Museum of The Horse

Museum of The Horse A Museum of the horse with large collection of antique bits, stirrups, spurs, saddles etc reflecting social history through the horse from 600bc - 20thC.

Open Mon-Fri 8.30 am - 3.30pm and Sat 8.30am-1pm. The Museum of The Horse has been constructed in an old coaching inn, The Newcastle Arms, in a small town called Tuxford in Nottinghamshire. It is very easy to get to being just one minute off the A1 at Tuxford in Nottinghamshire which is 14 miles North of Newark and 20 miles south of Doncaster. The museum has its own car park behind it accessed off

Open Mon-Fri 8.30 am - 3.30pm and Sat 8.30am-1pm. The Museum of The Horse has been constructed in an old coaching inn, The Newcastle Arms, in a small town called Tuxford in Nottinghamshire. It is very easy to get to being just one minute off the A1 at Tuxford in Nottinghamshire which is 14 miles North of Newark and 20 miles south of Doncaster. The museum has its own car park behind it accessed off

Operating as usual

07/10/2021

What would 'elf and safety' say!

03/10/2021

Facebook is up to its games again! I have had several emails over the weekend telling me of posts people have made but facebook, for some reason, has not posted them! If you think I have ignored or deleted you, please believe me, I haven't!

My last post led to talk of Tandems so I thought you might like to see Colin Henderson's classic tandem pulling a Cockin...
02/10/2021

My last post led to talk of Tandems so I thought you might like to see Colin Henderson's classic tandem pulling a Cocking Cart, so called because it was designed to watch c**k fights and other sports over the heads of the crowd. It really is very high up!

My last post led to talk of Tandems so I thought you might like to see Colin Henderson's classic tandem pulling a Cocking Cart, so called because it was designed to watch c**k fights and other sports over the heads of the crowd. It really is very high up!

I have just bought this fascinating painting. I have never seen a picture of a trotter being shown like this. Can anyone...
01/10/2021

I have just bought this fascinating painting. I have never seen a picture of a trotter being shown like this. Can anyone tell me if this was for exercise, or for a time trial? I am so intrigued by it I am thinking of making it into a limited edition print. Please let me know if you would be interested in it. If so would you like a smallish paper print or a canvas print that looks like the original? #Norfolktrotters #trotters #trotting

The world of Sisi, the Empress of Austria who loved hunting in England.
01/10/2021

The world of Sisi, the Empress of Austria who loved hunting in England.

Six Masters showing Piaffe
01/10/2021
Six Masters showing Piaffe

Six Masters showing Piaffe

Classical dressage masters - 6 pictures of Piafffe Lieutenant Oscar FrankHerr Egon Von NeindorffAlois PodhajskyNuno OliveiraPhilippe Karl Manolo Mendez

01/10/2021
From the 17thC Danish Court. Beautiful!
29/09/2021

From the 17thC Danish Court. Beautiful!

Sounds like a great day out tomorrow!
25/09/2021

Sounds like a great day out tomorrow!

☀️Richmond Equestrian Centre Demo ☀️

And we are on the road again! Join me and the team for an adventure of all things horsemanship. From Tricks and stunts to liberty and classical dressage we promise a performance to leave you spell bound and smiling!

.
𝐒𝐔𝐍𝐃𝐀𝐘 26𝐭𝐡 𝐒𝐄𝐏𝐓𝐄𝐌𝐁𝐄𝐑 2021
2 Separate Performances….
- 10am or 3pm

Tickets £35pp, children allowed
(under 5’s free with a paying adult)

People attending are welcome to bring a chair & must come appropriately dressed as performances will be taking place outdoor

• Plenty of onsite parking
• REC cafe open for food
• Indoor Cash bar
🍿 Popcorn & Prosecco 🥂

Tickets are available on the Richmond Equestrian Centre website 👇
https://www.myridinglife.com/eventdetails.aspx?id=347389

☎️ 07564 025 959 for more information

Photography credit to @ejlazenbyphotography

Some pictures of Sisi The Empress of Austria. If you click on the picture there is an article from the Dutch Side Saddle...
25/09/2021
Sisi und der Reitsport vor 150 Jahren – Hauptsache elegant!

Some pictures of Sisi The Empress of Austria. If you click on the picture there is an article from the Dutch Side Saddle association about her and side saddle history in general. There is an English version that your computer should offer you.

