Middlesex Yeomanry Association

Middlesex Yeomanry Association Middlesex Yeomanry Association In March 1797 Citizens of Uxbridge decided to form a Military Association. Another Troop was added by 1798. (For Hearth and Home).
(2)

Its aims were clear – a quasi – Military Police to keep the internal defence of the neighbourhood in case of insurrection or violent breach of the peace: in aid of the Civil Powers or in case of invasion. This would permit the regular forces to act more effectively on the coasts. London and nearby areas were a long way short of their proper quota of mounted men so only a Cavalry Troop was accepted

. Sir Christopher Baynes formed the Troop and by May it had agreed to become Yeomanry Cavalry with increased responsibilities in case of invasion by the ‘Rascal Bonaparte’. The ‘Peace of 1801’ brought disbandment and whilst other Yeomanry units were raised in Middlesex the Uxbridge Yeoman ‘slumbered on’ until 1830 when the country was drifting into anarchy. Two troops – 1st Harefield and 2nd West Drayton were raised on December 10th 1830, which is the correct date of the Units formation. Captain Newdegate was the first Commanding Officer. The Arms of Middlesex was adopted for a badge and the motto PRO ARIS ET FOCIS. They were established as Dragroons. Throughout the 19th Century the Regiment was often required to perform es**rt duty to the Sovereign and the royal family. The first occasion was King William IV in 1834 travelling through Uxbridge to visit the Marquess of Westminster at moor Park. The Regiment was frequently called upon to es**rt Queen Victoria through Middlesex on her way to Windsor, and on reaching the County Boundary would hand over to a detachment of the Royal Horse Guards to es**rt her to the castle. In 1843 a mounted band was formed, eventually a drill hall purchased and a rifle range at Runnymede. Royal Escorts, race meetings and general training were the usual ‘round’ until the Boer War. The unit grew – a third London Troop was added and in 1871 a fourth – West Middlesex. Whilst the title changed to Middlesex Yeomanry Cavalry (Uxbridge) and they became Hussars since Light Dragoons no longer existed in the Regular Army Lists. By 1879 Uxbridge joined West Middlesex Troops to form a County Troop; two Troops were allotted to London and a new Troop was formed in Brighton and Sussex. In I884, the Queen designated the Middlesex (Duke of Cambridge’s Hussars) Yeomanry Cavalry. In 1885 the unit was posted as no 27 in precedence of Yeomanry when the war Office bungled the new list. January 1900 saw the formation of No 34 Company of the 11th Battalion Yeomanry for service in the Boer War; followed by two more Companies – the 35th and 62nd. Sgt Major Roller was recommended for the VC for his conduct at Senekal by the General, but declined to give evidence as ‘he was only doing his duty’. The General therefor commissioned him instead. Over 25 troopers were eventually commissioned. The Companies fought well, but lost more to disease than the enemy. After the war the title changed to Imperial Yeomanry and khaki was worn on all parades. In 1908 the Regiment joined the Territorials and changed it title to 1st County of London Yeomanry, Middlesex (Duke of Cambridge’s Hussars). Recruiting was in London only. They joined the London Mounted Brigade. In 1914 the regiment mobilised and went to the East Coast for anti-invasion duties before moving to Egypt in early 1915. They fought at Sulva in the Gallipoli campaign before going to Macedonia to fight the Bulgarians. By 1917 they were part of the Desert Mounted Corps and fought in Sinai and up to Palestine. On the 27th October the regiment made its famous stand against the Turks, defending the rail head at Karm. Casualties were heavy and awards reflected this and the courage displayed. Major A.M. Lafone won the VC. Later Lt. Col. Watson won the VC in France, commanding an infantry Battalion. The Middlesex Hussars took part in the capture of Jerusalem and the final surrender of the Turks. On the 20th May 1920 the role of Cavalry Signals was accepted and the 2nd Cavalry Divisional Signal Regiment (Middlesex Yeomanry) formed and was integrated with the newly formed Royal Corps of Signals in June of that year. The regiment kept its old badge, motto and uniform, including the ancient tradition of NCO’s wearing a crown above their stripes. The shoulder title worn by the men changed to ‘Royal Corps of Signals’ with the concession of a ‘Y’ above it. In 1938, the Regiment became Mobile Divisional Signals and in 1939 formed a second Regiment. The 1st Cavalry Divisional Signals (Middlesex Yeomanry) went to Palestine and served in Syria, Iraq, Crete and Tobruk. On mechanisation, Squadrons were formed as Signals for 10th Armoured Division and the Squadron with 9th Armoured Brigade fought at El Alamein and the Western Desert before serving in Italy. The 2nd Armoured Divisional Signals (Middlesex Yeomanry) served in the Western Desert and Greece. Signal Detachments were provided for Special Forces including SAS, SBS and Commando. Others served in clandestine situations in Yugoslavia and Crete. No.4 Squadron (Middlesex Yeomanry) served with 22nd Armoured Brigade, which in September 1942 became part of 7th Armoured Division (The Desert Rats) under the command of General Montgomery’s 8th Army. They saw action at Caen, Villers Bocage, Falaise, Ghent, Eindhoven, Nimegan and then across the Rhine into Germany, the surrender of Hamburg and the end of war in May 1945. In 1947 the Middlesex Hussars became 16th Airborne Divisional Signals, wearing the ‘red beret’ and Yeomanry cap badge. Later they became the 40th Signal Regiment with a ‘phantom’ special role and a Troop with Airborne TA forces. In 1961 they were amalgamated with 47 (London) Signal Regiment, adopting the title 47 (Middlesex Yeomanry) Signal Regiment with Yeomanry cap badge, collar dogs, Royal Signals shoulder titles and 47th London Corps ‘Flash’. The new Regiment wag given the role SHAPE (Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe) Troops. When the Territorial Army Volunteer Reserve (TAVR) was formed in 1967 the Middlesex Yeomanry retained its title, but like so many other Yeomanry Regiments was reduced to Squadron establishment becoming 47 (Middlesex Yeomanry) Signal Squadron (V) and became part of 31st Signal Regiment (V). In 1995 moved from Harrow and returned to its roots at Uxbridge and became part of 39th (Skinners) Signal Regiment (V) with the role of 2 Brigades Command and Control Squadron. In 2006 the Sqn transferred to 71 (Yeomanry) Signals Regiment

