Keats-Shelley House is a museum dedicated to the British Romantic poets, who were spellbound by the Eternal City.

26 Piazza di Spagna is most famous for being the final dwelling place of John Keats, who died here in 1821, aged just 25, and to this day Keats’s bedroom is preserved as a shrine to h

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  in 1822 Joseph Severn told Charles Brown that preparations were being made for the placement of John Keats's tombstone...
07/12/2022



in 1822 Joseph Severn told Charles Brown that preparations were being made for the placement of John Keats's tombstone and that Percy Bysshe Shelley's ashes had arrived to Rome to be interred:

My Dear Brown,
…I had just given my directions about poor Keats Grave Stone. — your mention of your still existing wish for the Epitaph as it stood. — made me all consent — I saw the superiority of it —
…Poor Shelley's ashes have arrived — when I get out — I will conduct them to the Grave — with the respect due to the friend of Keats.

Informiamo i nostri followers e visitatori che si trovano a Firenze che domani, 6 dicembre alle ore 17:00, presso il Gab...
05/12/2022

Informiamo i nostri followers e visitatori che si trovano a Firenze che domani, 6 dicembre alle ore 17:00, presso il Gabinetto Scientifico Letterario G.P. Vieusseux di Firenze, a Palazzo Strozzi, nella Sala Ferri ci sarà la presentazione del libro Vita e leggenda di Allegra Figlia di Lord Byron e nipote di Mary Shelley, di Giulia Melandri. Dialogheranno con l'autrice Luca Caddia, vicedirettore della Keats-Shelley House e Alessandro Luparini, direttore della Fondazione Casa Oriani di Ravenna.

Per ulteriori informazioni vi rimandiamo alla pagina dedicata sul sito del Gabinetto Scientifico Letterario Vieusseux: https://bit.ly/3UvgAHh

F***y Brawne, John Keats's muse and fiancée, died  in 1865. After the poet's death on 23rd February 1821, she cut off he...
04/12/2022

F***y Brawne, John Keats's muse and fiancée, died in 1865.

After the poet's death on 23rd February 1821, she cut off her long hair and went immediately into a deep widow's mourning, which continued for several years.
She remained unknown to the public until 1878, when thirty-seven letters from Keats to her were published. Sadly, nothing remains of the letters she had written to Keats.

We'd like to commemorate her through the words of a celebrated sonnet that Keats dedicated to her:

Bright Star, would I were stedfast as thou art—
Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night,
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
Of pure ablution round earth's human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen masque
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors—
No—yet still stedfast, still unchangeable
Pillow'd upon my fair love's ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft swell and fall,
Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever—or else swoon to death—


Images:
- Scene from the film 'Bright Star'
- Replica of F***y Brawne's engagement ring: https://bit.ly/3OXm5x7

02/12/2022
'Written in Water - Keats's final voyage,' book launch with Alessandro Gallenzi

On 31 October 2022, we celebrated the anniversary of John Keats's birthday together with Alessandro Gallenzi, author of 'Written in Water,' a thrilling new biography on Keats, that for the first time provides a comprehensive account of the last five months of his life, from his voyage to Italy to his untimely death at Piazza di Spagna.

Christmas is around the corner!We'd like to remind our visitors and followers that our gift shop is open for Christmas s...
28/11/2022

Christmas is around the corner!

We'd like to remind our visitors and followers that our gift shop is open for Christmas shopping, Monday through Saturday, until 23 December. If you're in Rome, call in and browse our shop, and if you cannot reach us at 26, Piazza di Spagna, please take a look at our online shop, with a wide range of exclusive books, jewellery and bespoke merchandise, inspired by the Romantic poets who lived in Italy.

https://ksh.roma.it/shop

We would like to inform our visitors and friends that on Monday, November 28, there will be a conference, Shelley in Ita...
25/11/2022

We would like to inform our visitors and friends that on Monday, November 28, there will be a conference, Shelley in Italia, at the Nina Vinchi Cloister of Il Piccolo in Milan, as part of the bicentennial celebration of Percy Bysshe Shelley's death.