Sisi war eine passionierte und gute Reiterin - Gastautorin Petra Herzberg erzählt aber nicht nur von Sisis Reitkünsten, sondern auch, wie sich das Reiten im Damensattel entwickelte, was man dazu anzog und warum Reiten im Damensattel wieder schwer im Kommen ist!

I wonder how many of you know who this jockey was? Clues, he won the Triple Crown and  was about to become the Kings joc...
22/09/2021

I wonder how many of you know who this jockey was? Clues, he won the Triple Crown and was about to become the Kings jockey but got caught up in a betting scandal. Looking at this one feels he must have been quite a character. We have his saddle in the museum. #racing

I wonder how many of you know who this jockey was? Clues, he won the Triple Crown and was about to become the Kings jockey but got caught up in a betting scandal. Looking at this one feels he must have been quite a character. We have his saddle in the museum. #racing

Interesting ornate Arab style stirrup. Any ideas where it is from? Unusually ornate.
20/09/2021

Interesting ornate Arab style stirrup. Any ideas where it is from? Unusually ornate.

This stirrup was catalogued as Spanish. The curved sides look more Arabian to me, but the decoration is sort of baroque. Ottoman maybe ? ( I admit that's my go-to guess for half the things I can't positively identify 😊)

I have seen some strange mounts for side saddle ladies but how about this!!
19/09/2021

I have seen some strange mounts for side saddle ladies but how about this!!

I have seen some strange mounts for side saddle ladies but how about this!!

Stripey Mules!
18/09/2021

Stripey Mules!

Here is a rather unusual coach horn. Have you seen one like it before?
14/09/2021

Here is a rather unusual coach horn. Have you seen one like it before?

Here is a rather unusual coach horn. Have you seen one like it before?

We have a display of saddles on at the moment. There are 81 sadddles on show including 26 side saddles. Where do you thi...
11/09/2021

We have a display of saddles on at the moment. There are 81 sadddles on show including 26 side saddles. Where do you think this saddle comes from?

We have a display of saddles on at the moment. There are 81 sadddles on show including 26 side saddles. Where do you think this saddle comes from?

Last post from the SEA exhibition finishing tomorrow. Sme more lovely pictures! It would be a shame to miss it!
10/09/2021

Last post from the SEA exhibition finishing tomorrow. Sme more lovely pictures! It would be a shame to miss it!

Sue Merrill has just donated a great gift to the museum. It is a policeman's coat that is designed to cover the rump of ...
10/09/2021

Sue Merrill has just donated a great gift to the museum. It is a policeman's coat that is designed to cover the rump of the horse too to keep the wet and cold off. It is pleated in such a way as to make the rain drain off it. It was originally worn by Ruth Lynley,only the third lady to join the Met Mounted Branch. It makes a great addition to our police department!

Sue Merrill has just donated a great gift to the museum. It is a policeman's coat that is designed to cover the rump of the horse too to keep the wet and cold off. It is pleated in such a way as to make the rain drain off it. It was originally worn by Ruth Lynley,only the third lady to join the Met Mounted Branch. It makes a great addition to our police department!

Just to give you some idea of what to expect when you come to Tuxford, Andy, who makes films of all the villages around ...
10/09/2021
TUXFORD: Bassetlaw Parish #37 of 66

Just to give you some idea of what to expect when you come to Tuxford, Andy, who makes films of all the villages around has made a film of Tuxford and featured our museum. Do come and see the rest of it!

Time to go to the second of the two civil parishes with town status in the district of Bassetlaw, and this one's probably got just as much of not more to com...

Tomorrow Sept 11th is the first day of National Heritage week and we are offering free entry to the museum so do come an...
10/09/2021

Tomorrow Sept 11th is the first day of National Heritage week and we are offering free entry to the museum so do come and find out how the horse has affected your life. Mining, Military, Agriculture, Travel. Sport, they were involved in all! We are joining with The Walks of Life Museum in Tuxford for this promotion. There will be a furlong marked out between the two museums and a competition to guess how many furlongs it is between the two. See the last day of the SEA exhibition too. Saturday we close at 2pm but during the week we are open 9am-4pm. #tuxford #museums #mining #military

Another great painting from the SEA exhibition. Between The Lines by Ruth Buchannan. Tis would make a great present for ...
10/09/2021

Another great painting from the SEA exhibition. Between The Lines by Ruth Buchannan. Tis would make a great present for a polo enthusiast! #polo Don't forget tomorrow is the last day of the exhibition. It is also the beginning of National Heritage week and we are giving free entry to the museum.