In 2014 the Sqn was amalgamate to become 31 (Middlesex Yeomanry and Princes Louise’s Kensington) Signals Squadron



The Squadron today continues the ancient customs of NCO’s wearing a crown above their stripes and SSgt’s wearing 4 stripes and a crown. BATTLE HONOURS
South Africa
1900-1901

The Great War
1914-1918

Macedonia Nebi Samwil
Gallipoli Damascus
El Mughar Scimitar Hill
Sharon Gaza
Suvla Megiddo
Egypt Palestine

Middlesex Yeomanry Concert Band on Sunday, 15th October The Autumn Concert to be given by the Middlesex Yeomanry Concert...
11/09/2023

Middlesex Yeomanry Concert Band on Sunday, 15th October


The Autumn Concert to be given by the Middlesex Yeomanry Concert Band on Sunday, 15th October will be held in St.James's Church, Hampton Hill, TW12 1DQ at 3.00pm. Once again profits will go to the Shooting Star Children's Hospices.

Music from both sides of the Atlantic includes von Suppé's Light Cavalry, the theme from Ladies in Lavender, a selection of Gershwin melodies and much more

Tickets are £15 or £12.50 if reserved in advance and include programme, tea and homemade cakes.

Dear fellow Yeoman, I know it is a little way off before the next Newsletter but we have recently been sent a couple of ...
21/07/2023

Dear fellow Yeoman,



I know it is a little way off before the next Newsletter but we have recently been sent a couple of notices from The Royal Signals Association that some Members might be interested in.



CORPS SERVICE OF REMEMBERANCE AT THE NATIONAL MENORIAL ARBORETUM _ 2 SEPTEMBER 2023



ITINERARY

0900hrs Hosts and those requiring changing facilities will be granted access to the site.

0915hrs RSA members and other attendees arrive at the Remembrance Centre.

0925hrs All Hosts and VIPs in place at the NMA hospitality centre (Aspects Building) to welcome our guests.

0930hrs Guests of the Corps arrive and are es**rted to the Aspects building.

1020hrs Band move the Corps Memorial. Piper and standard bearers form up outside the Aspects building.

1025hrs All attending move with the piper and standards to the Corps Memorial. The walking route will be marked by guides; transport will be available for those who need it.

1035hrs VIPs and Guests of the Corps start to move from the Aspects building to the Corps Memorial.

1050hrs Everyone seated at the Corps Memorial.

1055hrs Service of Remembrance begins.

1115hrs Wreath laying:

Chair RSA
Guests of the Corps
RSA Branches / Affiliations

1130hrs Service concludes, VIPs and guests followed by all

those attending make their way back to the Aspects building.

1145 - 1300hrs Refreshments in the Aspects building.

1300hrs Following the service there is the opportunity for all those attending to visit any of the other memorials including the NMA Main Memorial, Bastion Wall, Afghanistan Wall, Heroes Square, etc.

If you are interested in attending, and for details of other RSA events, please follow this link:



https://online.royalsignals.org/Events

You will need to create an account to book if you haven’t already.



KOREA


I am not sure if we have any Members with experience of the Korean campaign, but ahead of the 70th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice on July 27 1953, bringing fighting in the Korean War to an end, DDC is seeking the following case studies from across the single Services:



Priority: Serving member of your service who has a still-alive relative/descendant who served in the Korean War. Both would need to be willing to be interviewed and photographed by The Sun newspaper (who have made this specific request) and DDC for coverage to mark the anniversary.


Serving member of your service who had a relative/descendent who served in the Korean War but is no longer alive. Would need to be able to share reflections/stories/experiences passed down to them and be willing to be interviewed and likely filmed by DDC.


Serving member of your service of Korean heritage who can either share reflections/stories/experience passed down to them or experiences as a Korean-Brit in the Armed Forces with DDC.


If you do fall into the above then please contact:

Gerry Waters Media Officer
Army Media Office South
International, Communications & Engagement
Email: [email protected]|

To find out more about each event or to book online please click on the 'Book Now' button, highlighted event title or calendar date(s) below.

21/12/2022

To my fellow Yeomen and friends,

Christmas is a time of reflection, and as I reflect on the past 12 months I cannot help but feel that we are returning to some form of normality; living with Covid, as we do with so many other illnesses and diseases.

This year we saw the Association actively re-engaging with our cavalry cousins at the Cavalry Memorial Parade in May. We went to France to visit Villers-Bocage for a memorable battlefield tour in June, and in October we had one of the best attended Lafone Day events for a number of years, reinforced by a welcome contingent from the serving Squadron

It was great to see so many familiar and new faces at these events, but as the Last Post sounded in the Crypt of St Paul’s I recalled that we had also lost many of the Regiment’s and Association’s characters in recent years.

We are already making plans for 2023 so watch out for the Newsletter for more information. Hopefully we will be able to plan more activities that are ‘in person’ than has been possible recently. This is important as it is starting to be more noticeable that many Associations are struggling due to aging membership and the dilution of the Regimental system in our Regular and Reserve Forces.