Participants will include Lilla Maria Crisafulli, founder and honorary president of the Inter-University Center for Romantic Studies at the University of Bologna; Francesco Rognoni, professor of American Literature at the Catholic University of the Sacred Heart in Milan; and Carla Sanguineti, president of the Friends of Mary Shelley Association, with readings by Giuseppe Scutellà and Lisa Mazoni, edited by English Theatre Milan. Maggie Rose, professor of English Theatre History at the University of Milan and playwright, will moderate.

Learn more and reserve your spot at Il Piccolo.

On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, we would like to share with you ...
25/11/2022

On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, we would like to share with you this quote from writer Mary Wollstonecraft, an early advocate of women's rights and equality and the mother of Mary Shelley:

"I love man as my fellow; but his scepter, real, or usurped, extends not to me, unless the reason of an individual demands my homage; and even then the submission is to reason, and not to man."

 in 1817 John Keats wrote to his friend Benjamin Bailey:…O! I wish I was as certain of the end of all your troubles as t...
22/11/2022



in 1817 John Keats wrote to his friend Benjamin Bailey:

…O! I wish I was as certain of the end of all your troubles as that of your momentary start about the authenticity of the Imagination. I am certain of nothing but of the holiness of the Heart's affections, and the truth of Imagination. What the Imagination seizes as Beauty must be truth — whether it existed before or not, — for I have the same idea of all our passions as of Love: they are all, in their sublime, creative of essential Beauty. …The Imagination may be compared to Adam's dream, — he awoke and found it truth: — I am more zealous in this affair, because I have never yet been able to perceive how anything can be known for truth by consecutive reasoning — and yet it must be. Can it be that even the greatest Philosopher ever arrived at his Goal without putting aside numerous objections? However it may be, for a life of Sensations rather than of Thoughts! It is "a Vision in the form of Youth," a shadow of reality to come — And this consideration has further convinced me, — for it has come as auxiliary to another favourite speculation of mine, — that we shall enjoy ourselves hereafter by having what we called happiness on Earth repeated in a finer tone — And yet such a fate can only befall those who delight in Sensation, rather than hunger as you do after Truth. Adam's dream will do here, and seems to be a Conviction that Imagination and its empyreal reflection, is the same as human life and its spiritual repetition. But, as I was saying, the Simple imaginative Mind may have its rewards in the repetition of its own silent Working coming continually on the Spirit with a fine Suddenness — to compare great things with small, have you never by being surprised with an old Melody, in a delicious place by a delicious voice, felt over again your very speculations and surmises at the time it first operated on your soul? — do you not remember forming to yourself the Singer's face — more beautiful than it was possible, and yet with the elevation of the Moment you did not think so? Even then you were mounted on the Wings of Imagination, so high that the prototype must be hereafter — that delicious face you will see. What a time! I am continually running away from the subject. Sure this cannot be exactly the Case with a complex mind — one that is imaginative, and at the same time careful of its fruits, — who would exist partly on Sensation, partly on thought — to whom it is necessary that years should bring the philosophic Mind? Such a one I consider yours, and therefore it is necessary to your eternal happiness that you not only drink this old Wine of Heaven, which I shall call the redigestion of our most ethereal Musings upon Earth, but also increase in knowledge and know all things.

 in 1820 Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote to his friend Thomas Love Peacock that John Keats's 'Hyperion' was an astonishing pi...
08/11/2022



in 1820 Percy Bysshe Shelley wrote to his friend Thomas Love Peacock that John Keats's 'Hyperion' was an astonishing piece of writing:

'Among the modern things which have reached me is a volume of poems by Keats; in other respects insignificant enough, but containing the fragment of a poem called “Hyperion.” I dare say you have not time to read it; but it is certainly an astonishing piece of writing, and gives me a conception of Keats which I confess I had not before.'