Another great painting from the SEA exhibition. Between The Lines by Ruth Buchannan. Tis would make a great present for a polo enthusiast! #polo Don't forget tomorrow is the last day of the exhibition. It is also the beginning of National Heritage week and we are giving free entry to the museum.

10/09/2021

I am really frustrated. Facebook has now marked the page as a private page so it can only be shared to groups! I cannot find where to alter this! Does anyone know? They have done it to our business page too! I expect it is some young IT idiot just out of college who thinks he has to alter everything to make himself look clever. It is a complete pain when these things are constantly altered. Come on facebook! Sort yourself out!

This week I posted an unusual Manger Log, Bobbin or one of the other many names they are referred to as. Lots of you sen...
10/09/2021

This week I posted an unusual Manger Log, Bobbin or one of the other many names they are referred to as. Lots of you sent pictures of the small logs which are the ones more commonly seen. Indeed they were manufactured into the 20thC. We had to use them for our ponies at Pony Club camp. The unusual thing about the one I posted was that it was made of hard rubber. I think it is early to mid 19thC and is very similar in size and shape to this one we have on display in the museum. This one is Lignum Vitae. the 4th heaviest wood in the world. Do you know why it was called Lignum Vitae? I love this log, it is so tactile.

This week I posted an unusual Manger Log, Bobbin or one of the other many names they are referred to as. Lots of you sent pictures of the small logs which are the ones more commonly seen. Indeed they were manufactured into the 20thC. We had to use them for our ponies at Pony Club camp. The unusual thing about the one I posted was that it was made of hard rubber. I think it is early to mid 19thC and is very similar in size and shape to this one we have on display in the museum. This one is Lignum Vitae. the 4th heaviest wood in the world. Do you know why it was called Lignum Vitae? I love this log, it is so tactile.

a lovely picture from the SEA exhibition.
09/09/2021

a lovely picture from the SEA exhibition.

'His Honest Comfort' by Debbie Dunbar Original Oil on Panel. Currently on show in our gallery in The Society of Equestrian Artists Annual exhibition 'The Horse in Art' Closes this Saturday. #equestrianart #exhibition @thesocietyofequestrianartists

‘On The Nod’ by Jane Braithwaite SEA. On show in The Society of Equestrian Artists annual exhibition ‘The Horse in Art’ ...
09/09/2021

‘On The Nod’ by Jane Braithwaite SEA. On show in The Society of Equestrian Artists annual exhibition ‘The Horse in Art’ in Our gallery #equestianart #oilpainting

‘On The Nod’ by Jane Braithwaite SEA. On show in The Society of Equestrian Artists annual exhibition ‘The Horse in Art’ in Our gallery #equestianart #oilpainting

And some more of the pictures from the SEA exhibition.
08/09/2021

And some more of the pictures from the SEA exhibition.

A few more pictures from this week's exhibition.
08/09/2021

A few more pictures from this week's exhibition.

08/09/2021
Discover the Incredible World of Trust Technique

I have always been a realist and a sceptic. This looks quite convincing. Has anyone had any experience of it? I see they want people to subscribe hence my scepticism. Would love to hear from people who know more than I do!

07/09/2021
07/09/2021

The good old days!