We are luckier than most but I do feel more than ever that the esprit de corps that comes from service, and the family bond that we all share, is slowly being lost across society generally. However with the challenges of life today, the camaraderie, support and ‘belonging’ that we can offer is perhaps more important than ever before; whether you are the most junior serving soldier or the oldest veteran.

We have sought to make our Association one for its members, not its elite. It would be great to see more people involved in events, joining the committee and making suggestions as to how we can serve and support each other better. If you would like to help or become more engaged then please do get in touch and similarly, if you have any ideas for events or activities then also do so too.

May I on behalf of the whole committee wish you and your families a very happy Christmas and New Year. Stay safe and stay warm!

Oliver Cyril Spencer WatsonOliver Cyril Spencer Watson was born on 7 September 1876 to Georgine Mary Jane Mair Watson an...
16/12/2022

Oliver Cyril Spencer Watson

Oliver Cyril Spencer Watson was born on 7 September 1876 to Georgine Mary Jane Mair Watson and William Spencer Watson, F.R.C.S. His mother died two years later, age 36. At the time of the 1881 census, his father is described as a widower living at 7 Henrietta Street, Marylebone, and at four years of age, Oliver is the youngest of eight children – John, Emma, George, Georgina, Mary, Alice and Spencer. At this time, his father was a surgeon and oculist and in the 1891 census he is described as a ‘surgeon practising as a dentist’. In 1901 his father (a surgeon, age 65) is listed as a patient at a nursing home at 29 Devonshire Street, Marylebone and a death for someone of the same name, age 70, is registered in 1906 in Kensington.

Oliver attended St Paul’s School, West Kensington and Sandhurst Royal Military College [HAU record states: honours 1896, Passed (a) (b) (c) (d) & (g) for promotion. Dis in Musketry], the start of a long an distinguished military career. From 1897 he served in the Tirah Campaign with the 19th Bn. Yorkshire Regiment, and he also served in China during the Boxer rebellion.

There are several other references to Lieutenant Colonel Watson and the details of his military service online.

On leaving the army, he enrolled on the Harper Adams Diploma course on 29 September 1904 as a relatively mature student, aged 29 years and is mentioned in the Mercer student diary for autumn 1905 [HA Archives]. He passed the College Diploma first part with Distinction in 1905 and also the Final NDA but officially left on 4 April 1906 as he could not afford to complete the course. Another source reports that from 1904 he worked for Sir Charles Henry MP as his estate manager at Parkwood and Crazies Hill, so his employment and studies may have run concurrently.

https://www.british**pire.co.uk/forces/yorkshireregimentspencerwatson.htm

He continued his military career on the Reserve of Regular Officers and joined the Middlesex Yeomanry in 1909, seeing active service at Gallipoli in 1915 and joining the 5th Battalion King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry in 1916.

He died on 28 March 1918, age 41 at Rossignol Wood, France, and was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

Victoria Cross Citation, from "The London Gazette," 18th May, 1918

"For most conspicuous bravery, self-sacrificing devotion to duty, and exceptionally gallant leading during a critical period of operations. His command was at a point where continual attacks were made by the enemy in order to pierce the line, and an intricate system of old trenches in front, coupled with the fact that his position was under constant rifle and machine-gun fire, rendered the situation still more dangerous. A counter-attack had been made against the enemy position, which at first achieved its object, but as they were holding out in two improvised strong points, Lt. Col. Watson saw that immediate action was necessary, and he led his remaining small reserve to the attack, organising bombing parties and leading attacks under intense rifle and machine-gun fire. Outnumbered, he finally ordered his men to retire, remaining himself in a communication trench to cover the retirement, though he faced almost certain death by so doing. The assault he led was at a critical moment, and without doubt saved the line. Both in the assault and in covering his men's retirement, he held his life as nothing, and his splendid bravery inspired all troops in the vicinity to rise to the occasion and save a breach being made in a hardly tried and attenuated line. Lt. Col. Watson was killed while covering the withdrawal."

https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/776250/watson,-oliver-cyril-spencer/

He is remembered with honour at the Arras Memorial (Bay 1).



The Arras Memorial commemorates nearly 35,000 soldiers of the British, South African and New Zealand forces with no known grave

https://www.cwgc.org/find/find-cemeteries-and-memorials/82700/arras-memorial

Arras Memorial | Cemetery Details | CWGC

12/11/2022

HISTORY OF THE MIDDLESEX YEOMANRY BAND

Our own regiment was raised in 1797 as the Uxbridge Yeomanry Cavalry and in due course acquired a brass band.

In 1908 on the formation of the Territorial Force the Regiment they became the 1st County of London Yeomanry (Middlesex Yeomanry). War time put the breaks on the band and after the Great War and with the formation of the Royal Corps of Signals in 1920 the Regiment lost its cavalry role and became a Signals Division.

Following WWII there were more changes and by the 1960s the Middlesex Yeomanry had amalgamated with the 47 London Signal Regiment. The band grew quickly in numbers taking on major roles in public duties and in films. In 1967 the Territorial Army was reformed,the two Regiments were reduced to Squadron strength and in 1968 the MOD ordered that the band be disbanded completely.

A former Major, now retired Lt.Col Bill Williams, who had worked so hard to recreate the band in 1960 was determined to keep the band in existence. He obtained permission for the MoD to keep the band with their uniforms and badges of rank. “Col Bill” as he was known supported the band until his death in 1999 but after that it proved not viable for the Squadron to support the band financially.