Today we are celebrating the 227th birthday of John Keats, who was born  in 1795.Don't miss our virtual event with Aless...
31/10/2022

Today we are celebrating the 227th birthday of John Keats, who was born in 1795.

Don't miss our virtual event with Alessandro Gallenzi author of Written in Water, today 31 October, at 5pm EST: https://bit.ly/3WgG25q

227 years ago, on October 31, 1795, John Keats was born! To celebrate, Harvard University Press is publishing the much a...
29/10/2022
A Greeting of the Spirit — Susan J. Wolfson

227 years ago, on October 31, 1795, John Keats was born! To celebrate, Harvard University Press is publishing the much anticipated: A Greeting of the Spirit, by Susan J. Wolfson, a renowned Keats scholar who illuminates the poet’s extraordinary career, in this new edition featuring seventy-eight verse selections with commentary.

Find out more here: https://bit.ly/3Foj729

Renowned scholar Susan J. Wolfson assembles seventy-eight selections -- some beloved, others less well known -- that illuminate the brief, extraordinary career of John Keats. Lively commentaries showcase the poems' form, style, layers of meaning, and relevant contexts, offering a chronicle of Keats'...

   in 1820 John Keats wrote his last letter to Mrs. Brawne and the whole Brawne family, bidding goodbye to his fiancée F...
24/10/2022



in 1820 John Keats wrote his last letter to Mrs. Brawne and the whole Brawne family, bidding goodbye to his fiancée F***y:

... Give my Love to F***y and tell her, if I were well there is enough in this Port of Naples to fill a quire of Paper — but it looks like a dream — every man who can row his boat and walk and talk seems a different being from myself. I do not feel in the world.... I dare not fix my Mind upon F***y, I have not dared to think of her. The only comfort I have had that way has been in thinking for hours together of having the knife she gave me put in a silver-case — the hair in a Locket — and the Pocket Book in a gold net. Show her this. I dare say no more. Yet you must not believe I am so ill as this Letter may look, for if ever there was a person born without the faculty of hoping I am he. Severn is writing to Haslam, and I have just asked him to request Haslam to send you his account of my health. O what an account I could give you of the Bay of Naples if I could once more feel myself a Citizen of this world — I feel a spirit in my Brain would lay it forth pleasantly — O what a misery it is to have an intellect in splints! My Love again to F***y...

My dear Mrs. Brawne, yours sincerely and affectionate
JOHN KEATS.
Good bye F***y! God bless you.

 in October 1820, John Keats and Joseph Severn finally reached the bay of Naples, after a long voyage aboard a schooner,...
22/10/2022

in October 1820, John Keats and Joseph Severn finally reached the bay of Naples, after a long voyage aboard a schooner, the Maria Crowther, which had lasted more than a month. Unfortunately, Keats and Severn were forced to remain aboard the schooner in quarantine for another ten days due to a typhus outbreak in London, the city from which they had departed.
From the deck of the ship, Joseph Severn wrote a letter to William Haslam describing Keats's difficult voyage:

My dear Haslam
Here we are thank God – but in quarentine – therefore accordingly – Close upon when I wrote you Keats began to droop – and the many privations coming in the want of fair winds – nice provisions – airing of beds – and – made him impatient – this brings on fever – and at times he has been very bad – but mind you I think from these things – for our passage has been most horribly rough – Keats has lived th[r]ough it – but it is a wonder – no way could be worse for him – I had determined on returning with him to London from the conviction that he would die on the passage – and should – but from the English Channel (in which we were groaning for a fortnight) the difficulties seem’d to decrease – we skipp’d the rest in 3 Weeks – though quick yet not well – in the Straits of Gibralter I perceived great changes in Keats for the better – he seem’d recovering – at least looked like it – but in two days the blood came from his stomach and with fever at night and violent perspiration all this had its cause in – but heres our courrier – this is only an opportunity–