All kids rode in a snaffle because usually that is what your parent [mother] had in their day and they had survived so you had to - D ring, eggbutt, or loose ring. If your pony was a s**t and you had a kind parent or one with money, you might be allowed a kimblewick or pelham. Double bits were for adults out hunting or show ponies only.
Rubber reins were coveted - hunting a pony with shaving foam sweat on his neck meant plain reins were as useful as cooked noodles. Plaited leather reins were just as bad and ripped between your fingers.
Leather girths were coveted just as much - choices were string or the white candlewick girths which would split at inappropriate moments.
Coloured browbands were naff - the plastic ones for riding schools and the velvet ones for show ponies. Brass was for heavy horses.
There were four types of rug - canvas NZ, jute, wool with a coloured edging and initials for best and a sweat rug that looked like something Rab C Nesbitt wore that you used when thatching. Then there were blankets, usually nasty and itchy unless you were rich and could afford a Witney blanket
Every NZ rug hung to one side within five minutes of your pony being turned out.
There were four types of clip - trace, blanket, hunter or full. No one asked what type of clip suited their pony, ponies were clipped to suit the level of work they were doing.
No one wanted a coloured hairy, it usually meant your parents knew nothing and had bought your pony from the local riding school and no one wanted a riding school pony.
Everyone plaited to go hunting.
The amount of fences you jumped out hunting and stayed in the saddle was far more important than if you saw a fox.
Ponies lived out in just a NZ rug, even if clipped, nothing up their necks.
Feed was natural - oats, barley, wheat, sugar beet and bran then came in pony nuts which were great for rattling in the bottom of a bucket and a countrymix with yummy locust beans.
You made your own chop and warmed the molasses on the Rayburn.
You thought you were a nutritionist if you added garlic to your pony's feed.
Tesco own brand vegetable cooking oil was added to feeds to give a shine to the coat.
If you went hunting, chances are your pony had a warm mash with a bottle of Guinness and a raw egg mixed into it for a pick me up. Chances are that you had the dried up remains of whatever your family had at lunchtime.
Linseed was boiled and fed to everything to make the coat shine.
Grooming by torchlight was a skill.
Baling twine was a Godsend
Your pony probably knew all the top 20 hits.
Everyone entered the yearly WH Smith Win A Pony competition.
If your pony went lame, the farrier was called before the vet and usually cured pony.
No one's pony had ulcers.
We all knew someone who knew someone whose pony had had colic but none of us actually had that pony.
Fat ponies lived on thin air and no one said how cruel because there was no grass in their paddock.
Boiled spud peelings and other veggie peelings were added to feeds as a treat.
Wormers came in powder form - most ponies knew when it was added to their feed and left the feed uneaten and themselves unwormed. It was considered the norm to mix the wormer into a paste, spread in a jam sandwich and feed it to your pony.
Bread was not considered bad for your pony or even odd to feed your pony.
Winning at your local show in front of your school friends gave you rock star status until the next show.
Hacking to a show was considered normal. Sometimes your parents would leave a trailer at a show with your grooming kit, picnic and a picnic for your pony because your pony would not load so you hacked anyway. 😉
You turned out your pony to the best of your abilities - always plaited with clean tack. Tack was always correct, if you used a curb chain on a pelham/double then you also had a lip strap.
Coloured nylon tack was laughed at and considered townie.
Plain leather with just a stable rubber under your saddle or a plain numnah meant you knew your stuff - coloured numnahs, reins, etc meant you were a townie or came from a riding school.
Stockholm tar was brushed into the bottom of the hoof and across the frog every night.
Everyone had gone to school with purple spray stains on their fingers.
When the white wound powder finally came in black, we got excited.
All buckets were black and ridged until the rubber allegedly indestructible feed bowls came out - also in black.
A bright yellow builder's bucket meant my pony snorted and stood as far away from it as possible and meant I had to walk to the end of the field in the hissing rain to catch him.
Long leather boots were added to every Christmas list - rubber ones never shone as much.
Christmas lists always consisted of things for the pony - bridle, bit, rug, etc.
We didnt wear hats and back protectors hadnt been invented.
We went out riding without a phone and couldnt tell anyone where we were going as chances are we didnt know ourselves, we were just going out riding.
As long as we were back for meal times and before it was dark, our parents didnt worry.
Ponies knew their way home if you parted company.
Everyone had cleaned their tack while listening to Bohemian Rhapsody at number one in the charts.

Credit unknown

A new addition to the collection. I am sure most of you will know what it is but I wonder how many of you know what it i...
06/09/2021

A new addition to the collection. I am sure most of you will know what it is but I wonder how many of you know what it is made of? I have never seen one before.

A new addition to the collection. I am sure most of you will know what it is but I wonder how many of you know what it is made of? I have never seen one before.