Regular quarterly concerts with our full band held in the beautiful St James's Church in Hampton, Middlesex
Our next Sunday afternoon concert is on Sunday 4th December 2022
Location: St James's Church
Time: 3pm - 5pm
Entrance Fee: £15

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Colonel Bickersteth, Middlesex Yeomanry, 1895Glass negative, W Gregory and Company, London, 1895This image comes from a ...
12/11/2022

Colonel Bickersteth, Middlesex Yeomanry, 1895

Glass negative, W Gregory and Company, London, 1895

This image comes from a collection of glass plate negatives associated with William Gregory and Company. The negatives depict the British Army, including some members of the colonial forces, 'at home' in Britain during the 1890s.

As well as being intimate portraits of soldiers from this era, the images provide detailed illustrations of uniforms worn during the high point of military tailoring.

The full dress uniform of the Middlesex Yeomanry in the late nineteenth century was based on Hussars uniforms. Col. Bickersteth wears a tunic made of green cloth with black facings on the collar and cuffs. It is highly decorated with gold looping cord, braiding, and lace. Plaited gold shoulder cords have rank insignia on them. He has a gold pouch belt with ornaments.

The full dress cap (busby) was also inspired by Hungarian uniforms and is made of black fur. The caplines are gold and the bag lace dark green, with a tall plume which is green over scarlet. He wears green pantaloons with a double stripe of gold lace down the outside seam, tucked into black riding boots with spurs attached. His sword, upon which he rests his hands, is attached to the slings of his sword belt, and a black sabretache can also be seen hanging behind him.

One of a collection of 280 glass negatives, associated with W. Gregory and Company, London, and F G O Stuart, 1892 -1900.

21/10/2022

41436 Pte Walter R S Wybrow 13/10/17
260648 Pte Sydney Ashley 27/10/17
260293 LCpl William Baker 27/10/17
260032 Sjt Clifford George Bullen 27/10/17
260520 Pte William George Cain 27/10/17
260894 LCpl Eustace Gordon Cossins 27/10/17
110621 Pte Stanley Harry Davies 27/10/17
260789 Pte Edward William Dodd 27/10/17
261356 Cpl Frederick James Frampton 27/10/17
260121 LCpl Sydney James Hollies 27/10/17
260683 Pte Ernest Eli Hudson 27/10/17
260019 Lsjt Albert Edward Johnston 27/10/17
Maj Alexander Malins Lafone 27/10/17
230822 Pte Harry Legg 27/10/17
260091 Pte Ernest Harold Luker 27/10/17
260211 LCpl Arthur Frederick Milner 27/10/17
260384 Lsjt Otto Opferman 27/10/17
260733 Pte William Herman Alfred Seidel 27/10/17
260733 Tpr William Herbert Spencer 27/10/17
Capt Seymour Van Den Bergh 27/10/17
260296 LCpl Vivian Cliff Latham 29/10/17

20/10/2022

Major Alexander Malins Lafone, VC (19 August 1870 – 27 October 1917)

Background
Alexander Malins Lafone was born in Liverpool in 1870. He was educated at Dulwich College and later studied Electrical Engineering in London.

In December 1899 he joined the 49th (Montgomeryshire) Imperial Yeomanry and in 1900 served in the South African War as a Sergeant. During operations in the Transvaal he was wounded in the right eye. He received the Queen’s South Africa Medal and three bars and was invalided home in December 1900.
In April 1901 Lafone was awarded a Commission in the Hertfordshire Imperial Yeomanry and four months later transferred to the Middlesex Yeomanry. At the outbreak of the First World War Lafone was Commanding B Squadron of the Middlesex Yeomanry.

In April 1915 he embarked for Alexandria and after a short period on the Suez Canal he left for Gallipoli with his Regiment. In November 1915 the Middlesex Yeomanry returned to Egypt and from March to September 1916 Lafone led a number of short but sometimes difficult expeditions into the Sinai Desert .

In October 1917 the Middlesex Yeomanry were a part of General Allenby’s Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) that was to advance through Palestine towards Jerusalem. At dusk on 26th October the Regiment took up positions holding trenches near the El Buqqar Ridge between Gaza and Beersheba. At dawn on the 27th October the Regiment came under heavy attack from an overwhelmingly superior Turkish force. Unable to communicate effectively with Regimental Headquarters, B Squadron held its position until mid-morning when “the situation became hopeless and its position was overrun. Fighting-and encouraging his men to the end-regardless of personal danger Major Lafone was killed at around 11.15am and was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross.

Victoria Cross
His citation from the London Gazette readS
Maj. Alexander Malins Lafone, late Yeo. For most conspicuous bravery, leadership and self-sacrifice when holding a position for over seven hours against vastly superior enemy forces. All this time the enemy were shelling his position heavily, making it very difficult to see. In one attack, when the enemy cavalry charged his flank, he drove them back with heavy losses. In another charge they left fifteen casualties within twenty yards of his trench, one man, who reached the trench, being bayoneted by Maj. Lafone himself. When all his men, with the exception of three, had been hit and the trench which he was holding was so full of wounded that it was difficult to move and fire, he ordered those who could walk to move to a trench slightly in the rear, and from his own position maintained a most heroic resistance. When finally surrounded and charged by the enemy, he stepped into the open and continued the fight until he was mortally wounded and fell unconscious. His cheerfulness and courage were a splendid inspiration to his men, and by his leadership and devotion he was enabled to maintain his position, which he had been ordered to hold at all costs.

01/10/2022

Forthcoming Events

Lafone Day, 22nd October 2022

The Association will hold its Lafone Day Memorial Service at 1100hrs on Saturday 22nd October at our Regimental Chapel, St Martin-within-Ludgate. Following the service there will be a wreath-laying ceremony in the crypt of St Paul’s Cathedral. Members of the Association will then make their way the short distance to HQ 68 (ICCY) Signal Squadron, Stone Buildings, Chancery Lane, where we will hold our annual reunion lunch. This will take the form of an informal buffet at no cost to members, with entertainment provided by a quartet from the Middlesex Yeomanry Concert Band. A cash bar will be available all afternoon.
We have been promised a strong turnout from the serving Squadron, for whom this will be their main collective Act of Remembrance in 2022. It would be very good if we also had a strong showing from the Association.