farewell Sincerely
Joseph Severn

Keats now is in a doubtful state – I cannot guess what this climate will do –

 in 1822 Mary Shelley wrote in her journal that Lord Byron's voice, 'a peculiar one', evoked past memories of the time s...
19/10/2022

in 1822 Mary Shelley wrote in her journal that Lord Byron's voice, 'a peculiar one', evoked past memories of the time she and P.B. Shelley spent at Villa Diodati, Byron's residence in Geneva. Since when they were there Mary had silently listened to numerous conversations that Byron and Shelley had at that time, Byron's voice would be forever associated in her mind with that of Shelley, so that later on whenever she heard Byron talk she expected to hear back the sound of her husband's voice:

I do not think that any person's voice has the same power of awakening melancholy in me as Albe's [Lord Byron] — I have been accustomed when hearing it to listen & to speak little; — another voice, not mine, ever replied, a voice whose strings are broken; when Albe ceases to speak I expect to hear that other voice, & when I hear another instead, it jars strangely with every association. I have seen so little of Albe since our residence in Switzerland, & having seen him there every day his voice, a peculiar one, is engraved on my memory with other sounds and objects from which it can never disunite itself. I have heard Hunt in company & conversation with many, when my own One was not there, Trelawny is perhaps more associated in my mind with Edward than with Shelley — Even our older friends Peacock & Hogg might talk together & or with others & their voices would suggest no change to me. But since incapacity & timidity always prevented my mingling in the nightly conversations of Diodati – they were as it were entirely tête-a-tête between my Shelley & Albe & thus as I have said – when Albe speaks & Shelley does not answer, it is as thunder without rain, The form of the sun without heat or light, as any familiar object might be shorn of its dearest & best attribute — & I listen with an unspeakable melancholy — that yet is not all pain. —
The above explains that which would otherwise be an enigma, why Albe has the power by his mere presence & voice of exciting such deep & shifting emotions within me. For my feelings have no analogy either with my opinion of him, or the subject of his conversation — With another I might talk (as I have talked when he was here) & not for the moment think of Shelley, at least not think of him with the same vividness as if I were alone — But when in company with Albe, I can never cease for a second to have him (Shelly) in my heart & brain with a clearness that mocks reality, interfering even by its force with the functions of life — until if tears do not relieve me, the hysterical feeling, analagous to that which the murmur of sea gives me, presses painfully upon me.
Well for the first time for about a month I have been in company with Albe for two hours, & coming home I write this, so necessary is it for me to express in words the force of my feelings. — Shelley, beloved! I look at the stars & at all nature & it speaks to me of you in the clearest accents — Why cannot you answer me, my own one? Is the instrument so utterly destroyed? I would endure ages of pain to hear one tone of your voice strike on my ear. How lost I am!

To all our followers in Rome, All Saints' Anglican Church, Rome is hosting a special event to commemorate the 200th anni...
18/10/2022

To all our followers in Rome, All Saints' Anglican Church, Rome is hosting a special event to commemorate the 200th anniversary of Shelley's death. There will be musical settings of his poems by a variety of composers interspersed with readings by Marzia Da Fabbro. The songs will be performed by Rome's English-speaking chamber choir The New Chamber Singers, soloists Rhonda AbouHana, Helen Raiswell, and Chris Phillips and The Campion Quartet. The conductor is Phillip Jennings and accompanying on the piano will be Joseph Draycott.
The event takes place at 18.00 on Sunday October 23rd and entrance is free: all are welcome!

Today, 17th October, at 6pm GMT (7pm CEST), the poet and biographer Fiona Sampson reveals the winners of 2022's Keats-Sh...
17/10/2022
2022 Keats-Shelley Prize - Video announcement

Today, 17th October, at 6pm GMT (7pm CEST), the poet and biographer Fiona Sampson reveals the winners of 2022's Keats-Shelley & Young Romantics Writing Prizes.