Address

1 Market Square Tuxford, Newark Notts NG22 0LA
Tuxford
NG22 OLA

Opening Hours

Monday 9am - 3:30pm
Tuesday 9am - 3:30pm
Wednesday 9am - 3:30pm
Thursday 9am - 3:30pm
Friday 9am - 3:30pm
Saturday 9am - 1:30pm

Telephone

01777 838234

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Our Story

Open Mon-Fri 8.30 am - 5pm and Sat 8.30am-2pm. Sorry but we are closed on Sundays and Bank holidays but groups by appointment. The Museum of The Horse has been constructed in an old coaching inn on the old Great North Road, The Newcastle Arms, in a small town called Tuxford in Nottinghamshire. It is very easy to get to being just one minute off the A1 at Tuxford in Nottinghamshire which is 14 miles North of Newark and 20 miles south of Doncaster. The museum has its own car park behind it accessed off Newcastle Street, either through the arch or via the small lane at the end of the first block of buildings. It is a privately funded museum so we do make a small charge, £5.50 for adults and £3 for OAPs and Children under 12. Unfortunately there is no disabled access to the museum but we are working on this. The museum has been formed from my own private collection, a collection made up over a lifetime. (I am pretty old!) There are over 1000 pieces on show and I could guarantee there will be something you have never seen before in it, even if you have been with horses all your life and travelled worldwide. There are some very unusual items. In most cases there will be a lot of things you have never seen before! You don't have to be a horse person to enjoy it. It reflects the way we used to live in the 18th and 19thC and people who have visited have been quite surprised by some of the things that had never occurred to them. It does go back a lot further than the 18thC. There are actually bits from 600BC as well as Roman, Celtic and Medieval pieces. It tells the story of the development of the side saddle, of the breeding policies in England, of competition and of military equipment. It has a heavy horse section and a carriage and coaching section. There is a clothing department which my staff say is creepy because the clothes are on models and look like the real thing! There are unusual items from many parts of the world. To look at everything and to take it all in takes more than one visit. When you have had enough there is an excellent coffee shop on the premises where you can have a light lunch or tea with delicious home made cakes. Downstairs in The Newcastle you can visit the Sally Mitchell art gallery which has hundreds of high quality limited edition sporting prints, beautiful greetings and Christmas cards and a range of gifts. Most of all it has wonderful original paintings. You can buy all your Christmas shopping in the village if you hate towns. The gallery price range for gifts is £4 - £10,000 so there really is something for everyone! There is a good portrait photographer and the coffee shop is also a florists and there is an excellent country butcher close by. Tuxford has other attractions too so it is well worth making a day of it or even a weekend in the area. In Tuxford there is a working windmill where you can buy flour made in the mill and have food too. There is a fabulous museum of handcarts and a rare early Victorian lock up. We are only about three miles from Laxton where strip farming can still be seen and also The Holocaust Centre. In the opposite direction at West Markham is one of the oldest churches in England, a wonderful little Saxon church. We are close to Robin Hood's Sherwood forest and on the other side Lincoln, a lovely small city with one of the finest cathedrals in England. If you would like more details about the area give us a ring 01 777 838 234

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Comments

On this site we have seen some equipement from the past and have gasped. How about looking at this list 2021!
pm me if interested
I just this bought Champion & Wilton dumb jockey. Any idea of age or how long C&W made them ? I am in the USA.
Some time ago I saw a post about the hinged collars of fire-horses - it might have been on this page? Anyway, this video shows how the collars worked, with the horses running into position beneath them suspended above. https://www.facebook.com/61179469120/videos/1346689029700
I thought I would send this one straight to you it features the latest clipping image from Baily's featuring he Barton Gillette 'Combination Clipping Machine' being demonstrated in 1899. It was promoted as being able to clip 'two animals in minutes' and could be used 80 times before the Gillette blades required sharpening. This 'top of the range' deluxe version was available on the day for £12-00. (about £1050)
Saddle and harness room in Isola Bella Borromeo Palazzo, Lake Maggiore, Italy is well worth a visit. Rugs and harness dating from early 1700s and saddle even older :-)
Anyone else spotted a sign like this? It was stencilled onto a wall in Wolverhampton by the 'National A.R.P. for Animals' during wartime.
Got permission to copy this from the horse access site which has no share options...as it is to do with our history I thought I’d post it here too
I do not know why, but I cannot send you private messages. But I wanted to share these photos. I just found this horse transporter in an old book. The photo is from 1896 and shows the "Tierschutz-Wagen", which recovered injured or exhausted carriage horses from the road in Munich/Germany. It was sponsored by the Munich Animal Protection Society, there were two of them in total.
Mum was going stir-crazy as she hasn’t been out since the lockdown started, so I took her out with me on the weekly shopping trip and we made a tiny detour to tie in our daily exercise and a visit to the Moulton Packhorse Bridge.