Middlesex Yeomanry Concert Band

The Autumn Concert is on Sunday 2nd October and the Christmas Concert on Sunday 4th December. Both will be held at St James’s Church in Hampton Hill. Please do your best to attend and support the Band.

30/09/2022

Please note that the newsletter is now out, Please contact me if you have not seen it yet

24/09/2022

Recommended for MM:

2591525 Dvr J Morris, Royal Signals

Driver John Morris MM, Middlesex Yeomanry, 2nd Armoured Division, The Royal Corps of Signals.

Awarded MM.
Morris was captured at El Mechili on 8 Apr 41 and was imprisoned at Capua amd Sulmona (Camp 78).

After the evacuation of Camp 78, Morris was amongst those recaptured by the Germans, but the same day he escaped again. Following 12 days spent in the hills, he moved to Pacentro with three other escapers. About three weeks later he travelled south with different companions, but all were recaptured on 20 Oct when they asked for food at a German-occupied house near Castrel Di Sangro. On 7 Nov 43, when being transferred by train from Sulmona, he and another P/W forced open a ventilator and jumped out near Greccio. Walking to Capistrello, they remained there until 21 Apr 44. Morris then travelled south with a S. African Sgt and British troops were met at Castel Di Sangro on 29 Apr 44.

Private Edward William DoddBIRTH unknownDEATH 27 Oct 1917BURIAL Beersheba War CemeteryBeersheba, Southern District, Isra...
22/06/2022

Private Edward William Dodd

BIRTH unknown
DEATH 27 Oct 1917
BURIAL Beersheba War Cemetery
Beersheba, Southern District, Israel Show Map
PLOT Q. 4.

First Name: Edward William
Initials: E W
Surname: Dodd
DOB: Circa 1879
Age: 38
Resided Town: Fulham
Nationality: British
Date of Death: 27/10/1917
Fate: Killed in Action
Information: Native of Essex. Served in the South African War.
Rank: Private
Service Number: 260789
Duty Location: Egypt
Service: British Army
Regiment: Middlesex Hussars
Battalion: 1st Sqdn
Commemorated: Britain

First Name: Edward W
Surname: Dodd
Regiments served with:
County of London Yeomanry Acting Corporal 4310
Corps of Hussars Acting Corporal 260789

Edward was born in 1881 in Danbury. The only Census record found for him is in 1911, when he was a postman, boarding at 10 Brookville Road, Fulham with Arthur Line, also a postman, and his wife and daughter.

His military history records that when he died he left his father, Samuel Dodd (1835) and sister Alice Kate Dodd (1864), both born in Danbury. Through this we can find that in 1871 Samuel was living in Dukes, Danbury with his first wife, Catherine, and their three children Herbert (1861), Alice (1864) and Edith (1869). Catherine died in November 1876. At the 1881 Census Samuel was living alone in Horn Row, Elm Green, but later that year he married Sarah Gundy, (1858) a dressmaker. The 1891 Census shows Samuel and Sarah in the Street, Danbury with Edward W Gundy, Sarah’s son, described as Samuel’s stepson; so it seems that at some time Edward began to use the name Dodd.

In January 1900 Edward enlisted in Colchester, to the 7th Hussars. He was described as a carpenter, 5’ 6 ¾” with a fresh complexion, dark brown eyes and hair. In December 1900 he was appointed Lance Corporal, and in May 1901 reverted to Private.
In November 1901 he transferred to South Africa where he served for four years. In April 1904 he extended his service to complete 8 years with the Colours and then in January 1908 he was transferred to the Army Reserve, as a Private.

In January 1912 he was discharged, having completed 12 years of service. He had been awarded the Queen’s South Africa Medal with clasps: (Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal) plus the South Africa 1901 and South Africa 1902 medals.

Edward enlisted for the First World War in Chelsea, date unknown, and was a Private with the Middlesex Yeomanry, 1st Squadron, service number 260789. He was killed in action in Palestine/Gaza on 27th October 1917, and is buried in Beersheba Cemetery, Grave Ref. Q 4.

Second Lieutenant Frederick Henry ReynellBIRTH unknownDEATH 23 Apr 1917BURIAL Aubigny Communal Cemetery ExtensionAubigny...
19/06/2022

Second Lieutenant Frederick Henry Reynell

BIRTH unknown
DEATH 23 Apr 1917
BURIAL Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension
Aubigny-en-Artois, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
PLOT VI. C. 12.

First Name: Frederick Henry
Initials: F H
Surname: Reynell
DOB: Circa 1892
Age: 25
Resided Town: Wallington, Surrey
Nationality: British
Date of Death: 23/04/1917
Fate: Killed in Action
Information: SON OF FREDERICK AND KATHARINE HASLER REYNELL, OF "THE RETREAT," SANDY LANE, WALLINGTON, SURREY.
Rank: Second Lieutenant
Service: British Army
Regiment: Royal Flying Corps
Battalion: 35th Squadron

First Name: Frederick H
Surname: Reynell
Regiments served with:
County of London Yeomanry Private 2047
Royal Flying Corps Second Lieutenant

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 A2709 was being utilised for a Line Patrol on 23rd April 1917

Its crew comprised:
Frederick Henry Reynell
Seymour Barne

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Left aerodrome 9.00, came down in spinning nose dive out of control; pilot and observer both killed”

A squadron report adds: “This machine was attacked by four hostile scouts and the pilot was shot in the head. The machine was too badly smashed to see if any attempt had been made to use the dual control and the observer too badly knocked about to see if he had been hit or not”

Captain Ritchie Pelham BullivantBIRTH 1884Bromley Common, London Borough of Bromley, Greater London, EnglandDEATH 24 Sep...
19/06/2022

Captain Ritchie Pelham Bullivant
BIRTH 1884
Bromley Common, London Borough of Bromley, Greater London, England
DEATH 24 Sep 1918 (aged 33–34)
Jerusalem, Jerusalem District, Israel
BURIAL Jerusalem Memorial
Jerusalem, Jerusalem District, Israel
PLOT Panel 4.