Watch the video here:
https://youtu.be/Z9igWnCoBPo

Read the shortlisted Essays & Poems at the Keats-Shelley Prize website, where you can also stream video of Fiona’s announcement:

https://bit.ly/YRPrizes22

https://bit.ly/KSPrize22

Sir Ivor Roberts, Chairman of the Keats-Shelley Memorial Association, introduces the online awards: https://bit.ly/KSAwards2022

Fiona Sampson announces the winners of 2022’s Keats-Shelley and Young Romantics Writing Prizes. The video premieres at 6pm (GMT), 17th October 2022.Read 2022...

 in 1822 Mary Shelley wrote in her journal about finally receiving her desk which had requested to her friend Maria Gisb...
07/10/2022

in 1822 Mary Shelley wrote in her journal about finally receiving her desk which had requested to her friend Maria Gisborne. The desk is presumably the same one which now belongs to our collection, the same that was generously donated to us by Lord Abinger, a noted Shelley descendant.
(https://bit.ly/3rAsLqV)

Read the Mary Shelley's journal's entry here:

I have received my desk today & have been reading my letters to mine own Shelley during his absences at Marlow. What a scene to recur to! My William, Clara, Allegra are all talked of — They lived then — They breathed this air & their voices struck on my sense, their feet trod the earth beside me — & their hands were warm with blood & life when clasped in mine. Where are they all? This is too great an agony to be written about. I may express my despair but my thoughts can find no words — Where are ye all?

——————––—'Tis falsely said
That there was ever in*******se
Between the living and they dead!

But they live — Tell me truth. Beloved, where are you? And when shall I join you? They are all gone & I live — if it be life to be as I am. But it is not - I am in the valley of the shadow of death & soon shall be a clod.
That diamond cross! given as the pledge of his safety — now a memorial of his loss. But I cannot write — I dare not think. Despair is in my heart — when, oh when shall I die? —

Indirizzo

Piazza Di Spagna, 26
Rome
00187

Metro line A to SPAGNA or buses to Via del Tritone or Piazza San Silvestro

Orario di apertura

Lunedì 10:00 - 13:00
14:00 - 18:00
Martedì 10:00 - 13:00
14:00 - 18:00
Mercoledì 10:00 - 13:00
14:00 - 18:00
Giovedì 10:00 - 13:00
14:00 - 18:00
Venerdì 10:00 - 13:00
14:00 - 18:00
Sabato 10:00 - 13:00
14:00 - 18:00

Telefono

+39 06 678 4235

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Discover Rome’s hidden Romantic secret

Situated at the right foot of the Spanish Steps, just a few steps away from Spagna metro station, the Keats-Shelley House is a museum dedicated to the English Romantic poets, who were spellbound by the Eternal City.

26 Piazza di Spagna is most famous for being the final dwelling place of John Keats, who died here in 1821, aged just 25, and to this day Keats’s bedroom is preserved as a shrine to his tragic story and extraordinary talent.

Displayed through a chain of beautiful rooms, the collection contains a great many treasures and curiosities associated with the lives and works of the Romantic poets, as well as one of the finest libraries of Romantic literature in the world; now numbering more than 8,000 volumes.


Altro Museo di storia Rome

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Commenti

Museo bellissimo situato in una splendida cornice. Si avverte la sensazione che lo spirito di Keats aleggi tuttora nelle stanze. Visita che consiglio vivamente associandola magari alla visita del cimitero acattolico dove il poeta riposa. Sono i posti di Roma in cui si respira quell'atmosfera "british " che tanto amo
Ho un fantastico ricordo di questo sito culturale,visitato in giovane età, con la gita scolastica,ritornerò sicuramente !
I walk up the stairs, give the girl my three Euros. I look at the sketch Elizabeth Browning did of Shelley. In the bedroom I look out the window to the view of the Spanish Steps. I hear a horse carriage pass by, and people who come and go from the Lord Byron Tea House, talking of Michelangelo. House. I look for stains of Keats' phlegm on the wall paper. I turn around. I'm startled by someone wearing in a Frankenstein mask.
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