First Name: Ritchie Pelham
Initials: R P
Surname: Bullivant
Nationality: British
Date of Death: 09/24/1918
Fate: Killed in action.
Rank: Captain
Service: British Army
Regiment: London Yeomanry (Middlesex Hussars)
Gallantry Awards: Military Cross
Gazette Info: Gazette Number 30801, Military Cross, With reference to the awards conferred as announced in the London Gazette dated 18th February, 1918, the following are the statement of service for which the decoration was conferred:-For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led an attack on the enemy's position with the greatest courage and determination, and captured all his objectives. He captured an enemy field gun, and by his dash and gallantry did much to ensure the success of the enterprise.
Gazette Date: 16/07/1918
Gazette Page: 8454
Regiment/Service: Middlesex Hussars

Regiments served with:
1st County of London Yeomanry Second Lieutenant
1st County of London Yeomanry Captain

He was in the family firm of wire rope manufacturers, his forebear having invented and industrialised a method of making flexible wire rope using steel and h**p.

Outside work Bullivant took a practical interest in social work in the East End of London, where he raised a patrol of Sea Scouts.

Family :
Bullivant was the elder son of William Pelham Bullivant JP, and of Jessie Ritchie his wife, of 7 Bayswater Hill, London and New Mills Court, Stroud.
Education & Career :
Rugby School 1898-1902
Bullivant was in the Running VIII in his last year

Trinity College, Cambridge University
Service Life:
Campaigns:
The First World War 1914-1918, World-wide.
Unit / Ship / Est.: Middlesex Hussars
Action : Palestine

Palestine is a generic term to cover actions in the region now consisting of Sinai, Israel, Jordan, Syria and Aden and involved operations against the Turks. Once the security of the Suez Canal was assured in 1915 the focus shifted to the area now within the post 1967 borders of Israel. In 1917 there were three battles at Gaza, which enabled the capture of Jerusalem in December. In 1918 the campaign continued north into the Jordan Valley then towards Damascus. The Armistice with Turkey was signed on the 31st October 1918.

He was commissioned into the the 1st County of London Yeomanry, the Middlesex Hussars. He saw active service from the 'beginning of the War. In 1915 he went out to Gallipoli, where he was wounded in August at Chocolate Hill, during the first operations after the landing at Suvla Bay.

He was invalided to England and rejoined the Regiment in Egypt after the evacuation of the Peninsula, and was engaged in some of the operations in the south of Sinai during 1916. In that autumn he went to Salonika, but returned in the autumn of 1917 to the Egyptian Expeditionary Force when General Allenby took command. He served all through the operations that led to the capture of Jerusalem, and during the summer of 1918 spent a long time in the Jordan Valley sector of the line.
Detail :
He was killed in action at Wadi Sherar, on the right bank of the Jordan, about 30 miles south of the Sea of Galilee, while cutting off the Turkish forces in the last engagement of the campaIgn in Palestine, on September 26th, 1918, aged 34.

Citations & Commemorations : Military Cross (MC)

While serving in Palestine, he won the Military Cross in February, 1918, at the third and last battle of Gaza, "for skilful and fearless handling of his Squadron" at Khuwelfeh, a few miles north of Beersheba.

The record for this is as follows: "Captain R P Bullivant, 1st County of London
Yeomanry. "He led an attack on the enemy's position with the greatest courage and determination, and captured all his objectives. He captured an enemy field gun, and by his dash and gallantry did much to ensure the success of the enterprise."

Captain Arthur Percy PalmerBIRTH unknownDEATH 27 Sep 1915MEMORIAL SITE Loos Memorial at Dud Corner CemeteryLoos-en-Gohel...
18/06/2022

Captain Arthur Percy Palmer

BIRTH unknown
DEATH 27 Sep 1915
MEMORIAL SITE Loos Memorial at Dud Corner Cemetery
Loos-en-Gohelle, Departement du Pas-de-Calais, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
(A structure erected in honor of someone whose remains lie elsewhere.)
PLOT Panel 10.

First Name: Arthur Percy
Initials: A P
Surname: Palmer
DOB: Circa 1872
Age: 43
Nationality: British
Date of Death: 27/09/1915
Information: HUSBAND OF JOSEPHINE H. PALMER, OF 26, COMPAYNE GARDENS, HAMPSTEAD, LONDON.
Rank: Captain
Service: British Army
Regiment: Welsh Guards
Battalion: 1st Battalion
Honors: D S O

Arthur Palmer's connection with Beer is still being researched. He clearly owned land in this area, as a farm in Musbury (Stocker's Farm) was among the bequests in his will, which is on his Army record in the National Archives at Kew. However he was born in West Ham, Essex in 1871, does not appear in Beer in the 1911 census, and was married in Hampstead, which was his home address at the time of his death.

He was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the East Surrey Regiment in January 1899[1] and served in the Boer War, transferring in South Africa to the Imperial Yeomanry (see below). He married Josephine Miles at Trinity Church, Hampstead on 23rd July 1902, and on 11th December 1909 they had a daughter, Pamela. At the time of his marriage he was a Captain in the South African Constabulary. By 1911 he was on the General Reserve of Officers[3], i.e. no longer a regular soldier, but could be called up in the event of war.

Soon after the outbreak of the First World War, letters began to appear in the press in Britain lamenting the fact that Wales was the only country in the United Kingdom not represented by a regiment of Foot Guards. Lord Kitchener, as Secretary of State for War, shared this view, and on 26th February 1915 King George V signed a Royal Warrant authorising the formation of the Welsh Guards. On 1st March 1915, St. David's Day, the new regiment mounted guard at Buckingham Palace for the first time.

Arthur Palmer was appointed as commander of No. 4 Company. The regimental history gives an account of his background and his character as a soldier:

'Palmer, who was the senior captain and acted as second in command, was a fanatical fighter, which showed itself in his face, in his actions and in his record. In private life he was a mining engineer, and his military career started in 1899 in the 3rd Battalion East Surrey Regiment. When the South African War broke out he believed that his Militia would not be used, and he resigned his commission to enlist as a trooper in the 34th Company of the Imperial Yeomanry. Bald official record shows that he was given a commission in Africa, and rose to command this same company, winning a DSO and being twice mentioned in despatches. At the end of that war he joined the South African Constabulary, where he remained until 1907. He was a year in Zanzibar reorganising the police, and was in Rhodesia when war was declared with Germany. But he managed to be at first battle of Ypres as a captain attached to the Royal Horse Guards'.

'In the early morning of the 17th [August 1915] the battalion left Waterloo station for Southampton and France. One of the few civilians on the station to see them off was Mr John Burns, who, though a man of peace, has ever been a friend of the soldier. No doubt as he watched them he asked himself the same question as Palmer when the Battalion was being photographed a few days before leaving -- when the artist had said "Thank you", Palmer turned round, and, thrusting his great jaw out at the group said, "I wonder how many of us will be alive in six months time?"

Arthur Palmer was to die less than six weeks after this incident.

The battalion sailed from Southampton at 6pm on the 17th August on the SS Petersburg and arrived at Le Havre at 1am the following day. They then travelled to Arques to undertake training. On the 23rd September they moved to Fontes, and the following day were briefed on the attack in which they were to take part.

The battle of Loos began on 25th September 1915 as part of a larger attack which involved French troops staging a major offensive in the Champagne area while British and Commonwealth forces attacked further north, through the mining area around Loos and Lens. On 27th September the Welsh Guards, together with the 4th Battalion Grenadier Guards, were ordered to attack Hill 70 near Loos. The attack was made just before night fell. Arthur Palmer's Company, No. 4, was initially in reserve, but was later sent to fill the gap between the Welsh Guards and the 10th Hussars on their right. The regimental history describes in bald terms what happened when Arthur went up the hill to discuss the situation with the commander of No. 2 Company, whose men had taken cover behind a bank near the top of the hill:

'Palmer came up the hill and began to talk to Dick Bulkeley about the gap on the right of the line, but was immediately killed'.

In the attack on Hill 70 the Welsh Guards had 5 officers killed (including Arthur Palmer) and 6 wounded, one of whom later died. Twelve other ranks were killed, and 60 reported missing, while 99 were wounded.

On 2nd October 1915, Josephine Palmer received a telegram at her home in Hampstead:

Deeply regret to inform you that Capt. A. P. Palmer Welsh Guards was killed on 27th Sept last. Kitchener expresses his sympathy.'

On 15th October a wounded soldier, Corporal Everitt, was interviewed while on a hospital ship in Boulogne harbour awaiting evacuation to England. He gave this account of Arthur Palmer's death at Loos a few weeks earlier:

'I saw this officer killed at Hill 70 on September 27th. I was close to him at the time. He was hit in the chest and in the mouth and when he fell, he did not move again. His body was, I am afraid, left out for we had to come back to the trenches at the foot of the hill and he was in front. I do not know whether he was brought in afterwards but I fancy not. I was wounded last Sunday'.

The regimental history describes something of Arthur Palmer's relationship with his men.

'His company, No. 4, or what is left of it, has never forgotten him, and his photograph will be found in several houses in Wales. He looked after the bodily comforts of his men down to attending to their blistered feet himself, but when one of them bobbed at something which whizzed over his head in the streets of Loos Palmer sprang at him and shook him like a rat'.

Most of the dead from the Battle of Loos were not recovered until the war ended in 1918. As a result, a very high percentage could not be identified. Arthur Palmer has no known grave, and his name appears on the Loos Memorial, one of 14,000 men killed in the Battle of Loos whose bodies could not be identified.

Address

Middlesex Yeomanry Association, Army Reserve Centre, Honeycroft Hill
Uxbridge
UB109NH

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Our Story

In March 1797 Citizens of Uxbridge decided to form a Military Association. Its aims were clear – a quasi – Military Police to keep the internal defence of the neighbourhood in case of insurrection or violent breach of the peace: in aid of the Civil Powers or in case of invasion. This would permit the regular forces to act more effectively on the coasts. London and nearby areas were a long way short of their proper quota of mounted men so only a Cavalry Troop was accepted. Sir Christopher Baynes formed the Troop and by May it had agreed to become Yeomanry Cavalry with increased responsibilities in case of invasion by the ‘Rascal Bonaparte’. Another Troop was added by 1798. The ‘Peace of 1801’ brought disbandment and whilst other Yeomanry units were raised in Middlesex the Uxbridge Yeoman ‘slumbered on’ until 1830 when the country was drifting into anarchy. Two troops – 1st Harefield and 2nd West Drayton were raised on December 10th 1830, which is the correct date of the Units formation. Captain Newdegate was the first Commanding Officer. The Arms of Middlesex was adopted for a badge and the motto PRO ARIS ET FOCIS. (For Hearth and Home). They were established as Dragroons. Throughout the 19th Century the Regiment was often required to perform es**rt duty to the Sovereign and the royal family. The first occasion was King William IV in 1834 travelling through Uxbridge to visit the Marquess of Westminster at moor Park. The Regiment was frequently called upon to es**rt Queen Victoria through Middlesex on her way to Windsor, and on reaching the County Boundary would hand over to a detachment of the Royal Horse Guards to es**rt her to the castle. In 1843 a mounted band was formed, eventually a drill hall purchased and a rifle range at Runnymede. Royal Escorts, race meetings and general training were the usual ‘round’ until the Boer War. The unit grew – a third London Troop was added and in 1871 a fourth – West Middlesex. Whilst the title changed to Middlesex Yeomanry Cavalry (Uxbridge) and they became Hussars since Light Dragoons no longer existed in the Regular Army Lists. By 1879 Uxbridge joined West Middlesex Troops to form a County Troop; two Troops were allotted to London and a new Troop was formed in Brighton and Sussex. In I884, the Queen designated the Middlesex (Duke of Cambridge’s Hussars) Yeomanry Cavalry. In 1885 the unit was posted as no 27 in precedence of Yeomanry when the war Office bungled the new list. January 1900 saw the formation of No 34 Company of the 11th Battalion Yeomanry for service in the Boer War; followed by two more Companies – the 35th and 62nd. Sgt Major Roller was recommended for the VC for his conduct at Senekal by the General, but declined to give evidence as ‘he was only doing his duty’. The General therefor commissioned him instead. Over 25 troopers were eventually commissioned. The Companies fought well, but lost more to disease than the enemy. After the war the title changed to Imperial Yeomanry and khaki was worn on all parades. In 1908 the Regiment joined the Territorials and changed it title to 1st County of London Yeomanry, Middlesex (Duke of Cambridge’s Hussars). Recruiting was in London only. They joined the London Mounted Brigade. In 1914 the regiment mobilised and went to the East Coast for anti-invasion duties before moving to Egypt in early 1915. They fought at Sulva in the Gallipoli campaign before going to Macedonia to fight the Bulgarians. By 1917 they were part of the Desert Mounted Corps and fought in Sinai and up to Palestine. On the 27th October the regiment made its famous stand against the Turks, defending the rail head at Karm. Casualties were heavy and awards reflected this and the courage displayed. Major A.M. Lafone won the VC. Later Lt. Col. Watson won the VC in France, commanding an infantry Battalion. The Middlesex Hussars took part in the capture of Jerusalem and the final surrender of the Turks. On the 20th May 1920 the role of Cavalry Signals was accepted and the 2nd Cavalry Divisional Signal Regiment (Middlesex Yeomanry) formed and was integrated with the newly formed Royal Corps of Signals in June of that year. The regiment kept its old badge, motto and uniform, including the ancient tradition of NCO’s wearing a crown above their stripes. The shoulder title worn by the men changed to ‘Royal Corps of Signals’ with the concession of a ‘Y’ above it. In 1938, the Regiment became Mobile Divisional Signals and in 1939 formed a second Regiment. The 1st Cavalry Divisional Signals (Middlesex Yeomanry) went to Palestine and served in Syria, Iraq, Crete and Tobruk. On mechanisation, Squadrons were formed as Signals for 10th Armoured Division and the Squadron with 9th Armoured Brigade fought at El Alamein and the Western Desert before serving in Italy. The 2nd Armoured Divisional Signals (Middlesex Yeomanry) served in the Western Desert and Greece. Signal Detachments were provided for Special Forces including SAS, SBS and Commando. Others served in clandestine situations in Yugoslavia and Crete. No.4 Squadron (Middlesex Yeomanry) served with 22nd Armoured Brigade, which in September 1942 became part of 7th Armoured Division (The Desert Rats) under the command of General Montgomery’s 8th Army. They saw action at Caen, Villers Bocage, Falaise, Ghent, Eindhoven, Nimegan and then across the Rhine into Germany, the surrender of Hamburg and the end of war in May 1945. In 1947 the Middlesex Hussars became 16th Airborne Divisional Signals, wearing the ‘red beret’ and Yeomanry cap badge. Later they became the 40th Signal Regiment with a ‘phantom’ special role and a Troop with Airborne TA forces. In 1961 they were amalgamated with 47 (London) Signal Regiment, adopting the title 47 (Middlesex Yeomanry) Signal Regiment with Yeomanry cap badge, collar dogs, Royal Signals shoulder titles and 47th London Corps ‘Flash’. The new Regiment wag given the role SHAPE (Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe) Troops. When the Territorial Army Volunteer Reserve (TAVR) was formed in 1967 the Middlesex Yeomanry retained its title, but like so many other Yeomanry Regiments was reduced to Squadron establishment becoming 47 (Middlesex Yeomanry) Signal Squadron (V) and became part of 31st Signal Regiment (V). In 1995 moved from Harrow and returned to its roots at Uxbridge and became part of 39th (Skinners) Signal Regiment (V) with the role of 2 Brigades Command and Control Squadron. The Squadron today continues the ancient customs of NCO’s wearing a crown above their stripes and SSgt’s wearing 4 stripes and a crown. BATTLE HONOURS South Africa 1900-1901 The Great War 1914-1918 Macedonia Nebi Samwil Gallipoli Damascus El Mughar Scimitar Hill Sharon Gaza Suvla Megiddo Egypt Palestine


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